ArtSlant - Recently added http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/show en-us 40 Nick Herman, Christopher James - Armory Center for the Arts - June 5th - September 11th <p align="center"><strong>Knowledge production </strong></p> <p align="center"><strong>in art and science </strong></p> <p align="center"><strong>explored by THEMODELINGAGENCY</strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>Pasadena, CA</em> &ndash; The Armory Center for the Arts is proud to present <strong>THEMODELINGAGENCY: TEKTITE &nbsp;</strong><strong>&ndash;</strong><strong><em>reflux</em></strong><em>, </em>an exhibition of new works by THEMODELINGAGENCY, a collaboration between artists Nick Herman and Christopher James. Conflating experimental art with scientific method, the drawings, paintings, sculptures, and video displayed here utilize the environment of the lab and strategies familiar to field work to produce alternative results to an existing body of scientific research. In doing so, these objects and images (re)frame the oppositional relationship between utility and art, the objective and subjective, and aesthetics and knowledge. The exhibition is on view in the Armory&rsquo;s Mezzanine Galleries from June 5 through September 11, 2016. A reception, free and open to the public, will take place on Saturday, June 4, 2016 from 6-8pm. The exhibition has been organized by Irene Tsatsos, the Armory&rsquo;s Gallery Director/Chief Curator, with generous support from The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. </p> <p style="text-align: justify;">During the Spring of 2013, THEMODELINGAGENCY took up residence at the Virgin Islands Ecological Research Station (VIERS), located on the remote south side of the island of St. John in the U.S. Virgin Islands. The facilities there had been built to support the 1969 project Tektite, a NASA experiment in undersea living and working envisioned as a model for the feasibility of con&shy;ducting research in space. While at VIERS, THEMODELINGAGENCY investigated both the research undertaken by the marine scientists occupying the undersea habitat as well as the concurrent NASA-funded behavioral study conducted on the submariner scientists from above. Enacting a kind of aesthetic reproduction of these tiered projects and utilizing methodologies and materials employed in conducting the original research, THEMODELINGAGENCY offers a consideration of the context and contingencies of how knowledge is produced.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">According to the artists, the strategy of modeling is fundamental to scientific inquiry, but it is also familiar to artistic practices that employ process-based experimentation. Herman and James emphasize that while scientists use models to describe and account for phenomena, artists use modeling to <em>embody</em> phenomena and so accordingly, the <em>kind</em> of knowledge produces differs. In scientific modeling, data is gathered through controlled observation and the knowledge that is produced is considered objective. In contrast, the subjective, experimental strategies of artists create the conditions for unpredictable outcomes for reasons that may have more to do with achieving a sense of emancipation from those uncertainties than an understanding of them.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>About the Artists</strong></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Nick Herman</strong> is an artist and writer and publisher of the imprint anteprojects. He has an MFA in sculpture from Yale University and a BA in religious studies from Macalester College. He has exhibited his work nationally and internationally at The Museum of Modern Art, Antwerp, The Sculpture Center, Peter Blum Gallery, LA&gt;&lt;ART, 356 Mission, Artist Curated Projects (ACP), and Public Fiction, among others. He was an artist-in-residence at The Chinati Foundation in Marfa, Texas in 2011. &nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Christopher James</strong> is an artist, writer, and curator. He has been published in <em>The Believer</em>, <em>Cabinet</em>, <em>artUS</em>, and <em>X-TRA Journal of Contemporary Art</em>, where he has written about the unique conditions of art production in Southern California. &nbsp;His artwork has been exhibited in New York at The Kitchen, Brooklyn Museum, Whitney at Altria, SAUCE; Internationally at the Museo San Telmo, San Sebastian; Magasin 3, Stockholm; and Gasworks, London as well as numerous sites and galleries in Los Angeles. He was educated at Colgate University, Hamilton, New York, and the San Francisco Art Institute and was awarded a Joan Mitchell grant to attend the residency program at the Atlantic Center for the Arts. In 2010 he produced artwork as a guest of the Hotchalpine Forschungsstation Jungfraujoch, a high altitude research station located at 11,400 feet in the Swiss Alps. </p> Fri, 27 May 2016 16:35:28 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list Ellen Lesperance, Helen Mirra - Armory Center for the Arts - June 5th - September 11th <p align="center"><strong>Craft and action resonate in <br /> <em>Ellen Lesperance, Helen Mirra, Traversing</em></strong></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>Pasadena, CA</em> &ndash; The Armory Center for the Arts is proud to present <em>Ellen Lesperance, Helen Mirra, Traversing</em>, an exhibition that features new paintings and a recent interactive project by Lesperance, and an international, intergenerational weaving project organized by Mirra. The exhibition has been organized for the Armory by guest curator Cassandra Coblentz, with generous support from The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts and the Pasadena Art Alliance. The exhibition is on view in the Armory&rsquo;s Caldwell Gallery from June 5 through September 11, 2016. A reception, free and open to the public, will take place on Saturday, June 4, 2016 from 6-8pm. </p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Through their works, Ellen Lesperance and Helen Mirra both consider the complex relationships we as individuals have to the physical and political landscapes we navigate. Each approaches her practice with a similarly poetic tone and critical consciousness. They share an interest in the material of textiles and the structural grid as well as a tendency to create work within carefully derived conceptual systems and parameters. Furthermore, for both artists, walking plays a central role in their art.&nbsp; </p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Despite their affinities, however, Mirra and Lesperance approach these concepts and activities in strikingly different ways. In this exhibition, the metaphor of traversing also refers to the idea of moving across the space between ideas and perspectives. The presentation of their projects together generates a dialogue between their ideologically distinct positions and subjectivities. Seen together, the projects offer an opportunity to compare and contrast approaches to singular, specific, and intimate physical experience versus public, shared experience.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>Ellen Lesperance, Helen Mirra, Traversing </em>highlights another conceptual underpinning of the overall project: the notions of dialogue and exchange as they relate to artistic production and exhibition curating. An accompanying publication documents these dynamics and poses questions about how we can move beyond binary models of conversation, collaboration and the nature of making and experiencing art.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>About the Artists</strong></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Ellen Lesperance</strong> (b. 1971, Minneapolis MN) lives and works in Portland, Oregon. Her work has been exhibited widely, most recently at the Drawing Center, New York, the Seattle Art Museum, the Portland Art Museum, and in the People&rsquo;s Biennial (traveling). Lesperance&rsquo;s work is represented in the following public collections: the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art at the Brooklyn Museum; the Museum of Art and Design; the Portland Art Museum; the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation; and at the Kadist Art Foundation. Lesperance has been honored with the Northwest regional Betty Bowen Award, a Robert Rauschenberg &ldquo;Artist-as-Activist&rdquo; Grant, a Ford Family Fellowship in the Arts, and a Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant. She received her MFA from Rutgers University in 1999 and has received residencies at the Skowhegan School; the MacDowell Colony; the Djerassi Foundation; and the Atlantic Center.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Helen Mirra</strong> (b. 1970, Rochester NY) presently maintains a rhythm of working in a sustained relation to walking, and her loyalty is to both the metrical and the ecological. Solo exhibitions include the Renaissance Society at the University of Chicago, the Berkeley Art Museum, Kunst-Werke Berlin, Haus Konstruktiv Zurich. She has also participated in the 50th Venice Biennial, the 30th Sao Paulo Bienal, and the 12th Havana Bienal. Public projects include <em>Farbenweg, indirekter</em>, architecturally embedded among the houses of the Universalmuseum Joanneum in Graz, Austria, and <em>Instance the Determination</em> at the University of Chicago, and a GSA Art-in-Architecture project at the Minnesota-Canada border. A fifteen-year survey (1996-2010) of her work was presented at Culturgest in Lisbon Portugal in 2014. Mirra has received awards from the Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation, the Driehaus Foundation, and Artadia, and has been a guest of the DAAD Kunstlerprogramm in Berlin, the Laurenz Haus in Basel, IASPIS in Stockholm, and OCA in Oslo, a fellow at the MacDowell Colony and Civitella Ranieri, and artist-in-residence with the Consortium of the Arts at the University of California at Berkeley, the Center for Book Arts at Mills College, and the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>About the Curator</strong></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Cassandra Coblentz </strong>is Senior Curator and Director of Public Engagement at Orange County Museum of Art. She has a diverse curatorial practice that champions the artistic process. Taking innovative approaches to collaborating with artists and architects, she initiated the Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art&rsquo;s Architecture + Art program that explores the boundaries between these creative practices, producing large-scale site-specific commissions with Hector Zamora, Annie Han, and Daniel Mihalyo of Lead Pencil Studio, as well as Jay Atherton and Cy Keener. Most recently she curated the exhibition <em>We Tell Ourselves Stories in Order to Live</em> for The Ford Family Foundation and Museum of Contemporary Craft in Portland, Oregon. She has authored and managed the production of several exhibition catalogues and publications including <em>How Deep Is Your</em>, a mid-career survey of the work of Julianne Swartz, published in 2012, and <em>Lyle Ashton Harris: Blow Up</em>,published by D.A.P. Her professional experience includes appointments at Hammer Museum, DIA Center for the Arts, Fabric Workshop and Museum, and The J. Paul Getty Museum. She received her BA in Art History and English from Cornell University and her MA from the Center for Curatorial Studies at Bard College. </p> Fri, 27 May 2016 16:30:08 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list - Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions (LACE) - June 7th - June 7th Fri, 27 May 2016 05:35:55 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list Ivan Comas - Steve Turner - June 3rd - July 9th <p class="p1">Steve Turner is pleased to present <em>After Sonora</em>, a solo exhibition of new paintings by Ivan Comas that are loosely based on the scenery of Sonora, a state in northern Mexico that Comas recently explored in depth, wandering slowly between its red and yellow desert and and its blue coastline.&nbsp;</p> Thu, 26 May 2016 20:26:01 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list Matt Lipps - Marc Selwyn Fine Art - May 26th - May 26th <p class="p1">Marc Selwyn Fine Art is pleased to announce, <em>Looking Through&nbsp;</em><em>Pictures</em>, an exhibition of new work by Matt Lipps.</p> <p class="p1">In this series, Lipps explores the genre of still life photography in relation to the <em>mise-en-sc&egrave;ne </em>of theater as a space for figures, props, objects&mdash;and photography itself&mdash;to perform. With a broad cast of characters culled from various high and low sources, the &ldquo;actors&rdquo; range from the familiar to the formal (including modernist sculpture, figure models, and floral arrangements) set to a backdrop that engages the &ldquo;death&rdquo; of Modernism as seen through the medium of photography and artwork reproductions found on the book&rsquo;s page.</p> Thu, 26 May 2016 17:34:15 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list Sandra Lauterbach - LA Artcore Brewery Annex - June 5th - June 26th <p><strong>Sandra Lauterbach | Material Matters</strong></p> <p>LA Artcore Brewery Annex</p> <p>650 A South Avenue 21</p> <p>Los Angeles, CA 90031</p> <p>(323) 276-9320</p> <p>info@laartcore.org</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>http://www.laartcore.org/</p> <p>http://www.sandralauterbach.com/</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Opening reception June 5, 1-3pm</p> <p>Exhibition runs June 2nd through June 26th</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Using a sewing machine as a tool for artistic creation, Sandra creates complexity with color and depth to explore dimensions of physical space. This results in a complex layering of materials, free form shape and a three dimensional aspect to the work. Swirls, circles, flowers, patterns, lines, and prints of almost every imaginable color are pieced together to form a complete transcendental piece of time and place.</p> Wed, 25 May 2016 22:51:33 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list Donn Delson - Photo LA - January 21st - January 24th <p>Archival Metallic Print/Acrylic Facemount, single image</p> Wed, 25 May 2016 16:54:35 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list Gilbert "Magu" Lujan - Craig Krull Gallery - May 28th - July 2nd <p>The gallery is pleased to announce representation of the estate of Gilbert &ldquo;Magu&rdquo; Luj&aacute;n.&nbsp; One of the members of the legendary Chicano arts collective, <em>Los Four,</em> Luj&aacute;n and his compatriots Carlos Almaraz, Frank Romero, and Robert De La Rocha, drew attention to Chicano art in the 70s with murals and public art projects.&nbsp; Luj&aacute;n invented a plethora of mythical/fanciful creatures and cultural oddities; dogs shaped like pyramids, brilliantly colored low-rider cars inflated like balloons, strutting stick figures and anthropomorphic rabbits in sunglasses.&nbsp; They populated an imaginary place called &ldquo;Magulandia&rdquo; but were drawn from the essence of Chicano culture.&nbsp; In 2017, Luj&aacute;n will be the subject of a major retrospective at UCI, curated by Hal Glicksman. This exhibition is part of <em>LA/LA,</em> the Getty&rsquo;s Pacific Standard Time initiative focusing on the relationship of Los Angeles to Latin American cultures.</p> Tue, 24 May 2016 22:14:56 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list Javier Carrillo, Roberto Ortiz, Jairo Perez - Craig Krull Gallery - May 28th - July 2nd <p>In an adjoining gallery, we will present linoleum-cut prints made by Javier Carrillo, Roberto Ortiz and Jairo Perez from the print department of Art Division, a non-profit art school for young adults in the Rampart District of LA, founded and directed by Dan McCleary.&nbsp; Images made by Carrillo in particular, share McCleary&rsquo;s simple purity of a singular form on a flat background.&nbsp; His little pick-up truck overloaded with stacks of wooden palettes has the flat, bold power of Manet&rsquo;s <em>Fifer</em>.</p> Tue, 24 May 2016 22:06:38 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list Dan McCleary - Craig Krull Gallery - May 28th - July 2nd <p>On May 28, the gallery will present its fifth exhibition of Dan McCleary, who is regarded by Christopher Knight at the LA TIMES as &ldquo;one of the finest figure painters working today.&rdquo;&nbsp; McCleary employs classical methodologies and devices like the golden mean, as well as traditional building blocks of design: cube, sphere, cylinder and cone.&nbsp; His everyday moments of LA life and simple still-lifes contain the gravity, structure and balance of Piero della Francesca. The new works are small paintings of quietly centered fruit, classic frontal portraits, and etchings of florals made recently in Oaxaca.</p> Tue, 24 May 2016 21:38:54 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list John Humble - Craig Krull Gallery - May 28th - July 2nd <p>John Humble began photographing the &ldquo;paradoxes and ironies of Los Angeles&rdquo; in 1979.&nbsp; He is a keen observer of this city of boundless asphalt, stucco, signage and mismatched patchworks of graffiti paint-overs. In 1981, Humble was one of eight photographers awarded an NEA grant to chronicle the city on its bicentennial.&nbsp; Then in 2007, The Getty Museum mounted a mid-career retrospective entitled, <em>A Place in the Sun: Photographs by John Humble</em>, accompanied by a monograph.&nbsp; Avoiding any stylistic affectations or cultural clich&eacute;s associated with LA, Humble seeks to record empirical evidence, creating images that are &ldquo;reminiscent of geological cross-sections or archeological excavations with layers of disparate natural and man-made elements compressed &ndash; a sampling of visual strata.&rdquo;&nbsp; His current exhibition focuses on the contrasting architecture and the squeezing, wedging and overlapping of cultures in downtown Los Angeles (DTLA).</p> Tue, 24 May 2016 21:29:37 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list UR New York - Thinkspace - May 28th - June 18th <div> <div align="justify">On view in the gallery's office space is<em>&nbsp;Destroy'ed and Rebuilt,</em>&nbsp;a special presentation of works by UR New York: Fernando Romero and Mike Baca, a graffiti duo from New York City. Known for their urban-industrial aesthetic, the pair has been collaborating since 2006, combining graffiti, photography, screen-printing and graphic design in their impactful mixed-media works.</div> </div> <div align="justify">&nbsp;</div> <div align="justify">With a philanthropic mission to connect to youth culture and to share the powerful potential of self-expression, the duo embraces experimentation and the diversity of context and environment. Born and bred in New York City, URNYC began making art on the streets and in the city's subway system. Now, their work has been showcased internationally, in museums, galleries, and cultural platforms across the world.</div> Mon, 23 May 2016 16:21:55 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list James Bullough - Thinkspace - May 28th - June 18th <div align="justify">Concurrently on view in the Thinkspace project room is&nbsp;<em>Breaking Point</em>, featuring new works by American, Berlin-based, artist James Bullough. A technically accomplished painter who creates with a staggering degree of detail, Bullough begins with figurative imagery, disjointing and levitating its fragmented parts impressionistically to build dynamic surfaces that read with startling affective resonance.<br /><br /></div> <div align="justify">In this new series of works, Bullough captures moments of existential fracture, disruption, and personal breach through the expressive movement of the body, asking his models to channel personal memory and to recall experiences of "breaking" at the moment of their capture. Working with dancers from Berlin, Bullough begins with the body in motion, arrested in an expense of negative space, then dissembles it further, splicing, striating, and fragmenting its surfaces and planes. The models remain anonymous and faceless throughout, an omission intended to reaffirm the symbolic universality of the emotive physical gesture.<br /><br /></div> <div align="justify">His technique and style have evolved significantly over the past three years. Earlier works involved graphic additions and interruptions, with areas of the figure clearly removed. Now the works are increasingly dynamic as the bodies' interrupted segments have been shifted and activated, rather than deleted. Areas of the figure are superimposed, vibrating with transitional movement rather than apprehended in static still. Each piece is created primarily with a minute #1 brush, a preference the artist has cultivated for its control and detail. Working on canvas, reclaimed wood flooring from a Berlin dance studio, and panel, Bullough continues to experiment with his materials and ground.</div> Mon, 23 May 2016 16:21:31 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list Curiot - Thinkspace - May 28th - June 18th <div style="text-align: justify;" align="justify">Thinkspace&nbsp; is pleased to present new works by Curiot in&nbsp;<em>Warped Passage</em>, opening May 28.&nbsp;Michoac&aacute;n artist Favio Martinez, known by his pseudonym Curiot, currently lives and works in Mexico City. Raised in Costa Mesa, California, the artist relocated to Mexico, following his completion of high school, hoping to reconnect with his estranged cultural roots. He completed his BFA at the&nbsp;Universidad Michoacana&nbsp;in 2008 and since then has continued to hone his unique aesthetic in both his ambitiously scaled site-specific public mural pieces and his gallery works.</div> <div style="text-align: justify;" align="justify">&nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: justify;">Renowned for his experimentally surreal and colorfully vibrant imagery, Curiot creates visual worlds with an anthropological suggestion. Simultaneously ancient and contemporary, they're inspired by Mexican folklore, handicraft traditions, textiles, and patterns. His larger-than-life sensibility often borders on the abstract, as he combines the human and the animal into awe-worthy aggregates. Ambiguously totemic and ancestral, the works have been known to explore the primal coexistence, and contention, of the human and natural worlds. An advocate for the preservation and respect of this tenuous balance, Curiot has created a mythological shorthand with a wealth of characters and recurring symbols, immediately recognizable as his own.</div> <div style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: justify;">In this new body of work, Curiot explores transition and metaphysical passage, working intentionally within a loosely defined future tense. In this dizzying new quasi-futuristic realm, the mythological creatures of his self-devised mythology have passed on, transmogrified, and are reincarnated as depictions of deities and icons for worship. Exploring both loss and expulsion, metamorphosis and inheritance, Curiot offers a labyrinthine splitting of worlds and paths.</div> <div style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: justify;"><em>The breaking of light will offer first site of the path within paths, at times intertwined or straight, split into two or three or four, hidden exits and glowing welcomes. As some tunnels cave in behind you, one may think, what if? But does it really matter, each road that one takes is that of the unknown; unexplored experiences which build upon a dream, a dream we all share, that slowly unravels within our time. The mirage will remain for others to probe, vanity fades, knowledge transfers, we wake once again to another bright door.</em><em>- CURIOT</em></div> <div style="text-align: justify;"><em>&nbsp;</em></div> <div style="text-align: justify;"> <div><em>Act 1: Warped Passage</em>&nbsp;will feature a collection of new paintings, two new digital editions, an adventurous installation component, including musical accompaniment from Franz (Pira MD Records) as well as an offsite mural completed for the RFK Schools project via Branded Arts.</div> </div> Mon, 23 May 2016 16:21:00 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list Sam Gilliam - David Kordansky Gallery - June 4th - July 9th <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <table style="color: #222222; font-family: 'Century Schoolbook Mono', 'Courier New', Courier, monospace; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px;" border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" align="center"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">David Kordansky Gallery is very pleased to announce&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Green April</span>, an exhibition of major large-scale paintings by Sam Gilliam from the late 1960s and early 1970s. The show will open on&nbsp;<span class="aBn" style="border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: dashed; border-bottom-color: #cccccc; position: relative; top: -2px; z-index: 0;" data-term="goog_750784098"><span class="aQJ" style="position: relative; top: 2px; z-index: -1;">June 4</span></span>&nbsp;and remain on view through&nbsp;<span class="aBn" style="border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: dashed; border-bottom-color: #cccccc; position: relative; top: -2px; z-index: 0;" data-term="goog_750784099"><span class="aQJ" style="position: relative; top: 2px; z-index: -1;">July 9, 2016</span></span>. An opening reception will be held on&nbsp;<span class="aBn" style="border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: dashed; border-bottom-color: #cccccc; position: relative; top: -2px; z-index: 0;" data-term="goog_750784100"><span class="aQJ" style="position: relative; top: 2px; z-index: -1;">Saturday, June 4</span></span>&nbsp;from&nbsp;<span class="aBn" style="border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: dashed; border-bottom-color: #cccccc; position: relative; top: -2px; z-index: 0;" data-term="goog_750784101"><span class="aQJ" style="position: relative; top: 2px; z-index: -1;">6:00pm until 8:00pm</span></span>.</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Sam Gilliam is one of the key figures in postwar and contemporary American art. Emerging from the Washington, D.C. scene in the mid 1960s with works that both elaborated upon and disrupted the ethos of Color School painting, he has subsequently pursued a wide-ranging, pioneering course in which improvisation and experimentation have been the only constants.<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Green April</span>&nbsp;focuses on works executed during a crucial period in the artist's development, one in which he began to make the iconic Beveled-edge and Drape paintings for which he is best known. These works feature a number of striking formal advances, but their radicality also hinges upon the fact that they were made in dialogue with the profound social shifts that were taking place at the time. Most of the works on view have remained in Gilliam's studio since their creation and have never before been exhibited.</span></p> <table style="color: #222222; font-family: 'Century Schoolbook Mono', 'Courier New', Courier, monospace; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px;" border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" align="center"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">The Beveled-edge paintings (or Slice paintings, as they were also called) that Gilliam started to produce in 1967 were quickly recognized by critics as a breakthrough body of work. By pouring acrylic paints onto a length of canvas and then folding it over on itself while still wet, or vice versa, he created prismatic spatial effects and unexpected color combinations, pushing the brushless staining and soaking techniques also employed by artists like Thomas Downing, Morris Louis, and Kenneth Noland to a newly lyrical extreme. He then stretched the canvas on a beveled frame, so that the painting appeared to emerge from the wall on which it was hung. This sculptural extension established a physically immediate and active connection with the viewer, who now approached not a flat picture plane but a dimensional and bodily one.</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Green April</span>'s title is borrowed from a monumental Beveled-edge painting from 1969. Over twenty feet wide and eight feet tall, it represents Gilliam at his most ambitious and exploratory. Its panoramic landscape format and ethereal palette channels the immersive optical richness of Monet's&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Water Lilies</span>. While dominant art historical narratives hail those hallmarks of Impressionism as gateways to a modernist realm of pure abstraction, one in which painting exists as a standalone, idealized mode of discourse, Gilliam's work engages the body as well as the eye.&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Green April</span>&nbsp;is a decidedly volumetric object; the processes, both intensely physical and material, responsible for its creation inform the way the painting is experienced as a thing in space.</span></p> <table style="color: #222222; font-family: 'Century Schoolbook Mono', 'Courier New', Courier, monospace; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px;" border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" align="center"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">With works like these Gilliam began eroding the distinction between the visual world traditionally conjured within a painting and the tangible world outside it. For an African-American artist working in the nation's capital in the late 60s, at the height of the Civil Rights Movement, this was not merely an aesthetic proposition. It was a way of defining art's role as a primary mode for expression in a democratic society undergoing dramatic change, and of affirming the power and relevance of non-objective painting in the widest array of cultural as well as political contexts. Gilliam increasingly embodied the idea that free, and free-ranging, expression was itself a form of engaged citizenship.</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">This idea would take dramatic new form in the Drape paintings he began to produce next in 1968, cementing his position as one of the most important formal innovators of his generation. By suspending a stretcherless, often vast length of painted canvas from the walls or ceiling of an exhibition space, Gilliam transformed both his medium and the contexts in which it was viewed. Architectural in scale, these installation-based objects both literalized the sublimity of abstract expressionism and returned painting to its archaic roots as an intervention in, or on, a particular space, be it a cave or a church or an exterior wall. In many ways this was a natural outgrowth of the experimental and embodied processes he was using to apply his pigments. It also reflected his treatment of the canvas not only as a surface or support, but as a material with its own expansive potential for plastic manipulation.</span></p> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #222222; font-size: small;">However, unlike other contemporary artists' attempts to break with the rectilinear constraints of the stretcher, the Drapes are also painterly works in the traditional sense of the word. As minimalism was beginning to exert its dominant influence as a formal language, Gilliam's unabashedly bold use of color and performative, even baroque sensibility evince his ongoing interest in the trajectory of Western painting as a discrete discipline with its own pleasures and mysteries. The works on view in this exhibition attest to the fact that the Drapes, and the Beveled-edge paintings, must also be read as standalone compositions, each of which has its own internal logic and mood. Herein lies the bracing paradox at the heart of Gilliam's project. Dismantling one of painting's basic structural foundations not only energized the medium, but also showed that the visceral experience of beauty is, figuratively and literally, an "all-over" phenomenon. Such experiences might originate within an artwork, but they are not limited to a space delimited by the edges of a canvas; they exist in a social dimension, always shared among communities of viewers, and yet simultaneously unique to each viewer alone.</span></p> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><span style="color: #222222;">Sam Gilliam (b. 1933, Tupelo, Mississippi) was the subject of a traveling retrospective organized by the Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. in 2005; over the last four decades his work has also been the subject of solo exhibitions at the J.B. Speed Memorial Museum, Louisville, Kentucky; the Whitney Museum of American Art, Philip Morris Branch, New York; The Studio Museum in Harlem, New York; and the Museum of Modern Art, New York, among many other institutions. In 1972, Gilliam exhibited his work in the group exhibition, curated by Walter Hopps, comprising the American Pavilion of the 36th Venice Biennale. Recent group exhibitions include&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #222222; font-size: 14px; text-decoration: underline;">Not New Now</span><span style="color: #222222;">, Marrakech Biennale 6, Morocco (2016);&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #222222; font-size: 14px; text-decoration: underline;">Black: Color, Material, Concept</span><span style="color: #222222;">, The Studio Museum in Harlem, New York (2015);&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #222222; font-size: 14px; text-decoration: underline;">Surface Matters</span><span style="color: #222222;">, Edward H. Linde Gallery, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (2015);&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #222222; font-size: 14px; text-decoration: underline;">Surface Tension</span><span style="color: #222222;">, The FLAG Art Foundation, New York (2015);&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #222222; font-size: 14px; text-decoration: underline;">Affecting Presence and the Pursuit of Delicious Experiences</span><span style="color: #222222;">, The Menil Collection, Houston (2015);&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #222222; font-size: 14px; text-decoration: underline;">Represent: 200 Years of African American Art</span><span style="color: #222222;">, Philadelphia Museum of Art (2015);&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #222222; font-size: 14px; text-decoration: underline;">Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties</span><span style="color: #222222;">, Brooklyn Museum, New York (2014); and&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #222222; font-size: 14px; text-decoration: underline;">A Bigger Splash: Painting after Performance</span><span style="color: #222222;">, Tate Modern, London (2012). Gilliam's work is in the collections of many prominent institutions worldwide, including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Tate Modern, London; the Art Institute of Chicago; Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, D.C.; Mus&eacute;e d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. He lives and works in Washington, D.C.</span></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <table style="color: #222222; font-family: 'Century Schoolbook Mono', 'Courier New', Courier, monospace; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px;" border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" align="center"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px;">David Kordansky Gallery is very pleased to announce&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Green April</span>, an exhibition of major large-scale paintings by Sam Gilliam from the late 1960s and early 1970s. The show will open on<span class="aBn" style="border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: dashed; border-bottom-color: #cccccc; position: relative; top: -2px; z-index: 0;" data-term="goog_750784098"><span class="aQJ" style="position: relative; top: 2px; z-index: -1;">June 4</span></span>&nbsp;and remain on view through&nbsp;<span class="aBn" style="border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: dashed; border-bottom-color: #cccccc; position: relative; top: -2px; z-index: 0;" data-term="goog_750784099"><span class="aQJ" style="position: relative; top: 2px; z-index: -1;">July 9, 2016</span></span>. An opening reception will be held on<span class="aBn" style="border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: dashed; border-bottom-color: #cccccc; position: relative; top: -2px; z-index: 0;" data-term="goog_750784100"><span class="aQJ" style="position: relative; top: 2px; z-index: -1;">Saturday, June 4</span></span>&nbsp;from&nbsp;<span class="aBn" style="border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: dashed; border-bottom-color: #cccccc; position: relative; top: -2px; z-index: 0;" data-term="goog_750784101"><span class="aQJ" style="position: relative; top: 2px; z-index: -1;">6:00pm until 8:00pm</span></span>.</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px;">Sam Gilliam is one of the key figures in postwar and contemporary American art. Emerging from the Washington, D.C. scene in the mid 1960s with works that both elaborated upon and disrupted the ethos of Color School painting, he has subsequently pursued a wide-ranging, pioneering course in which improvisation and experimentation have been the only constants.<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Green April</span>&nbsp;focuses on works executed during a crucial period in the artist's development, one in which he began to make the iconic Beveled-edge and Drape paintings for which he is best known. These works feature a number of striking formal advances, but their radicality also hinges upon the fact that they were made in dialogue with the profound social shifts that were taking place at the time. Most of the works on view have remained in Gilliam's studio since their creation and have never before been exhibited.</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px;">The Beveled-edge paintings (or Slice paintings, as they were also called) that Gilliam started to produce in 1967 were quickly recognized by critics as a breakthrough body of work. By pouring acrylic paints onto a length of canvas and then folding it over on itself while still wet, or vice versa, he created prismatic spatial effects and unexpected color combinations, pushing the brushless staining and soaking techniques also employed by artists like Thomas Downing, Morris Louis, and Kenneth Noland to a newly lyrical extreme. He then stretched the canvas on a beveled frame, so that the painting appeared to emerge from the wall on which it was hung. This sculptural extension established a physically immediate and active connection with the viewer, who now approached not a flat picture plane but a dimensional and bodily one.</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px;"><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Green April</span>'s title is borrowed from a monumental Beveled-edge painting from 1969. Over twenty feet wide and eight feet tall, it represents Gilliam at his most ambitious and exploratory. Its panoramic landscape format and ethereal palette channels the immersive optical richness of Monet's&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Water Lilies</span>. While dominant art historical narratives hail those hallmarks of Impressionism as gateways to a modernist realm of pure abstraction, one in which painting exists as a standalone, idealized mode of discourse, Gilliam's work engages the body as well as the eye.&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Green April</span>&nbsp;is a decidedly volumetric object; the processes, both intensely physical and material, responsible for its creation inform the way the painting is experienced as a thing in space.</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px;">With works like these Gilliam began eroding the distinction between the visual world traditionally conjured within a painting and the tangible world outside it. For an African-American artist working in the nation's capital in the late 60s, at the height of the Civil Rights Movement, this was not merely an aesthetic proposition. It was a way of defining art's role as a primary mode for expression in a democratic society undergoing dramatic change, and of affirming the power and relevance of non-objective painting in the widest array of cultural as well as political contexts. Gilliam increasingly embodied the idea that free, and free-ranging, expression was itself a form of engaged citizenship.</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px;">This idea would take dramatic new form in the Drape paintings he began to produce next in 1968, cementing his position as one of the most important formal innovators of his generation. By suspending a stretcherless, often vast length of painted canvas from the walls or ceiling of an exhibition space, Gilliam transformed both his medium and the contexts in which it was viewed. Architectural in scale, these installation-based objects both literalized the sublimity of abstract expressionism and returned painting to its archaic roots as an intervention in, or on, a particular space, be it a cave or a church or an exterior wall. In many ways this was a natural outgrowth of the experimental and embodied processes he was using to apply his pigments. It also reflected his treatment of the canvas not only as a surface or support, but as a material with its own expansive potential for plastic manipulation.</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px;">However, unlike other contemporary artists' attempts to break with the rectilinear constraints of the stretcher, the Drapes are also painterly works in the traditional sense of the word. As minimalism was beginning to exert its dominant influence as a formal language, Gilliam's unabashedly bold use of color and performative, even baroque sensibility evince his ongoing interest in the trajectory of Western painting as a discrete discipline with its own pleasures and mysteries. The works on view in this exhibition attest to the fact that the Drapes, and the Beveled-edge paintings, must also be read as standalone compositions, each of which has its own internal logic and mood. Herein lies the bracing paradox at the heart of Gilliam's project. Dismantling one of painting's basic structural foundations not only energized the medium, but also showed that the visceral experience of beauty is, figuratively and literally, an "all-over" phenomenon. Such experiences might originate within an artwork, but they are not limited to a space delimited by the edges of a canvas; they exist in a social dimension, always shared among communities of viewers, and yet simultaneously unique to each viewer alone.</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px;">Sam Gilliam (b. 1933, Tupelo, Mississippi) was the subject of a traveling retrospective organized by the Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. in 2005; over the last four decades his work has also been the subject of solo exhibitions at the J.B. Speed Memorial Museum, Louisville, Kentucky; the Whitney Museum of American Art, Philip Morris Branch, New York; The Studio Museum in Harlem, New York; and the Museum of Modern Art, New York, among many other institutions. In 1972, Gilliam exhibited his work in the group exhibition, curated by Walter Hopps, comprising the American Pavilion of the 36th Venice Biennale. Recent group exhibitions include&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Not New Now</span>, Marrakech Biennale 6, Morocco (2016);&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Black: Color, Material, Concept</span>, The Studio Museum in Harlem, New York (2015);&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Surface Matters</span>, Edward H. Linde Gallery, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (2015);&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Surface Tension</span>, The FLAG Art Foundation, New York (2015);&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Affecting Presence and the Pursuit of Delicious Experiences</span>, The Menil Collection, Houston (2015);&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Represent: 200 Years of African American Art</span>, Philadelphia Museum of Art (2015);&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties</span>, Brooklyn Museum, New York (2014); and&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">A Bigger Splash: Painting after Performance</span>, Tate Modern, London (2012). Gilliam's work is in the collections of many prominent institutions worldwide, including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Tate Modern, London; the Art Institute of Chicago; Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, D.C.; Mus&eacute;e d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. He lives and works in Washington, D.C.</p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Mon, 23 May 2016 16:16:57 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list Valentin Carron - David Kordansky Gallery - June 4th - July 9th <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <table style="color: #222222; font-family: 'Century Schoolbook Mono', 'Courier New', Courier, monospace; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px;" border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" align="center"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px;"><span style="font-size: small;">David Kordansky Gallery is very pleased to announce&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">A comb a hole</span>, an exhibition of new work by Valentin Carron. The show will open on&nbsp;<span class="aBn" style="border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: dashed; border-bottom-color: #cccccc; position: relative; top: -2px; z-index: 0;" data-term="goog_750784090"><span class="aQJ" style="position: relative; top: 2px; z-index: -1;">June 4</span></span>&nbsp;and remain on view through&nbsp;<span class="aBn" style="border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: dashed; border-bottom-color: #cccccc; position: relative; top: -2px; z-index: 0;" data-term="goog_750784091"><span class="aQJ" style="position: relative; top: 2px; z-index: -1;">July 9, 2016</span></span>. An opening reception will be held on&nbsp;<span class="aBn" style="border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: dashed; border-bottom-color: #cccccc; position: relative; top: -2px; z-index: 0;" data-term="goog_750784092"><span class="aQJ" style="position: relative; top: 2px; z-index: -1;">Saturday, June 4</span></span>&nbsp;from&nbsp;<span class="aBn" style="border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: dashed; border-bottom-color: #cccccc; position: relative; top: -2px; z-index: 0;" data-term="goog_750784093"><span class="aQJ" style="position: relative; top: 2px; z-index: -1;">6:00pm until 8:00pm</span></span>.</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Valentin Carron's sculptures, installations, and paintings inhabit the world as recreated ready-mades. Drawing from iconography associated with his own native Switzerland, he meticulously recreates characteristic local forms, often substituting one material for another, and generating unexpected compositional complexity from otherwise mute or overlooked objects. In so doing, he infuses the ordinary and the mundane with humor, melancholy, and poetry.&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">A comb a hole</span>features a new body of pedestal-based bronze sculptures and a stealthily dramatic installation that alters the gallery's space.</span></p> <table style="color: #222222; font-family: 'Century Schoolbook Mono', 'Courier New', Courier, monospace; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px;" border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" align="center"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Working from photographs taken of seemingly random sections of pavement, asphalt, flooring, and sewer grates in his hometown of Sully in southwest Switzerland, Carron has created flat, slab-like objects designed to be viewed from above. Beginning with clay, he forms each of the elements by hand before casting the composition in bronze and then painting it. The sculptures capture, by way of relief, the patterns in surfaces that often go unnoticed because they are underfoot. Many also feature sculptural representations of the kinds of things that end up on the ground in a municipal environment; these include stylized renditions of banana peels, fallen French fries, and hardware that might have dropped into the wet concrete before it set.</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Installed on pedestals arranged in the gallery according to a slightly irregular grid, in their totality the sculptures exist as an austere field of monuments to the quotidian. These are depictions of daily life at its most drab and banal, and yet they bristle with surreal juxtapositions and a stoic comedy, suggesting that even the ground we stand upon can be raised up for contemplation and reflection. Since the viewer is still required to look down to see them, however, they also skewer the very notion of tabletop sculpture, performing as both the flat tabletop and the object that rests upon it. At the same time, this flatness also allows them to be read as if they were horizontal paintings, or hybrid works occupying an intermediate spatial dimension between the second and the third. Subtle textures and color shifts play out from one sculpture to the next, drawing the eye toward minor distinctions that take on exponentially increasing significance as the viewer navigates the installation.</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">An emphasis on surface detail can be identified as a common theme throughout Carron's practice. Regardless of the materials he uses in any given body of work, he revels in their plainness and the aesthetic interest they offer in a relatively unadorned state. While his matter-of-fact attitude is indebted in part to minimalist art historical examples, it also speaks to a certain punk-like aesthetic and his interest in homage as a form of both affection and critique. In&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">A comb a hole</span>&nbsp;this is also exemplified in the way the sculptures have been painted. Carron uses industrial paints (colors are selected from a pre-existing chart), and applies them, in what is at once an off-handed gesture and a careful assessment of the innate properties of both the bronze and the paint, using an uninflected series of broad strokes, sometimes allowing the finish of the bronze to show through. In several instances, variously shaped holes in the bronzes reveal identically shaped openings in the tops of their pedestals; together the apertures function like momentary eruptions of the abyss, breaking any conceptual fourth wall that might exist between the ideal space of the art object and the tangible space of the exhibition itself.</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">These ruptures find an eerie parallel in two eye-shaped holes that seem to observe the sculptures, as well as their viewers, from high up in one of the gallery's walls. The "eyes" are the result of an elaborate and carefully constructed intervention. An entirely new wall has been built in front of the existing one, and the holes themselves are lined with concrete forms that subtly differentiate their perimeter from the plaster that surrounds them; even the surface of the wall behind the holes has been painted black, as if to further accentuate the overriding power of negative space. Inspired by similar openings found in the walls of European village architecture, the installation both invites and thwarts the desire to look beyond what is right in front of us. As in much of Carron's work, this dynamic has broader cultural implications--in a world of widespread globalization, local things are exposed to a universal gaze, but they also get harder to see.</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">In 2013, Valentin Carron (b. 1977, Martigny, Switzerland) represented Switzerland at the 55th Venice Biennale. He has also been the subject of solo exhibitions at numerous institutions worldwide, including Overbeck Gesellschaft, L&uuml;beck, Germany (2015); Kunsthalle Bern, Switzerland (2014); Fondation Louis Moret, Martigny, Switzerland (2014); Palais de Tokyo, Paris (2010); Centro de Arte Contempor&aacute;neo La Conserva, Ceuti, Spain (2009); Kunsthalle Z&uuml;rich, Switzerland (2007); Swiss Institute, New York (2006); and, with Mai-Thu Perret, Chisenhale Gallery, London (2006). Recent group exhibitions include&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Wanderlust</span>, High Line, New York (2016);&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Elevation 1049: Between Heaven and Hell</span>, LUMA Foundation, Gstaad, Switzerland (2014);&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Alone Together</span>, Rubell Family Collection, Miami (2013);&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Lost (in LA)</span>, presented by FLAX, Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery, Barnsdall Park, Los Angeles (2012);&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Le jeunesse est un art</span>, Jubil&auml;um Manor Kunstpreis, Aargauer Kunsthaus, Aarau, Switzerland (2012);&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">The World as Will and Wallpaper</span>, Le Consortium, Dijon, France (2012); and&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">The New Public</span>, MUSEION of Modern and Contemporary Art, Bolzano, Italy (2012). Carron lives and works in Martigny, Switzerland.</span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <table style="color: #222222; font-family: 'Century Schoolbook Mono', 'Courier New', Courier, monospace; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px;" border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" align="center"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px;">David Kordansky Gallery is very pleased to announce&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">A comb a hole</span>, an exhibition of new work by Valentin Carron. The show will open on&nbsp;<span class="aBn" style="border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: dashed; border-bottom-color: #cccccc; position: relative; top: -2px; z-index: 0;" data-term="goog_750784090"><span class="aQJ" style="position: relative; top: 2px; z-index: -1;">June 4</span></span>&nbsp;and remain on view through&nbsp;<span class="aBn" style="border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: dashed; border-bottom-color: #cccccc; position: relative; top: -2px; z-index: 0;" data-term="goog_750784091"><span class="aQJ" style="position: relative; top: 2px; z-index: -1;">July 9, 2016</span></span>. An opening reception will be held on&nbsp;<span class="aBn" style="border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: dashed; border-bottom-color: #cccccc; position: relative; top: -2px; z-index: 0;" data-term="goog_750784092"><span class="aQJ" style="position: relative; top: 2px; z-index: -1;">Saturday, June 4</span></span>&nbsp;from&nbsp;<span class="aBn" style="border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: dashed; border-bottom-color: #cccccc; position: relative; top: -2px; z-index: 0;" data-term="goog_750784093"><span class="aQJ" style="position: relative; top: 2px; z-index: -1;">6:00pm until 8:00pm</span></span>.</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px;">Valentin Carron's sculptures, installations, and paintings inhabit the world as recreated ready-mades. Drawing from iconography associated with his own native Switzerland, he meticulously recreates characteristic local forms, often substituting one material for another, and generating unexpected compositional complexity from otherwise mute or overlooked objects. In so doing, he infuses the ordinary and the mundane with humor, melancholy, and poetry.&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">A comb a hole</span>features a new body of pedestal-based bronze sculptures and a stealthily dramatic installation that alters the gallery's space.</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px;">Working from photographs taken of seemingly random sections of pavement, asphalt, flooring, and sewer grates in his hometown of Sully in southwest Switzerland, Carron has created flat, slab-like objects designed to be viewed from above. Beginning with clay, he forms each of the elements by hand before casting the composition in bronze and then painting it. The sculptures capture, by way of relief, the patterns in surfaces that often go unnoticed because they are underfoot. Many also feature sculptural representations of the kinds of things that end up on the ground in a municipal environment; these include stylized renditions of banana peels, fallen French fries, and hardware that might have dropped into the wet concrete before it set.</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px;">Installed on pedestals arranged in the gallery according to a slightly irregular grid, in their totality the sculptures exist as an austere field of monuments to the quotidian. These are depictions of daily life at its most drab and banal, and yet they bristle with surreal juxtapositions and a stoic comedy, suggesting that even the ground we stand upon can be raised up for contemplation and reflection. Since the viewer is still required to look down to see them, however, they also skewer the very notion of tabletop sculpture, performing as both the flat tabletop and the object that rests upon it. At the same time, this flatness also allows them to be read as if they were horizontal paintings, or hybrid works occupying an intermediate spatial dimension between the second and the third. Subtle textures and color shifts play out from one sculpture to the next, drawing the eye toward minor distinctions that take on exponentially increasing significance as the viewer navigates the installation.</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px;">An emphasis on surface detail can be identified as a common theme throughout Carron's practice. Regardless of the materials he uses in any given body of work, he revels in their plainness and the aesthetic interest they offer in a relatively unadorned state. While his matter-of-fact attitude is indebted in part to minimalist art historical examples, it also speaks to a certain punk-like aesthetic and his interest in homage as a form of both affection and critique. In&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">A comb a hole</span>&nbsp;this is also exemplified in the way the sculptures have been painted. Carron uses industrial paints (colors are selected from a pre-existing chart), and applies them, in what is at once an off-handed gesture and a careful assessment of the innate properties of both the bronze and the paint, using an uninflected series of broad strokes, sometimes allowing the finish of the bronze to show through. In several instances, variously shaped holes in the bronzes reveal identically shaped openings in the tops of their pedestals; together the apertures function like momentary eruptions of the abyss, breaking any conceptual fourth wall that might exist between the ideal space of the art object and the tangible space of the exhibition itself.</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px;">These ruptures find an eerie parallel in two eye-shaped holes that seem to observe the sculptures, as well as their viewers, from high up in one of the gallery's walls. The "eyes" are the result of an elaborate and carefully constructed intervention. An entirely new wall has been built in front of the existing one, and the holes themselves are lined with concrete forms that subtly differentiate their perimeter from the plaster that surrounds them; even the surface of the wall behind the holes has been painted black, as if to further accentuate the overriding power of negative space. Inspired by similar openings found in the walls of European village architecture, the installation both invites and thwarts the desire to look beyond what is right in front of us. As in much of Carron's work, this dynamic has broader cultural implications--in a world of widespread globalization, local things are exposed to a universal gaze, but they also get harder to see.</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px;">In 2013, Valentin Carron (b. 1977, Martigny, Switzerland) represented Switzerland at the 55th Venice Biennale. He has also been the subject of solo exhibitions at numerous institutions worldwide, including Overbeck Gesellschaft, L&uuml;beck, Germany (2015); Kunsthalle Bern, Switzerland (2014); Fondation Louis Moret, Martigny, Switzerland (2014); Palais de Tokyo, Paris (2010); Centro de Arte Contempor&aacute;neo La Conserva, Ceuti, Spain (2009); Kunsthalle Z&uuml;rich, Switzerland (2007); Swiss Institute, New York (2006); and, with Mai-Thu Perret, Chisenhale Gallery, London (2006). Recent group exhibitions include&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Wanderlust</span>, High Line, New York (2016);&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Elevation 1049: Between Heaven and Hell</span>, LUMA Foundation, Gstaad, Switzerland (2014);&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Alone Together</span>, Rubell Family Collection, Miami (2013);&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Lost (in LA)</span>, presented by FLAX, Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery, Barnsdall Park, Los Angeles (2012);&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Le jeunesse est un art</span>, Jubil&auml;um Manor Kunstpreis, Aargauer Kunsthaus, Aarau, Switzerland (2012);&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">The World as Will and Wallpaper</span>, Le Consortium, Dijon, France (2012); and&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">The New Public</span>, MUSEION of Modern and Contemporary Art, Bolzano, Italy (2012). Carron lives and works in Martigny, Switzerland.</p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Mon, 23 May 2016 16:13:05 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list