Chicago | Los Angeles | Miami | New York | San Francisco | Santa Fe
Amsterdam | Berlin | Brussels | London | Paris | São Paulo | Toronto | China | India | Worldwide
 
New York

Jennifer Mondfrans

my blog
DiPrima's guide to LSD  
by
11/16/09

This is an excerpt from my work-in-progress Night*Time Stories. Choosing radical Bay Area elders to be the storytellers; I recorded Mal Sharpe, Diane DiPrima, Alexander "Sasha" Shulgin and Ann Shulgin with binaural microphones so with headphones, participants can hear the 360-degree sound of their stories. Each storyteller has a porch, made from salvaged wood, with a roof divet that houses "Laser Stars," which creates a holographic, animated starry sky. More about this project is found on my w... [more]

Sharpe, surrealism and the foot apple  
by
11/16/09

This is an excerpt from my work-in-progress Night*Time Stories. Choosing radical Bay Area elders to be the storytellers; I recorded Mal Sharpe, Diane DiPrima, Alexander "Sasha" Shulgin and Ann Shulgin with binaural microphones so with headphones, participants can hear the 360-degree sound of their stories. Each storyteller has a porch, made from salvaged wood, with a roof divet that houses "Laser Stars," which creates a holographic, animated starry sky. More about this project is found on my w... [more]

Sasha's favorite drugs and how to take them  
by
11/16/09

This is an excerpt from my work-in-progress Night*Time Stories. Choosing radical Bay Area elders to be the storytellers; I recorded Mal Sharpe, Diane DiPrima, Alexander "Sasha" Shulgin and Ann Shulgin with binaural microphones so with headphones, participants can hear the 360-degree sound of their stories. Each storyteller has a porch, made from salvaged wood, with a roof divet that houses "Laser Stars," which creates a holographic, animated starry sky. More about this project is found on my w... [more]

Ann considers GOD  
by
11/16/09

This is an excerpt from my work-in-progress Night*Time Stories. Choosing radical Bay Area elders to be the storytellers; I recorded Mal Sharpe, Diane DiPrima, Alexander "Sasha" Shulgin and Ann Shulgin with binaural microphones so with headphones, participants can hear the 360-degree sound of their stories. Each storyteller has a porch, made from salvaged wood, with a roof divet that houses "Laser Stars," which creates a holographic, animated starry sky. More about this project is found on my w... [more]

Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin  
Posted 12/18/08

Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin Chemist 1910-1994 In 1964, she was the third woman to win a Nobel Prize in chemistry. Her three greatest chemical achievements were her determination of the structures of penicillin, vitamin B12, the vitamin that prevents pernicious anemia and insulin, the hormone essential for carbohydrate metabolism. Dorothy dazzles in her formula for Vitamin B-12. [more]

Maria Mitchell  
Posted 12/18/08

Maria Mitchell Astronomer 1818-1889 She won the gold medal in a competition held by the King of Denmark to discover a new comet in 1847. Mitchell’s comet is now identifies as C/1847 tl. In 1848, she was the first woman elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She co-founded the Association for the Advancement of Women in 1873. Maria’s comet streaks through her hair. [more]

The Curie Family Investigate the Crab Nebula in Taurus  
Posted 12/18/08

  The Curie Family Investigate the Crab Nebula Marie Curie (1867-1934), Peirre Curie (1859-1906), Iréne Joliot-Curie (1897-1956) Frédéric Joliot-Curie (1900-1958) The magnetic field near the Crab Nebula is 900 billion times stronger than the Earth’s. The average density of Crab Nebula material is the same as a sugar cube containing every American automobile. Imagine the weight of 100 billion cars in a one-centimeter cube. This same density is found in every atomic nucleus in your body.   ... [more]

Werner Heisenberg  
Posted 12/18/08

Werner Heisenberg Theoretical Physics, 1901-1976 Heisenberg’s Uncertainty Principle, imagined with Energy and time, shows that Nature is inherently indeterministic, implying both an open future and an open past. Time is simultaneous whereby All Times Are Equally Real. This theory supports the idea of parallel universes, where every thought and action is played out in a distinct universe. [more]

Agnes Pockels  
Posted 11/11/08

Agnes Pockels Physicist, Fluid Dynamics 1862-1935 With no more than a public high school education for girls, she pioneered the study of surface film physics. Remarkably, she did this out of her own home, studying with her brother’s physics books, while taking care care of her sick parents. The surface balance technique Pockels developed is still used today. Agnes relaxes with her surface tension blouse. [more]

Barbara McClintock  
Posted 11/11/08

Barbara McClintock Geneticist 1902-1992 She received the Nobel Prize in medicine in 1983 for showing that genes could transpose (move around) within chromosomes. This so-called “jumping gene” taught her that stress and the genome’s reaction to it underlie our evolution. Her revolutionary understanding came from studying simple grains of maize. Barbara poses with her maize. [more]

Elizabeth Blackwell  
Posted 11/11/08

Elizabeth Blackwell Medical Doctor 1821-1934 She was the first woman awarded a medical degree in the United States. No hospital would employ her, so in 1853 she opened a dispensary in a tenement district of NYC,which later became the New York Infirmary ofr Women and Children. she was a visionary doctor who worked for those in the poorest conditions. Elizabeth sports a 19th century travel stethoscope. [more]

Lise Meitner  
Posted 10/14/08

Lise Meitner Physicist 1878-1968 She gave the first theoretical explanation of the fission process. While exiled in Stockholm during the second world war, she kept in constant collaboration with her partner in chemistry, Otto Hahn. Although the Nobel Committee overlooked her vital contribution, the element Meitnerium, a transuranian element, is named after her. Lise basks in the sparks of fission. [more]

Rosalind Franklin  
Posted 10/14/08

Rosalind Franklin Chemist 1920-1957 A bold physical chemist, Rosalind’s groundbreaking crystallographic techniques led to important discoveries in plant viruses and coal. Although she was not honored, her photographs of DNA gave the experimental proof for the Nobel Prize–winning double helix model. Rosalind shines in her double helix necklace. [more]

Chien Shiung Wu  
Posted 10/14/08

Chien Shing Wu Physicist 1912-1997 In 1957, she devised the experiment which disproved the law of conservation of parity–an amazing feat in physics. She was the first woman to receive the Comstock Award from the National Academy of Sciences in 1964. After all this success, she moved into medical research to study sickle cell anemia. Chien dresses up a sickle cell slide. [more]

Emmy Noether  
Posted 10/13/08

  Emmy Noether Mathematician 1882-1936 She developed the basis for group theory, which is the mathematics behind the representation of al modern physics. At her death, Einstein wrote in her obituary: Fraulein Noether was the most significant creative mathematical genius thus far produced since the higher education of women began. Emmy works her algebraic formula as a bow tie.   [more]

Beatrix Potter  
Posted 10/7/08

Beatrix Potter Mycologist, writer 1866-1943 Before becoming a storybook writer, she studied fungi, creating over 270 detailed watercolors now on display in the Armitt Library in Ambleside, England. She kept a private journal written in code, which wasn’t published until 1966 because no one could break it. Once broken, it took the decoder seven years to decipher. Beatrix can’t wait to play with her dog. Spot. [more]

Marie Curie  
Posted 10/7/08

  Marie Curie Physicist and Chemist 1867-1934 She was a pioneering scientist who won the Nobel Prize twice. she was awarded in 1903, sharing the Nobel Prize in physics with her husband, Pierre Curie and Henri Becquerel for the discovery of radium and polonium. In 1911, she was the first woman to win the Noble Prize in chemistry, by herself, for the isolation of pure radium. Marie radiates in the green glow of radium. [more]

Marie Geoppert-Mayer  
Posted 10/5/08

Marie Geoppert-Mayer Physicist 1906-1972 She won the Nobel Prize in physics in 1963 for her discoveries concerning the meaning of the magic numbers (nuclei with a special number of protons). She established mathematically that these numbers are the nuclear counterpart to the closed shells of electrons at the atomic level. Marie on the move in her magic numbers hat. [more]

Henrietta Swan Leavitt  
Posted 10/2/08

Henrietta Swan Leavitt Astrononomer 1868-1961 In her career at Harvard College Observatory, she discovered more than 2,400 variable stars. She saw a direct correlation between the time it took  a star to go from bright to dim and the star’s actual brightness. Knowing this relationship helped other astronomers, such as Edwin Hubble, make their own groundbreaking discoveries. Henrietta models a distant galaxy. [more]


Copyright © 2006-2012 by ArtSlant, Inc. All images and content remain the © of their rightful owners.