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Los Angeles

PYO GALLERY LA

Exhibition Detail
Jin Ho Song - A Celestial Space
Curated by: Heidi Chang
1100 South Hope Street
Suite 105
Los Angeles, CA 90015


November 8th, 2012 - January 5th, 2013
Opening: 
November 8th, 2012 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
 
Untitled, Jin Ho SongJin Ho Song, Untitled,
1997 - 1999, Oil on Solid Wood Door, 24 x 26
> QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://www.pyogalleryla.com/
NEIGHBORHOOD:  
downtown/east la
EMAIL:  
info@pyogalleryla.com
PHONE:  
213.405.1488
OPEN HOURS:  
Tuesday through Saturday; 10:00 am - 6:00 pm
TAGS:  
figurative, abstraction, digital, landscape, abstract
> DESCRIPTION

LOS ANGELES, CA. The Korean American Museum and Pyo Gallery LA, are pleased to announce: a celestial space, An exhibition that commemorates the late Korean American artist Jin Ho Song. The exhibition with be held at PYO Gallery LA November 8 thru January 5, 2013. The opening reception will take place on Thursday November 8, 6 ‐ 8 p.m. The retrospective examines for the first time publicly, the complete work of a reclusive artist who viewed painting as a journey to the divine. Song was engaged with making visible the ephemeral and stylistically explored many influences ranging from impressionist to expressionist paint applications. Deeply inspired by Bay Area Figurative Expressionism, Song continued to revisit the formal aspects of the movement throughout his life. His palette varied from somber earth tones to highly chromatic surfaces, but was also colored by an underlying mystery. The shifting landscape and ghostly figures symbolized a lifelong search for spiritual transcendence. Song created works that challenged the familiar through a willful concealment of context, and invited viewers to decipher much of the works meaning for themselves. His paintings embraced deconstructivist methodology and employed

transparent, often fractured figures that approximate what Jacques Derrida described in his essay titled Specters of Marx, that “Learning to Live” more justly, more open to the other and to death,“ remains in so far as the specter neither present or absent, a figure representing past and future temporalities that cannot be “given a date in the chain of presents.” Clearly, The more you look, the more they disappear.


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