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Los Angeles

Human Resources

Exhibition Detail
74 Minutes
410 Cottage Home St.
Los Angeles, CA 90012


August 23rd, 2012 8:00 PM - 10:00 PM
 
,
© Courtesy of Human Resources
> QUICK FACTS
EVENT TYPE:  
Screening
WEBSITE:  
http://humanresourcesla.com/
NEIGHBORHOOD:  
downtown/east la
EMAIL:  
info@humanresourcesla.com
PHONE:  
213-290-4752
OPEN HOURS:  
Wed-Sun 12-6
TAGS:  
film, screening
> DESCRIPTION

Please join us for 74 MINUTES An Evening of New Movies, screening this coming Thursday the 23rd of August at Human Resources, 8pm.

BabyGirl         Danielle Dean
HADHAD         Sean Grattan
Meanwhile      Amy Howden-Chapman
drive by          Francisco Janes

See below for a little more about the programme. Hope to see you there.

 

Danielle Dean (b. 1982, Alabama, U.S.A) grew up in a suburb of London, graduated with a BFA from Central St Martins school of Art, London. She is a recent MFA graduated from CalArts and just returned from Skowhegan school of Art. Working in video, performance, installation and drawing. Dean uses language from advertising, news and popular culture as a material. She also utilizes genre from film and soap opera’s to investigate what constitutes our subjectivity. People often feature in her works as potentials, language shifts between bodies to deconstruct fixed political positions. How much of our “self” is constructed by our surroundings, such as popular culture and education and how far does this allow for potentiality or causes social and psychological constraints.

BabyGirl shot in Alief on the outskirts of Houston, Texas. Based on the narrative structure of a soap opera and Nollywood films, the piece moves through Houston into an empty apartment room in Alief where Dean, her sister Ashstress and her father Okechukwu Alex, perform a scripted dialogue. The script is a montage of text from various sources including the filmBaby Boy, Coloimbia pictures 2001 CCN Africa and Radiohead. Dean’s sister and father rewrote parts of the script, which where montaged within the found text. The script is configured in an order that can be reordered, as each statement is independent from one another. The text and image are not embedded together, disrupting the convention of narrative flow.
 
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Sean Grattan (b. 1981, Auckland, New Zealand) graduated from the University of Auckland with a BA (Philosophy) in 2001 and again in 2008 with a BFA (Honors) from Elam School of Fine Art. He is a recent MFA graduate from CalArts. His method of production utilizes a ‘language of exchange’ that can take as its subject any matter pertaining to the antagonisms and currency of the global political economy, and its attendant history. The nature of the exchange emerges through the recorded performance of a script, constructed for the purpose of isolating conflicting points of view with regards to the issues at hand.

Ostensibly a horror movie, HADHAD uses the traditional story-line of a group of people encountering an intruder from the outside. The action takes place in a preset of domestic modern architecture, contextually displaced by the limited compositional palette. The performances emphasize the absurd aspects of an obsessive use of rational language, via the subject of technological determinism.

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Amy Howden-Chapman (b. 1984 Wellington, New Zealand)  graduated from Victoria University Wellington Auckland with a BA (Art History, Honors)  and a MA in Creative Writing. She is a recent MFA graduate from CalArts. Working primarily in performance, film and printed matter Howden-Chapman’s work uses language, movement and site-specificity to investigate the bureaucratic proceses and political theatre that underlie political change.

Meanwhile, filmed in California, 2012.

We were walking down a waterfall, a shallow one, shallow and foamy. The rocks on either side of the water had been spray painted, and then around the bend I saw a tree with 1990 carved into it. After all these years the bark was bulging back into the cut. It has been a long time since 1990: that's what the tree was implying.

Under the Kyoto Protocol, industrialised countries were obliged to cut their greenhouse gas emissions by a collective 5% below 1990 levels by the year 2012. This hasn't happened. What have we spent all these years doing? What have we been doing for nearly a quarter of a century while that tree has been putting on rings?

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Francisco Janes (b. 1981 Lisbon, Portugal) studied philology at Lisbon University and has a BFA in Photo and Media from Ar.Co. He is a recent MFA graduate from CalArts and was a fellow at the Experimental Intermedia in New York in 2008. Janes’s work usually takes the form of immersive audio visual installations, using duration interplay and montage for space as arrangements that involve the spectator in a situation of signs.

drive by is a project developed between 2010-2012 comprising both installations and sound works based on experiences in the city of Los Angeles and Southern California. These two short films are screening versions of two such installation works.74 Min


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