STREET now open! Chicago | Los Angeles | Miami | New York | San Francisco | Santa Fe
Amsterdam | Berlin | Brussels | London | Paris | São Paulo | Toronto | China | India | Worldwide
 
Los Angeles

Commonwealth and Council

Exhibition Detail
SomeTimeApart
3006 W 7th St
#220
Los Angeles, California 90005


February 8th - March 1st
 
, Brica WilcoxBrica Wilcox
© Courtesy of the Artist and Commonwealth and Council
> QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://www.commonwealthandcouncil.com
NEIGHBORHOOD:  
mid-wilshire
EMAIL:  
we@commonwealthandcouncil.com
PHONE:  
213 703 9077
OPEN HOURS:  
Wed - Sat, 12 noon to 6 PM
TAGS:  
video-art, sculpture
> DESCRIPTION

Commonwealth & Council presents SomeTimeApart with Mary Hill, Zach Kleyn, and Brica Wilcox. The works by the three artists suture time (Wilcox), honor the former self (Kleyn), and commemorate the bodies encapsulated in representation (Hill).

In Brica Wilcox’s Untitled video, we watch a mirror transition from a blank and fully intact state to one fractured through a gradual revelation of splintering lines. The shattered fragments that appear are less an instant of destruction and more a contemplative act, drawn out by the artist. Although we cannot see our image reflected back, the steady evisceration of the once seamless surface maps the cumulative impact of time by proliferating a single moment to 12 minutes and 7 seconds.

Zach Kleyn’s Self-Self-Portraits are an amalgamation of past and present selves: the drawing(s), which were started and finished years apart (reprise) at two separate stages of his life, are both a copy and twice an original; an obliteration of the self into selves.

Mary Hill’s sculptures suggest both absence and presence of the physical body. The work, titled Power Bottom I-IV, acknowledges the struggle for dominance between object and subject. Using images of "figure drawing" as a reference, the various postures of paired archetypal bodies impress themselves onto minimalist forms. The removal of definitive directions in which they could potentially be associated with uprightness creates an ever-expanding rupture of the relationship between the original bodies and the art object, wherein the viewer's own corporeality becomes implicated.


Copyright © 2006-2013 by ArtSlant, Inc. All images and content remain the © of their rightful owners.