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Celeste T. Carada

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Chaste_ofcl

Birthplace
Manila

Birth year
1977

Lives in
Parañaque City

Works in
Bast & Gitel Art Discovery Center

Website

Schools
Assumption College, 1998, BSC-Entrepreneurship

Tags
surrealism, pop, Fantasy/Mythological, Sci-Fi/Futuristic

Black Lines and Color Field

I kept insisting that the man in "Knecht" is riding a horse, but my nephew told me that he sees shapes forming a horse and not a horse per se.  He was right.  I knew all along that he was right, and, I already envisioned what that painting would be like.  Expressing my thoughts through paintings became so natural that the words to describe my painting at that time we're just at the tip of my toungue and they stayed there.  The result was an unsure long-winded narrative.  

I wasn't exactly in hiatus but 2012 was the year that i discovered my inner otaku.  I discovered that size is not just used in anime to determine if the subject is near or far.   Chibi characters, for instance, denote the subject felt scared, belittled, or missing his childhood.  Moreover, what they lack in standard feature-length animation movements, they make up through change in color to show cause and effect resulting in that lasting image.  

With Skillfully-drawn comic lines in manga, you could hear the gust of wind when the subject was about to fall 50 floors down.  Even without the color, you could also feel the temperature of the room when their lips touched, or when his hand brushes someone's nape, or when they looked at one another with a content smile.  This is exactly what I wanted to achieve.  

Animators have a thousand panels of images, comic artists or mangakas have a minimum 10 pages with 3 to 6 panels each.  We, painters have one panel of one image.  Yet, the painting world is so vast, that I don't just have to classify my paintings solely as surrealistic.  Surrealism is about juxtaposed figures, animals, everyday non-celestial objects so it excludes sprites, cartoon characters, aliens et al, anyway.  

The blue Beethoven-like character meant to match the background in "Cello" is almost Smurf, Na'vi or Muppet-like that the acrylic piece is now a Pop painting.  The dragon in "Kiyohime" is based on a Japanese myth, hence, "Kiyohime" is a Fantasy/Mythological painting.  References to a meteor shower imply that "Ichigo" is a Sci-Fi/Futuristic piece.  

So to my otaku, writer and painter self rolled into one, Bitte Este (Please Este, or Este, Please!), you've seen inspiration and similarities of your work from a country which is not really that far away, so you are not alone.  Keep the descriptions short!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  


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