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Los Angeles

Workspace

Exhibition Detail
I Brush My Teeth With My Left Hand to Loosen Up
2601 Pasadena Ave.
Los Angeles , CA 90031


December 5th, 2009 - January 10th, 2010
Opening: 
December 5th, 2009 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM
 
, Lia LowenthalLia Lowenthal
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> DESCRIPTION

"I Brush My Teeth With My Left Hand to Loosen Up" 

Los Angeles-based painter Lia Lowenthal's enigmatic painting-objects crisscross personal and public histories. A number of alternations between painterly and drawing-based abstractions in vinyl shape a host of objects in a precipitating installation. Nonrepresentational yet familiar, these are new works in a space between poses, claiming the right to contradict themselves. They make right by the contradiction on the might of their doubled surfaces: nothing is fixed and fixed points are tried. Surprises come in lyric swoops, inky undulations and will-nilly insurgent moments pulsed with the stress on the material. The boundaries between painting and drawing are deconstructed and then overlapped into an aspect of the allover composition; the pictorial surface concerns the expanse of the industry and the business of stimulated and yet liquidated forms. The modulated horror of typological inferences, the trickling, thin latex splats work out a fallout of effects set up against backdrops of soft pastel. Values are exchanged and components occur elsewhere. The production of reading is conceptualized, established, but then just put off.

Expression of the "in between" is numerous and intermittent. The eccentricity of materials are nonetheless tactile, sensual, visceral. Distortions. Obliterations. Some polite roughhousing by way of folding, slouching, crinkling or hanging. Imaginary, antisocial figures show up, loiter a bit and then strike out. Black, calligraphic-line lines draw themselves into repeating elements, such as barely legible text, for instance, but when caught from another angle, all but disappear. Illustrations of buildings and plans and "everyday objects." A recall of anomalies: dilapidated diagrams and confusing evacuation maps. Painting's vertical section and completely covered surface contends with the horizontal and diagrammatic space of textuality; antinomies are annulled and explored through expressive interventions and negative elisions.

-- Itza Vilaboy

Lia Lowenthal lives and works in Los Angeles. She graduated from UCLA in 2006 with a degree in Fine Art and German, and attended the Mountain School of the Arts in 2009. This is her first solo show and first show at Workspace. She has been in group shows at Five Thirty Three, the Barnsdall Art Center, and High Energy Constructs.


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