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Los Angeles

Parker Jones (Closed)

Exhibition Detail
The Worry Vase
8545 Washington Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90232


March 12th, 2011 - April 16th, 2011
 
The Worry Vase,  , Gerald DavisGerald Davis, The Worry Vase, ,
2011, oil on canvas , 78 x 53"
© Courtesy of the Artist and Parker Jones
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> DESCRIPTION

PARKER JONES is pleased to present The Worry Vase, an exhibition of new paintings by Gerald Davis. The exhibition will run from Saturday, March 12, to Saturday, April 16, 2011. An opening reception will beheld on Saturday, March 12, from 6 to 8 pm.

For his fourth solo show in his adopted hometown of Los Angeles, Gerald Davis presents a group of six paintings that with varying techniques leave behind the all-over exactitude of his hallmark draftsmanship for a dramatically looser, more painterly approach. While pushing the application of his chosen medium into new territory for himself, it’s further into the familiar territory of his own psyche that he continues to take the viewer.

By rendering heart-wrenching or darkly humorous scenes of a perverse version of everyday-life with exacting precision and a tender touch, Davis has made a practice of packing ever more vulnerability into the already terrifyingly vulnerable. Vignettes whose horror or hilarity range from the implied to the overly-explicit get eye-popping veils of pinks, greens and yellows dropped over them, and that which we tell ourselves we do not care to see we are not only offered, but are offered in soft pastel undulations with unflinching, overly-generous detail. This play on attraction and repulsion highlights Davis’ continued interest in exploring the dynamic between artist and viewer. By painting scenes of extreme intimacy or even humiliation, we’re pulled into an ambiguous negotiation with Davis where we’re unsure if the privacy that we’ve invaded is his own.

This new body of paintings, like previous work, is both autobiographical and born from Davis’ imagination. However, Davis has dropped the preparatory drawing step in his practice in favor of a more exploratory process, where the act of painting is used not only to depict an image, but to discover the image, as well. In “Dancing Couple” (2011), for instance, meandering, gestural, curvilinear brushstrokes slowly emerge from the low-contrast field of yellows to be the anatomy of several figures praying, masturbating, crying, copulating, dancing and self-mutilating. As

Davis has made a practice of packing ever more vulnerability into the already terrifyingly vulnerable. Vignettes whose horror or hilarity range from the implied to the overly-explicit get eye-popping veils of pinks, greens and yellows dropped over them, and that which we tell ourselves we do not care to see we are not only offered, but are offered in soft pastel undulations with unflinching, overly-generous detail. This play on attraction and repulsion highlights Davis’ continued interest in exploring the dynamic between artist and viewer. By painting scenes of extreme intimacy or even humiliation, we’re pulled into an ambiguous negotiation with Davis where we’re unsure if the privacy that we’ve invaded is his own.

This new body of paintings, like previous work, is both autobiographical and born from Davis’ imagination. However, Davis has dropped the preparatory drawing step in his practice in favor of a more exploratory process, where the act of painting is used not only to depict an image, but to discover the image, as well. In “Dancing Couple” (2011), for instance, meandering, gestural, curvilinear brushstrokes slowly emerge from the low-contrast field of yellows to be the anatomy of several figures praying, masturbating, crying, copulating, dancing and self-mutilating. As opposed to his previous work, the narrative followed the painting as much as it existed prior. This synthesis of the pictorial and the non-objective is the foundation of every painting in the exhibition, and even the literal—a Grecian urn, a dancing woman, a Rococo relief, a Flemish still-life—are imbued with metaphor.

Gerald Davis was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and received his MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. His work has been shown in numerous galleries in the U.S. and Europe, and most recently in a solo exhibition of drawings at Salon 94 in New York., and is in numerous public collections, including The Whitney Museum of American Art and The Hammer Museum. Davis lives and works in Los Angeles.


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