ArtSlant - Openings & events http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/show en-us 40 - Human Resources - May 29th 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM <div style="text-align: justify;" dir="ltr">doors:&nbsp;4:30<br />performance:&nbsp;5 PM&nbsp;SHARP<br />mediated discussion:&nbsp;5:30 $10 suggested donation</div> <div style="text-align: justify;" dir="ltr">&nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><em>Song of Eurydice</em>&nbsp;is a choral / movement piece that re-envisions the Greek myth of Orpheus and Eurydice as a call to marginalized artists, emphasizing a discourse between Eurydice (mecca vazie andrews) and the deity of the underworld, Persephone (Carolyn Pennypacker Riggs). Picking up where the ancient tale left off, Eurydice descends once more into the Underworld to contemplate its infrastructure and inhabitants.&nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><br />This work-in-progress preview of Prelude + Act 1 marks the LA premiere of Sophia Cleary's REHEARSAL series. REHEARSAL, founded in 2011, is a works-in-progress performance series in which one artist or group shares their work with the opportunity to hear back from their audience. Loosely following the Liz Lerman Critical Response process, REHEARSAL provides a nurturing and structured space for feedback for artists at any stage in their process.&nbsp;<br /><br /><em>Song of Eurydice&nbsp;</em><br />choreography by mecca vazie andrews<br />libretto + score by Carolyn Pennypacker Riggs<br />costume by 69&nbsp;<br /><br /><em>Song of Eurydice</em>&nbsp;is made possible by support from the California Arts Council - Local Impact Grant, and the generous time and effort on the part of Sarah Williams / Women's Center for Creative Work.</div> Mon, 23 May 2016 07:14:07 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list Greg Curtis - Monte Vista - May 29th 3:00 PM - 7:00 PM <p style="text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><strong>Please join us for the closing reception for Greg Curtis' Event October Horizon this&nbsp;Sunday May 29th&nbsp;12-5&nbsp;pm.</strong><br /><br />&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &ldquo;Lens flare&rdquo; is a phenomena in photography and cinema that occurs when non-image forming light enters and refracts within the glass components of a camera lens before reaching the camera&rsquo;s film or digital sensor. The visible artifacts typically manifest themselves as&nbsp;starbursts, rings, or geometric shapes in a row across the image.&nbsp;These artifacts are a common obstacle in photography, usually suppressed through the use of coated lenses, hoods, and lighting technologies.&nbsp;However, the use of lens flare as a signifier of the presence of a documenting camera is suffuse within filmic culture today as a tool for lending reality to an otherwise fabricated digital world; in CGI sequences lens flare gives the illusion of a camera filming a scene that was digitally fabricated inside a computer.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><br />&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;Monte Vista Projects is proud to present&nbsp;<em>Event October Horizon</em>. Greg Curtis' exhibition is an installation of framed chromogenic prints wherein the mechanics of the camera lens itself are the sole object. With a camera pointed at a black backdrop in the artist&rsquo;s studio, a light was pointed into various lenses to produce and record isolated lens flares. The resulting images are at once diminutive and expansive: portraits of the camera&rsquo;s own machinations presented as vast extraterrestrial events. The images are paired with identically sized black monochromatic chromogenic prints that contain no information from the camera, pointing to the spaces between still images that construct cinematic sequences. The installed panorama consists of self-reflexive operations made with the fundamental apparatus of the entertainment industry, isolating and foregrounding what is usually considered at best an aesthetic flourish, and at worst an error on the part of the photographer.&nbsp;</p> Mon, 23 May 2016 16:02:21 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list - ROBERT BERMAN GALLERY B7 - May 30th 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM Mon, 30 May 2016 02:34:52 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list - Machine Project - May 31st 8:00 PM - 10:00 PM <div class="row"> <div class=" col-12 px1 px2-sm pt3-5 pb4 col-md-8 col-md-offset-2 col-lg-6 col-lg-offset-3 "> <h3 style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Machine Project presents a special Mystery Theater concert by the Mexico City based group FILERA,</span></h3> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">exploring breath, everyday sounds, and an inner and detailed exploration of human emotions through the works of Helmut Lachenmann, Ignacio Baca Lobera, Carola Bauckholt, Gerhart Muench, Hilda Paredes, and Filera&rsquo;s own works.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">FILERA is:</span><br /><span style="font-size: small;"> Carmina Escobar, voice</span><br /><span style="font-size: small;"> Natalia P&eacute;rez Turner, cello</span><br /><span style="font-size: small;"> Wilfrido Terrazas, flutes</span></p> </div> </div> Sat, 28 May 2016 16:25:45 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list Caitlin McCormack - La Luz de Jesus Gallery - June 3rd 8:00 PM - 11:00 PM <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>Lostwithall</em> is a place inhabited by the remains of familiar, yet foreign, beasts; a tenebrous forest permeated by notions&nbsp;of faded nostalgia and unaccountable loss, where memory&rsquo;s authenticity is overtaken by the incessant buckling of time.&nbsp;Creatures gnarled by the woods&rsquo; amnesia wither and decay, their skeletal forms disintegrating into delicate fibers,&nbsp;which tenaciously venture to reform themselves as impressions of commonplace objects. The works in this series are&nbsp;attempts to bind the loose ends of obscure recollections, which have nearly dissolved in the wake of memory&rsquo;s&nbsp;transmutation. Each piece embodies the remaining husk of a single experience, like a piece of string tied around one&rsquo;s&nbsp;finger for remembrance &ndash; a symbol of identity, worn as one is engulfed by the forest&rsquo;s aphotic oblivion.</p> Fri, 13 May 2016 18:33:41 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list Katherine Brannock - La Luz de Jesus Gallery - June 3rd 8:00 PM - 11:00 PM <p style="text-align: justify;">Cyclical patterns in nature maintain a captivating allure for the artist Katherine Brannock. Everything from water bodies aligning with the lunar cycle, to seasons predictably sculpting our environmental landscape, has captured her unwavering fascination and curiosity. However, this innate attraction to quantifiable changes in the physical world, finds an amusing digression when aligned with Katherine&rsquo;s transcendent, philosophical roots stemming from childhood.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">In an effort to validate the physical feelings rooted in our cycles of emotional evolution, Katherine has elected to explore the concept of Chrysopoeia in order to metaphorically articulate her observance of this, oftentimes, neglected inner experience.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Chrysopoeia was originally an Alchemical process defined as the act of transmuting a base metal into gold; but according to a more philosophical approach, Chrysopoeia could be denoted as the act of transforming the base qualities of our psychological nature into more enlightened functions. By adopting this Alchemical credo, Katherine intends to explore the birth and death of the Ego as one might examine the rise and fall of the tide.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Born and raised San Diego, California, Katherine attended Catholic School from Kindergarten on up to her graduating year of High School. This dogmatic, parish setting imbedded the language of old world religion within her psyche, while sparking an attraction to alternative forms of spiritual mysticism. The further Katherine explored the conceptual depths of otherworldly reality, the stronger her obsession grew to comprehend the degree to which these seemingly intangible influences shaped our psychological perceptions of the Ego.</p> Fri, 13 May 2016 18:34:01 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list Gea - La Luz de Jesus Gallery - June 3rd 8:00 PM - 11:00 PM Fri, 13 May 2016 18:34:22 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list Genie Melisande - La Luz de Jesus Gallery - June 3rd 8:00 PM - 11:00 PM <p style="text-align: justify;"><em><strong>Catalyst</strong></em> is an exploration of evolution in both humanity and on an individual scale. This theme continues in the vein of the Tree of Life mythology that is fundamental to cultures worldwide, and maps the evolution of cosmic energy to solid matter and the ascension of living beings to a higher plane of consciousness. In harmonizing scientific theories with the spiritual realm, this archetypal journey leads us to a crossroads and urgent questions about our next phase. The new frontier that Terry Pratchett called &ldquo;the place where the falling angel meets the rising ape&rdquo;.&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Genie M&eacute;lisande</strong> is a contemporary magic realist painter who was born in Manhattan, studied fine art in England, and is now based in Los Angeles. Throughout a nomadic upbringing that spanned over 20 countries and many different cultures, the one enduring thread has been a need to reach the heart of the human condition through art. She aims to reconcile both visible and metaphysical archetypes in ways that are new yet true, and beautiful yet challenging.</p> Fri, 13 May 2016 18:34:50 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list Ivan Comas - Steve Turner - June 3rd 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM <p class="p1">Steve Turner is pleased to present <em>After Sonora</em>, a solo exhibition of new paintings by Ivan Comas that are loosely based on the scenery of Sonora, a state in northern Mexico that Comas recently explored in depth, wandering slowly between its red and yellow desert and and its blue coastline.&nbsp;</p> Thu, 26 May 2016 20:26:02 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list Otto Berchem - Steve Turner - June 3rd 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM <p>Tropical Buren: Otto Berchem <br />June 3 &ndash; July 9, 2016 <br />Opening Reception: June 3, 7&ndash;9</p> <p>Steve Turner is pleased to present Tropical Buren, a solo exhibition by Bogot&aacute;-based Otto Berchem. The exhibition combines Berchem&rsquo;s observations of the lush tropical foliage that surrounds him in Colombia and his interest in the rigor of Daniel Buren&rsquo;s geometric paintings. Berchem's practice frequently involves the study of codes and methods of classification, and by combining Buren's orderly stripes with elements from exotic flora, Berchem creates a hybrid of his own, part conceptual, part natural.</p> <p>Otto Berchem (born 1967, Milford, Connecticut) received an MFA from Edinburgh College of Art <br />(1994), with further studies at Rijksakademie van beeldende kunsten, Amsterdam (1995/96). He has had solo exhibitions at Galeria Pilar, S&atilde;o Paulo, Hopstreet Gallery, Brussels and Bis-oficina de proyectos, Cali, Colombia. Tropical Buren was recently featured at Frieze, New York by Instituto de Visi&oacute;n, Bogot&aacute;, where it was honored with the Frieze Stand Prize. Berchem lives and works in Bogot&aacute;.</p> Fri, 27 May 2016 22:45:06 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list Joshua Saunders - Steve Turner - June 3rd 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM <p>Rock Candy: Joshua Saunders<br />June 3 &ndash; July 9, 2016<br />Opening Reception: June 3, 7&ndash;9</p> <p>Steve Turner is pleased to present Rock Candy, a solo exhibition of new works by Joshua Saunders consisting of brightly colored enamel paintings on panel which have rock-climbing grips, chains and ropes attached to their surfaces. The artist aims to produce a tension between the elements, with the pristine, smooth and reflective candy-colored panels conveying &ldquo;do not touch&rdquo; while the attachments convey the opposite: &ldquo;climb me.&rdquo;</p> <p>Joshua Saunders (born 1981, Salina, Kansas) spent his youth in Steamboat Springs, Colorado before earning a BFA at the University of Texas, Austin (2013.) He currently is an MFA candidate at the University of California, San Diego (2017) and has had solo exhibitions at CoLab, Austin (2009 &amp; 2014). This is his first exhibition at Steve Turner.</p> Fri, 27 May 2016 22:47:56 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list Ellen Lesperance, Helen Mirra - Armory Center for the Arts - June 4th 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM <p align="center"><strong>Craft and action resonate in <br /> <em>Ellen Lesperance, Helen Mirra, Traversing</em></strong></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>Pasadena, CA</em> &ndash; The Armory Center for the Arts is proud to present <em>Ellen Lesperance, Helen Mirra, Traversing</em>, an exhibition that features new paintings and a recent interactive project by Lesperance, and an international, intergenerational weaving project organized by Mirra. The exhibition has been organized for the Armory by guest curator Cassandra Coblentz, with generous support from The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts and the Pasadena Art Alliance. The exhibition is on view in the Armory&rsquo;s Caldwell Gallery from June 5 through September 11, 2016. A reception, free and open to the public, will take place on Saturday, June 4, 2016 from 6-8pm. </p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Through their works, Ellen Lesperance and Helen Mirra both consider the complex relationships we as individuals have to the physical and political landscapes we navigate. Each approaches her practice with a similarly poetic tone and critical consciousness. They share an interest in the material of textiles and the structural grid as well as a tendency to create work within carefully derived conceptual systems and parameters. Furthermore, for both artists, walking plays a central role in their art.&nbsp; </p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Despite their affinities, however, Mirra and Lesperance approach these concepts and activities in strikingly different ways. In this exhibition, the metaphor of traversing also refers to the idea of moving across the space between ideas and perspectives. The presentation of their projects together generates a dialogue between their ideologically distinct positions and subjectivities. Seen together, the projects offer an opportunity to compare and contrast approaches to singular, specific, and intimate physical experience versus public, shared experience.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>Ellen Lesperance, Helen Mirra, Traversing </em>highlights another conceptual underpinning of the overall project: the notions of dialogue and exchange as they relate to artistic production and exhibition curating. An accompanying publication documents these dynamics and poses questions about how we can move beyond binary models of conversation, collaboration and the nature of making and experiencing art.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>About the Artists</strong></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Ellen Lesperance</strong> (b. 1971, Minneapolis MN) lives and works in Portland, Oregon. Her work has been exhibited widely, most recently at the Drawing Center, New York, the Seattle Art Museum, the Portland Art Museum, and in the People&rsquo;s Biennial (traveling). Lesperance&rsquo;s work is represented in the following public collections: the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art at the Brooklyn Museum; the Museum of Art and Design; the Portland Art Museum; the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation; and at the Kadist Art Foundation. Lesperance has been honored with the Northwest regional Betty Bowen Award, a Robert Rauschenberg &ldquo;Artist-as-Activist&rdquo; Grant, a Ford Family Fellowship in the Arts, and a Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant. She received her MFA from Rutgers University in 1999 and has received residencies at the Skowhegan School; the MacDowell Colony; the Djerassi Foundation; and the Atlantic Center.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Helen Mirra</strong> (b. 1970, Rochester NY) presently maintains a rhythm of working in a sustained relation to walking, and her loyalty is to both the metrical and the ecological. Solo exhibitions include the Renaissance Society at the University of Chicago, the Berkeley Art Museum, Kunst-Werke Berlin, Haus Konstruktiv Zurich. She has also participated in the 50th Venice Biennial, the 30th Sao Paulo Bienal, and the 12th Havana Bienal. Public projects include <em>Farbenweg, indirekter</em>, architecturally embedded among the houses of the Universalmuseum Joanneum in Graz, Austria, and <em>Instance the Determination</em> at the University of Chicago, and a GSA Art-in-Architecture project at the Minnesota-Canada border. A fifteen-year survey (1996-2010) of her work was presented at Culturgest in Lisbon Portugal in 2014. Mirra has received awards from the Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation, the Driehaus Foundation, and Artadia, and has been a guest of the DAAD Kunstlerprogramm in Berlin, the Laurenz Haus in Basel, IASPIS in Stockholm, and OCA in Oslo, a fellow at the MacDowell Colony and Civitella Ranieri, and artist-in-residence with the Consortium of the Arts at the University of California at Berkeley, the Center for Book Arts at Mills College, and the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>About the Curator</strong></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Cassandra Coblentz </strong>is Senior Curator and Director of Public Engagement at Orange County Museum of Art. She has a diverse curatorial practice that champions the artistic process. Taking innovative approaches to collaborating with artists and architects, she initiated the Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art&rsquo;s Architecture + Art program that explores the boundaries between these creative practices, producing large-scale site-specific commissions with Hector Zamora, Annie Han, and Daniel Mihalyo of Lead Pencil Studio, as well as Jay Atherton and Cy Keener. Most recently she curated the exhibition <em>We Tell Ourselves Stories in Order to Live</em> for The Ford Family Foundation and Museum of Contemporary Craft in Portland, Oregon. She has authored and managed the production of several exhibition catalogues and publications including <em>How Deep Is Your</em>, a mid-career survey of the work of Julianne Swartz, published in 2012, and <em>Lyle Ashton Harris: Blow Up</em>,published by D.A.P. Her professional experience includes appointments at Hammer Museum, DIA Center for the Arts, Fabric Workshop and Museum, and The J. Paul Getty Museum. She received her BA in Art History and English from Cornell University and her MA from the Center for Curatorial Studies at Bard College. </p> Fri, 27 May 2016 16:30:13 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list Nick Herman, Christopher James - Armory Center for the Arts - June 4th 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM <p align="center"><strong>Knowledge production </strong></p> <p align="center"><strong>in art and science </strong></p> <p align="center"><strong>explored by THEMODELINGAGENCY</strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>Pasadena, CA</em> &ndash; The Armory Center for the Arts is proud to present <strong>THEMODELINGAGENCY: TEKTITE &nbsp;</strong><strong>&ndash;</strong><strong><em>reflux</em></strong><em>, </em>an exhibition of new works by THEMODELINGAGENCY, a collaboration between artists Nick Herman and Christopher James. Conflating experimental art with scientific method, the drawings, paintings, sculptures, and video displayed here utilize the environment of the lab and strategies familiar to field work to produce alternative results to an existing body of scientific research. In doing so, these objects and images (re)frame the oppositional relationship between utility and art, the objective and subjective, and aesthetics and knowledge. The exhibition is on view in the Armory&rsquo;s Mezzanine Galleries from June 5 through September 11, 2016. A reception, free and open to the public, will take place on Saturday, June 4, 2016 from 6-8pm. The exhibition has been organized by Irene Tsatsos, the Armory&rsquo;s Gallery Director/Chief Curator, with generous support from The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. </p> <p style="text-align: justify;">During the Spring of 2013, THEMODELINGAGENCY took up residence at the Virgin Islands Ecological Research Station (VIERS), located on the remote south side of the island of St. John in the U.S. Virgin Islands. The facilities there had been built to support the 1969 project Tektite, a NASA experiment in undersea living and working envisioned as a model for the feasibility of con&shy;ducting research in space. While at VIERS, THEMODELINGAGENCY investigated both the research undertaken by the marine scientists occupying the undersea habitat as well as the concurrent NASA-funded behavioral study conducted on the submariner scientists from above. Enacting a kind of aesthetic reproduction of these tiered projects and utilizing methodologies and materials employed in conducting the original research, THEMODELINGAGENCY offers a consideration of the context and contingencies of how knowledge is produced.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">According to the artists, the strategy of modeling is fundamental to scientific inquiry, but it is also familiar to artistic practices that employ process-based experimentation. Herman and James emphasize that while scientists use models to describe and account for phenomena, artists use modeling to <em>embody</em> phenomena and so accordingly, the <em>kind</em> of knowledge produces differs. In scientific modeling, data is gathered through controlled observation and the knowledge that is produced is considered objective. In contrast, the subjective, experimental strategies of artists create the conditions for unpredictable outcomes for reasons that may have more to do with achieving a sense of emancipation from those uncertainties than an understanding of them.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>About the Artists</strong></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Nick Herman</strong> is an artist and writer and publisher of the imprint anteprojects. He has an MFA in sculpture from Yale University and a BA in religious studies from Macalester College. He has exhibited his work nationally and internationally at The Museum of Modern Art, Antwerp, The Sculpture Center, Peter Blum Gallery, LA&gt;&lt;ART, 356 Mission, Artist Curated Projects (ACP), and Public Fiction, among others. He was an artist-in-residence at The Chinati Foundation in Marfa, Texas in 2011. &nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Christopher James</strong> is an artist, writer, and curator. He has been published in <em>The Believer</em>, <em>Cabinet</em>, <em>artUS</em>, and <em>X-TRA Journal of Contemporary Art</em>, where he has written about the unique conditions of art production in Southern California. &nbsp;His artwork has been exhibited in New York at The Kitchen, Brooklyn Museum, Whitney at Altria, SAUCE; Internationally at the Museo San Telmo, San Sebastian; Magasin 3, Stockholm; and Gasworks, London as well as numerous sites and galleries in Los Angeles. He was educated at Colgate University, Hamilton, New York, and the San Francisco Art Institute and was awarded a Joan Mitchell grant to attend the residency program at the Atlantic Center for the Arts. In 2010 he produced artwork as a guest of the Hotchalpine Forschungsstation Jungfraujoch, a high altitude research station located at 11,400 feet in the Swiss Alps. </p> Fri, 27 May 2016 16:35:33 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list Annelie McKenzie - CB1 Gallery - June 4th 3:00 PM - 6:00 PM <p>CB1 Gallery is pleased to present our second solo exhibition of the work of LA-based artist&nbsp;<strong>Annelie McKenzie</strong>,&nbsp;<a href="http://cb1gallery.com/project/annelie-mckenzie-man-canoe-grizzly/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><strong><em>Man in Canoe and Grizzly</em></strong></a>. The title comes from a 1960 painting of the same name by Canadian landscape artist Gladys Johnson. The exhibition will be on view from June 4 through July 16, 2016. A reception for the artist will be held on Saturday, June 4, 2016.</p> <p>In the party game&nbsp;<em>Who&rsquo;s Coming to Dinner?</em>&nbsp;participants are asked to choose any number of dinner guests, famous or not, from any period in time, and imagine what the party would be like. Annelie McKenzie&rsquo;s exhibition is her personal variation of that game, except that she has imagined a museum exhibition, choosing artists&mdash;famous or not, from any period in time&ndash;and they become her &ldquo;Old Masters.&rdquo;</p> <p>McKenzie&rsquo;s practice is not to create exact replicas of their works but is more interested in creating cover songs or valentines: loose impersonations made in order to ponder, revel in, decorate, and pile onto the imagery of the originals. Artists referred to in this collection include the women of Beaver Hall (a Canadian painting collective from the 1930s), Rosalie Filleul, Gladys Johnston, and the artist&rsquo;s mother. The paintings in the exhibition are in playful dialogue with each other as they are mirrored, repeated, confirmed, and transformed.</p> <p>Born in Montreal, Canada, Annelie McKenzie graduated from the University of Calgary with a BFA and earned her MFA from California State University, Long Beach, in 2013. In addition to art, she has a music background and plays the piano, clarinet and drums and has an ongoing collaborative practice with artist Tina Linville. In addition to her CB1 Gallery exhibitions, she has exhibited at Mark Moore Gallery (CA), 18th Street Arts Center (CA), Contemporary Calgary (Canada), Wignall Museum (CA), Den Contemporary (CA), and other spaces throughout Southern California, Canada, and South Korea. She won the&nbsp;<em>Against the Grain</em>&nbsp;Award in 2012 and was recently named one of&nbsp;<em>Eight LA Artists You Should Know</em>&nbsp;in Fabrik Magazine #19.</p> <p>http://cb1gallery.com/project/annelie-mckenzie-man-canoe-grizzly/</p> Sat, 28 May 2016 22:27:21 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list Susan Silas - CB1 Gallery - June 4th 3:00 PM - 6:00 PM <p>CB1 Gallery is pleased to announce our third solo exhibition with New York artist&nbsp;<strong>Susan Silas</strong>. In this exhibition, titled&nbsp;<a href="http://cb1gallery.com/project/susan-silas-self-portrait-sessions/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><strong><em>the self-portrait sessions</em></strong></a>, Ms. Silas will present photographs, bronze and beeswax sculptures and a video work. The exhibition will open on June, 4th, 2016 from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. and runs through July 16th, 2016.</p> <p>The works in&nbsp;<em>the self-portrait sessions</em>&nbsp;began as an exploration of privacy and what Ms. Silas refers to as self-intimacy, meaning the way in which we are different alone with ourselves than we are with others. At a time when privacy is disappearing and we are under constant surveillance both in the public realm and in our homes and on our computers, our notion of what privacy means is undergoing serious questioning and change. In these images, the artist places herself in front of a large mirror, and returns her own gaze. The reference to Lacan&rsquo;s mirror stage is obvious and yet the degree to which our self is constituted through our own self-reflexive gaze vs. the gaze that is cast on us by the outside world is deeply intermeshed and impossible to tease apart. At the same time, body integrity and the boundary between inside and outside seem pretty basic. But as we submit to myriad platforms in which we voluntarily hand over information about ourselves or simply photograph ourselves and share these images ad infinitum, the assumption that privacy is sacrosanct and that interiority is both vital and indispensable no longer seem to be universally shared values. Hence the notion that artificial intelligence can replace man, and may in fact. In Silas&rsquo;s photographs there are multiple reflections but the mirror has disappeared from view, creating a liminal space or ambiguity, about which space is &ldquo;real&rdquo; and which is a reflection. Over time, the images themselves suggested content to the artist that was not initially conscious; the examination of the aging female face and body.</p> <p>Self-portraiture was explored by the artist in the late 70s and a few of those images resurfaced when her family home was sold and one b &amp; w image from 1979 is included in the exhibition. Ms. Silas also began to cast her face in plaster in 1992. This project was picked up again in 2012 and the artist now casts her face yearly in the spring, keeping track of the changes in appearance from one year to the next. Five plasters have been cast in bronze and in beeswax for the exhibition ranging from the first cast made in 1992 up to the most recent in 2015. The casts show dramatic change, first in a twenty year leap, and then more subtle changes in yearly increments. By contrast, in a series of eight color photographs, the artist documents changes in expression taking place from moment to moment. Ms. Silas was inspired by the life masks of President Abraham Lincoln on view at the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, the extraordinary beeswax busts from the late nineteenth and early twentieth century by the Italian artist Medardo Rosso and especially by the eighteenth century German sculptor Franz Xaver Messerschmidt, whose &ldquo;character heads&rdquo; evolved out of a ritual of making faces in front of the mirror.</p> <p>Ms. Silas&rsquo;s work has been featured in Anti-Utopias, Camera Austria, Fot&oacute;m&uacute;v&eacute;szet, Heist. Photography Collective, and Artnet magazine and reviewed in Hyperallergic, Artforum, Art in America, the Village Voice, and the New Yorker. Her occasional essays have been published in the New York Times, Theo Westenberger Estate, Exquisite Corpse, thirteen.org REEL 13, Frog, and Podium. She is a regular contributor to the online art magazine Hyperallergic and co-editor of the artblog MOMMY. Ms. Silas has been interviewed on the radio by MsRepresent: Behind the Face, a Fierce Woman, at Rabble magazine, Museum of Non Visible Art at Yale University Radio, ArtonAir. org., and the BBC. She has been awarded residential fellowships from The MacDowell Colony, The Corporation of Yaddo, VCCA, Ucross Foundation, New Space Arts Foundation in Vietnam and the National Parks Service at Everglades National Park. Ms. Silas received her BA in History at Reed College in Portland, Oregon and her MFA in Fine Art at California Institute of the Arts in Valencia, California.</p> <p>http://cb1gallery.com/project/susan-silas-self-portrait-sessions/</p> Sat, 28 May 2016 22:32:39 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list Valentin Carron - David Kordansky Gallery - June 4th 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <table style="color: #222222; font-family: 'Century Schoolbook Mono', 'Courier New', Courier, monospace; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px;" border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" align="center"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px;"><span style="font-size: small;">David Kordansky Gallery is very pleased to announce&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">A comb a hole</span>, an exhibition of new work by Valentin Carron. The show will open on&nbsp;<span class="aBn" style="border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: dashed; border-bottom-color: #cccccc; position: relative; top: -2px; z-index: 0;" data-term="goog_750784090"><span class="aQJ" style="position: relative; top: 2px; z-index: -1;">June 4</span></span>&nbsp;and remain on view through&nbsp;<span class="aBn" style="border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: dashed; border-bottom-color: #cccccc; position: relative; top: -2px; z-index: 0;" data-term="goog_750784091"><span class="aQJ" style="position: relative; top: 2px; z-index: -1;">July 9, 2016</span></span>. An opening reception will be held on&nbsp;<span class="aBn" style="border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: dashed; border-bottom-color: #cccccc; position: relative; top: -2px; z-index: 0;" data-term="goog_750784092"><span class="aQJ" style="position: relative; top: 2px; z-index: -1;">Saturday, June 4</span></span>&nbsp;from&nbsp;<span class="aBn" style="border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: dashed; border-bottom-color: #cccccc; position: relative; top: -2px; z-index: 0;" data-term="goog_750784093"><span class="aQJ" style="position: relative; top: 2px; z-index: -1;">6:00pm until 8:00pm</span></span>.</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Valentin Carron's sculptures, installations, and paintings inhabit the world as recreated ready-mades. Drawing from iconography associated with his own native Switzerland, he meticulously recreates characteristic local forms, often substituting one material for another, and generating unexpected compositional complexity from otherwise mute or overlooked objects. In so doing, he infuses the ordinary and the mundane with humor, melancholy, and poetry.&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">A comb a hole</span>features a new body of pedestal-based bronze sculptures and a stealthily dramatic installation that alters the gallery's space.</span></p> <table style="color: #222222; font-family: 'Century Schoolbook Mono', 'Courier New', Courier, monospace; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px;" border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" align="center"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Working from photographs taken of seemingly random sections of pavement, asphalt, flooring, and sewer grates in his hometown of Sully in southwest Switzerland, Carron has created flat, slab-like objects designed to be viewed from above. Beginning with clay, he forms each of the elements by hand before casting the composition in bronze and then painting it. The sculptures capture, by way of relief, the patterns in surfaces that often go unnoticed because they are underfoot. Many also feature sculptural representations of the kinds of things that end up on the ground in a municipal environment; these include stylized renditions of banana peels, fallen French fries, and hardware that might have dropped into the wet concrete before it set.</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Installed on pedestals arranged in the gallery according to a slightly irregular grid, in their totality the sculptures exist as an austere field of monuments to the quotidian. These are depictions of daily life at its most drab and banal, and yet they bristle with surreal juxtapositions and a stoic comedy, suggesting that even the ground we stand upon can be raised up for contemplation and reflection. Since the viewer is still required to look down to see them, however, they also skewer the very notion of tabletop sculpture, performing as both the flat tabletop and the object that rests upon it. At the same time, this flatness also allows them to be read as if they were horizontal paintings, or hybrid works occupying an intermediate spatial dimension between the second and the third. Subtle textures and color shifts play out from one sculpture to the next, drawing the eye toward minor distinctions that take on exponentially increasing significance as the viewer navigates the installation.</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">An emphasis on surface detail can be identified as a common theme throughout Carron's practice. Regardless of the materials he uses in any given body of work, he revels in their plainness and the aesthetic interest they offer in a relatively unadorned state. While his matter-of-fact attitude is indebted in part to minimalist art historical examples, it also speaks to a certain punk-like aesthetic and his interest in homage as a form of both affection and critique. In&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">A comb a hole</span>&nbsp;this is also exemplified in the way the sculptures have been painted. Carron uses industrial paints (colors are selected from a pre-existing chart), and applies them, in what is at once an off-handed gesture and a careful assessment of the innate properties of both the bronze and the paint, using an uninflected series of broad strokes, sometimes allowing the finish of the bronze to show through. In several instances, variously shaped holes in the bronzes reveal identically shaped openings in the tops of their pedestals; together the apertures function like momentary eruptions of the abyss, breaking any conceptual fourth wall that might exist between the ideal space of the art object and the tangible space of the exhibition itself.</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">These ruptures find an eerie parallel in two eye-shaped holes that seem to observe the sculptures, as well as their viewers, from high up in one of the gallery's walls. The "eyes" are the result of an elaborate and carefully constructed intervention. An entirely new wall has been built in front of the existing one, and the holes themselves are lined with concrete forms that subtly differentiate their perimeter from the plaster that surrounds them; even the surface of the wall behind the holes has been painted black, as if to further accentuate the overriding power of negative space. Inspired by similar openings found in the walls of European village architecture, the installation both invites and thwarts the desire to look beyond what is right in front of us. As in much of Carron's work, this dynamic has broader cultural implications--in a world of widespread globalization, local things are exposed to a universal gaze, but they also get harder to see.</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">In 2013, Valentin Carron (b. 1977, Martigny, Switzerland) represented Switzerland at the 55th Venice Biennale. He has also been the subject of solo exhibitions at numerous institutions worldwide, including Overbeck Gesellschaft, L&uuml;beck, Germany (2015); Kunsthalle Bern, Switzerland (2014); Fondation Louis Moret, Martigny, Switzerland (2014); Palais de Tokyo, Paris (2010); Centro de Arte Contempor&aacute;neo La Conserva, Ceuti, Spain (2009); Kunsthalle Z&uuml;rich, Switzerland (2007); Swiss Institute, New York (2006); and, with Mai-Thu Perret, Chisenhale Gallery, London (2006). Recent group exhibitions include&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Wanderlust</span>, High Line, New York (2016);&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Elevation 1049: Between Heaven and Hell</span>, LUMA Foundation, Gstaad, Switzerland (2014);&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Alone Together</span>, Rubell Family Collection, Miami (2013);&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Lost (in LA)</span>, presented by FLAX, Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery, Barnsdall Park, Los Angeles (2012);&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Le jeunesse est un art</span>, Jubil&auml;um Manor Kunstpreis, Aargauer Kunsthaus, Aarau, Switzerland (2012);&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">The World as Will and Wallpaper</span>, Le Consortium, Dijon, France (2012); and&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">The New Public</span>, MUSEION of Modern and Contemporary Art, Bolzano, Italy (2012). Carron lives and works in Martigny, Switzerland.</span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <table style="color: #222222; font-family: 'Century Schoolbook Mono', 'Courier New', Courier, monospace; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px;" border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" align="center"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px;">David Kordansky Gallery is very pleased to announce&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">A comb a hole</span>, an exhibition of new work by Valentin Carron. The show will open on&nbsp;<span class="aBn" style="border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: dashed; border-bottom-color: #cccccc; position: relative; top: -2px; z-index: 0;" data-term="goog_750784090"><span class="aQJ" style="position: relative; top: 2px; z-index: -1;">June 4</span></span>&nbsp;and remain on view through&nbsp;<span class="aBn" style="border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: dashed; border-bottom-color: #cccccc; position: relative; top: -2px; z-index: 0;" data-term="goog_750784091"><span class="aQJ" style="position: relative; top: 2px; z-index: -1;">July 9, 2016</span></span>. An opening reception will be held on&nbsp;<span class="aBn" style="border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: dashed; border-bottom-color: #cccccc; position: relative; top: -2px; z-index: 0;" data-term="goog_750784092"><span class="aQJ" style="position: relative; top: 2px; z-index: -1;">Saturday, June 4</span></span>&nbsp;from&nbsp;<span class="aBn" style="border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: dashed; border-bottom-color: #cccccc; position: relative; top: -2px; z-index: 0;" data-term="goog_750784093"><span class="aQJ" style="position: relative; top: 2px; z-index: -1;">6:00pm until 8:00pm</span></span>.</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px;">Valentin Carron's sculptures, installations, and paintings inhabit the world as recreated ready-mades. Drawing from iconography associated with his own native Switzerland, he meticulously recreates characteristic local forms, often substituting one material for another, and generating unexpected compositional complexity from otherwise mute or overlooked objects. In so doing, he infuses the ordinary and the mundane with humor, melancholy, and poetry.&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">A comb a hole</span>features a new body of pedestal-based bronze sculptures and a stealthily dramatic installation that alters the gallery's space.</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px;">Working from photographs taken of seemingly random sections of pavement, asphalt, flooring, and sewer grates in his hometown of Sully in southwest Switzerland, Carron has created flat, slab-like objects designed to be viewed from above. Beginning with clay, he forms each of the elements by hand before casting the composition in bronze and then painting it. The sculptures capture, by way of relief, the patterns in surfaces that often go unnoticed because they are underfoot. Many also feature sculptural representations of the kinds of things that end up on the ground in a municipal environment; these include stylized renditions of banana peels, fallen French fries, and hardware that might have dropped into the wet concrete before it set.</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px;">Installed on pedestals arranged in the gallery according to a slightly irregular grid, in their totality the sculptures exist as an austere field of monuments to the quotidian. These are depictions of daily life at its most drab and banal, and yet they bristle with surreal juxtapositions and a stoic comedy, suggesting that even the ground we stand upon can be raised up for contemplation and reflection. Since the viewer is still required to look down to see them, however, they also skewer the very notion of tabletop sculpture, performing as both the flat tabletop and the object that rests upon it. At the same time, this flatness also allows them to be read as if they were horizontal paintings, or hybrid works occupying an intermediate spatial dimension between the second and the third. Subtle textures and color shifts play out from one sculpture to the next, drawing the eye toward minor distinctions that take on exponentially increasing significance as the viewer navigates the installation.</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px;">An emphasis on surface detail can be identified as a common theme throughout Carron's practice. Regardless of the materials he uses in any given body of work, he revels in their plainness and the aesthetic interest they offer in a relatively unadorned state. While his matter-of-fact attitude is indebted in part to minimalist art historical examples, it also speaks to a certain punk-like aesthetic and his interest in homage as a form of both affection and critique. In&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">A comb a hole</span>&nbsp;this is also exemplified in the way the sculptures have been painted. Carron uses industrial paints (colors are selected from a pre-existing chart), and applies them, in what is at once an off-handed gesture and a careful assessment of the innate properties of both the bronze and the paint, using an uninflected series of broad strokes, sometimes allowing the finish of the bronze to show through. In several instances, variously shaped holes in the bronzes reveal identically shaped openings in the tops of their pedestals; together the apertures function like momentary eruptions of the abyss, breaking any conceptual fourth wall that might exist between the ideal space of the art object and the tangible space of the exhibition itself.</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px;">These ruptures find an eerie parallel in two eye-shaped holes that seem to observe the sculptures, as well as their viewers, from high up in one of the gallery's walls. The "eyes" are the result of an elaborate and carefully constructed intervention. An entirely new wall has been built in front of the existing one, and the holes themselves are lined with concrete forms that subtly differentiate their perimeter from the plaster that surrounds them; even the surface of the wall behind the holes has been painted black, as if to further accentuate the overriding power of negative space. Inspired by similar openings found in the walls of European village architecture, the installation both invites and thwarts the desire to look beyond what is right in front of us. As in much of Carron's work, this dynamic has broader cultural implications--in a world of widespread globalization, local things are exposed to a universal gaze, but they also get harder to see.</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px;" valign="top" width="600"> <p style="margin-bottom: 17px;">In 2013, Valentin Carron (b. 1977, Martigny, Switzerland) represented Switzerland at the 55th Venice Biennale. He has also been the subject of solo exhibitions at numerous institutions worldwide, including Overbeck Gesellschaft, L&uuml;beck, Germany (2015); Kunsthalle Bern, Switzerland (2014); Fondation Louis Moret, Martigny, Switzerland (2014); Palais de Tokyo, Paris (2010); Centro de Arte Contempor&aacute;neo La Conserva, Ceuti, Spain (2009); Kunsthalle Z&uuml;rich, Switzerland (2007); Swiss Institute, New York (2006); and, with Mai-Thu Perret, Chisenhale Gallery, London (2006). Recent group exhibitions include&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Wanderlust</span>, High Line, New York (2016);&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Elevation 1049: Between Heaven and Hell</span>, LUMA Foundation, Gstaad, Switzerland (2014);&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Alone Together</span>, Rubell Family Collection, Miami (2013);&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Lost (in LA)</span>, presented by FLAX, Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery, Barnsdall Park, Los Angeles (2012);&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Le jeunesse est un art</span>, Jubil&auml;um Manor Kunstpreis, Aargauer Kunsthaus, Aarau, Switzerland (2012);&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">The World as Will and Wallpaper</span>, Le Consortium, Dijon, France (2012); and&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: underline;">The New Public</span>, MUSEION of Modern and Contemporary Art, Bolzano, Italy (2012). Carron lives and works in Martigny, Switzerland.</p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Mon, 23 May 2016 16:13:09 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/la/Events/list