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Los Angeles

Egyptian Theatre

Exhibition Detail
Los Angeles Filmforum presents The 2010 Festival of (In)appropriation - Contemporary Found Footage Filmmaking
6712 Hollywood Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90028


September 19th, 2010 7:30 PM - 9:44 PM
 
Ceibas: (we things at play) , Evan MeaneyEvan Meaney, Ceibas: (we things at play) ,
2010, video
Five-Dimensional Vacation 2 , Ryan LambRyan Lamb, Five-Dimensional Vacation 2 ,
2010, Video
Voice on the Line , Kelly SearsKelly Sears, Voice on the Line ,
2009, Video
World on Wheels , Tanja M. LadenTanja M. Laden, World on Wheels ,
2008, Video
< || >
> ARTISTS
> QUICK FACTS
EVENT TYPE:  
Screening
WEBSITE:  
http://www.americancinematheque.com/inde...
NEIGHBORHOOD:  
hollywood
PHONE:  
323-466.FILM
TAGS:  
digital, video-art, conceptual
COST:  
$10 general, $6 students/seniors, free for Filmforum members
> DESCRIPTION

Sunday September 19, 2010, 7:30 pm

Los Angeles Filmforum presents

The 2010 Festival of (In)appropriation -  Contemporary Found Footage Filmmaking

At the Egyptian Theatre, 6712 Hollywood Blvd. at Las Palmas, Los Angeles

www.lafilmforum.org

 

Admission for Filmforum screenings: $10 general, $6 students/seniors, free for Filmforum members

Advance ticket purchase available through Brown Paper Tickets at

http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/125278

Whether you call it collage, compilation, found footage, detournement, or recycled cinema, the incorporation of previously shot materials into new artworks is a practice that has generated novel juxtapositions of elements which have produced new meanings and ideas that may not have been intended by the original makers, that are, in other words “inappropriate.”

Founded in 2009, the Festival of (In)appropriation is a yearly showcase of contemporary short (20 minutes or less) audiovisual works that appropriate film or video footage and repurpose it in “inappropriate” and inventive ways.  In this program, we bring together a selection of 14 recent films that appropriate footage from diverse sources with vastly different results, demonstrating the range of approaches contemporary filmmakers are taking in repurposing found materials. Indeed, these films push the boundaries of the “found footage” film, raising questions about how we define “found footage” filmmaking in an era in which ever more materials are available for reuse in ever more complex ways. We believe that together, these films reveal how (in)appropriation is flourishing at this social and historical moment.

–      Jaimie Baron, Andrew Hall, and Madeleine Gallagher, Curators

Five-Dimensional Vacation 2 (Ryan Lamb, 2010, 2:01 min.)

“Five-Dimensional Vacation 2 is one in a series of videos exploring time through a visual representation of a five-dimensional time stream.  The video appropriates amateur 8mm film footage found on the web depicting a 1960’s family vacation.  In addition, a musical soundtrack is also utilized (The Smiths, Please, Please, Please Let Me Get What I Want), having been added by an anonymous collaborator who posted the film to the internet…Vacation 2 represents a spatial, rather than a linear, progression in which time is manipulated by allowing each moment in the video to occur and reoccur without end.” (Ryan Lamb)

Voice on the Line (Kelly Sears, 2009, 6:52 min.)

“Voice on the Line is a collage animation made from figures cut out of archival ephemeral films from the late 1950s. This animation mixes the history of these films with events of this era that result in a large-scale secret operation that veers bizarrely off course.  The film also reflects on current and troubled relationships between the areas of national security, civil liberties and telephone companies. Voice on the Line explores how technology can be used to shape our fears and desires.” (Kelly Sears

Ceibas: (we things at play) (Evan Meaney, 2010, 3:21 min.)

“We have come to this place of meaning together, celebrating our un-remaindered completeness. Yet, in our wake endures a long procession of stowaways. We celebrate the lineage of our information as we celebrate one another, not realizing that the loudest affirmations might come from these unacknowledged collaborators. With each generation, they say a little bit more, speaking a little bit louder. Now we share more than just our experience, finding the meaning changed through remediative revisions. Finding more where we have come to recognize less. We revisit these evolving states, recounting our stories and theirs a partnership, over and over.” (Evan Meaney)

Nuke Em, Duke (LJ Frezza, 3:47 min.)

“The film titled The Conqueror starred John Wayne as Genghis Khan.  The production took place downwind from a nuclear testing site and close to half the cast and crew developed cancer, including “the duke” himself.  Nuke Em, Duke is a reinterpretation of the film, looking at “conquest” in past and present media, fiction and non-fiction, and the “compression” of these experiences into mediated forms ready for consumption.” (LJ Frezza)

Guttae (Marcin Blajecki, 2010, 3 min.)

"There are some questions that can't be answered…" (Marcin Blajecki)

Suspension of Belief (Wago Kreider, 2010, 5:33 min.)

Tarnished Angels (Sirk, ’58) and Dr. Strangelove (Kubrick, ’64) remixed.  Completed during a residency at the Experimental Television Center.

Pfft. Pfft. Pfft. (Catherine Ross, 2009, 3:05 min.)

“Sourcing footage from American popular movies of the last two decades, Pfft..Pfft..Pfft.. is a sequence of impossible cause and effect pairings. The improvised Vocal Fx by Adam Matta focus the viewer on the connection between the human and mechanical, while reminding us of the magic in everyday interactions.” (Catherine Ross)

Triptych Unrendered (Antonio Mendoza, 2010, 7:33 min.)

Triptych Unrendered is the 2010 remix of several video loops from triptych.tv. that have been resequenced by antonio mendoza. triptych.tv is a pirate glitch video anti-blog that is constantly mashed, sampled and maintained by three media artists from three different parts of the world: jimpunk, abe linkoln, and mrtamale. It has been active since 2008 and has won awards at the Stuttgarter FILMWINTER Festival in Germany, and the Ibiza Biennial in Spain, and the Critical Glitch Artware Festival in the US.

World on Wheels (Tanja Laden, 2008, 2:08 min.)

“Vintage animation from the Prelinger archives (at archive.org) set to music from the Cylinder Preservation and Digitization Project at UCSB.” (Tanja Laden)

A Movie by Jen Proctor (Jennifer Proctor, 2010, 11:47 min.)

“A loving remake of Bruce Conner’s epic 1958 film A Movie using online video culled from YouTube and LiveLeak. As a remake, the video provides a parallel narrative that explores the changes in historical and visual icons from 1958 to 2010 – and those images that remain surprisingly, disturbingly, and delightfully the same.” (Jennifer Proctor)

Blow Job (Stuart Sandford, 2009, 1 min. excerpt)

“A tongue-in-cheek homage to Warhol’s film of the same name, Blow Job features a reengineered digital clip depicting teen heartthrob Zack Morris (Mark-Paul Gosselaar’s character on Saved by the Bell) on the receiving end of some sort of off- camera pleasuring.” (Stuart Sandford)

Galactic Docking Company (Clark Nikolai, 2009, 2:49 min.)

“The commercialization of space causes new discoveries. Using found and original footage shot on Earth and in near Earth orbit, we find that space wants to have an encounter of the most intimate kind.” (Clark Nikolai)

Thoughts (Julian Krubasik, 2008, 4:51 min.)

“A man gets caught up in his thoughts over a cup of coffee. Homage to Godard’s 2 or 3 things I know about her.” (Julian Krubasik)

The Western Front (Lauren Cook, 2010, 21:21 min.)

“Three narrators are forced to reconcile experiences of senseless violence and cruelty. By juxtaposing intricately handcrafted images and harsh reality, the film examines what we choose to remember and forget in our own lives.” (Lauren Cook)

Total running time: 89 minutes including a 10 minute intermission

This screening series is supported, in part, by the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors through the Los Angeles County Arts Commission and the Department of Cultural Affairs, City of Los Angeles.  Additional support generously provided by the American Cinematheque.

For the screenings at the Egyptian Theater:

Parking is now easiest at the Hollywood & Highland complex. Bring your ticket for validation. Parking is $2 for 4 hours with validation. Enter that complex on Highland or Hollywood. The theater is 1.5 blocks east.

 


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