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Cleveland Museum of Art

Venue Display
Cleveland Museum of Art
11150 East Boulevard
Cleveland, OH 44130
Venue Type: Museum

Country:
united states



,
© Courtesy of Cleveland Museum of Art
> CURRENT EXHIBITIONS & EVENTS
October 19th - January 11th, 2015 Forbidden Games: Surrealist and Modernist Photography
Erwin Blumenfeld, Brassaï, Horacio Coppola, Marcel-G. Lefrancq, El Lissitzky, Dora Maar, László Moholy-Nagy, Roger Parry, Man Ray, Alexander Rodchenko, Maurice Tabard, Emiel van Moerkerken
 
October 11th - January 4th, 2015 The Toussaint L’Ouverture Series
Jacob Lawrence
 
October 4th - January 25th, 2015 Maine Sublime: Frederic Church’s "Twilight in the Wilderness"
Frederic Church
 
September 7th - February 22nd, 2015 Epic Systems: Three Monumental Paintings
Jennifer Bartlett
 
July 20th - November 30th The Believable Lie: Heinecken, Polke, and Feldmann
Hans Peter Feldmann, Robert Heinecken, Sigmar Polke
 
July 13th - June 28th, 2015 Floral Delight: Textiles from Islamic Lands
 
December 21st, 2013 - December 7th The Netherlandish Miniature, 1260–1550
 
> QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://www.clevelandart.org
EMAIL:  
info@clevelandart.org
OPEN HOURS:  
Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, Sunday 10:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m. Wednesday, Friday 10:00 a.m.–9:00 p.m. Closed Monday
PHONE:  
216-421-7340
OTHER PHONE:  
1-877-262-4748
[large map]
DESCRIPTION

The Cleveland Museum of Art was founded in 1913 “for the benefit of all the people forever.” 1 We strive to help the broadest possible audience understand and engage with the world’s great art while honoring the highest aesthetic, intellectual, and professional standards.

We are proud to be one of the world’s most distinguished comprehensive art museums and one of northeastern Ohio’s principal civic and cultural institutions.

Founding
The museum opened on June 6, 1916 after many years of planning. Its creation was made possible by Cleveland industrialists Hinman B. Hurlbut, John Huntington, and Horace Kelley, all of whom bequeathed money specifically for an art museum, as well as by Jeptha H. Wade II, whose Wade Park property was donated for the site. The endowments established by these founders continue to support the museum. The original neoclassic building of white Georgian marble was designed by the Cleveland firm of Hubbell & Benes and was constructed at a cost of $1.25 million. Located north of the Wade Lagoon, it forms the focus of the city’s Fine Arts Garden.

Establishing Programs for Children and Adults
Frederick Allen Whiting was the museum’s first director from 1913 to 1930. An authority on handicrafts, he believed in the museum as an educational institution. Under his leadership, the museum established the education department and a wide variety of programs for children and adults. In 1919 the first “Annual Exhibition of Cleveland Artists & Craftsmen” was held. This exhibition soon became known as the May Show, and continued to showcase local artists for 73 years.

Securing an International Reputation
William M. Milliken served as the museum’s second director from 1930 to 1958. During his tenure the museum continued to prosper, particularly during the 1940s and 1950s, when a series of large bequests, including the Rogers Bequest and the Severance Fund, allowed the purchase of significant works that established the museum’s international reputation.

Three important milestones occurred in 1958. On March 4 the first major addition doubled the size of the museum. During the year the museum also received a sizable bequest from Leonard Hanna Jr., which provided the funds necessary to function in the mainstream of national and international art collecting. Dr. Sherman Emery Lee became the museum’s third director. Lee would be known for his long tenure in the director’s role and the development of the museum’s Asian collection, which ranks as one of the finest in the country. During his directorship another wing, developed by signature architect Marcel Breuer, opened in 1971. It contained special exhibition galleries, classrooms, lecture halls, Gartner Auditorium, and the headquarters of the education department.

Expanding the Collections
In 1983 Dr. Evan Hopkins Turner became the fourth director. Another addition to the museum opened during his tenure. It contained the museum’s extensive library, as well as nine new galleries. Turner’s legacy includes the expansion of the photography and modern art collections and the reinstallation of permanent galleries. He also established the museum’s community-centered focus to ensure the institution’s relevancy to its audiences.

Enhancing Community Connections
Turner’s community-centered outlook continued under the directorship of Dr. Robert P. Bergman, who served from July 1993 until May 1999. A specialist in the art of the European Middle Ages, Dr. Bergman established community advisory committees to act as consultants for exhibitions and programs. Upon the untimely death of Dr. Bergman, Deputy Director Kate Sellers was appointed acting director and served from May 1999 until March 2000.

Advancing a Great Legacy
On March 13, 2000 Katharine Lee Reid, the daughter of former director Sherman Lee, became the museum’s sixth director. Her special interests included 17th century European paintings, 20th-century painting and sculpture, and late 19th-and 20th-century American and European decorative arts. Under her tenure ground was broken for the Rafael Viñoly-designed renovation and expansion of the entire museum complex. Mrs. Reid retired in 2005.

Building for the Future
Succeeding Katharine Lee Reid in April 2006, Timothy Rub became the seventh director of the museum. With a background in architecture and modern and contemporary art, Mr. Rub brought 20 years of museum experience to Cleveland. The museum’s renovation and expansion project continued under Mr. Rub, with the renovated 1916 Beaux-Arts building reopening in June 2008 and the new east wing in June 2009. Mr. Rub resigned as director in September 2009 to become director of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Deborah Gribbon, a former director of the J. Paul Getty Museum, is currently serving as interim director while a national search for Rub’s successor is conducted.


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