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Stephen G. Rhodes

Stephengrhodeshammer1 Clusterfuck Infotainment: Stephen G. Rhodes   Pick-button-5bf6c1b36c3b74ec8f312c7c9f6f1ae3
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Stephen G. Rhodes at Hammer Museum June 19th, 2010 - September 26th, 2010
Posted 7/19/10

All the diligent historians of the world, or at least most of them, bend and curse over their papers, aspiring for the most precise and infallible histories that their faulty pens, typewriters, and computers can possibly muster. With loving use of footnotes and primary sources, these stalwart and striving historians try to pin down the surging forces of history. History (slippery fucker that it is) unfortunately refuses most moldings. The well-worn cliché “History is written by the victors,” tel... [more]

Sgrhodes2 Reconstruction   Pick-button-5bf6c1b36c3b74ec8f312c7c9f6f1ae3
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Stephen G. Rhodes at Vilma Gold October 15th, 2009 - December 20th, 2009
Posted 11/22/09

        A scene from William Friedkin’s The Exorcist (1973) is isolated and collapsed into questionable cinematic depictions of the formless period of America’s Reconstruction, in particular the forgotten Tennessee Johnson (1942). Shot in the desert involving subjects manically and inscrutably performing a fort da ritual of the Iraq archeological dig scene from the opening of The Exorcist. Bodies dig, wait, and bang on green boards as if trying to summon both the exorcist and the repressed narrat... [more]

47 Abstract America   Pick-button-5bf6c1b36c3b74ec8f312c7c9f6f1ae3
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Kristin Baker John Bauer, Mark Bradford, Joe Bradley, Tom Burr, Jedediah Caesar, Carter, Eric Chanschatz, Heather Chanschatz, Peter Coffin, Dan Colen, Guerra de la Paz, Francesca DiMattio, Bart Exposito, Mark Grotjahn, Rachel Harrison, Jacob Hashimoto, Patrick Hill, Matt Johnson, Ryan Johnson, Paul Lee, Chris Martin, Elizabeth Neel, Baker Overstreet, Stephen G. Rhodes, Halsey Rodman, Amanda Ross-Ho, Sterling Ruby, Gedi Sibony, Amy Sillman, Agathe Snow, Kirsten Stoltmann, Dan Walsh, Garth Weiser, Jonas Wood, Aaron Young at Saatchi Gallery May 29th, 2009 - January 17th, 2010
Posted 8/2/09

    Abstract America: New Paintings and Sculpture is not for me, but I have to admit that the Saatchi Gallery’s done a phenomenal job gathering up artwork by the biggest and brightest in contemporary American abstract artists.  As this was my first visit to Saatchi’s swanky digs in Chelsea, I must also mention that the gallery is phenomenal – perhaps even the best venue for viewing art that I’ve ever come across.  Many of the works in the exhibition seemed too clever for my taste, but the few... [more]

Sanford_biggers_mint Old Mint, New Art   Pick-button-5bf6c1b36c3b74ec8f312c7c9f6f1ae3
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El Anatsui, Sanford Biggers, Francis Cape, Anne Delaporte, Srdjan Loncar, Deborah Luster, Beatriz Milhazes, Yasumasa Morimura, Zwelethu Mthethwa, Stephen G. Rhodes, Clare E. Rojas, Fred Tomaselli at The U.S. Mint Louisiana State Museum November 1st, 2008 - January 18th, 2009
Posted 1/5/09

On the edge of the French Quarter is the Louisiana State Museum, housed in the old U.S. Mint, envisioned as the centerpiece of Prospect.1, where the opening ceremony took place. The Mint hosted a smaller number of artists than the Contemporary Arts Center, but was equally formidable, if not more so. The location itself could not be more perfect, facing the picturesque Esplanade Avenue, which leads to the Mississippi River and the historic French Market. This former US Mint is the only to operate un... [more]

Image002 A Place for Everything and Everything in its Place   Pick-button-5bf6c1b36c3b74ec8f312c7c9f6f1ae3
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Stephen G. Rhodes at Overduin & Co. September 6th, 2007 - October 17th, 2007
Posted 9/9/07

When you first enter Overduin and Kite, especially when you’re making the visit during a typically over-bright LA afternoon, the transition from the glare of the outdoors to the clutter and darkness of the gallery can be quite jarring. But that fact that it’s difficult even to see much of Rhodes’ installation at first, save for two lower-than-eye-level screens onto which are projected what looks like cutting-room-floor footage of a duel, only adds to the eventual charm of the show—and is probably, afte... [more]

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