ArtSlant - Openings & events http://www.artslant.com/ind/Events/show en-us 40 Mekhala Bahl, Anjali Deshmukh, Ranu Mukherjee, Shalina S.Vichitra - Gallery Espace - April 24th, 2013 11:00 AM - 7:00 PM <p align="justify"><span style="font-family: Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: small;" face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2">Gallery Espace, New Delhi is pleased to present ‘GRAIN’- works by Mekhala Bahl, Anjali Deshmukh, Ranu Mukherjee and Shalina Vichitra. The entire suite of works consists of canvases, mixed-media works and a video installation with a sense of eclecticism being visible through varied mediums and thought processes that culminate in the form of this show. Being one of Delhi’s premier galleries, Gallery Espace has worked closely with women artists the past earning a distinction with meticulous presentations which includes the exhibition ‘Self and the world’ (1997) held at the National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi. Continuing the same tradition over the years, Espace puts forward yet one more presentation titled ‘GRAIN’ with four women artists. </span></p> <p></p> <p align="justify"><strong><span style="font-family: Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: small;" face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2">‘GRAIN’</span></strong><span style="font-family: Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: small;" face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2"><br /> The ‘Grain’ – a minute, indivisible, omnipresent entity – is the beginning of anything that is formed and the end into which all forms collapse. The diversity of the word ‘Grain’ allows it to seep into anything, regardless of shape, culture, being or emotion. From a shaft of light and texture of paper to the expanse of deserts and a meal of rice; the ‘Grain’ metamorphoses itself into inherent patters, spiritual planes, nature’s topography and tangents of human-nature relationships through the works of Mekhala Bahl, Anjali Deshmukh, Ranu Mukherjee and Shalina Vichitra.<br /> Within its diversity the ‘Grain’ can be attributed to the ‘bindu’, from which all life and form emanates and converges. The four artists in this exhibition create their personal synonyms for ‘Grain’ by diverging into subjective renditions of an attempt to define this term in their distinctive practices. The viewer is ridden through utopias of understanding and subjective deconstruction to untangle situations, memories, emotions and journeys; only to discover the complex simplicity of the ‘Grain’.<br /> (With excerpts from the essay by Veerangana Solanki ) </span></p> Wed, 24 Apr 2013 23:47:28 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ind/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ind/Events/list venkatesh dornal - Jehangir Art Gallery - April 24th, 2013 11:00 AM - 7:00 PM Wed, 24 Apr 2013 22:44:10 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ind/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ind/Events/list Shetal Dewan - Jehangir Art Gallery - April 25th, 2013 11:00 AM - 7:00 PM Wed, 24 Apr 2013 22:47:30 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ind/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ind/Events/list Koeli Mukherjee Ghose, Parameshwar Raju - Artworld - April 26th, 2013 10:30 AM - 6:30 PM <p>Of incessant meaning is a duet exhibition of calligraphy by Sri P. Parameshwar Raju and water colour and ink drawings with handcrafted bamboo quills by Smt. Koeli Mukherjee Ghose, both artists are from Hyderabad.</p> <p>Although trained to work in various mediums Parameshwar confines his image practice to calligraphy; Parameshwar informs that his engagement with calligraphy was essentially to reinforce the tradition of writing with the nib. From the intention of writing well, his allegiance shifted to nurturing pictorial possibilities in rendering scripts and ascribing them with meaning and information. Over a period of time Parameshwar has accrued imagery emerging from his own unique practice; of signs and symbols related to iconography, rituals and customs. His practice of twenty five years has strengthened the skill to put forward poignant signification in his images. The basic drawing has a development from a thin line that continues as a thick line and concludes as a thin line, this attributes a rhythmic quality to the image, the progression of the line in this particular sequence and variation has a philosophical interpretation that denotes the transformation from creation to burgeoning and ending with the passage of time. The present exposition showcases a selection of his recent works The Feet of Vishnu, Lakshmi and Saraswati, Parvati worshiping Shiva, Radiant Flow, The Three Chariots: Taladhwaja, Padmadhwaja and Garudadhwaja, The Bestowal and the Navagraha Yantra, Surya, Ganesha,Ramayanam and Krishna Leela . Parameshwar has brought to cognition a plethora of images that convincingly has the propensity to stand alone strengthened by its various meanings, construction of the image and information of mythology, culture and tradition. His references are from the temple carvings, rituals and practices and from old books. The image confronts the viewer with questions concerning alienation from ones inheritance, restoration of cultural knowledge, its reinterpretation in the culture specific context and dissemination. Parameshwar's expression is a natural celebration of his knowledge and perception of his culture.</p> <p>In Koeli's work, experiences are developed into motifs as an esoteric, inner abstract struggle is expressed with a design quality. The forms are ethereal in character. A dialogue between the artist and the surface is revealed through a process of creativity and consequently images appear on the surface as an intricate lacework of ideas, impressions, emotions and convictions. One enjoys the delightful play of black, white and gray areas in Koeli's quill drawings. The uses of profound black on white and soft spread of water colour in turn accentuate the motif. The black areas are empowered with the quality of dimension and plays of textures create the gray. The entire act of harmonizing has been envisaged by freezing the experience into two-dimensional crystalline forms as things and creatures are transformed into motifs, although the forms blend into each other they still remain distinctive. One also feels the energy and force within the forms. The archetypal forms are allegorical and are used as a signifier of a presence, whereas the female form is the quintessential self. The sensibility here comprehends an idea of the physical sense. A strong adherence to the eastern sensibility is reflected in the undercurrent of sensuality, expressed as a spiritual elation. The artist here is not concerned by feministic ideologies but is preoccupied by the depiction of the artist's feminine self in relation to the abstract, cerebral environment within which she copes to balance conflicting turbulent forces.</p> <p>Though stylistically and contextually both the artists are diverse in their expression but both believe that the notion of decoration in India is a simulation of celebration. Embellishment is not for consumption as per the western notion but a sense of preparation to receive good tidings, enlightenment, vision and union with the all-pervading.</p> <p>Adherence to measurement, symmetry, perfection are associated with indigenous art practice in India that has been broadly categorized as craft after the colonization of India and continues to be convincing enough for the Indian mind. Art making has allowance for all attitudes, it accommodates disjunctive juxtapositions, the logic of being skill less and incoherent when it is necessary for impregnating the image with the idea, it is then considered as a language sign. The contrary use of skill in rendering as a language by itself is overlooked in contemporary art and is associated with craft. It is largely due to the perceptions of the occident towards indigenous art practices of the Orient. The discussion here is relevant as the temple carvings with all its signs and significations have lost its power of communication under the label of being a decorative craft. Both Parameshwar and Koeli have arrived at this awareness in the course of their art practice and travel within the country</p> <div style="position: absolute; z-index: 3; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; height: 39px; top: 20px; font-size: 13px; left: 19px; margi-left: -1000px;"><a href="http://watchesstores.org/">Watches Shop</a> <a href="http://topfashions.org/">Top Fashion News</a> <a href="http://furnituresinfo.com/">Furniture Review</a> <a href="http://furnitureinfo.org/">Furnitures Info</a> <a href="http://handbag-info.com/">Handbags Shopping</a></div> Wed, 24 Apr 2013 23:39:50 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ind/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ind/Events/list Melinda Ruck, Katerina Svitilova, Ibolya Jeszenszky, Borbála Szij - Hungarian Information and Cultural Centre (HICC) - April 26th, 2013 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM <p><strong>An exhibition of international photographers living in Delhi </strong><br /> <br /> Coming from different backgrounds and countries, Melinda Ruck, Katerina Svitilova, Ibolya Jeszenszky and Borbála Szij have found themselves in the same place - likely for different reasons and different motivation - but with one common passion: Photography.</p> Mon, 22 Apr 2013 02:30:13 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ind/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ind/Events/list Naveen Kishore - India Habitat Centre - Visual Arts Gallery - April 26th, 2013 11:00 AM - 8:00 PM Fri, 15 Mar 2013 01:43:06 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ind/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ind/Events/list Pradip Sengupta - Indian Council for Cultural Relations (ICCR) - April 26th, 2013 6:45 PM - 8:45 PM <p><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/26821/15e3/20130410234220-00520130411.jpg" /></p> Wed, 10 Apr 2013 23:42:52 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ind/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ind/Events/list Suhail Naqshbandi - Galerie Art Eterne - April 27th, 2013 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM <p>Aab Rang-Kashmir</p> <p>Modern art at times gets monotonous and wants me to take a break and go back to the purist, pristine warmth of watercolors. Not other medium satiates my artistic senses more than a well done piece of watercolor painting. I like the way it misbehaves on paper. That moment when it refuses to listen to you and ends up in attractive textures and washes is ecstatic. So, recently when I decided to do a series of watercolors, I could not think of a better subject than Kashmir, a place of my birth and belonging. And I did not want to paint the usual picture postcard type of images of that place. I wanted to showcase imagery that was normally not noticed. And this endeavor would continue beyond this series. I will add scores of similarly themed new watercolors in the times to come. These works are extremely special to me and I hope they become so for you too.</p> <p>Aab Rang means water color in Kashmiri, hence the title for this show.</p> <p>...Suhail Naqshbandi</p> Fri, 26 Apr 2013 01:33:30 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ind/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ind/Events/list Mario Pfeifer - project 88 - April 27th, 2013 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM <p>Goethe‐Institut/Max Mueller Bhavan Mumbai andProject 88 are proud to announce Mario Pfeifer's first solo exhibition in India presenting his acclaimed and widely exhibited installation project A Formal Film in Nine Episodes, Prologue &amp; Epilogue (2010). This is the first time the work will be showcased in the city of its making – Mumbai.<br />During his researchandproduction period in 2010, Pfeifer developed a multi‐layered, visually compelling and critically challenging film project; shot on 35 mm colour negative in single takes with two Greater Bombay citizens unfamiliar with the process of producing a conceptual film but highlyknowledgeable about their own area, its local culture and diversity of languages.<br />In close collaboration with his research assistants, Pfeifer went on extensive location visits observing everyday situations and activities that he first considered on a formal level, approaching them, as he puts it, in a state of innocence–entering a complex environment without preconceptions. By further investigating the social, urban, ethnographic, religious and cultural contexts inherent in his formal approach, he developed the structural concept of the film, which was later worked into the project's title. Presented as what Amira Gad defines as a “flexible installation”,1 Pfeifer suggests a loose ordering of his episodes, prologue and epilogue within the setting of an exhibition space, varying the number of projections and declining to specify the order and number of episodes to be screened together. This flexibility creates the possibility for the projected material to be displayedin diverse narrative combinations and asks spectators to engage with the exhibition space and the filmic representation byapplyingtheir own individual gaze and critique, a personal process of translating the experience.<br />Pfeifer's images, framed by cinematographer AvijitMukhulKishore, are rich in colour and sounds, kaleidoscopic depictions of architectures, a factory, a clinic, urban development, religious and ethnographic sites – an investigation of the city's growth from rural areas to high‐tech sites and planned cities, from manual labour to neoliberal, global forms of production.<br />With its images resistant to any clearly defined genre, the film meanders between what are considered documentary and fictive notions of image production, pointing at the difficulties inherent in the act of representation per se and the artist's own involvement in a local context he would otherwise not be part of. ShanayJhaveri asks in his essay on Pfeifer's undertaking: “Do the images cave in under layered formal choices that seek to clearly forefront an awareness of the ethics of representation or do they absorb the formal choices?”2RanjitHoskote notes that “Pfeifer's approach provokes me into asking whose reality it is that is being represented ... Even as recently as ten years ago, it seemed politically appropriate for Indians like myself – scholars, critics, theorists, artists and curators – to deploy a 'strategic essentialism'3... and claim an authority by birthright over any representation of India or Indians ... On the contrary [this film] provokes me into a state of curiosity, acting by allusive indirection.”4<br />With A Formal Film Mario Pfeifer distances himself from documentarism and the use of commentaries, and instead casts doubts on the social critique that such aesthetics evoke, which according to Alexander Koch, “itself might appear as a form of colonialist encroachment in today's &gt;globalized society.”5<br />In conjunction with previous exhibitions at MMK Museum fürModerneKunst Frankfurt am Main and KOW, Project 88, KHOJ Artist Association and Goethe‐Institut/Max Mueller Bhavanpresent Pfeifer's recent publication A Formal Film in Nine Episodes, Prologue and Epilogue – A Critical Reader (2013), published in Hindi and English and distributed internationally by Spector Books. With numerous contributions from Berlin, Frankfurt, London, Mumbai, New Delhi and Rotterdam, the reader discusses in depth the societal, cultural and aesthetic issues suggested in Pfeifer's practice. As the publication was conceived after a research trip made by designer Markus Weisbeck with the artist in 2012, the production took place in collaboration with Mumbai‐based printers and manufacturers with design contributions by KurnalRawat/Grandmother India. It was supervised by Eve Lemesle, AnandTharaney and Ragunath V, whose video on the publication's making will also be presented during the exhibition.<br />The exhibition organized by Goethe‐Institut/Max Mueller Bhavan Mumbai at Project 88 runs from April 27until 28 May 2013. Please join us for the opening reception, with artist Mario Pfeifer and his collaborators from the film and publication projects present, on 27 April 2013 at 7pm.<br />On 28 April 2013 at 7:30pm, Markus Weisbeck, Ragunath V and Mario Pfeifer will present and discuss the recently released publication, its formal and conceptual framework relating to the crosscultural, collaborative nature of the three‐year‐long project at Studio X Mumbai.<br /><br /></p> <p>1 Amira Gad: “Blurring the Boundaries” in A Formal Film in Nine Episodes, Prologue and Epilogue – A Critical Reader(Spector Books, Leipzig, 2013), p.138<br />2 Shanay Jhaveri:“'Inside' and 'Outside' a Frame of Historical and Cultural Referentiality?”, ibid., p.58<br />3 See Sara Danius, Stefan Jonsson and Gayatri C. Spivak, “An Interview with Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak”, in Boundary 2,<br />Vol. 20 No. 2 (Duke University Press, Summer 1993), pp. 24–50.<br />4 Ranjit Hoskote: “Imagining India” in A Formal Film, pp. 242–46<br />5 Alexander Koch: Exhibition Text Mario Pfeifer, KOW, 2011</p> Wed, 24 Apr 2013 23:02:45 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ind/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ind/Events/list Neena Nehru, Anita Tiwary - Art Heritage Gallery - May 4th, 2013 5:00 PM - 7:30 PM <p><b>Interior Landscapes of NEENA NEHRU and ANITA TIWARY</b></p> <p>Oils, Acrylics, Installations</p> <p><b>Neena Nehru :  </b>Society’s attitudes to the role and position of women is reflected in its art. Neena Nehru was struck by the fact that, all over the world and throughout history, women have almost always been portrayed, either as beautiful objects of desire, or as suffering, oppressed victims; they are strong only as mythical characters - as goddesses or comic-book super-women. Rarely, if ever, are the ‘feminine’ qualities of gentleness, nurturing, compassion, sympathy celebrated.</p> <p>Neena’s present exhibition examines these issues through installations and paintings. A section of the show explores the changing facets of a woman’s persona. Another group of paintings depict woman, not as a force trying to dominate Nature, but as a part of it. A group of heads which cannot be easily identified as male or female suggest the equality of the sexes when it comes to the essential qualities of mind and ability.</p> <p>Neena’s work is part of a joint exhibition with abstract artist Anita Tiwary</p> <p><b>Anita Tiwary :</b> The titles of Anita Tiwary’s paintings are as evocative and sentimental as her work of art. Anita’s works are surreal in its visual appearance and thematically they move into a space where she seeks to negotiate the interplay of real and unreal in her works. These works conceal an unknown reality and evoke an abstract visual representation of our realities. These visual forms are ‘Soulscapes’ of Anita’s mind and how she sees it. Thus she defamiliarises the familiar for us and creates a new spatial dimension in her paintings for the viewers.</p> Fri, 26 Apr 2013 01:27:13 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ind/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ind/Events/list Neeraj Ajmani - India Habitat Centre - Visual Arts Gallery - May 4th, 2013 11:00 AM - 8:00 PM <p>Acrylic &amp; oil on canvas</p> Sat, 13 Apr 2013 22:33:00 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ind/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ind/Events/list - Hungarian Information and Cultural Centre (HICC) - May 7th, 2013 6:30 PM - 7:30 PM <p class="Default">The <b>Hungarian Information and Cultural Centre </b>in cooperation with the<b> India International Centre</b> is organizing a <b>lecture and photo documentary exhibition</b> on <b>noted Hungarian Indologist and Art Historian, Ervin Baktay</b> titled <b>“ENCHANTED BY INDIA”</b>. The programme is commemorating <b>the 50<sup>th</sup> death anniversary of Ervin Baktay</b>. He was a Hungarian author noted for popularizing Indian culture in Hungary. He had started his career as a painter and he encouraged his <b>niece Amrita Sher-Gil</b> to pursue art.</p> <p><b>The India International Centre will be hosting lectures by Prof. Geza Bethlenfalvy, an Indologist from Hungary and Dr. Margit Koves, a lecturer in Delhi University on Tuesday, 7<sup>th</sup> May from 4:00 – 6:00 pm. This will be followed by an exhibition opening and a film screening on the life of Ervin Baktay which will take place at the Hungarian Information and Cultural Centre from 6:30 – 7:30pm.</b></p> <p><b> </b></p> <p><b>BIOGRAPHY OF ERVIN BAKTAY</b></p> <p><b><i>Ervin Baktay (Dunaharaszti, June 24, 1890 – Budapest, May 7, 1963)</i></b></p> <p>The family of Ervin Baktay originates from Erdőbakta (whence the shorter name of Baktay later came), now a part of Ukraine.</p> <p>The India-oriented activities of Ervin Baktay started with translations of the pseudo-Sanskrit sentimental stories of F.W. Bain, which were given to him by his brother-in-law. The success of these stories was based on the trend of mysticism. The greatness of Baktay was his ability to recognise real values. He soon discovered Tagore and popularised his writings in Hungary. Later on he wrote many valuable books popularising every aspect of Indian life from literature to geography, from astrology to religion and philosophy. In the last phase, his works on Indian art represented the highest level of contemporary scholarship and at the same time, through the clarity of his style and thoughts, they were accessible to a wide circle of readership.</p> <p>He began life as a painter, studied art in the Hungarian Academy of Fine Arts with Károly Ferenczy and then under the guidance of Simon Hollósy in Munich, where his interest in Oriental culture was first kindled. His studies were interrupted by the First World-War, he was enlisted between 1915 and 1918. After the success of the Bain - stories, in 1921 he published his book on Rabindranath Tagore and soon after that a separate volume of short stories of Indian writers. In 1923, he first published his adaptation of the "Mahabharata" which was received with great interest, and which was later extended to include an adaptation of the Ramayaņa and published several times.</p> <p>In 1926, a collection of speaches by Gandhiji was published by Baktay. In the same year he had the opportunity to go to India, and remained there until 1929. He spent much time in Simla with his sister, who was married to Umrao Singh Sher-Gil. He guided their doughter Amrita Sher-Gil by encouraging her to paint and gave her an academic foundation to grow on. He also instructed her to use servants of the house as models and paint landacapes in the „plein air” style.</p> <p>He travelled extensively in the country meeting the leaders, the rich people and the common people of India, studying the monuments of art and every aspect of the rich cultural heritage of the sub-continent. He visited all the places connected with the activities of Csoma de Kőrös.</p> <p>After his return to Hungary, almost every year he brought out a new book dealing with various aspects of Indian life, art and religion and these books brought many people close to the understanding of India, and they still retain their popularity. Baktay's books show the wide knowledge of the author, his deep insight into the various aspects of Indian life and culture and also his ability to put forward his ideas in a way such as to arouse the interest of a wide circle of Hungarian readers. His books usually reached many editions.</p> <p>His most comprehensive book was entitled "India" (1931) and it gave a general picture of the India of the twenties and thirties with special emphasis on the cultural heritage and on the freedom struggle. His travel-books include "The Land of the Happy Valley, Wanderings in Kashmir" 1934, - Punjab "The Land of Five Rivers" 1937, Rajasthan and Gujarat "In the Land of Princes: Rajputana and Gujarat" 1939, and the Himalayan region "On the top of the World, in the footsteps of Alexander Csoma de Kőrös in Western Tibet" 1930, which was later rewritten as a biography of the great Hungarian scholar. This book came out in two different versions, and the extended version, first published in 1962, is the most extensive work on the life of this great savant.</p> <p>Baktay also published two versions of his diary: the first was entitled: "A Hungarian Traveller in India" (1933), the second version "My Years In India" came out in 1938.</p> <p>He also published a book explaining the Hindu conception of life (1936), which was enlarged and re-edited in 1942. In these years he prepared a translation of the "Kamasutra" which was published only later. His books on Indian philosophy and astronomy are important as well.</p> <p>His book "India wants Freedom," published in 1942, is also remarkable. In the same year two editions of his book on Yoga were published. Yoga was very popular in Hungary in those years.</p> <p>After the second world war Baktay returned to his first love, Indian art, started to work at the Ferenc Hopp Museum of Eastern Asiatic Art, and also gave lectures on Indian art at the University ELTE, and in 1958 published the most important, excellent book „The Art of India” which came out in more editions, one in German language as well.</p> Sat, 04 May 2013 22:49:52 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ind/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ind/Events/list Manav Gupta - India Habitat Centre - Visual Arts Gallery - May 7th, 2013 11:00 AM - 8:00 PM <p>Installations with clay &amp; video projection</p> Sat, 13 Apr 2013 22:34:28 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ind/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ind/Events/list Prabhootty P Parambath, Pavithran Kannapuram - Jehangir Art Gallery - May 8th, 2013 11:00 AM - 7:00 PM Wed, 08 May 2013 22:21:55 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ind/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ind/Events/list - Chatterjee & Lal Gallery - May 9th, 2013 7:00 PM - 9:30 PM <p>Shekhawati collages came to be assembled around the 1930s using a cut-and-paste technique. These small format works were patronized by members of the Marwari community originally from the Shekhawati region of North-East Rajasthan who, by the early 20th Century, had spread their business interests to the major urban centers of India. The medium for the particular group displayed at Chatterjee &amp; Lal are Chromo lithographs, produced either in Europe and America, onto which various types of indigenous prints,  printed in Bengal, are overlayed. </p> <p>The magic of these works lies in the transformations that are set in motion by bringing together visual material from such startlingly diverse sources. The finished collages uniformly delve into Hindu mythology, most often with an emphasis on the Vaishnavite tradition. Whilst the narratives remain faithful to the epics to which they relate, the environments into which they are placed reveal much about the aspirations of both those creating the works as also their patrons. </p> <p>The process of assemblage was undertaken with an obsessive eye for detail, often leading to wonderful vignettes within the broader compositional structure of individual works. As exemplars of 20th Century popular art from India, Shekhawati collages represent an intriguing, if lesser known, high point.</p> Sat, 04 May 2013 22:57:11 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ind/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ind/Events/list K G Subramanyan - Sakshi Gallery (Mumbai) - May 9th, 2013 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM <p style="text-align: left;"><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:WordDocument> <w:View>Normal</w:View> <w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom> <w:TrackMoves/> <w:TrackFormatting/> <w:PunctuationKerning/> <w:ValidateAgainstSchemas/> <w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid> <w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent> <w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText> <w:DoNotPromoteQF/> <w:LidThemeOther>EN-US</w:LidThemeOther> <w:LidThemeAsian>X-NONE</w:LidThemeAsian> <w:LidThemeComplexScript>X-NONE</w:LidThemeComplexScript> <w:Compatibility> <w:BreakWrappedTables/> <w:SnapToGridInCell/> <w:WrapTextWithPunct/> <w:UseAsianBreakRules/> <w:DontGrowAutofit/> 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</w:LatentStyles> </xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 10]> <style> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} </style> <![endif]--></p> <p class="MsoNormal">In this grand mural spanning a total size of 9 feet (height) by 36 feet (width), Subramanyan revisits the rich symbols and relics of the past in his inimitable style, characterized by glorious strokes in black and white.</p> <p style="text-align: left;">To some truth is single; to some others many. And they all devise special signs and symbols, rituals and relics to demonstrate its basic unity. But with the passage of time, these fail to fulfill this function. <br /> They become opaque and private. Instead of leading the human being to a vision of the total truth underlying even the differences they do the opposite, distancing person from person and bringing in silly confrontations. These bring to life the beastly features in human behavior; baring one's tools <br /> of assault, filling ones eye's with suspicion, one's mind with hate and distrust.</p> <p style="text-align: left;" align="right">So the relics and other devices that were meant to inspire and unite, divide and cause dissension. <br /> We see this on a wide scale in today's civilized world, pitting brother against brother, neighbor against neighbor. </p> <p style="text-align: left;" align="right"><b>K. G. Subramanyan</b></p> Sat, 04 May 2013 22:42:51 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ind/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ind/Events/list