ArtSlant - Recently added http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/show en-us 40 UR New York - Thinkspace - May 28th - June 18th <div> <div align="justify">On view in the gallery's office space is<em>&nbsp;Destroy'ed and Rebuilt,</em>&nbsp;a special presentation of works by UR New York: Fernando Romero and Mike Baca, a graffiti duo from New York City. Known for their urban-industrial aesthetic, the pair has been collaborating since 2006, combining graffiti, photography, screen-printing and graphic design in their impactful mixed-media works.</div> </div> <div align="justify">&nbsp;</div> <div align="justify">With a philanthropic mission to connect to youth culture and to share the powerful potential of self-expression, the duo embraces experimentation and the diversity of context and environment. Born and bred in New York City, URNYC began making art on the streets and in the city's subway system. Now, their work has been showcased internationally, in museums, galleries, and cultural platforms across the world.</div> Mon, 23 May 2016 16:21:55 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list James Bullough - Thinkspace - May 28th - June 18th <div align="justify">Concurrently on view in the Thinkspace project room is&nbsp;<em>Breaking Point</em>, featuring new works by American, Berlin-based, artist James Bullough. A technically accomplished painter who creates with a staggering degree of detail, Bullough begins with figurative imagery, disjointing and levitating its fragmented parts impressionistically to build dynamic surfaces that read with startling affective resonance.<br /><br /></div> <div align="justify">In this new series of works, Bullough captures moments of existential fracture, disruption, and personal breach through the expressive movement of the body, asking his models to channel personal memory and to recall experiences of "breaking" at the moment of their capture. Working with dancers from Berlin, Bullough begins with the body in motion, arrested in an expense of negative space, then dissembles it further, splicing, striating, and fragmenting its surfaces and planes. The models remain anonymous and faceless throughout, an omission intended to reaffirm the symbolic universality of the emotive physical gesture.<br /><br /></div> <div align="justify">His technique and style have evolved significantly over the past three years. Earlier works involved graphic additions and interruptions, with areas of the figure clearly removed. Now the works are increasingly dynamic as the bodies' interrupted segments have been shifted and activated, rather than deleted. Areas of the figure are superimposed, vibrating with transitional movement rather than apprehended in static still. Each piece is created primarily with a minute #1 brush, a preference the artist has cultivated for its control and detail. Working on canvas, reclaimed wood flooring from a Berlin dance studio, and panel, Bullough continues to experiment with his materials and ground.</div> Mon, 23 May 2016 16:21:31 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list Curiot - Thinkspace - May 28th - June 18th <div style="text-align: justify;" align="justify">Thinkspace&nbsp; is pleased to present new works by Curiot in&nbsp;<em>Warped Passage</em>, opening May 28.&nbsp;Michoac&aacute;n artist Favio Martinez, known by his pseudonym Curiot, currently lives and works in Mexico City. Raised in Costa Mesa, California, the artist relocated to Mexico, following his completion of high school, hoping to reconnect with his estranged cultural roots. He completed his BFA at the&nbsp;Universidad Michoacana&nbsp;in 2008 and since then has continued to hone his unique aesthetic in both his ambitiously scaled site-specific public mural pieces and his gallery works.</div> <div style="text-align: justify;" align="justify">&nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: justify;">Renowned for his experimentally surreal and colorfully vibrant imagery, Curiot creates visual worlds with an anthropological suggestion. Simultaneously ancient and contemporary, they're inspired by Mexican folklore, handicraft traditions, textiles, and patterns. His larger-than-life sensibility often borders on the abstract, as he combines the human and the animal into awe-worthy aggregates. Ambiguously totemic and ancestral, the works have been known to explore the primal coexistence, and contention, of the human and natural worlds. An advocate for the preservation and respect of this tenuous balance, Curiot has created a mythological shorthand with a wealth of characters and recurring symbols, immediately recognizable as his own.</div> <div style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: justify;">In this new body of work, Curiot explores transition and metaphysical passage, working intentionally within a loosely defined future tense. In this dizzying new quasi-futuristic realm, the mythological creatures of his self-devised mythology have passed on, transmogrified, and are reincarnated as depictions of deities and icons for worship. Exploring both loss and expulsion, metamorphosis and inheritance, Curiot offers a labyrinthine splitting of worlds and paths.</div> <div style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: justify;"><em>The breaking of light will offer first site of the path within paths, at times intertwined or straight, split into two or three or four, hidden exits and glowing welcomes. As some tunnels cave in behind you, one may think, what if? But does it really matter, each road that one takes is that of the unknown; unexplored experiences which build upon a dream, a dream we all share, that slowly unravels within our time. The mirage will remain for others to probe, vanity fades, knowledge transfers, we wake once again to another bright door.</em><em>- CURIOT</em></div> <div style="text-align: justify;"><em>&nbsp;</em></div> <div style="text-align: justify;"> <div><em>Act 1: Warped Passage</em>&nbsp;will feature a collection of new paintings, two new digital editions, an adventurous installation component, including musical accompaniment from Franz (Pira MD Records) as well as an offsite mural completed for the RFK Schools project via Branded Arts.</div> </div> Mon, 23 May 2016 16:21:00 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list Sam Gilliam - David Kordansky Gallery - June 4th - July 9th <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <table style="color: #222222; font-family: 'Century Schoolbook Mono', 'Courier New', Courier, monospace; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px;" border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" align="center"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">David Kordansky Gallery is very pleased to announce&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Green April</span>, an exhibition of major large-scale paintings by Sam Gilliam from the late 1960s and early 1970s. The show will open on&nbsp;<span class="aBn" style="border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: dashed; border-bottom-color: #cccccc; position: relative; top: -2px; z-index: 0;" data-term="goog_750784098"><span class="aQJ" style="position: relative; top: 2px; z-index: -1;">June 4</span></span>&nbsp;and remain on view through&nbsp;<span class="aBn" style="border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: dashed; border-bottom-color: #cccccc; position: relative; top: -2px; z-index: 0;" data-term="goog_750784099"><span class="aQJ" style="position: relative; top: 2px; z-index: -1;">July 9, 2016</span></span>. An opening reception will be held on&nbsp;<span class="aBn" style="border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: dashed; border-bottom-color: #cccccc; position: relative; top: -2px; z-index: 0;" data-term="goog_750784100"><span class="aQJ" style="position: relative; top: 2px; z-index: -1;">Saturday, June 4</span></span>&nbsp;from&nbsp;<span class="aBn" style="border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: dashed; border-bottom-color: #cccccc; position: relative; top: -2px; z-index: 0;" data-term="goog_750784101"><span class="aQJ" style="position: relative; top: 2px; z-index: -1;">6:00pm until 8:00pm</span></span>.</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Sam Gilliam is one of the key figures in postwar and contemporary American art. Emerging from the Washington, D.C. scene in the mid 1960s with works that both elaborated upon and disrupted the ethos of Color School painting, he has subsequently pursued a wide-ranging, pioneering course in which improvisation and experimentation have been the only constants.<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Green April</span>&nbsp;focuses on works executed during a crucial period in the artist's development, one in which he began to make the iconic Beveled-edge and Drape paintings for which he is best known. These works feature a number of striking formal advances, but their radicality also hinges upon the fact that they were made in dialogue with the profound social shifts that were taking place at the time. Most of the works on view have remained in Gilliam's studio since their creation and have never before been exhibited.</span></p> <table style="color: #222222; font-family: 'Century Schoolbook Mono', 'Courier New', Courier, monospace; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px;" border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" align="center"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">The Beveled-edge paintings (or Slice paintings, as they were also called) that Gilliam started to produce in 1967 were quickly recognized by critics as a breakthrough body of work. By pouring acrylic paints onto a length of canvas and then folding it over on itself while still wet, or vice versa, he created prismatic spatial effects and unexpected color combinations, pushing the brushless staining and soaking techniques also employed by artists like Thomas Downing, Morris Louis, and Kenneth Noland to a newly lyrical extreme. He then stretched the canvas on a beveled frame, so that the painting appeared to emerge from the wall on which it was hung. This sculptural extension established a physically immediate and active connection with the viewer, who now approached not a flat picture plane but a dimensional and bodily one.</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Green April</span>'s title is borrowed from a monumental Beveled-edge painting from 1969. Over twenty feet wide and eight feet tall, it represents Gilliam at his most ambitious and exploratory. Its panoramic landscape format and ethereal palette channels the immersive optical richness of Monet's&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Water Lilies</span>. While dominant art historical narratives hail those hallmarks of Impressionism as gateways to a modernist realm of pure abstraction, one in which painting exists as a standalone, idealized mode of discourse, Gilliam's work engages the body as well as the eye.&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Green April</span>&nbsp;is a decidedly volumetric object; the processes, both intensely physical and material, responsible for its creation inform the way the painting is experienced as a thing in space.</span></p> <table style="color: #222222; font-family: 'Century Schoolbook Mono', 'Courier New', Courier, monospace; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px;" border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" align="center"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">With works like these Gilliam began eroding the distinction between the visual world traditionally conjured within a painting and the tangible world outside it. For an African-American artist working in the nation's capital in the late 60s, at the height of the Civil Rights Movement, this was not merely an aesthetic proposition. It was a way of defining art's role as a primary mode for expression in a democratic society undergoing dramatic change, and of affirming the power and relevance of non-objective painting in the widest array of cultural as well as political contexts. Gilliam increasingly embodied the idea that free, and free-ranging, expression was itself a form of engaged citizenship.</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">This idea would take dramatic new form in the Drape paintings he began to produce next in 1968, cementing his position as one of the most important formal innovators of his generation. By suspending a stretcherless, often vast length of painted canvas from the walls or ceiling of an exhibition space, Gilliam transformed both his medium and the contexts in which it was viewed. Architectural in scale, these installation-based objects both literalized the sublimity of abstract expressionism and returned painting to its archaic roots as an intervention in, or on, a particular space, be it a cave or a church or an exterior wall. In many ways this was a natural outgrowth of the experimental and embodied processes he was using to apply his pigments. It also reflected his treatment of the canvas not only as a surface or support, but as a material with its own expansive potential for plastic manipulation.</span></p> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #222222; font-size: small;">However, unlike other contemporary artists' attempts to break with the rectilinear constraints of the stretcher, the Drapes are also painterly works in the traditional sense of the word. As minimalism was beginning to exert its dominant influence as a formal language, Gilliam's unabashedly bold use of color and performative, even baroque sensibility evince his ongoing interest in the trajectory of Western painting as a discrete discipline with its own pleasures and mysteries. The works on view in this exhibition attest to the fact that the Drapes, and the Beveled-edge paintings, must also be read as standalone compositions, each of which has its own internal logic and mood. Herein lies the bracing paradox at the heart of Gilliam's project. Dismantling one of painting's basic structural foundations not only energized the medium, but also showed that the visceral experience of beauty is, figuratively and literally, an "all-over" phenomenon. Such experiences might originate within an artwork, but they are not limited to a space delimited by the edges of a canvas; they exist in a social dimension, always shared among communities of viewers, and yet simultaneously unique to each viewer alone.</span></p> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><span style="color: #222222;">Sam Gilliam (b. 1933, Tupelo, Mississippi) was the subject of a traveling retrospective organized by the Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. in 2005; over the last four decades his work has also been the subject of solo exhibitions at the J.B. Speed Memorial Museum, Louisville, Kentucky; the Whitney Museum of American Art, Philip Morris Branch, New York; The Studio Museum in Harlem, New York; and the Museum of Modern Art, New York, among many other institutions. In 1972, Gilliam exhibited his work in the group exhibition, curated by Walter Hopps, comprising the American Pavilion of the 36th Venice Biennale. Recent group exhibitions include&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #222222; font-size: 14px; text-decoration: underline;">Not New Now</span><span style="color: #222222;">, Marrakech Biennale 6, Morocco (2016);&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #222222; font-size: 14px; text-decoration: underline;">Black: Color, Material, Concept</span><span style="color: #222222;">, The Studio Museum in Harlem, New York (2015);&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #222222; font-size: 14px; text-decoration: underline;">Surface Matters</span><span style="color: #222222;">, Edward H. Linde Gallery, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (2015);&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #222222; font-size: 14px; text-decoration: underline;">Surface Tension</span><span style="color: #222222;">, The FLAG Art Foundation, New York (2015);&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #222222; font-size: 14px; text-decoration: underline;">Affecting Presence and the Pursuit of Delicious Experiences</span><span style="color: #222222;">, The Menil Collection, Houston (2015);&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #222222; font-size: 14px; text-decoration: underline;">Represent: 200 Years of African American Art</span><span style="color: #222222;">, Philadelphia Museum of Art (2015);&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #222222; font-size: 14px; text-decoration: underline;">Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties</span><span style="color: #222222;">, Brooklyn Museum, New York (2014); and&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #222222; font-size: 14px; text-decoration: underline;">A Bigger Splash: Painting after Performance</span><span style="color: #222222;">, Tate Modern, London (2012). Gilliam's work is in the collections of many prominent institutions worldwide, including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Tate Modern, London; the Art Institute of Chicago; Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, D.C.; Mus&eacute;e d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. He lives and works in Washington, D.C.</span></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <table style="color: #222222; font-family: 'Century Schoolbook Mono', 'Courier New', Courier, monospace; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px;" border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" align="center"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px;">David Kordansky Gallery is very pleased to announce&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Green April</span>, an exhibition of major large-scale paintings by Sam Gilliam from the late 1960s and early 1970s. The show will open on<span class="aBn" style="border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: dashed; border-bottom-color: #cccccc; position: relative; top: -2px; z-index: 0;" data-term="goog_750784098"><span class="aQJ" style="position: relative; top: 2px; z-index: -1;">June 4</span></span>&nbsp;and remain on view through&nbsp;<span class="aBn" style="border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: dashed; border-bottom-color: #cccccc; position: relative; top: -2px; z-index: 0;" data-term="goog_750784099"><span class="aQJ" style="position: relative; top: 2px; z-index: -1;">July 9, 2016</span></span>. An opening reception will be held on<span class="aBn" style="border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: dashed; border-bottom-color: #cccccc; position: relative; top: -2px; z-index: 0;" data-term="goog_750784100"><span class="aQJ" style="position: relative; top: 2px; z-index: -1;">Saturday, June 4</span></span>&nbsp;from&nbsp;<span class="aBn" style="border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: dashed; border-bottom-color: #cccccc; position: relative; top: -2px; z-index: 0;" data-term="goog_750784101"><span class="aQJ" style="position: relative; top: 2px; z-index: -1;">6:00pm until 8:00pm</span></span>.</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px;">Sam Gilliam is one of the key figures in postwar and contemporary American art. Emerging from the Washington, D.C. scene in the mid 1960s with works that both elaborated upon and disrupted the ethos of Color School painting, he has subsequently pursued a wide-ranging, pioneering course in which improvisation and experimentation have been the only constants.<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Green April</span>&nbsp;focuses on works executed during a crucial period in the artist's development, one in which he began to make the iconic Beveled-edge and Drape paintings for which he is best known. These works feature a number of striking formal advances, but their radicality also hinges upon the fact that they were made in dialogue with the profound social shifts that were taking place at the time. Most of the works on view have remained in Gilliam's studio since their creation and have never before been exhibited.</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px;">The Beveled-edge paintings (or Slice paintings, as they were also called) that Gilliam started to produce in 1967 were quickly recognized by critics as a breakthrough body of work. By pouring acrylic paints onto a length of canvas and then folding it over on itself while still wet, or vice versa, he created prismatic spatial effects and unexpected color combinations, pushing the brushless staining and soaking techniques also employed by artists like Thomas Downing, Morris Louis, and Kenneth Noland to a newly lyrical extreme. He then stretched the canvas on a beveled frame, so that the painting appeared to emerge from the wall on which it was hung. This sculptural extension established a physically immediate and active connection with the viewer, who now approached not a flat picture plane but a dimensional and bodily one.</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px;"><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Green April</span>'s title is borrowed from a monumental Beveled-edge painting from 1969. Over twenty feet wide and eight feet tall, it represents Gilliam at his most ambitious and exploratory. Its panoramic landscape format and ethereal palette channels the immersive optical richness of Monet's&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Water Lilies</span>. While dominant art historical narratives hail those hallmarks of Impressionism as gateways to a modernist realm of pure abstraction, one in which painting exists as a standalone, idealized mode of discourse, Gilliam's work engages the body as well as the eye.&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Green April</span>&nbsp;is a decidedly volumetric object; the processes, both intensely physical and material, responsible for its creation inform the way the painting is experienced as a thing in space.</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px;">With works like these Gilliam began eroding the distinction between the visual world traditionally conjured within a painting and the tangible world outside it. For an African-American artist working in the nation's capital in the late 60s, at the height of the Civil Rights Movement, this was not merely an aesthetic proposition. It was a way of defining art's role as a primary mode for expression in a democratic society undergoing dramatic change, and of affirming the power and relevance of non-objective painting in the widest array of cultural as well as political contexts. Gilliam increasingly embodied the idea that free, and free-ranging, expression was itself a form of engaged citizenship.</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px;">This idea would take dramatic new form in the Drape paintings he began to produce next in 1968, cementing his position as one of the most important formal innovators of his generation. By suspending a stretcherless, often vast length of painted canvas from the walls or ceiling of an exhibition space, Gilliam transformed both his medium and the contexts in which it was viewed. Architectural in scale, these installation-based objects both literalized the sublimity of abstract expressionism and returned painting to its archaic roots as an intervention in, or on, a particular space, be it a cave or a church or an exterior wall. In many ways this was a natural outgrowth of the experimental and embodied processes he was using to apply his pigments. It also reflected his treatment of the canvas not only as a surface or support, but as a material with its own expansive potential for plastic manipulation.</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px;">However, unlike other contemporary artists' attempts to break with the rectilinear constraints of the stretcher, the Drapes are also painterly works in the traditional sense of the word. As minimalism was beginning to exert its dominant influence as a formal language, Gilliam's unabashedly bold use of color and performative, even baroque sensibility evince his ongoing interest in the trajectory of Western painting as a discrete discipline with its own pleasures and mysteries. The works on view in this exhibition attest to the fact that the Drapes, and the Beveled-edge paintings, must also be read as standalone compositions, each of which has its own internal logic and mood. Herein lies the bracing paradox at the heart of Gilliam's project. Dismantling one of painting's basic structural foundations not only energized the medium, but also showed that the visceral experience of beauty is, figuratively and literally, an "all-over" phenomenon. Such experiences might originate within an artwork, but they are not limited to a space delimited by the edges of a canvas; they exist in a social dimension, always shared among communities of viewers, and yet simultaneously unique to each viewer alone.</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px;">Sam Gilliam (b. 1933, Tupelo, Mississippi) was the subject of a traveling retrospective organized by the Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. in 2005; over the last four decades his work has also been the subject of solo exhibitions at the J.B. Speed Memorial Museum, Louisville, Kentucky; the Whitney Museum of American Art, Philip Morris Branch, New York; The Studio Museum in Harlem, New York; and the Museum of Modern Art, New York, among many other institutions. In 1972, Gilliam exhibited his work in the group exhibition, curated by Walter Hopps, comprising the American Pavilion of the 36th Venice Biennale. Recent group exhibitions include&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Not New Now</span>, Marrakech Biennale 6, Morocco (2016);&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Black: Color, Material, Concept</span>, The Studio Museum in Harlem, New York (2015);&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Surface Matters</span>, Edward H. Linde Gallery, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (2015);&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Surface Tension</span>, The FLAG Art Foundation, New York (2015);&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Affecting Presence and the Pursuit of Delicious Experiences</span>, The Menil Collection, Houston (2015);&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Represent: 200 Years of African American Art</span>, Philadelphia Museum of Art (2015);&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties</span>, Brooklyn Museum, New York (2014); and&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">A Bigger Splash: Painting after Performance</span>, Tate Modern, London (2012). Gilliam's work is in the collections of many prominent institutions worldwide, including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Tate Modern, London; the Art Institute of Chicago; Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, D.C.; Mus&eacute;e d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. He lives and works in Washington, D.C.</p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Mon, 23 May 2016 16:16:57 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list Valentin Carron - David Kordansky Gallery - June 4th - July 9th <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <table style="color: #222222; font-family: 'Century Schoolbook Mono', 'Courier New', Courier, monospace; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px;" border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" align="center"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px;"><span style="font-size: small;">David Kordansky Gallery is very pleased to announce&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">A comb a hole</span>, an exhibition of new work by Valentin Carron. The show will open on&nbsp;<span class="aBn" style="border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: dashed; border-bottom-color: #cccccc; position: relative; top: -2px; z-index: 0;" data-term="goog_750784090"><span class="aQJ" style="position: relative; top: 2px; z-index: -1;">June 4</span></span>&nbsp;and remain on view through&nbsp;<span class="aBn" style="border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: dashed; border-bottom-color: #cccccc; position: relative; top: -2px; z-index: 0;" data-term="goog_750784091"><span class="aQJ" style="position: relative; top: 2px; z-index: -1;">July 9, 2016</span></span>. An opening reception will be held on&nbsp;<span class="aBn" style="border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: dashed; border-bottom-color: #cccccc; position: relative; top: -2px; z-index: 0;" data-term="goog_750784092"><span class="aQJ" style="position: relative; top: 2px; z-index: -1;">Saturday, June 4</span></span>&nbsp;from&nbsp;<span class="aBn" style="border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: dashed; border-bottom-color: #cccccc; position: relative; top: -2px; z-index: 0;" data-term="goog_750784093"><span class="aQJ" style="position: relative; top: 2px; z-index: -1;">6:00pm until 8:00pm</span></span>.</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Valentin Carron's sculptures, installations, and paintings inhabit the world as recreated ready-mades. Drawing from iconography associated with his own native Switzerland, he meticulously recreates characteristic local forms, often substituting one material for another, and generating unexpected compositional complexity from otherwise mute or overlooked objects. In so doing, he infuses the ordinary and the mundane with humor, melancholy, and poetry.&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">A comb a hole</span>features a new body of pedestal-based bronze sculptures and a stealthily dramatic installation that alters the gallery's space.</span></p> <table style="color: #222222; font-family: 'Century Schoolbook Mono', 'Courier New', Courier, monospace; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px;" border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" align="center"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Working from photographs taken of seemingly random sections of pavement, asphalt, flooring, and sewer grates in his hometown of Sully in southwest Switzerland, Carron has created flat, slab-like objects designed to be viewed from above. Beginning with clay, he forms each of the elements by hand before casting the composition in bronze and then painting it. The sculptures capture, by way of relief, the patterns in surfaces that often go unnoticed because they are underfoot. Many also feature sculptural representations of the kinds of things that end up on the ground in a municipal environment; these include stylized renditions of banana peels, fallen French fries, and hardware that might have dropped into the wet concrete before it set.</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Installed on pedestals arranged in the gallery according to a slightly irregular grid, in their totality the sculptures exist as an austere field of monuments to the quotidian. These are depictions of daily life at its most drab and banal, and yet they bristle with surreal juxtapositions and a stoic comedy, suggesting that even the ground we stand upon can be raised up for contemplation and reflection. Since the viewer is still required to look down to see them, however, they also skewer the very notion of tabletop sculpture, performing as both the flat tabletop and the object that rests upon it. At the same time, this flatness also allows them to be read as if they were horizontal paintings, or hybrid works occupying an intermediate spatial dimension between the second and the third. Subtle textures and color shifts play out from one sculpture to the next, drawing the eye toward minor distinctions that take on exponentially increasing significance as the viewer navigates the installation.</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">An emphasis on surface detail can be identified as a common theme throughout Carron's practice. Regardless of the materials he uses in any given body of work, he revels in their plainness and the aesthetic interest they offer in a relatively unadorned state. While his matter-of-fact attitude is indebted in part to minimalist art historical examples, it also speaks to a certain punk-like aesthetic and his interest in homage as a form of both affection and critique. In&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">A comb a hole</span>&nbsp;this is also exemplified in the way the sculptures have been painted. Carron uses industrial paints (colors are selected from a pre-existing chart), and applies them, in what is at once an off-handed gesture and a careful assessment of the innate properties of both the bronze and the paint, using an uninflected series of broad strokes, sometimes allowing the finish of the bronze to show through. In several instances, variously shaped holes in the bronzes reveal identically shaped openings in the tops of their pedestals; together the apertures function like momentary eruptions of the abyss, breaking any conceptual fourth wall that might exist between the ideal space of the art object and the tangible space of the exhibition itself.</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">These ruptures find an eerie parallel in two eye-shaped holes that seem to observe the sculptures, as well as their viewers, from high up in one of the gallery's walls. The "eyes" are the result of an elaborate and carefully constructed intervention. An entirely new wall has been built in front of the existing one, and the holes themselves are lined with concrete forms that subtly differentiate their perimeter from the plaster that surrounds them; even the surface of the wall behind the holes has been painted black, as if to further accentuate the overriding power of negative space. Inspired by similar openings found in the walls of European village architecture, the installation both invites and thwarts the desire to look beyond what is right in front of us. As in much of Carron's work, this dynamic has broader cultural implications--in a world of widespread globalization, local things are exposed to a universal gaze, but they also get harder to see.</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">In 2013, Valentin Carron (b. 1977, Martigny, Switzerland) represented Switzerland at the 55th Venice Biennale. He has also been the subject of solo exhibitions at numerous institutions worldwide, including Overbeck Gesellschaft, L&uuml;beck, Germany (2015); Kunsthalle Bern, Switzerland (2014); Fondation Louis Moret, Martigny, Switzerland (2014); Palais de Tokyo, Paris (2010); Centro de Arte Contempor&aacute;neo La Conserva, Ceuti, Spain (2009); Kunsthalle Z&uuml;rich, Switzerland (2007); Swiss Institute, New York (2006); and, with Mai-Thu Perret, Chisenhale Gallery, London (2006). Recent group exhibitions include&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Wanderlust</span>, High Line, New York (2016);&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Elevation 1049: Between Heaven and Hell</span>, LUMA Foundation, Gstaad, Switzerland (2014);&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Alone Together</span>, Rubell Family Collection, Miami (2013);&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Lost (in LA)</span>, presented by FLAX, Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery, Barnsdall Park, Los Angeles (2012);&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Le jeunesse est un art</span>, Jubil&auml;um Manor Kunstpreis, Aargauer Kunsthaus, Aarau, Switzerland (2012);&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">The World as Will and Wallpaper</span>, Le Consortium, Dijon, France (2012); and&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">The New Public</span>, MUSEION of Modern and Contemporary Art, Bolzano, Italy (2012). Carron lives and works in Martigny, Switzerland.</span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <table style="color: #222222; font-family: 'Century Schoolbook Mono', 'Courier New', Courier, monospace; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px;" border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" align="center"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px;">David Kordansky Gallery is very pleased to announce&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">A comb a hole</span>, an exhibition of new work by Valentin Carron. The show will open on&nbsp;<span class="aBn" style="border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: dashed; border-bottom-color: #cccccc; position: relative; top: -2px; z-index: 0;" data-term="goog_750784090"><span class="aQJ" style="position: relative; top: 2px; z-index: -1;">June 4</span></span>&nbsp;and remain on view through&nbsp;<span class="aBn" style="border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: dashed; border-bottom-color: #cccccc; position: relative; top: -2px; z-index: 0;" data-term="goog_750784091"><span class="aQJ" style="position: relative; top: 2px; z-index: -1;">July 9, 2016</span></span>. An opening reception will be held on&nbsp;<span class="aBn" style="border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: dashed; border-bottom-color: #cccccc; position: relative; top: -2px; z-index: 0;" data-term="goog_750784092"><span class="aQJ" style="position: relative; top: 2px; z-index: -1;">Saturday, June 4</span></span>&nbsp;from&nbsp;<span class="aBn" style="border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: dashed; border-bottom-color: #cccccc; position: relative; top: -2px; z-index: 0;" data-term="goog_750784093"><span class="aQJ" style="position: relative; top: 2px; z-index: -1;">6:00pm until 8:00pm</span></span>.</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px;">Valentin Carron's sculptures, installations, and paintings inhabit the world as recreated ready-mades. Drawing from iconography associated with his own native Switzerland, he meticulously recreates characteristic local forms, often substituting one material for another, and generating unexpected compositional complexity from otherwise mute or overlooked objects. In so doing, he infuses the ordinary and the mundane with humor, melancholy, and poetry.&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">A comb a hole</span>features a new body of pedestal-based bronze sculptures and a stealthily dramatic installation that alters the gallery's space.</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px;">Working from photographs taken of seemingly random sections of pavement, asphalt, flooring, and sewer grates in his hometown of Sully in southwest Switzerland, Carron has created flat, slab-like objects designed to be viewed from above. Beginning with clay, he forms each of the elements by hand before casting the composition in bronze and then painting it. The sculptures capture, by way of relief, the patterns in surfaces that often go unnoticed because they are underfoot. Many also feature sculptural representations of the kinds of things that end up on the ground in a municipal environment; these include stylized renditions of banana peels, fallen French fries, and hardware that might have dropped into the wet concrete before it set.</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px;">Installed on pedestals arranged in the gallery according to a slightly irregular grid, in their totality the sculptures exist as an austere field of monuments to the quotidian. These are depictions of daily life at its most drab and banal, and yet they bristle with surreal juxtapositions and a stoic comedy, suggesting that even the ground we stand upon can be raised up for contemplation and reflection. Since the viewer is still required to look down to see them, however, they also skewer the very notion of tabletop sculpture, performing as both the flat tabletop and the object that rests upon it. At the same time, this flatness also allows them to be read as if they were horizontal paintings, or hybrid works occupying an intermediate spatial dimension between the second and the third. Subtle textures and color shifts play out from one sculpture to the next, drawing the eye toward minor distinctions that take on exponentially increasing significance as the viewer navigates the installation.</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px;">An emphasis on surface detail can be identified as a common theme throughout Carron's practice. Regardless of the materials he uses in any given body of work, he revels in their plainness and the aesthetic interest they offer in a relatively unadorned state. While his matter-of-fact attitude is indebted in part to minimalist art historical examples, it also speaks to a certain punk-like aesthetic and his interest in homage as a form of both affection and critique. In&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">A comb a hole</span>&nbsp;this is also exemplified in the way the sculptures have been painted. Carron uses industrial paints (colors are selected from a pre-existing chart), and applies them, in what is at once an off-handed gesture and a careful assessment of the innate properties of both the bronze and the paint, using an uninflected series of broad strokes, sometimes allowing the finish of the bronze to show through. In several instances, variously shaped holes in the bronzes reveal identically shaped openings in the tops of their pedestals; together the apertures function like momentary eruptions of the abyss, breaking any conceptual fourth wall that might exist between the ideal space of the art object and the tangible space of the exhibition itself.</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px;">These ruptures find an eerie parallel in two eye-shaped holes that seem to observe the sculptures, as well as their viewers, from high up in one of the gallery's walls. The "eyes" are the result of an elaborate and carefully constructed intervention. An entirely new wall has been built in front of the existing one, and the holes themselves are lined with concrete forms that subtly differentiate their perimeter from the plaster that surrounds them; even the surface of the wall behind the holes has been painted black, as if to further accentuate the overriding power of negative space. Inspired by similar openings found in the walls of European village architecture, the installation both invites and thwarts the desire to look beyond what is right in front of us. As in much of Carron's work, this dynamic has broader cultural implications--in a world of widespread globalization, local things are exposed to a universal gaze, but they also get harder to see.</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px;">In 2013, Valentin Carron (b. 1977, Martigny, Switzerland) represented Switzerland at the 55th Venice Biennale. He has also been the subject of solo exhibitions at numerous institutions worldwide, including Overbeck Gesellschaft, L&uuml;beck, Germany (2015); Kunsthalle Bern, Switzerland (2014); Fondation Louis Moret, Martigny, Switzerland (2014); Palais de Tokyo, Paris (2010); Centro de Arte Contempor&aacute;neo La Conserva, Ceuti, Spain (2009); Kunsthalle Z&uuml;rich, Switzerland (2007); Swiss Institute, New York (2006); and, with Mai-Thu Perret, Chisenhale Gallery, London (2006). Recent group exhibitions include&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Wanderlust</span>, High Line, New York (2016);&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Elevation 1049: Between Heaven and Hell</span>, LUMA Foundation, Gstaad, Switzerland (2014);&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Alone Together</span>, Rubell Family Collection, Miami (2013);&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Lost (in LA)</span>, presented by FLAX, Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery, Barnsdall Park, Los Angeles (2012);&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Le jeunesse est un art</span>, Jubil&auml;um Manor Kunstpreis, Aargauer Kunsthaus, Aarau, Switzerland (2012);&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">The World as Will and Wallpaper</span>, Le Consortium, Dijon, France (2012); and&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">The New Public</span>, MUSEION of Modern and Contemporary Art, Bolzano, Italy (2012). Carron lives and works in Martigny, Switzerland.</p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Mon, 23 May 2016 16:13:05 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list Uta Barth, Heather Cleary, John Divola, Marten Elder, Peter Holzhauer, Owen Kydd, Jeff Wall, James Welling - Tif Sigfrids - May 28th - July 2nd <p style="text-align: justify;">an opening in an otherwise solid, opaque surface, through which light can pass.<br /><br />an opening in a wall, door, roof or vehicle that allows the passage of light and, if not closed or sealed, air and sound.<br /><br />an opening in the wall or roof of a building or vehicle that is fitted with glass or other transparent material in a frame to admit light or air and allow people to see out.<br /><br />an interval or opportunity for action.<br /><br />an opening in a wall, door, etc., that usually contains a sheet of glass.<br /><br />an opening especially in the wall of a building for admission of light and air that is usually closed by casements or sashes containing transparent material (as glass) and capable of being opened and shut.<br /><br />an opening (as a shutter, slot, or valve) that resembles or suggests a window.<br /><br />any of various rectangular boxes appearing on a computer screen that display files or program output, that can usually be moved and resized, and that facilitate multitasking.<br /><br />The window is a constant subject in the history of photography both literally and figuratively. Light can pass through a window and/or be reflected off of it. A window can separate two spaces in three dimensions or combine them in two dimensions (image). It can frame a view or obscure it entirely. A window is a photographic cliche. The window is a viewfinder to the world and a picture of a window is a picture of photography itself.</p> Mon, 23 May 2016 16:08:09 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list - C.A.V.E. Gallery - May 22nd - June 19th <div align="left">C.A.V.E. GALLERY PRESENTS OUR</div> <div align="left"> <div><strong><br /><em>8 YEAR ANNIVERSARY EXHIBITION</em></strong></div> <div><br />in conjunction with:</div> <strong>THE ANNUAL VENICE ARTWALK</strong> <div> <div><em>PLUS:<strong>&nbsp;Venice Duck Brewery&nbsp;</strong>Pop-Up Beer Tasting!</em><br />Beats by Resident DJ Bu$R1D3R</div> <div><strong>Sunday May 22</strong><strong><em><br /></em></strong></div> <em><strong>11am - 6pm&nbsp;- at the gallery</strong><br /></em></div> <br /> <div><em>Please join us to celebrate!<br /><br /></em>Exhibition is on view thru&nbsp;June 19, 2016</div> </div> Mon, 23 May 2016 15:56:50 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list Frank J. Stockton - Samuel Freeman - May 21st - June 25th <p class="size-15" style="text-align: justify;">Samuel Freeman is pleased to present&nbsp;<strong>Frank J. Stockton&rsquo;s</strong>&nbsp;debut solo exhibition,&nbsp;<em>True Believers</em>,&nbsp;opening May 21st, 2016. Pairing new, large-scale paintings with recent smaller works on paper and canvas, the exhibition will represent the focus of Stockton&rsquo;s practice since graduating from UCLA&rsquo;s Graduate Fine Arts Program in 2015.</p> <div style="text-align: justify;">Stockton&rsquo;s energetic paintings build upon disparate mythologies, combining elements of Western religion with literary symbolism and historical events into a singular narrative language. These amoral allegories are meditations upon the genesis of myth and memory.&nbsp; When the primary subject, a male figure comically nude but for a superhero&rsquo;s cape, strides off with a naked woman slung over his shoulder, it is left unresolved whether the act is one of abduction or salvation. Unlike the singleminded crusaders of popular fiction, Stockton&rsquo;s shambling &Uuml;bermensch is perpetually caught between morality and depravity.&nbsp; <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">The cadmium red mark employed in all of Stockton&rsquo;s recent work evokes blood and passion,&nbsp;predisposing&nbsp;an impression of quick and facile work.&nbsp; To the contrary, when engaged in person it is visibly clear that each mark has been debated, questioned, and quickly painted over if found wanting.&nbsp; The scarred and layered surfaces that result are an act of revelation, not hiding.&nbsp; Their sophistication is balanced with vulgarity, strength tied to fragility, morality tempered with corruption. De Kooning-esque surfaces slowly reveal tired, huddled masses and amorous antagonists, while bouncing pink phalluses denounce and venerate their own symbolic meaning. Exposing the unstretched canvas edges,&nbsp;these paintings openly carry the&nbsp;indexes of their&nbsp;making, the&nbsp;rough&nbsp;cuts and imperfections&nbsp;physically acknowledging&nbsp;the frailties of Stockton&rsquo;s subjects. Collectively, the works invite the viewer to look past the fictionalized, and indeed artificial, contrast between good and evil&nbsp;to contemplate the inherently subjective ambiguity of these primal forces that link our histories, our stories and our selves.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Frank J. Stockton was born in Santa Ana, California in 1980. He received his MFA from the University of California, Los Angeles and his BFA from Art Center College of Design, Pasadena, CA. He was a recipient of the UCLA Graduate Fellowship as well as the Lorser Feitelson &amp; Helen Lundberg Feitelson Arts Foundation Award. In 2015 Stockton participated in a residency at the Skowhegan School of Painting &amp; Sculpture, in Skowhegan, ME. Notable exhibitions include&nbsp;<em>INSIDE/OUTSIDE: Works from the</em>Skowhegan Archives, curated by Michelle Grabner at Skowhegan (Waterville, ME),&nbsp;<em>TOP COAT</em>, Curated by Roger Herman at The Pit (Glendale, CA) and&nbsp;<em>The Status of Portraiture</em>, Curated by Grant Vetter at Autonomie Projects (Los Angeles, CA). He currently lives and works in Los Angeles, CA.</p> </div> Mon, 23 May 2016 15:52:18 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list Kate Groobey - Redling Fine Art - May 26th - July 9th Mon, 23 May 2016 11:38:09 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list Sam Lipp, Anna Rosen, Chloe Seibert, Nelson Sullivan, Alexandra Noel, Andy Robert - Night Gallery - May 28th - June 25th <p style="text-align: justify;">Night Gallery is proud&nbsp;to present&nbsp;<em>Aunt Nancy</em>, an exhibition of work by Alexandra Noel, Andy Robert, Anna Rosen, Chloe Seibert, Nelson Sullivan, and Sam Lipp.&nbsp;<em>Aunt&nbsp;Nancy</em>&nbsp;is titled after the aunt&nbsp;of Nelson Sullivan, whose prolific video practice documented his life and friends in downtown New York in&nbsp;the 1980s, as well as visits to his hometown of Kershaw,&nbsp;South Carolina, where Nancy lived.<br /><br />Aunt Nancy&nbsp;appears&nbsp;in many of&nbsp;Sullivan's videos, presented as a simultaneously sympathetic, strong, and vulnerable figure.&nbsp;The works included in the exhibition were&nbsp;created from personal&nbsp;memories, found photographs,&nbsp;knick knacks, and the art of storytelling.&nbsp;Nelson&nbsp;Sullivan's portrayal of Aunt Nancy embodies a number of interpersonal dynamics underlying the works in the show:&nbsp;parent to child, adult self to childhood memory, and self to home&mdash;that is, the hometown you find yourself in versus the home that you make for yourself as an adult.&nbsp;</p> <div style="text-align: justify;"> <div><strong>Sam Lipp</strong>&nbsp;was born in 1989, and lives and works in New York. Recent exhibitions include X Bienal de Nicaragua, Managua; Balice Hertling, Paris; Ellis King, Dublin; &Eacute;ric Hussenot, Paris;&nbsp;Central Fine, Miami; Neochrome, Turin; Bodega, New York; and Arcadia Missa, London. Lipp is also the co-director of Queer Thoughts, a gallery in NYC.</div> </div> <div style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Anna Rosen</strong>&nbsp;was born in&nbsp;1984 in&nbsp;Arlington, VA, and&nbsp;received her BFA from RISD in 2006 and her MFA from Columbia University in 2010. Rosen has been included in exhibitions at Silberkuppe, Berlin; and at Murray Guy, American Medium, and Derek Eller Gallery, New York.&nbsp;In 2016, she will have a solo exhibition at Kerry Schuss, New York, and will also be included in exhibitions at Lyles &amp; King, New York, and at Night Gallery, Los Angeles.&nbsp;She had a two-person exhibition with the artist John Miller at Malraux's Place, Brooklyn, in 2014, and a solo exhibition at Night Gallery in 2013.&nbsp;Rosen is based in New York.<br /><br /><strong>Chloe Seibert</strong>&nbsp;was born in New York in 1989, and&nbsp;lives and works in Chicago.&nbsp;Recent exhibitions include Balice Hertling, Paris; Efrain Lopez, Chicago; American Medium, Brooklyn;&nbsp; COOPER COLE, Toronto; and Atlanta Contemporary. Upcoming exhibitions include Queer Thoughts, New York; and Courtney Blades, Chicago.&nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: justify;"><br /><strong>Nelson Sullivan</strong>&nbsp;was born in 1948 in Kershaw, SC, and&nbsp;lived in New York during the 1980s, where he documented the now-legendary Downtown scene in a prolific and seminal body of videos. His work has been featured in numerous film festivals in the United States and Europe, and has also been shown in museum and gallery exhibitions, most recently&nbsp;Greater New York&nbsp;at MoMA P.S.1 in 2015-16. Sullivan&nbsp;died in New York on July 4, 1989.&nbsp;<br />&nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Alexandra Noel</strong>&nbsp;was born in&nbsp;1989, and&nbsp;lives and works in Los Angeles. Recent exhibitions include Bodega, New York; Neochrome, Turin; Hester, New York; and Shanaynay, Paris. Her first book&nbsp;By Rote&nbsp;was published by Holoholo Books in 2015.</div> <div> <div style="text-align: justify;"><br /><strong>Andy Robert</strong>&nbsp;was born in 1984 in Les Cayes, Haiti, and received his MFA from California Institute of the Arts in 2011. He attended the Whitney Independent Study Program in 2014-2015, and in summer of 2016 will attend Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture. Robert has exhibited at the Bienal de las Fronteras (Instituto Tamaulipeco para la Cultura y las Artes) in Tamaulipas, Mexico, Papillion Art in Los Angeles, Dimensions Variable in Miami, and the Studio Museum in Harlem, New York.&nbsp;Robert is a recipient of the Rema Hort Mann Foundation Grant, and he is based in Los Angeles.&nbsp;</div> </div> Mon, 23 May 2016 16:10:19 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list Patrick Jackson - François Ghebaly Gallery - June 11th - July 30th Mon, 23 May 2016 08:30:11 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list Neïl Beloufa - François Ghebaly Gallery - June 11th - July 30th Mon, 23 May 2016 08:29:50 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list John Mills - Rosamund Felsen Gallery - June 4th - July 3rd <p style="text-align: justify;">Engaging in their complexity and enigmatic in their elusiveness,&nbsp;<strong>John Mills</strong>&nbsp;shows his most recent large and small scale graphite and oil paintings on canvas with&nbsp;<strong>Rosamund Felsen Gallery</strong>. Anxious marks, confident jots and sinewy lines intersect with cautious smudges, discrete scoring and self-aware shading to yield subtle, assertive, visual and psychological innuendos. Forms referencing figuration fade in and materialize out of misty atmospheric backgrounds, as deliberate color and implied denotations allude to portraits, landscapes or still lifes. As visual reflections on identity and consciousness, these abstract paintings illuminate how perception is shaped by the subjectivity of the mind and its fleeting memories and experiences.<br />&nbsp;<br /><br /><em>Born in Kent, England, John Mills now lives and works in Los Angeles. &nbsp;In 1995, he received his BFA in Painting at the University of Florida and his MFA in Painting and Drawing at the California College of Arts and Crafts, San Francisco in 1999. He was &nbsp;honored with the Barclay Simpson Award in 1999, the Rema Hort Mann Foundation YoYoYo Grant in 2013, and most recently the Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant in 2016. His one artist exhibitions in Los Angeles include: Acuna-Hansen Gallery, WEEKEND, and P&Oslash;ST. His group exhibitions include: Contra Costa College in San Pablo, CA; Armory Center for the Arts, Pasadena; Feature, NY; Torrance Art Museum; Claremont Graduate University; Thomas Solomon Gallery, Los Angeles; an exhibition curated by Daniel Weinberg at ACME; Charlie James Gallery, Los Angeles; San Francisco State University; and the Guggenheim Gallery, Chapman University, Orange, CA. Additionally, his artwork is in the J.P Morgan Chase Contemporary Art Collection. He has been represented by Rosamund Felsen Gallery since 2014.</em></p> Mon, 23 May 2016 08:27:55 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list Justine Kurland - Kayne Griffin Corcoran - June 4th - July 30th Mon, 23 May 2016 08:23:54 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list DEANNA THOMPSON - Kayne Griffin Corcoran - June 4th - July 30th Mon, 23 May 2016 08:23:38 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list - 1301PE - May 19th - May 21st <p style="line-height: 1.5em; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; vertical-align: baseline; margin: 0px 0px 1.3em; padding: 0px; text-align: justify;" align="left">Join us Thursday night for a reception of SASSAS' Bootleg LP Auction Redux at 1301PE!</p> <p style="line-height: 1.5em; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; vertical-align: baseline; margin: 0px 0px 1.3em; padding: 0px; text-align: justify;" align="left">Participating artists:&nbsp;<br />Basma Alsharif, Dave Bailey Miyoshi Barosh, Cindy Bernard, Michael Bevilacqua, Josh Blackwell, Brian Bress, Joshua Callaghan, Enrique Castrejon, Jane Chafin, York Chang, Greg Colson, Jeff Colson, Matt Connolly, Meg Cranston, Aaron Curry, Dave Deany, Steve DeGroodt, Tomory Dodge, Sid M. Due&ntilde;as, David P. Earle, Nancy Evans, Paul W. Evans, Founding Fathers: Alexander Collins &amp; Kelly Wall, Janice Gomez, Dan Goodsell, Alexandra Grant, Todd Gray, Phyllis Green, Kio Griffith, Katie Grinnan, Doug Harvey, Drew Heitzler, Andrea Hidalgo, Patrick Hill, Stephen Hillenburg, Fatima Hoang, Dave Hughes, Marianne Hurum, Charles Irvin, Pam Jorden, John Knuth, Alice K&ouml;nitz, David Korty, Maxwell Krivitzky, Friedrich Kunath, Tom Lawson, Won Ju Lim, Karen Lofgren, Charles Long, Chris Martin, Heather Gwen Martin, Daniel Mendel-Black, Adam Miller, Denis Morella, Brian Moss, Davida Nemeroff, Alison O'Daniel, Stanislav Orlovski, Juliana Paciulli, John Pearson, M.A. Peers, Ave Pildas, Joe Potts, Jon Pylypchuk, Brian Randolph, Heather Rasmussen, Jessica Rath, David Schafer, Jim Shaw, Francesco X Siqueiros, Susan Sironi, Barbara T. Smith, Juliana Snapper with Paula Cronan, LeRoy Stevens, Dani Tull, Frohawk Two Feathers, Tyler Vlahovich, Benjamin Weissman, Alexandra Wiesenfeld, Chris Wilder, B. Wurtz, Eric Yanker, HK Zamani, Jody Zellen</p> <p style="line-height: 1.5em; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; vertical-align: baseline; margin: 0px 0px 1.3em; padding: 0px; text-align: justify;" align="left"><a style="color: #3693cc; word-break: break-word;" href="https://sable.godaddy.com/click?id=45953.40463.151.1.52be726872b7ee4fb84103bb9593cd25" target="_blank">More information on the auction here.</a>&nbsp;Bidding continues online until&nbsp;<span class="aBn" style="border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: dashed; border-bottom-color: #cccccc; position: relative; top: -2px; z-index: 0;" data-term="goog_983284554"><span class="aQJ" style="position: relative; top: 2px; z-index: -1;">7 pm</span></span>&nbsp;on Sunday May 22.</p> <table style="color: #222222; font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12.8px; border-collapse: collapse; border-spacing: 0px; margin: auto; border-style: none; border-width: 0px;" width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px; clear: both; padding: 0px;" align="left" width="530"> <h2 style="line-height: 1.2em; color: #333333; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 36px; margin: 10px 0px; padding: 0px;" align="left">SASSAS Bootleg LP Auction Redux at 1301PE</h2> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Mon, 23 May 2016 08:18:04 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list