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Rodney Artiles

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Meweb2010-2md

Birth year
1975

Lives in
Oakland CA

Works in
the world

Website

Representing galleries
nicolahall.com (london) pollardconnection.com (chicago)

Tags
modern, mixed-media, arts-education, digital, abstract, figurative

Statement

 

Art can change how we look at our surroundings. The representations we see in art

challenge not only our shared, if rarely articulated, notions of legitimate

representation, but also what we perceive as interesting, or relevant to our

culture—as beautiful in itself. My goal in painting is not to represent objects in the

world, but to call attention to the act of seeing that makes representation possible.

My paintings are field notes from a life. Taken together they are a necessarily

incom plete account of my observations on what it means to be a human in the world,

set down in shapes and lines, colors and textures. For the past ten years I have

explored through painting the relationship between what is on, and what we perceive

as being on the canvas. In my most prominent series I paint my way into unfamiliar

territory, abstracting the ground of the canvas. I survey the canvas, isolating within it

areas suggesting discrete images. I paint around the edges of these images to

reveal them through a figure-ground reversal. These isolated images are, to me,

extremely important. They are an object lesson in how we perceive our reality. The

difference between signal and noise amounts to an act of framing, an internal act

motivated and not constrained by the external. These inscriptions reveal meaning

and order as functions of the mind. They are studies in differentiation.

Through my paintings I try to represent and distill the human compulsion to make

pictures, and to record the experience of seeing, of recognizing images in random

patterns and textures. My paintings also celebrate the delight that accompanies this

recognition, the combination of surprise and satisfaction of seeing differently from

one moment to the next. In so doing, they gesture toward archetypes, the images we

share, but which escape articulation. My paintings isolate and express the deeply

human feeling that what we see is ours and everyone's, that we are the first of many

witnesses to a reality ever unfolding

Art can change how we look at our surroundings. The representations we see in art
challenge not only our shared, if rarely articulated, notions of legitimate
representation, but also what we perceive as interesting, or relevant to our
culture—as beautiful in itself. My goal in painting is not to represent objects in the
-x: hidden; overflow-y: hidden;" id="_mcePaste">world, but to call attention to the act of seeing that makes representation possible.
My paintings are field notes from a life. Taken together they are a necessarily
incomplete account of my observations on what it means to be a human in the world,
set down in shapes and lines, colors and textures. For the past ten years I have
explored through painting the relationship between what is on, and what we perceive
as being on the canvas. In my most #x000A; prominent series I paint my way into unfamiliar
territory, abstracting the ground of the canvas. I survey the canvas, isolating within it
areas suggesting discrete images. I paint around the edges of these images to
reveal them through a figure-ground reversal. These isolated images are, to me,
extremely important. They are an object lesson in how we perceive our reality. The
difference between signal and noise amounts to an act of framing, an internal act
motivated and not constrained by the external. These inscriptions reveal meaning
and order as functions of the mind. They are studies in differentiation.
Through my paintings I try to represent and distill the human compulsion to make
pictures, and to record the experience of seeing, of recognizing images in random
patterns and textures. My paintings also celebrate the delight that accompanies this
recognition, the combination of surprise and satisfaction of seeing differently from
one moment to the next. In so doing, they gesture toward archetypes, the images we
share, but which escape articulation. My paintings isolate and express the deeply
human feeling that what we see is ours and everyone's, that we are the first of many
witnesses to a reality ever Art can change how we look at our surroundings. The representations we see in art
challenge not only our shared, if rarely articulated, notions of legitimate
representation, but also what we perceive as interesting, or relevant to our
culture—as beautiful in itself. My goal in painting is not to represent objects in the
world, but to call attention to the act of seeing that makes representation possible.
My paintings are field notes from a life. Taken together they are a necessarily
incomplete account of my observations on what it means to be a human in the world,
set down in shapes and lines, colors and textures. For the past ten years I have
explored through painting the relationship between what is on, and what we perceive
as being on the canvas. In my most prominent series I paint my way into unfamiliar
territory, abstracting the ground of the canvas. I survey the canvas, isolating within it
areas suggesting discrete images. I paint around the edges of these images to
reveal them through a figure-ground reversal. These isolated images are, to me,
extremely important. They are an object lesson in how we perceive our reality. The
difference between signal and noise amounts to an act of framing, an internal act
motivated and not constrained by the external. These inscriptions reveal meaning
and order as functions of the mind. They are studies in differentiation.
Through my paintings I try to represent and distill the human compulsion to make
pictures, and to record the experience of seeing, of recognizing images in random
patterns and textures. My paintings also celebrate the delight that accompanies this
recognition, the combination of surprise and satisfaction of seeing differently from
one moment to the next. In so doing, they gesture toward archetypes, the images we
share, but which escape articulation. My paintings isolate and express the deeply
human feeling that what we see is ours and everyone's, that we are the first of many
witnesses to a reality ev

 


 

 

Art can change how we look at our surroundings. The representations we see in art challenge not only our shared, if rarely articulated, notions of legitimate representation, but also what we perceive as interesting, or relevant to our culture as beautiful in itself. My goal in painting is not to represent objects in the world, but to call attention to the act of seeing that makes representation possible.

My paintings are field notes from a life. Taken together they are a necessarily incomplete account of my observations on what it means to be a human in the world, set down in shapes and lines, colors and textures. For the past ten years I have explored through painting the relationship between what is on, and what we perceive as being on the canvas. In my most prominent series I paint my way into unfamiliar territory, abstracting the ground of the canvas. I survey the canvas, isolating within it areas suggesting discrete images. I then paint around the edges of these images to reveal them through a figure-ground reversal. These isolated images are, to me, extremely important. They are an object lesson in how we perceive our reality. The difference between signal and noise amounts to an act of framing, an internal act motivated and not constrained by the external. These inscriptions reveal meaning and order as functions of the mind. They are studies in differentiation.

Through my paintings I try to represent and distill the human compulsion to make pictures, and to record the experience of seeing, of recognizing images in random patterns and textures. My paintings also celebrate the delight that accompanies this recognition, the combination of surprise and satisfaction of seeing differently from one moment to the next. In so doing, they gesture toward archetypes, the images we share, but which escape articulation. My paintings isolate and express the deeply human feeling that what we see is ours and everyone's, that we are the first of many witnesses to a reality ever unfolding

 


 

 

Recent Exhibits

Rodney Artiles participated in these exhibits:

Dec, 2013 Exhibition of Rodney Artiles
John Natsoulas Center for the Arts
 
Dec, 2010 GREEN: Berkeley Art Center Members Showcase
Berkeley Art Center
 
May, 2009 Street Art at Het Filiaal
Het Filiaal (CBK Groningen)
 
Jul, 2005 Opposition (Oakland,CA)
Joyce Gordon Gallery
 
Mar, 2007 All Colors: from Oakland 2 Oakland
Joyce Gordon Gallery
 
Click here to see all exhibits for Rodney Artiles
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