ArtSlant - Contemporary Art Network http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/show en-us 40 Allen Ginsberg’s Photographs: The Unforgivable Passage of Time <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">An exhibition of Allen Ginsberg&rsquo;s photographs, currently on view at the <a href="http://www.utac.utoronto.ca/index.php/current-exhibitions/276-we-are-continually-exposed-to-the-flashbulb-of-death-the-photographs-of-allen-ginsberg-1953-1996">University of Toronto&rsquo;s Art Centre</a>, presents its audience with a large volume of stills taken by the poet between 1953 and 1996. Approximately 150 images hang on the walls of <em>We are Continually Exposed to the Flashbulb of Death: The Photographs of Allen Ginsberg (1953-1996)</em>, representing some of Ginsberg&rsquo;s most intimate documented moments that capture and immortalize an instance in time. The viewer&rsquo;s relationship to the work, like a gesture of paying homage,&nbsp;shifts between the dual role of exhibitionism and voyeurism with the subjects in the photographs. A number of artists consistently appear in the photographs&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ams/articles/show/40776" target="_blank">William S. Burroughs</a>, Jack Kerouac, Neal Cassady, Peter Orlovsky, and Gregory Corso. They're both symbols of twentieth century Americana and significant participants in literary history&mdash;the Beat Generation&mdash;it is at once eerie and fascinating to observe their images snapped by Ginsberg throughout the years.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141024115339-18.1_AG_3683.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Jack Kerouac looking out the window apartment 206 E 7th street, 1953</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The exhibit unfolds in three parts: the photographs, a looped audio piece of Ginsberg&rsquo;s voice reciting a number of poems, and a variety of objects&mdash;book editions, notes, images, drawings, etc.&mdash;that connect to Ginsberg and the Beat Generation. The photographs included are all black and white and contain meticulous descriptions added by Ginsberg in his own handwriting. The images share a lot in common besides the recurring figures photographed, namely, the manner in which they convey intimacy, eroticism, friendship, and, most importantly, the unforgiving passage of time. Faces begin to wrinkle and fade with age; we become more aware of the subjects&rsquo; proximity to death (and therefore, mortality). While testimonial, the particular homage that Ginsberg provides does not carry a quality of glorification. Rather, it is delicate, melancholic, and somber&mdash;a glimpse into the poet and his friends' intimate lives.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">We perhaps feels like voyeurs of the author&rsquo;s private memories. Some pictures are so intimate and erotic that we begin to experience the satisfaction and fascination of having the ability to observe a stranger&rsquo;s private moments inconsequentially. However, in a number of photographs, the subjects pointedly invite us into the image, like exhibitionists. This is seen in the number of nude pictures taken by Ginsberg of himself; unashamed of his body, the author too presents himself to time&mdash;capturing and suspending a spontaneous moment where the photograph begins to act a sign of history. Each picture contains a world within itself. As a whole, we see these intensely familiar yet unknown subjects age, begin to gray, eventually disappearing altogether.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141024115413-31.1_AG_3686.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Neal Cassady at North Beach used car lot, San Francisco, (frontal image/looking down and left), 1955</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Underscoring these more subdued themes is an audio piece&mdash;Ginsberg&rsquo;s own nervous voice reciting three poems on a loop: <em>Howl</em>, <em>Kaddish </em>and <em>Three Poems from &ldquo;Don&rsquo;t Grow</em> Old.<em>&rdquo;</em>&nbsp;The unavoidable sensory presence of the work, loudly installed at the entrance, fading but ever-present as you move toward the rest of the exhibition, makes us feel less like intruders. While feeling <em>welcomed</em> to watch would not exactly be the right sentiment, due to tension in his confrontational speech, being aware that it is<em> okay to look</em>, and that Ginsberg <em>wants</em> <em>you to look</em>, is perhaps a better description of the affect&mdash;he is present along the way. By the time we near the exhibit&rsquo;s end, a palpable chilling and empty feeling occurs&mdash;the voice that followed you dulls, and the author&rsquo;s presence becomes distant and ghostly. The people in the images have become old. Their faces and bodies have aged. Some are dead. The images, however, retain their intimate magic.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">These moments, snapped and suspended by Ginsberg and the people he was close with, pay homage to a modern time, a Beat time, a romantic time, and a time of writing&mdash;writing in the name of writing, death, and life.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/402512-yoanna-terziyska?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Yoanna Terziyska</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at top: <strong>Allen Ginsberg</strong>,&nbsp;Allen Ginsberg and Gregory Corso, nude, two images (covered, then uncovered), 1961.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><strong>All images: Allen Ginsberg,&nbsp;</strong>Black and white silver gelatin prints with ink; University of Toronto Collection. Gift of the Larry and Cookie Rossy Family Foundation, 2012; Copyright of the Estate of Allen Ginsberg)</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> Fri, 24 Oct 2014 19:44:25 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list Photo Report: Inside Dutch Design Week <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Recently, a <a href="http://i.imgur.com/QYzBR8r.jpg">&ldquo;Stereotypes of the Netherlands&rdquo;</a>&nbsp;map made its rounds on the Internet, describing how the Dutch conceptualize their small country&rsquo;s terrain. Down south, in the middle of Brabant&rsquo;s &ldquo;Catholic Carnival Country,&rdquo; a short distance from &ldquo;Dumb People, Great Beer&rdquo; (apologies, Belgium), is the technological oasis of &ldquo;Philipstown,&rdquo; so named for the diversified technology mega-corporation. If the city is known for innovation in technology and industrial design then Philips is the omnipresent forebear to this reputation; buildings, streets, a museum, and a football stadium all honor in name the little light bulb manufacturing company founded there in 1891.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141023151651-philips_factory.jpg" alt="" /><span style="font-size: x-small;">The Philips Light Tower, once a lightbulb factory, in central Eindhoven</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">It&rsquo;s no surprise then that Philipstown&mdash;sorry, Eindhoven&mdash;is home to <a href="http://www.ddw.nl/" target="_blank">Dutch Design Week</a>, an annual celebration of lowland innovation that is, in different measures, a tradeshow, awards ceremony, debutant ball, art exhibition, market, showroom, conference, classroom, playground, and festival.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">For all the clever and economical objects it presents, the 13th&nbsp;edition of DDW, running from October 18&ndash;26, is an exercise in surfeit. It comprises some 387 presentations and events across 86 venues. Giant tradeshows and exhibitions meet pop up stores and food trucks. It&rsquo;s a feast for the eyes, the mind, and stomach. In every venue, park, and shipping container you&rsquo;ll find covetable objects you&rsquo;ll want to consume in every way: wear, live in, eat, watch, and generally use to make your life easier, safer, and more comfortable. There are objects and concepts&mdash;material and immaterial alike&mdash;to save the world, help the sick or needy, solve social and environmental problems, to communicate, explore, spread ideas. In short: an infectious techno- and design-optimism pulses through Eindhoven (most likely broadcast on hardware developed by Philips).</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Here's a peek into a day at DDW:</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141023152133-klokgebouw_scene_2.jpg" alt="" />The Strijp S district of the city has the highest concentration of DDW venues and events.&nbsp;With four large exhibition halls, the&nbsp;Klokgebouw is one of DDW's main venues. Inside, the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.ddw.nl/event.php?eventID=4a0bc3483f18ca0113976d519e977ef6" target="_blank">"Social Design Garden"</a>&nbsp;highlights innovations from the North Brabant region.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">It showcased multi-million dollar objects like a Philips digital MRI machine as well as more general projects like Smart Highways with glowing lines and electric priority lanes.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141023152513-klokgebouw_fashion.jpg" alt="" />The Klokgebouw also featured wares to<a href="http://www.ddw.nl/event.php?eventID=b3001a942384e0926b7d86a899c8b660" target="_blank"> improve your look</a>. I'll take one of everything, please.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141023163929-bike1.jpg" alt="" /><a href="http://vimeo.com/109435781" target="_blank">This bicycle</a> by Design Academy Eindhoven grad Anne Pabon appears in no fewer than three DDW venues. In collaboration with <a href="http://www.collectieveenhuizen.nl/" target="_blank">Collectie Veenhuizen</a> Pabon developed a bike for prisoners to make that requires all the welding techniques they must demonstrate to earn a welding certificate.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141023163737-klokgebouw_funny_outfit_.jpg" alt="" />&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; This comfy-looking onesie is the <a href="http://byborre.com/#/" target="_blank">BB.Suit</a>, an air purifying suit that debuted at Beijing Design Week and is shown here as part of Eindhoven University of Technology's presentation.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141023152602-solar_car.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Because you must have&nbsp;<a href="http://www.ddw.nl/event.php?eventID=7d5d9d026c74f39834fed2f4d10dc61e" target="_blank">solar cars</a>&nbsp;at your design fair, naturally.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141023152345-DDW_taxis.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Outside the Klokgebouw embellished Volvo (a DDW sponsor) taxis can take you to other DDW venues.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141023153652-ketelhuis_bar.jpg" alt="" />Ketelhuisplein across the street is a sort of festival square with info points, temporary venues, a skate park, activities for children, and lots of restuarants&mdash;permanent and pop-up alike.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141023152240-damn_food_waste_pop_up.jpg" alt="" />This <a href="http://damnfoodwaste.com/?page_id=1576" target="_blank">pop-up restaurant</a>&nbsp;aims to stop food waste by cooking with food that would have been thrown out otherwise.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141023152311-food_truck.jpg" alt="" />The cutest little sausage roll truck ever.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141023154024-for_the_kids.jpg" alt="" />A soccer obstacle event for the kids on Ketelhuisplein.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141023154149-large_bench.jpg" alt="" />A fun pause for kids&nbsp;<em>and</em> adults.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141023154226-torenalle_market.jpg" alt="" />A&nbsp;market runs the length of Torenallee.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141023155145-DDW_bikes.jpg" alt="" />DDW Bikes for rent.&nbsp;<span style="text-align: left;">Much like the classic <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ams/articles/show/41095" target="_blank">art or not</a> game, as you wander around Eindhoven you&rsquo;ll wonder whether things are part of DDW or if everyone in town really does ride wooden bicycles in their neoprene skirts and ugly but presumably sustainably produced shoes. Are these shipping container restaurants always here? I just don&rsquo;t know.</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141023161606-we_make_carpets_MU.jpg" alt="" /><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141023161631-we_make_carpets_2.jpg" alt="" />The gorgeous <em>Kneeling | Five Years of&nbsp;We Make Carpets</em> at <a href="http://www.mu.nl/uk/" target="_blank">MU</a>. The trio behind We Make Carpets use everyday items like Heineken bottles, balloons, and cocktail umbrellas to create elaborate floor installations.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141023155407-sneakers_at_DDA.jpg" alt="" />The&nbsp;<a href="http://www.dutchdesignawards.nl/nl/" target="_blank">Dutch Design Awards</a> were held in Building TAB nearby in Strijp T.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp; &nbsp; <iframe src="//player.vimeo.com/video/86895084" frameborder="0" width="700" height="394"></iframe></span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://vimeo.com/86895084" target="_blank">Terre des Hommes - Sweetie Case film</a> from <a href="http://vimeo.com/lemz" target="_blank">Lemz</a> on <a href="https://vimeo.com" target="_blank">Vimeo</a>.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Amsterdam agency Lemz was the top winner of the Dutch Design Awards for the avatar Sweetie, who resembles a ten-year-old girl from the Philippines and was developed to catch offenders of webcam child sex tourism. In 2013 Sweetie identified over 1,000 individuals from 71 countries, whose identities were then released with evidence to Interpol.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141023155309-invitro_meat_cookbook.jpg" alt="" />The&nbsp;<a href="http://www.mensvoort.com/work/the-in-vitro-meat-cookbook/" target="_blank"><em>In Vitro Meat Cookbook</em></a> won in the categoty of Design Research. You know, for when you can't think of what to make with your lab-grown meat.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141023161207-viktor_and_rolf.jpg" alt="" />Viktor &amp; Rolf won the Fashion category with their Fall 2013 collection. Among other winners were <a href="http://www.artslant.com/chi/articles/show/38237" target="_blank">Rob Hornstra and Arnold van Bruggen</a>'s&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ams/articles/show/38178" target="_blank"><em>The Sochi Project</em></a> in Communication and architecture firm Benthem and Crouwel's amazing Rotterdam Central Station in the Habitat sector.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141023161503-showrooms_fab_labs.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Building TAB is also home to design studios, fabrication labs, and shops. Here is <a href="http://www.joostandkiki.nl/" target="_blank">Kiki and Joost's</a> temporary showroom in a fab lab.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Onward to the city center! Hosted in De Witte Dame, the <a href="http://www.designacademy.nl/" target="_blank">Design Academy Eindhoven</a> Graduation Show&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">is perhaps the biggest highlight of DDW. There are a number of gratuitously novel, pretty, and cool objects here, but largely the show presents the final projects of students committed to identifying problems&mdash;both practical and conceptual&mdash;and finding solutions through design.&nbsp;Some address environmental or practical issues: What are alternative sustainable materials? How can we furnish a small space? Can housewares help people with allergies? Others are conceptual puzzles: Can we trigger memory through smell? Can we represent embodied sensory experiences? Still others are social: How can we denaturalize assumed positions, destigmatize illness or disability? Can we rethink what concepts like disability or gender even are?&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141023162751-moving_mouse.jpg" alt="" />This is not a torture device, but rather <a href="http://www.designacademy.nl/" target="_blank">Govert Flint</a>'s Dynamic Chair, which uses gestures from the entire body to control a mouse. An impressive piece of designed technology, but after seeing it in use, it seems more novel than practical.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141023162807-nettles.jpg" alt="" /><a href="http://www.ninagautier.com/" target="_blank">Nina Gautier</a>'s Urtica is one of a number of projects investigating underused raw materials. Gautier's in-depth research used stinging nettles to create fabrics and dyes, but also pointed out the material's potential as a medicine and fertilizer.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141023162415-facebook_mobile.jpg" alt="" /><a href="http://www.lauracornet.nl/" target="_blank">Laura Cornet</a>'s New Born Fame addresses the practice of parents sharing info about their babies in social media. This tongue-in-cheek project lets babies take back their social identities using everyday objects to shoot videos and take selfies, which are automatically uploaded to their social media.<br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141023162822-nasty_posters.jpg" alt="" />Merel Witteman rests her case. These posters from her <a href="http://merelwitteman.nl/aversive-aesthetics/" target="_blank">Aversive Aesthetics: Research on the Power of Disgust</a> project were totally gross, but I couldn't not look at them.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141023163500-pubic_hair.jpg" alt="" /><a href="http://mandyroos.nl/" target="_blank">Mandy Roos</a>' Trichophilia fashion collection questions taboos and fetishizes hair where we normally hide it: armpits, chest, pubic areas. This project is also presented in the show <em>DDW&nbsp;Sense Nonsense&nbsp;</em>at the Van Abbemuseum.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141023163559-single_cup_water_heater.jpg" alt="" /><a href="http://chudyandgrase.com/" target="_blank">Nils Chudy</a>'s <a href="http://chudyandgrase.com/portfolio/miito/" target="_blank">Miito</a> was developed to reduce the energy wasted from overfilled electric kettles, which typically have a minimum fill line of 500-700 ml. This induction base plus heating rod heats exact amounts of water directly in the vessels you need. Chudy was a winner of both the Keep an Eye Grant, the Ren&eacute; Smeets Award and the National stage of the <a href="http://www.jamesdysonaward.org/en-GB/projects/miito-2/">James Dyson Award</a>.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141023163126-gender_clothes_perf.jpg" alt="" />Keep and Eye Grant and Gijs Bakker Award winner&nbsp;<a href="http://www.designacademy.nl/News/tabid/2055/articleType/ArticleView/articleId/2263/De_sign-by-Gabriel-Anne-Maher.aspx" target="_blank">Gabriel Ann Maher's DE_SIGN</a> is one of the more conceptual projects in the show. It comprises research, artefacts (like clothing), and performances that deconstruct gendered meanings through analysis of gender- and identity-related signs related.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">And on to <a href="http://www.kazerne.com/en/" target="_blank">Kazerne</a>, a restaurant-galley-workspace-lab:</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141023162850-kazerne_rugs.jpg" alt="" />Rugs in the Kazerne exhibition&nbsp;<em>OPEN MIND</em>.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">For all the conceptual, problem-solving work across DDW, there were still some simple&nbsp;</span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Wow, that's beautiful&nbsp;</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">moments. The image at the very top is&nbsp;</span><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" href="http://www.studiodrift.com/work/fragile-future-iii" target="_blank">Studio Drift's Fragile Future</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">, light-emitting dandelions connected by bronze electrical circuits.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141023162718-tool_box.jpg" alt="" /><a href="http://www.daphnalaurens.nl/" target="_blank">Daphna Laurens</a>' Tool Cabinet.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><img style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141023162547-fictional_collective.jpg" alt="" /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In an old house in the Kazerne complex was the quiet but lovely exhibition&nbsp;<em>Fragments of Ongoing Fiction</em> by <a href="http://fictionalcollective.com/" target="_blank">Fictional Collective</a>, a group of 24 design practioners and Design Academy Eindhoven Social Design Master alumni. It's a perfect place to conclude a day at DDW. The works don't see design as producing set outcomes. Instead they present methods that showcase design as "a practice in constant movement."</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141023162933-identity_swap.jpg" alt="" />The last thing I did there was exchange my identity at Silvia Neretti's Exchangeable Identity Shop. I sat down and chatted with Neretti and we decided I'd write a tutorial on "How to be small in the Netherlands," an uncommonly tall land&mdash;#1 tip: enlist help from strangers at the grocery store&mdash;and include a 5-foot-long paper tape measure so people could squat to experience my point-of-view. In exchange, I received an Exchangeable Identity Box filled with tips from "Positive Tamara" whose tips about letting go of negative experiences makes my vertically-challenged advice seem kind of lame. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">But it turns out that our instructions both enlist the help of others, forging human connections to understand someone else's experience. And indeed, some of the best projects throughout DDW are those that aren't just sexy or clever, but ones that probe and communicate the human experience&mdash;subjective <em>and</em> collective&mdash;socially, enironmentally, and aesthetically. Maybe I don't need Positive Tamara's advice after all. DDW, your optimism is rubbing off on me.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/95201-andrea-alessi?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Andrea Alessi</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(All images taken by the author)</span></p> Fri, 24 Oct 2014 13:40:13 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list <em>Art Review's</em> 2014 Power 100: Money Is Power (Still) <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">As Camus incisively observed, it is our lot as human beings to try (and fail) to give meaning to life's invisible forces. Thrust out i</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">nto the real world, after you finish your education ( and unless you're in the army) there's no way to know just how important you are. Yes, you're the Director of the Tate&mdash;but how to validate the magnitude of your success? As Three 6 Mafia would say "We eat so many shrimp"&mdash;but sometimes, we get iodine poisoning.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://artreview.com/power_100/">The <em>Art Review</em> Power 100</a> is a shining example of this existential absurdism:&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">last night the UK art magazine announced their 13th annual list of the most powerful players in the contemporary art world, compiled by a jury of 26 international members&mdash;undisclosed&mdash;and presented to the public. It is of course, being taken very seriously.</span><span style="font-size: 12px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">Sir Nicholas Serota, the talisman of the Tate, is the number one most important person in the entire art world this year. The Tate has been praised by Rappolt as a "western paradigm" for arts&mdash;Sir Serota has been in the top 10 since the list began&mdash;but takes the number 1 position for the first time in 2014. And yet the top spot has only been occupied by two artists: Damien Hirst, in 2005 and 2008, and Ai Wei Wei, in 2011. Hirst does not even feature in this year's list.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Using the top 10 of this year's list as a microcosm, we're faced with the basic complexion of the art world&mdash;and it's pretty much as you'd expect.&nbsp;How much does money mean power? Start by considering the number of millionaires in the top 10.&nbsp;It's 10.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In 2013, just one artist appeared in the top 10: Ai Wei Wei. This year, three artists appear, all of them new entries in the top ten,&nbsp;out of only four new appearances. The most staggering is the rise is Jeff Koons: boosted from a humble 56 to enter the list at number 7; others to move into the upper echelons are gallerist Marian Goodman, alongside artists Cindy Sherman, and&nbsp;Marina Abramović. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">What Sherman, Abramović, and Koons share has little to do with "talent" per se.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">For the artists that do appear in 2014 (23 percent of the list, with 15 inside the top 50) Mark Rappolt, <em>Art Review</em>'s editor, describes them as "distributors" rather than "producers" of art&mdash;since the list is voted in based on the ability to influence on a global scale.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">It shows the strange phenomenon that the actual creators of art are outnumbered by the chief administrators of major commercial galleries and public institutions (mostly in London, New York, and Paris) who still have the greatest impact on the art we see around us.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">From a dysfunctional anarcho-syndicalist perspective, the list is simply a public decry of the ultra-rich and institutionalized art world. It was a far more controversial move to include the darling communist Slavoj Zizek two years ago. But then, the thing with the Power List is, it's just aspirational. As Camus himself would say, "It's a kind of spiritual snobbery that makes people think they can be happy without money."&nbsp;<br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><span style="font-size: medium;">&mdash;ArtSlant Team</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><span style="font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">(Image at top: Screen capture from a&nbsp;<a href="http://www.stuckism.com/Tate/Tate06.html">Stuckist demonstration against the Turner Prize, Tate Britain, 4 December 2006</a>. Sir Nicholas Serota faces Stuckist co-founder, Charles Thomson, and says, "Can't you make another image?", holding up the Stuckist demo leaflet, just given to him by Thomson, which has on one side Thomson's picture, "Sir Nicholas Serota Makes an Acquisitions Decision.")</span></p> Fri, 24 Oct 2014 19:07:16 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list Why Patti Loves Paris and Paris Loves Patti <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Patti loves Paris and Paris loves Patti, and the question that I&rsquo;d ask is why?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Now right at the beginning, up front, I need to make a few things clear. First, let me state that this relates to our FIAC coverage because Patti is performing at the most sought after, and possibly the only gig to feature as part of the FIAC programme. It's a reunion with John Cale, on Thursday night, at Fondation Cartier.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Since this hardly seems sufficient to qualify my bold assertion I&rsquo;ll also add that in 2005 she was named a commander of the <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ordre_des_Arts_et_des_Lettres" target="_blank">Ordre des Arts et des Lettres</a></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;by the French Ministry of Culture, which, for those who don&rsquo;t know, is a big deal and means she gets to wear a cool medal and gain respect from every French person in the world (although, tbf they also gave one to Bono). She&rsquo;s also had a big exhibition at the Fondation Cartier, she appears in their latest video, she writes about the place in </span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Just Kids</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"> and so on... Believe me, as a long term Paris resident, I&rsquo;ll tell you: they love her.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The answer as to why is also, on a certain level, very simple: it&rsquo;s that, as you might be able tell from the title of the piece, they are consumming one another in an ouroboros-like clinch of mutual appreciation. Everybody loves to be loved after all, and why not? When it works in two directions it can be a wonderful thing. So what?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Moving beyond tautological loops, I can also go on to steal from John Lennon and remind the world that &ldquo;French rock is like English wine,&rdquo; and therefore it would seem necessary, as the English do with their drinks, to import from another country that which is lacking in your own culture. But this is where the question begins to open up and the French are notoriously bad at doing this. They glorify their own culture, and by extension, are wary of anything from outside, not least of all everything related to the arts; I mean, this is the country that aired <a href="http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/feb/27/benjamin-carle-100-percent-french-made-in-france" target="_blank">a reality tv show</a> where a guy tried to live with 100% exclusively French products</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">, Johnny Hallyday still has a massive following, and, on a personal note, I&rsquo;ve been involved in conversations where the paucity of quality French music has been defended by the example of Debussy.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Why so quick to take Patti to their hearts? Well, poetry is one reason, and because she&rsquo;s old is another.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141023115436-2853095466_c4b0399147_o.jpg" alt="" />&nbsp;<span style="font-size: x-small;">Tristan Tzara's gravestone in Montparnasse Cemetery; Via: Flickr user &nbsp;<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/gyrus/2853095466/in/photolist-51aW4K-iyL84r-68L5xX-68QiDG-68L5Gt-68Qis5-6pSHSd-5m7RT9-cNFXmC-5m3ApF-dJCBUd-fnxLfY-4gGP8u-4ScG88-cNFXxy-dJCBG1-4A4gLU-e3Xiso-7VzsDf-ekGbmD-9heFmV-ifxh9B-cKwF3Q-d1L4Jo-d1L3L3-d1L2LS-dLeKtW-nai4fM-5eA64L-6fx87Z-5JFpFy-2maSKH-7PVGDu-2Ves54-oy6B2o-hDaTk-7VsTzx-4Po29P-4Fus1P-7Vw84G-adzk8q-cxqjkf-3AySP-895iea-4FXqo1-4gNEGD-4gdRJo-4gdRw9-nQbHbS-4Tv2MN" target="_blank">Steven Taylor</a></span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Who in the world loves poetry? Or let me rephrase this, who in the Western, hyper-velocity, late-capitalist, post-modern, iPhone loving, latte-drinking world loves poetry on a level beyond maybe a slim Ted Hughes volume next to the toilet for convenience&rsquo;s/apearence&rsquo;s sake? What is its cultural significance? Pretty much as slim as the aforementioned volume&nbsp;<a title="" href="#_ftn1">[1]</a>. In the last 60 years poetry has gone from being the relatively weighty gravitational center of the beat movement to an uncomfortable backwater of art masquerading as group therapy, a place where people go to share their pain and talk with disconcertingly earnest voices. The simple answer as to why this happened is modern music. This has become the lyric literary style of choice, like Kathleen Hanna said in the documentary&nbsp;<a href="http://www.thepunksinger.com/" target="_blank"><em>The Punk Singer</em></a>, &ldquo;Why the hell are you doing poetry? If you want people to listen, start a band.&rdquo;&nbsp;<a title="" href="#_ftn4"><br /></a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">But then if all lyrics are poetry then why Patti? Well, exactly. OK, obvious answer, Rimbaud, yes she name checks Rimbaud which is always going to go down well, and, more importantly, she claims the <em>title</em> poet, kind of wears it like an oversized white shirt, and with this gesture elevates herself above the crass anglocentric world of popular music into the world of refined "high" culture, thus making it appealing within the elitist strictures of the bourgeois dominated Parisien world. You can see Pete Dougherty going for the same maneuver at the moment, and doing so wearing a similar hat.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><img style="vertical-align: middle; display: block; margin: 10px auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141023120112-Rimbaud.png" alt="" width="375" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Arthur Rimbaud, 1872; Photo: &Eacute;tienne Carjat. Via: <a href="http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Rimbaud.PNG#mediaviewer/File:Rimbaud.PNG%20" target="_blank">Wikimedia Commons</a>&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">And yes: she&rsquo;s old. Let&rsquo;s remember French society is at heart deeply anti-capitalist, and this means in one way or another rejecting the glamorized consumption of youth,&nbsp;&agrave; la&nbsp;US and UK. The next big thing is literally laid down in the cellar until it emerges dusty and ready for consumption, till it&rsquo;s mature, well-rounded, full bodied etc. And this, at the moment, is pretty much Patti (and also why French women in middle age don&rsquo;t seem to carry as many of the silly hang-ups ported around by their English speaking counterparts).</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">As for Patti, her portion of tail consists mainly of the thing that Paris does best: self mythologizing. Yes, it's the romantic capital of the world frozen under a screen of Haussmannian architecture and Nazi capitulation, and now the most popular global tourist destination. They were all here at one time, from Beckett to Val&eacute;ry, Piaf to Tzara and so on, just <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZMF7Jq8xNGI" target="_blank">ask Jonathan Richman</a> if you need confirmation. And let&rsquo;s remember Patti was first here for six months in her late teens (or was it early twenties?) the perfect time for doing all <a href="http://www.buzzfeed.com/jenniferschaffer/paris-je-taime" target="_blank">those studenty type things</a>:&nbsp;drinking wine on the banks of the Seine, wandering the streets of Montmartre in a shabby overcoat with notebook in pocket, feeling inspired, finding the place sympathetic to the internal struggles you&rsquo;re facing, generally "soaking up" the artistic atmosphere, and so on. A first meeting when she&rsquo;s at an impressionable age&mdash;unlikely to notice the grimaces of people on the metro or the banlieue&mdash;and it was the start of a great love affair, one that continues to this day. And who could, after all, not look at mutual love with some kind of fondness?</span></p> <div style="line-height: 26px;"> <div style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="color: #000000;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/273879-james-loks?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">James Loks</a></span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <div style="line-height: 26px;"><hr style="line-height: 26px;" align="left" size="1" width="33%" /> <div style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;" title="" href="#_ftnref1">[1]</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">&nbsp;Although everyone should read <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xZfgoh2ZEI0" target="_blank">Frederick Seidel</a>. I know you won&rsquo;t.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at top: Patti Smith performing in Finland, 2007, Photo: Beni K&ouml;hler; Via <a href="http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Patti_Smith_performing_in_Finland,_2007.jpg#mediaviewer/File:Patti_Smith_performing_in_Finland,_2007.jpg" target="_blank">Wikimedia Commons</a>)</span></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Thu, 23 Oct 2014 14:47:45 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list What Does Paris' Deflated Butt Plug Say About Art? <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino; color: #000000;">Is it possible that there is someone out there, in the admittedly rather narrow demographic of folk who read this and other art related material, who hasn&rsquo;t heard of Paul McCarthy&rsquo;s forceful insertion of a thirty foot high inflatable replica Butt Plug into one of Paris&rsquo; most desirable addresses?</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">And yes, in case you were wondering, there is a fair chance that this puerile level of double entendre will continue throughout. If nothing else it gives me, the humble writer, a chance to palm off a hefty load of this kind of stuff. (Too much?)</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">But what of it? What can be said of this impossible to ignore the&mdash;some might say&mdash;all too brief intrusion into Place Vend&ocirc;me? (The piece has now been permanently removed.)</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Having been asked my opinion by a number of colleagues and friends I found myself, without too much forethought, responding that it is&mdash;if nothing else&mdash;perhaps the art we as western society in our later stages of decadence, truly deserve. A fact spoken of not only by the previously unimaginable level of recognition McCarthy's sculpture has gained within society at large, but also because its (temporary) erection was done in celebration of another round of the worldwide, non-stop orgy of untrammelled consumerism that is the Art Fair circuit.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">I even wondered if this could be the physical manifestation of the Italian expression &ldquo;<em>estrarre il tappo</em>&rdquo; that translates as &ldquo;pull the cork out&rdquo; (meaning out of your arse, i.e., don&rsquo;t be so uptight/pretentious). And subsequent to this appearance, the implication is that, as is the nature of Butt Plugs, it has been somehow, magically, removed <em>from,</em> rather than introduced to,<em>&nbsp;</em>the art world, and now across all these gatherings&mdash;FIAC, Frieze, Artissima,&nbsp;<em>et al.&mdash;</em>the gallerists were going to fall silent, the buyers put their wallets/egos away, and all these grand halls were going to slowly empty, the entire circus deflating like so much lurid green PVC.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141023090017-tree-mccarthy-saccagee.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; color: #000000;">Via: Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/Flosh/status/523372641458327553/photo/1" target="_blank">@Flosh</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">The amount of recognition would also seem to qualify this piece of art as being truly a work of the quandiu-internet art phase we are currently inhabiting (yes, I have just coined this term, but then again "<a href="http://artfcity.com/2014/10/14/finally-a-semi-definitive-definition-of-post-internet-art/" target="_blank">post-internet art</a>" seems a terrible misnomer as, for now at least, the internet doesn&rsquo;t seem to be disappearing<span style="color: #000000;">)</span>, and just <a href="http://www.newstatesman.com/culture/2013/06/can-pornography-be-art" target="_blank">another cross semination</a> between the worlds of <a href="http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/view/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199609581.001.0001/acprof-9780199609581" target="_blank">Art and Pornography</a><span style="color: #000000;">.<br /></span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">You&rsquo;ve also got to question just how truly shocking is it? I mean, really? I can quite happily give you a list of plenty sexually explicit artworks we could consider far more shocking, from Koons&rsquo; <a href="http://www.jeffkoons.com/artwork/made-in-heaven" target="_blank"><em>Made in Heaven</em></a> to Andrea Fraser&rsquo;s&nbsp;<a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2004/06/13/magazine/13ENCOUNTER.html" target="_blank"><em>Untitled</em></a>, and even the depressingly desperate and heavy-handed work of Mischa Badasyan that recently gained <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/08/15/mischa-badasyan-_n_5680257.html" target="_blank">half a second&rsquo;s notice</a> in the world (which, it must be said, is neither that interesting nor worth the risk of STDs)<span style="color: #000000;">.&nbsp;</span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Now, admittedly none of these were quite as monumental as McCarthy&rsquo;s work, quite so &ldquo;in your face,&rdquo; as it were, and therefore less likely to <a href="http://www.france24.com/en/20141018-paris-giant-green-butt-plug-vandalised-paul-mccarthy-place-vendome/" target="_blank">offend the sensibilities of the public</a>, who apparently don&rsquo;t need much excuse to slap a 69-year-old man three times, or&mdash;perhaps worse in their eyes&mdash;furiously accuse him of not being French<span style="color: #000000;">.&nbsp;</span>Putting to one side the nationality of the artist, none of this escapes the central paradox at the heart of the entire debacle: that to actually be offended by this form you have to recognize it for what it is, implying either that you yourself have what we could call a "diverse" or "open" sexual life or, the more likely option I feel, you have taken advantage of the free access to hardcore pornography offered by our quandiu-internet age (I&rsquo;m sticking with it). Both possibilities indicate a certain hypocrisy in your offence (an uncomfortable little thought knocking on the back door of your psyche perhaps?), the unpacking of which leads us in the direction in which the sculpture was maybe truly intended: as an homage to the liberated adult pleasures and joys of contemporary times.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">And note that I say here "adult" pleasures, as so often this is the nexus upon which these little storms of outrage focus, that it&rsquo;ll be seen by "the kids" and here again we seem to come across a crazy hypocrisy within the forces of the offended, and perhaps some of McCarthy&rsquo;s brilliance as an artist. McCarthy meanwhile, in his slashed description of the piece as a Butt Plug/Christmas tree, offered us all an easy escape clause from the children bind. Yes, just tell them it&rsquo;s a Christmas tree and don&rsquo;t get upset about it. Your getting all red-faced only necessitates the explanation and expos&eacute; of some uncomfortable truths about life and the human body in advance of the moment when they hit early teens and find their way around whatever password encryption system you&rsquo;ve established on the family computer. And this could be the criticism of McCarthy. This could show his na&iuml;vety as to the times in which we&rsquo;re living and harken back to when he was a child and adults knew how to put to one side their own narcissistic desire for attention in order to preserve the innocence of the babes.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Either way, it is now gone forever and everyone is left blushing and wishing that one way or other it could have ended differently. We could have, after all, simply keep our mouths shut, and, no matter what our feelings were, looked at the sculpture and remembered that not all discomfort is bad; some of it can actually be quite gratifying.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <div style="line-height: 26px;"> <div style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="color: #000000;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/273879-james-loks?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">James Loks</a><br /></span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <div style="line-height: 26px;"> <div style="line-height: 26px;"> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">(Image at top: <strong>Paul McCarthy</strong>, <em>Tree</em>, Place Vend&ocirc;me, Paris; Via Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/HauserWirth" target="_blank">@HauserWirth</a>)</span><em><br /></em></span></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Sun, 26 Oct 2014 08:25:38 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list 5 Zine Producers You Need to Know <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino; color: #525552;">Zines&mdash;short run and independently produced miniature magazines&mdash;have been a staple tool in various underground communities for decades. While traces of the zine aesthetic can be followed back throughout history, the true imagery of the contemporary zine was fathered back in the 1980s with punk rock culture being the topic of choice. Early punks would take their Xeroxed sketches, photos, literary musings&mdash;and whatever else their bleeding hearts desired&mdash;and compile them into small booklets, transforming the way information and knowledge was dispersed throughout the culture.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">This aesthetic of the punk rock zine has since been adopted by other subcultures such as the skateboard and graffiti communities. Now, the notion of what a zine can encompass is for all intents and purposes, endless.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Luckily for a millennial like myself, zines are as powerful and relevant as ever. In celebration, here are 5 zine publishers who have produced titles that make me jealous I had nothing to do with them:</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://zinewiki.com/We_Got_Power" target="_blank">1. We Got Power!</a></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141022124243-Cover_of_We_Got_Power__a_compilation_of_photos_featured_in__the_1980s_zine_accompanied_by_writings_from_the_artists_and_musicians__involved.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">Cover of We Got Power! By David Markey and Jordan Schwartz</span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">When hardcore punk hit LA&mdash;overflowing out of hubs like the iconic Roxy and Whiskey a Go Go&mdash;there were two (barely post-pubescent) high-schoolers ready to stay out way too late on school nights and concoct fake press presses to photograph and interview the up and coming bands. David Markey and Jordan Schwartz, the two main players in this venture, managed to produce six zines between 1981 and 1983 consisting of some of the earliest coverage of iconic hardcore punk bands such as Black Flag, Circle Jerks, Suicidal Tendencies, Minor Threat and so much more. They're the only zine makers on my list not publishing today, but&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">their influence</span><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;and</span><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;interest in the work is as potent as ever. That is way, way more than I accomplished by the age of 18.</span><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong><a href="http://www.nieves.ch/catalogue/zineseries.html" target="_blank">2. Nieves</a><br /></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141022125551-From_Hazardous_Conditions_and_Unmasked_Obstacles_by_Peter__Sutherland_released_by_Nieves.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">From Hazardous Conditions and Unmasked Obstacles by Peter Sutherland; Co-Published by Nieves and Innen.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141022124351-Cover_art_for_Ed_Templeton_s_The_Debasing_of_Juanita__published_by_Nieves.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">Cover art for Ed Templeton's The Debasing of Juanita; Published by Nieves</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141022124537-From_Devils_and_Babies_by_Harmony_Korine_published_by__Nieves.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">From Devils and Babies by Harmony Korine; Published by Nieves</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Nieves, based out of Switzerland, is a publishing house to pay attention to for a few reasons&mdash;particularly because they tackle the craft of zine publishing by utilizing the cr&egrave;me de la cr&egrave;me of contemporary art. Not every zine publishing company simply has titles laying around from a chunk of my favorite modern day muses including Harmony Korine, Chris Johanson, and Ed Templeton. Because of this, they earn themselves a 100% guaranteed fresh seal of approval.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://nightedlife.com/" target="_blank">3. NIGHTED</a><br /></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141022124715-From_Cash_Only_by_Nolan_Price_published_by_NIGHTED.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">From Cash Only by AIGHTY; Published by NIGHTED</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="color: #525552;"><strong><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141022124832-From_The_Sorrow_of_a_Young_Man_by_Matthew_Eloy_published__by_NIGHTED.jpg" alt="" /></strong></span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">From The Sorrows of Young by Matthew Eloy; Published by NIGHTED</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Ever since I was exposed to NIGHTED, my perception of the execution of the photozine has been altered. Gritty imagery aligning with photojournalistic undertones make this Bay Area-based collective one of my favorites. What also earns notable brownie points is the relentless grind of the camp. Only on its third year (est. 2012) NIGHTED has dropped dozens of titles and extended its reach to represent the brand at fests far and near. The camp will soon be releasing its 6th&nbsp;installment of NIGHTED Life&mdash;the collective&rsquo;s signature group zine&mdash;with a release party/photo show to be held on October 30. More info <span style="color: #525552;"><a href="http://nightedlife.com/post/100425209546/we-are-throwing-a-photo-show-party-for-the" target="_blank">here</a></span>.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><strong><a href="http://www.hamburgereyes.com/" target="_blank">4. Hambuger Eyes</a><br /></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141022124914-From_Hamburger_Eyes_No._3.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><span style="color: #525552;">From Hamburger Eyes No. 3</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="color: #525552;"><strong><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141022124958-From_Hamburger_Eyes_No._16_2_.jpg" alt="" /></strong></span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><span style="color: #525552;">From Hamburger Eyes No. 16(2)</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><span style="color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141022125405-Cover_of_Romance_Warrior__a_group_zine_published_by__Hamburger_Eyes.jpg" alt="" /></span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><span style="color: #525552;">Cover of Romance Warrior; Published by Hamburger Eyes&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><span style="color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">To talk photozines, one must never forget the contributions of Hamburger Eyes to the game. With 13 years of producing zines under its belt, HE has honed its look by continuously dropping that signature monochromatic, collage-filled style. Volume after volume, the series continues with images that entice the reader, invoke curiosity, and paint a much appreciated awkward and honest portrayal of the human experience.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><strong><a href="http://brokenfingaz.com/" target="_blank">5. Broken Fingaz</a></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141022125224-A_page_from_Sex_Picnic_published_by_Broken_Fingaz.png" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Page from Broken Fingaz, Sex Picnic Vol.1</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">I still don&rsquo;t really understand how exactly Broken Fingaz Crew do what they do. Their release &ldquo;Sex Picnic, Vol 1&rdquo; has earned them status in my mind as a collective that could literally draw anything, and I&rsquo;m sure I will be dazzled beyond belief just as much as I&rsquo;m appalled. Based out of Israel the crew is known for its risqu&eacute; imagery, but more importantly, its strenuous attention to detail. If you&rsquo;re ever in Berlin or Tokyo&mdash;or basically anywhere ever&mdash;sniff around for a BF mural and witness the craft firsthand.</span><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;They have also released a series of zines titled "Suck on Titties."</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">In subcultural fashion&mdash;with major headlines foreshadowing the eventual demise of tangible printed literature and art&mdash;the underground responds tenfold. Hundreds of annual zine fests are held throughout the nation yearly&mdash;I went to three in Los Angeles this year alone&mdash;so it is evident that these small scale books hold major value to those who indulge in them.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/379784-kimberly-b-johnson?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Kimberly Johnson</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino; color: #525552;">(Image on top:&nbsp;Issue #5 of We Got Power! released in 1983 featuring Los Crudos [cover])</span></p> Sat, 25 Oct 2014 14:31:09 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list Marina Abramovic to Help Others Sit Really Still for a Really Long Time and Count Rice <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552; line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">Legendary performance artist Marina Abromovic announced today her next public workshop aimed at helping others push beyond their own physical and psychological limits of sitting really still for a really long time while doing something really boring.&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; color: #525552; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium;">In partnership with the Italian furniture maker <a href="http://www.moroso.it/morosoworld/news/counting-the-rice-table-marina-abramovic/?lang=en" target="_blank">Moroso</a>, the <a href="http://www.immaterial.org/" target="_blank">Marina Abromovic Institute (MAI)</a> will present "Counting the Rice" at this year's Art Basel Miami in December. Participants will try to sit these scary-looking modernist torture tables designed by Daniel Libeskind for a minimum of six hours while they count and separate rice from lentils.&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; color: #525552; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium;">The project also has a new twist: you can buy it. As part of the project, Moroso will release a limited edition of 30 "Counting the Rice" tables along with a collection of other designed objects, the proceeds of which will go to supporting the MAI. (The irony of Abromovic's immaterial art institute releasing a collection of designed objects is not lost on us.)&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; color: #525552; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium;">The first iteration of this project was presented earlier this year in the Cortile d'Onore cloister at Milan University during Design Week 2014, where they used Italian art students as their rice-counting, concentration-building victims. Subsequently, the project was opened up to the public at Centre d'Art Contemporain in Geneva in May. A four-hour long YouTube video on that <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZaXBLwuq7Uc" target="_blank">here</a>.&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; color: #525552; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium;">While both earlier iterations used wooden versions of the design, Moroso will present a new design development at Art Basel Miami: "high-performance cement."&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; color: #525552; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium;">Of the design, Moroso writes: "The slab of cement folds over itself, enfolding and pushing the body to carry out the performance"&mdash;or confess to a crime you didn't commit&mdash;"while the vigorous gestural expressiveness of the form is embossed across its surface with complex geometries that give a sense of visual fragmentation." &nbsp;</span><span style="color: #000000; text-align: left;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; color: #525552; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium;">In keeping with the newly developed strong artistic ties between Abromovic and the Italian furniture manufacturer, "the seat takes on a dialectical dimension that goes beyond function to become the metaphor for the virtual union between the visionary genius of Marina Abramovic, the creativity of Daniel Libeskind, and the leading producer of Italian-made design that is Moroso."&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; color: #525552; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium;">The first table in the limited edition was <a href="https://paddle8.com/work/marina-abramovic/38274-counting-the-rice-table" target="_blank">auctioned off</a>&nbsp;at the Fondation Beyeier in Basel last month.&nbsp;Along with the cement "Count the Rice, Bitch" collection, Moroso announced plans to release yet another version at Art Basel Miami designed by Patricia Urquilo.&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; color: #525552; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; color: #525552; text-align: justify;">(Image at top:&nbsp;The "Counting the Rice" Chair Designed by Daniel Libeskind for Moroso in cooperation with the Marina Abromovic Institute)</p> Wed, 22 Oct 2014 13:34:51 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list Why Should London Get More Culture Money? <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino; color: #000000;">Last week, the <em>Financial Times</em> posted an article: "<span style="color: #000000;"><a href="http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/dc2d0672-547a-11e4-bac2-00144feab7de.html">What Is Wrong With Inequality?</a></span>"&nbsp;It highlighted the various effects of social unbalances in modern society through some recently published texts on this blazing hot topic. As urban citizens struggle against markets and unfair pay, and the 1 percent become wealthier, what happens to culture? "The equality of citizens is an ideal worth defending"&mdash;after all, as the <em>FT</em> concludes.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino; color: #000000;">Peter Stark, Christopher Gordon, and David&nbsp;Powell, three British arts professionals who have worked in the industry for 45 years, released the third&nbsp;report from their comprehensive research earlier this month. Entitled "<span style="color: #000000;"><a href="http://www.gpsculture.co.uk/downloads.php">Hard Facts to Swallow</a></span>,<em>"</em>&nbsp;it unmasks the culture funding bias of the Arts Council England's plans for the next 3 years. In a Robin Hood-esque display, the trio were motivated by the feeling that something wasn't right in the arts funding system: "In 2013 we decided that we needed to look at the evidence for the balance between large and small companies, between more and less affluent and 'arts engaged' communities, and between London and the rest of England."</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: medium;">It finds arts funding to be at a startling 1:4 ratio in favor of the capital</span><span style="font-size: medium;">&mdash;43.4 percent of the investment in the arts for England will go to London. Their previous reports had revealed similar imbalances in funding between the capital and the rest of the country.</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">But Stark, Gordon, and Powell's report is endemic of a much wider, more troubling picture of increasing inequality within our "glocal" world. It's a bitter indictment of the growing cultural chasm between major cities and "outside." A funding bias will only widen the gap.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">So why does London deserve more?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: medium;">It's a hot potato. According to the <span style="color: #000000;"><a href="%20http://press.artscouncil.org.uk/Press-Releases/Arts-Council-England-responds-to-Hard-Facts-to-Swallow-8c1.aspx">ACE's official response</a></span>&nbsp;to the "Hard Facts to Swallow" report,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: medium;">they at first cite the government squeeze on national budgets as a reason for the bias.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: medium;">But as Powell puts it:&nbsp;"We want a national policy for the arts in England which does not just reinforce the status quo whilst pleading that no change is possible without substantial new funding."</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">But ACE does raise a fair point: London is a natural cultural center for the whole of the UK. Inhabited by a 23 percent chunk of the population, it attracts more visitors, both national and international, and houses more gallery spaces, artists, and artistic projects. They also point out that many of their funding plans include "companies that are administered in London but whose outreach is national."&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: medium;">This privilege is precisley the issue.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: medium;">London is a complex brew, churning with the world's commerce, pumped by the ideology of capitalism and the machine of the metropolis. Many creatives and young people are being choked off. </span><span style="font-size: medium;">ACE projects might be long term, and their progress might only be charted over years not months</span><span style="font-size: medium;">&mdash;but that in itself is a&nbsp;fundamental problem, because culture moves much quicker.</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Just where does all the money go? If the&nbsp;funding bias continues, London is at risk of a defanged, homogenized arts scene with the poorer being forced out. The&nbsp;corollary is that the majority of those recipients of ACE funding, being based in one of the world's wealthiest cities, are already privileged, either by access to larger (and richer) audiences, to prominent media, or to broader networks, private wealth, etc. As Powell points out, "there is no strategic support of participation in the arts at local level."&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">What are the wider implications of this? I ask Powell, via email. "The impacts of this bias will be felt across the whole arts ecology. 85 percent of England&rsquo;s population lives outside London and should have an equal call on arts and culture to those of us who live in London. &nbsp;Taking part in arts and culture locally&mdash;where you live&mdash;is an essential part of every child and family&rsquo;s upbringing; emerging talent is developed in small companies. At a time when local funding across England is under so much pressure, the continuation of the London imbalance will have serious consequences for the arts and culture in communities throughout the country."</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;Char Jansen</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at top: Illustration by Joel Kuennen)</span></p> Wed, 22 Oct 2014 18:16:32 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list Transitioning Through a Love Affair <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">Have you ever fallen in love?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">Her face is open, unselfconscious, laughing. Framed by wash of blonde hair, the light sheen of sweat settles on her skin and both eyes beam, full of trust and free of tension. Here is unalloyed happiness on the face of a full-grown woman, a joy one rarely sees in adults. Of course, she&rsquo;s looking at her love, the man holding the camera.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">As a love-story between this couple unfolds in scattered pictures, videos, and poems read aloud (each word a thud, but so carefully chosen), so does another story. Our woman over the course of the courtship has been changing physically. As has her man. Both are transgender and are transitioning.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">With sections previously shown in the <em>Made in LA 2012</em> and the Whitney Biennial, Zackary Drucker and Rhys Ernst&rsquo;s current exhibition at Luis de Jesus captures&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">in scattered pictures and videos&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">the rise and fall of their years-long love affair, a relationship that ravels and unravels whilst both more fully transition into their true genders.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">A broken romance of spiritual refugees sent into strange territories by identity and desire. I remember this well from early Gus Van Sant films but have rarely seen captured since so movingly. The political portent of their mutual transitions adds a layer of contemporary meaning given the increasing awareness and slow-moving equal recognition for transgender people, but the works work not because of this but because the story is authentically romantic, a heart-wrenching tale seen through the Vaseline lens of a dream. Even if sometimes maudlin or clich&eacute; in its imagery&mdash;Ernst looking pensive in a field of daisies&mdash;somehow the earnestness of the feeling and the skill with which it is captured supercede this. And, of course, those moments only punctuate rather than define a nuanced history in pictures.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; color: #525552; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/1629/2ij/20141021082133-druckerrnst-install" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">Each photograph or snippet of video, often taken by one of the other, reveals their changing bodies as they become who they are together. Teenagers feel something like it everyday, but rarely do teenagers have the aesthetic range of fully realized artists, able to deftly capture the realizations of owning a new body&mdash;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">the hormones here not from puberty but those taken to reassign gender&mdash;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">and discovering that with another person.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">I feel like a witness, but curiously not a voyeur, to some deep human event in their lives, that each of us only have so many times. I see such deep affection rare enough that I feel gratitude in being privy to their experience together if only for a few rooms, a couple of videos, and 62 photographs that sweep through their union and break. Not unlike Nan Goldin&rsquo;s <em>The Ballad of Sexual Dependency</em> (1986) the intimacy allowed evaporates that feeling of distance. Despite whatever differences we might find between ourselves and the actual subjects, those pictures become our pictures.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">I have so few photographs of my own adolescence and young adulthood, my friends and I in various states of unstable identities, substance abuse, wreckless happiness, love affairs, and struggle, that I adopt Goldin&rsquo;s pictures as my own. Her friends and lovers were not mine, but she captured their humanity with such rare intimacy, it was not hard for me to find my truth in hers. Perhaps I have such few documents of my own forlorn love affairs, and none of my snapshots so artfully made, these images become the ones I don&rsquo;t have, overcoming the differences and fingering a universal emotion.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">Perhaps all of it is sentimental, but maybe so am I.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">Though a common trope in music, love feels more rarely a subject for contemporary art. The vulnerability that good art requires perhaps feels too vulnerable for public exhibition of love, but those transitioning wear their changing bodies in public, the deeply intimate nature of one&rsquo;s femininity, masculinity, or queerness and the changes are science and fashion on parade. The intimacy of Drucker and Ernst&rsquo;s images are not belied at all by their sometime performative nature, the relationship between intimacy and performance already so blurred.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">But as this couple transcends the gender binary, the work itselfs transcends the limitations of being read simply in those terms. The love and its heartbreak are real for them and for us watching it unfold.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">And when in love, how thoughtlessly in the moment we are. And when it ends, how reduced it all feels, how much we grieve the despair our desires have wrought. But desire we must.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">As Drucker says in a video, &ldquo;Our poetry evaporated leaving us just a few pounds of salt.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/12307-andrew-berardini?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Andrew Berardini</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; color: #525552; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">(All images:&nbsp;Zackary Drucker and Rhys Ernst,&nbsp;<em>Post / Relationship / X</em>, 2014; Courtesy of the artists and&nbsp;Luis De Jesus Los Angeles)</span><br /></span></p> Wed, 22 Oct 2014 16:44:25 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list Malala's Nobel Peace Prize: Images Speak Longer Than Words <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">"This is a story of a native girl being saved by the white man. Flown to the UK, the Western world can feel good about itself as they save the native woman from the savage men of her home nation. It is a historic racist narrative that has been institutionalized."</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; padding-left: 60px;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;"><span style="color: #525552;">&ndash; Assed Baig, quoted in</span> <a href="http://middleeastrevised.com/2014/10/11/why-i-cant-celebrate-malalas-nobel-peace-prize/" target="_blank">Middle East Revisited</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Reception to Malala Yousafzai&rsquo;s selection as a Nobel Peace Prize winner (shared with Kailash Satyarthi)&nbsp;earlier this month was met with mixed sentiments: from contemptuousness to confidence, affirmation to cynicism. Beyond the obvious ways that the prize influences and is informed by the economic, sociopolitical, and humanitarian requirements that grant individuals the award, there is also something intensely aesthetic in how we look at the prize: the image of the winners themselves. Yousafzai&rsquo;s image is of particular note&mdash;she is a girl, the youngest winner of the prize at 17 years old, Muslim, and from Pakistan. But the prize itself presents an equally strong aesthetic; winners in each category represent and become the face of their contributions. How can we deal with this combined image, a heightened aesthetic that highlights stark opposition in popular reception, in a way that resists a historically antagonistic reading? These aesthetics may be secondary symptoms, but point toward an increasingly unavoidable form of branding in an image-fueled society: Malala&rsquo;s image is now an immediate symbol that represents that resistance against the Taliban exists.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;"><span style="color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141020182537-800px-WomenofAlgiers.JPG" alt="" /></span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-small;"><span style="color: #525552;"><strong>Eug&egrave;ne Delacroix</strong>, <em>The Women of Algiers</em>, 1834; Collection: The Louvre, Paris</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-small;"><span style="color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;"><span style="color: #525552;">The quote above comes from a piece written for</span> <a href="http://middleeastrevised.com/2014/10/11/why-i-cant-celebrate-malalas-nobel-peace-prize/" target="_blank">Middle East Revisited</a><span style="color: #525552;">, which begins with a simple question: why is it that we (the popular we, the West) are so quick to recognize and award survivors of torment (victims of the East), but do so in a way that purposefully and systemically fails to acknowledge the West&rsquo;s contributions to those torments? This parsing of images, what the author outlines as &ldquo;the western narrative of oriental oppression,&rdquo; is a narrative that belongs to</span> <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exoticism">exoticism</a><span style="color: #525552;">, which begins with art and images&mdash;a primitive fantasy of Western society projected on the other. We can award the aggressors whose agendas we despise, but will never award a recognition of peace to an individual standing in the face of, say, US drone strikes in those same territories. Reactions to the potential hypocrisy of the award and Yousafzai&rsquo;s selection are an aesthetics problem. They are a problem of representation. </span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;"><span style="color: #525552;">The institutionalization of the other has been ingrained in a</span> <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orientalism" target="_blank">history of painting</a><span style="color: #525552;"> since the 16th&nbsp;and 17th&nbsp;centuries, most popular in the 19th, and in stories of damsels in distress, in the myth of helplessness&mdash;of adopting the image before the content. White European woman adorned in opulent woven silks bask in the haze of incense-filled harems; Islamic ornamentation is carved into arabesques on Greek and Roman columns; their hair is pulled back into headdresses that serve no higher purpose than accessory. The harem girl is our property, made sellable by her portrait. We own her image, and own her too in the process&mdash;she is an imaginary reflection, ours to keep. These constructs literally &ldquo;paint the picture&rdquo; of the East that has stayed cemented in popular discourse for centuries. Images speak longer than words.</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;"><span style="color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141020182557-640px-HaremPool.jpg" alt="" /></span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-small;"><span style="color: #525552;"><strong>Jean-L&eacute;on G&eacute;r&ocirc;me</strong>, <em>Pool in a Harem</em>, c. 1876</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-small;"><span style="color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">This image the author of this piece speaks of, like the harem girl, is not only that of <em>institutionalization</em>, in terms of how we deal with oppositional representations of the enemy&mdash;what Yousafzai represents is as much her award as a damnation of her oppressors, the East&mdash;but also that of <em>reification</em>. The image becomes the subject. The argument in the quote is not whether or not Yousafzai should be celebrated&mdash;she should absolutely be celebrated. The critical point of Baig&rsquo;s argument is that in addition to this celebration, the West, the Nobel Peace Prize, should be criticized for its inabilities to search for more complicated figures that challenge western interests, while similarly contributing to peace.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">The formula for exoticism hinges on two essential elements: one, complete ignorance (or the <em>imaginary</em>) and two, the caricature of that myth. Such rapid jumps to a colonial reading of the prize are valid as a symptom in and of themselves. However, the danger of this reading is that it takes authority away from the individual. It implies that the figure, Yousafzai, has been saved by a force beyond her own agency. What is missing from this reading is just one possibility among others: that Yousafzai was not absorbed by the West, but is using a different locale as her political platform. As her choice.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141020182623-Inspecting_New_Arrivals_by_Giulio_Rosati_2.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><strong>Giulio Rosati,</strong> <em>Inspection of New Arrivals</em>, 1858-1917</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;"><span style="color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;"><span style="color: #525552;">The image of exoticism is the will of one explored through the agenda of others. While a cautionary interpretation of a historical image certainly applies, such as the one used in the opening quote, the award of the Nobel Peace Prize should not be so dismissible by an Orientalist read. The suspicion and contempt for the Western agenda is one often</span> <a href="http://www.nbcnews.com/news/asian-america/not-all-indians-are-celebrating-kailash-satyarthis-nobel-prize-n227676" target="_blank">brought up for Satyarthi</a><span style="color: #525552;">, with whom Yousafzai shared her prize. &ldquo;I call it &lsquo;atrocity porn,&rsquo;&rdquo; said Sankrant Sanu, of the right-leaning news site Niti Central. &ldquo;It makes people in the West feel good about the burden that is borne because of colonialism. The misery industry helps them assuage that feeling." But the phenomenon of the award has also been received and criticized as a commodity. In the</span> <a href="http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2014/10/10/a-lot-of-pakistanis-hate-their-nobel-winner.html">Daily Beast</a><span style="color: #525552;">, the BBC quoted Tariq Khattack, a former editor of the <em>Pakistan Observer</em>, condemning the prize and Malala: &ldquo;She is a normal, useless type of a girl. Nothing in her is special at all. She&rsquo;s selling what the West will buy.&rdquo;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Does the West really benefit from this? The aesthetic problem of the award is that it welcomes these irrelevant questions for the winners, and not the relevant ones for their cause. Few would dispute Yousafzai&rsquo;s position for peace. Interpreting the image of the prize is to render it counterfeit&mdash;to see Malala as anything but an active agent of Western beneficence would render the imaginary narrative mute. The image of peace cannot be imagined, cannot belong to myth, and cannot continue this narrative of the exotic&mdash;the only solution to this problem is that the image be wholly, and necessarily, authentic.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/183982-stephanie-cristello" target="_blank">Stephanie Cristello</a><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;The author would like to thank Tara Plath for her contributions.<br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">(Image at top:&nbsp;Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres, <em>Grande Odalisque</em>, 1814)</span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> Tue, 21 Oct 2014 14:23:51 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list Frieze Flashback: How To Do An Art Party at Home <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Good evening, art-appreciators! Please pull up a Beuysian chair, with a heap of fat on it, because I have something to ask you:</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Had a good Frieze, did you, reader? Drank some complimentary champagne? Saw at least one instance of 'is this art'? Hung out at Selfridges Hotel, in a dress with spaghetti straps? Wore a black smock instead&mdash;normcore style? Said the words "art market," and didn't even flinch at how serious you were about it? Listened, once, "ironically," to "Anaconda" by Nicki Minaj at an afterparty, and popped your flat, middle-class buttocks outwards-then-inwards-then-outwards-again in a tragic, arrhythmic imitation of a dance-move (it's so much funnier if you're wearing Acne and Isabel Marant, and talking about "contemporaneity," and also, like, not really into <em>that stuff</em>)?</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141020191738-Kim_Beom_Yellow_Scream_2012_image_courtesy_Walker_Arts_Centre.png" alt="" />&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">Ken Beom, Yellow Scream, 2012, Courtesy Walker Arts Center</span><br /></span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">I didn't. Because I spent a long flight in a tin-can blasting back from Hungary last week, leaving me with the kind of flu which would encourage a lesser individual to yelp "I have ebola! I definitely have ebola!" on social media; the kind of running nose which would, if I were a curator of note, be a side-effect from cocaine. I saw Frieze happen only on the internet this year, and as a result, I felt the same way that I did when I watched the better-off kids from my class go on a skiing trip to the Swiss Alps: unsophisticated, d&eacute;mod&eacute;, disconnected, and out of touch.&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">(Which is an undesirable feeling, yes?)</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Let's look, then, at how you might have done Frieze without actually going there:</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">1. Immediately buy some kind of sparkling wine which might pass as champagne. Luckily enough, I found myself with a bottle of Cristal in the fridge which a homosexual housemate had taken from a heterosexual strip-club&mdash;I won't ask how it happened, and I didn't drink it, either (the fug of flu-medicine does that to you&mdash;even to me, who sees champagne as a life-blood), but I was, at least, well-equipped.&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">2. Invite a wealthy couple into your home who have just bought an artwork they don't really care for. This, you will learn, is a special kind of rejuvenation for people who have more money than sense: watch the auctions and see who sells for the most, and you will see which artworks inject a dead-in-the-water money-marriage with another six months of erotic charge.</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">3. Paint your walls white, and I do mean all of them. If nobody else is going to see them, take comfort in the idea that your bedroom&mdash;just that one room, by itself&mdash;is a microcosm of the gallery industry. Hang up a favourite t-shirt (&ldquo;Female Body Inspector&rdquo; even&mdash;so postmodern!), and imagine it as a niche exhibition. What might it mean to the outside world? In my case, it sent a very strong message&mdash;&ldquo;this woman is, somehow, high on Lemsip. Should we call a doctor?&rdquo;</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141020191806-Jenny-Holzer-Money_Creates_Taste_-San-Fran-installation_2010_-_image_courtesy_Ellisism..jpeg" alt="" /><span style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">Jenny Holzer, Money Creates Taste, Installation 2010</span></span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">4. Cordon off a V.I.P. area. This is the part of your house or bedroom which you're only allowed to enter if you are a) press, b) signed to a mega-gallery, or c) an artist of some note. For some of ArtSlant's readers, I admit, this means an awkward weekend of avoiding the space between the bed and the desk, for example, if that's where you've chosen. To circumvent the inconvenience, write yourself an Editor's letter. You can list your position as anything you like (e.g., The Creative Director of Drinking Lemsip and Crying a Bit Over Nothing, Really).</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">5. Obey <em>Vogue</em>'s suggestions as to what you should wear to Frieze, if only because in recent years they seem invested in it. If you lack the designer credentials, try to imagine how what you wear as a layman might fit into <em>Vogue</em>-style copy. For myself, for example: &ldquo;Cramps t-shirt with holes, vintage. Black knickers, Agent Provocateur. Feeling of slight nausea and running nose, Wizz Air Airlines, Hungary.&rdquo;</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">6. Realize that missing a weekend of anything doesn't really hinder your ability to appreciate art. Really&mdash;you have this inherently, if you care about it, and it's still there. You don't need a weekend pass; you don't need accreditation. For all that Frieze's weekend might seem trendy and fun&mdash;and, from what I remember, through the mist of illness, it is&mdash;you are your own best art critic. Look forward to next year. And if nothing else, there's always Art Basel.&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">Art fairs are ephemeral, but (however much I might be tongue-in-cheek about the industry) art is forever, and it's wonderful.&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><em>Man</em>, this Lemsip is some strong shit. Does anyone else need to lie down?</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">&ndash;&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/265136-philippa-snow">Philippa Snow</a></span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-small; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-small; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">(Image on top: Birch &amp; Conran Gallery, Soho)</span></p> Tue, 21 Oct 2014 13:10:02 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list Who is Responsible for the American Dream? <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;"><span style="color: #525552;">I had a dream a couple years ago in which a new, previously unknown continent was discovered on Earth. The knowledge entered my consciousness first like the ambient news of a radio dispatch. It was an impersonal knowledge, born through the slippery medium of dream space, the source of the transmission overlooked as my dream self wondered instead about the profound consequence such a discovery might have on the rest of humankind. The next thing I remember is that I stood on the ground of the new country. It was made of gypsum, entirely empty except for many animals who seemed to have been living there for a very long time. I woke up shortly thereafter in a warm stupor. Imagine the way our concept of global space would change upon discovering that we had, for so many decades, overlooked an entire continent. It would offer so much to the imagination. A blank place to start again. To be reborn, as they say, with the luxury of retaining prior memories. In his first US solo exhibition, Josef Strau examines such a place.</span> <em><a href="http://www.renaissancesociety.org/exhibitions/josef-strau/" target="_blank">The New World, Application for Turtle Island</a>&nbsp;</em><span style="color: #525552;">at</span> <a href="http://www.renaissancesociety.org/" target="_blank">The Renaissance Society</a><span style="color: #525552;"> reflects a <em>real</em> new world: the Americas.</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Leaving University of Chicago&rsquo;s academic corridors behind, The Renaissance Society&rsquo;s double doors act as a portal, opening up on a flood lit, counter intuitively large, modern gallery; Strau uses that sense and shock of arrival into a new space as a backdrop for a series of material assemblages.&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">Positioned throughout the room on various low-lying plinths, or occasionally on the floor, these small islands contain the same family of objects repeated in different configurations: metal gates, or printed flags with those metal gates, or messily painted ceramic tiles so small in comparison as to be easily overlooked. There are a variety of IKEA lamps, the lampshades of which are in some cases still wrapped in plastic. Others are fitted with tasseled shades or garnished with elaborate and lush folk-art-esque sequin paintings of Pocahontas, the Holy Mother of Guadalupe, a bear and a wolf together&mdash;as they so often appear in the rest of the exhibit&mdash;a turtle, a priest, a purple bird. Ceramic bamboo sticks make a regular appearance as well in this tableaux, as do fabrics and flags with Strau&rsquo;s text.&nbsp;Another recurring component is a ceramic turtle&mdash;its shell hollowed out like a dish&mdash;offering itself up, as if suddenly in service.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141017075312-rs_2288.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p class="Default" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><strong>Josef Strau</strong>, <em>Turtle Island </em>(detail), 2014; Courtesy the artist; House of Gaga, Mexico City; Greene Naftali Gallery, New York; and the Renaissance Society, Chicago; Photo: Tom Van Eynde</span></p> <p class="Default" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">If exhibits can have main protagonists, the stars of this one are a wolf and a bear; originally stuffed animals, they appear in the exhibit as unglazed, white plaster multiples. In most instances they appear as a pair, sometimes sitting side by side, sometimes across from one another. Often it looks like they are rowing, and by that simple gesture transform their plinths into rafts, the floor into a kind of metaphorical river. Not surprisingly, Strau references the Mississippi in his book</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">&mdash;another document of the exhibition&mdash;and a</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;photograph of the comical couple also sits on its back cover. The artist photographed the pair when the bear and the wolf still sat plush in his studio. &ldquo;Coincidentally,&rdquo; he writes, &ldquo;I had caught them [in the photograph] while in fact they were reading [my] text poster on the wall next to them. They read very carefully and with great focus obviously. First I just laughed and said to myself, they are probably, aside from 2 or 3 exceptions, the only ones that have read my texts in germany&rdquo;<a title="" href="#_ftn1">[1]</a> </span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;"><span style="color: #525552;">The soft animals consistently appear as friends and allies to the artist, and yet a remarkable conversion takes place. The animals are translated from image into a mold, from which more bears and wolfs are born. These hard representations are frozen in the same position, becoming archetypal. They populate the installation like characters, where each assembled plinth could be one frame of a single comic book. Strau&rsquo;s own book ends in Mexico, where the artist worked with friends to create the publication, which includes the photograph of the bear and wolf. Overall, there is a delineation between the book and the material exhibition.</span>&nbsp;<a href="http://vimeo.com/107928408" target="_blank">In his talk with curator Solveig&nbsp;&Oslash;vsteb&oslash;</a><span style="color: #525552;">, he explains that text occurs in the past, whereas exhibitions appear in the present. Nevertheless there is a real connection: sequential chapters printed on the page, and constellations of objects installed in the gallery are two different kinds of islands, all of which feel similarly fragmented, and personal.</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">The text also begins with friendship, though its account reflects the strange and somewhat accidental unfolding of a new friendship. The way discomfort becomes intimacy. Not surprisingly, the book begins in the old world of Europe; in the second chapter the holocaust enters the artist&rsquo;s thoughts. Or, rather, we enter the artist&rsquo;s family history, and the way one of Strau&rsquo;s aunts escaped the holocaust on a boat to America. Somehow, those stories are also present in the material tableaus Strau assembles for this exhibit. Using objects like characters&mdash;indeed objects that even appear in the text&mdash;he creates a vertiginous mash up of American mythologies. Present in the semiotics of these materials is the decimation of Native Americans; the chains of slavery; even the pangs of America&rsquo;s immigration policies: all threads that remain present while sublimated into the friendly guise of our bear, wolf, and sequin lamps.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141017075420-eVxFz8As5FX0aMps8gZz7IWGE0DMDRJeFcN7pO6ToUQ_SeZpVf3oUl23EcVsSh9SpFGswozYnEvt8xlHBNLhe0Q_eXk-vzjRUR-1RujmWGyTYPLbaTX51GdStkjjCCH23Mo_Yy49qVkeMQ5CU49YtfD2EFiH_A40vQggUwrXqx9Gv9s_t1xMJYClJrXs6jX_cFsxGltZ_m30og2fpBMY.jpg" alt="" />&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="Default" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><strong>J</strong><strong>osef Strau</strong>, <em>Guadalupe Speaks</em>, 2014; Courtesy the artist; House of Gaga, Mexico City; Greene Naftali Gallery, New York; and the Renaissance Society, Chicago; Photo: Tom Van Eynde</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">When Strau talks about this project, he emphasizes an unabashed appreciation and love for this continent. In the show&rsquo;s poster, he even writes, &ldquo;For many months I tried to work on these obviously simple expressions of the happiness in everyday life that I first finally found in my life in these countries on the great continent of the Americas.&rdquo; He describes this work as an act of gratitude.</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Nevertheless, there is an underlying and purposeful ambivalence in the exhibition. A can of Red Bull is nestled into one assortment of things &mdash; the only one of its kind in the whole show&mdash;it sits nevertheless on purpose, a tiny but powerful advocate for enhanced production. The gates are metal, jutting, and fierce; by delineating space they create exclusive borders. Pocahontas&rsquo; prayer repeats on different pedestals where it, like the turtle and even Strau&rsquo;s use of America&rsquo;s original name in his exhibition title, remind the audience that the New World so many of us came to was an ancient home to others. In fact, he reminds us, the Americas represent an idea more than a place&mdash;as a stuffed bear translated into a hard, easily reproduced ideology. America is &ldquo;&lsquo;no country but an invention for foreigners and for immigrants&hellip;garnished with factories of dreams&rsquo;&rdquo;<a title="" href="#_ftn2">[2]</a>. Even the repetitive material of the brand new lamps recall a discount show room for disposable furnishings; the hard white casts of bear, wolf, turtle, sea shell etc.&mdash;those items too are similarly situated within a global economic landscape of mass production, capitalism, and consumerism. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">The <em>new world</em> is always a dream, but it is a complicated one. A place one desires to furnish with affordable and hopeful things. A site for productivity. Strau&rsquo;s own questions resonate as a final word, &ldquo;But what if I tell I [sic] a dream in American? Is this me or something or someone else doing so?&nbsp;Who is responsible for this unconscious American dream and who for the factory?&rdquo;<a title="" href="#_ftn3">[3]</a><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/155816-caroline-picard?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Caroline Picard</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <div style="line-height: 26px;"><hr style="line-height: 26px;" align="left" size="1" width="33%" /> <div style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: small;"><a title="" href="#_ftnref1">[1]</a> <span style="color: #525552;"><em>The New World 1: The Application,&nbsp;</em>p.107</span></span></p> </div> <div style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: small;"><a title="" href="#_ftnref2">[2]</a> <span style="color: #525552;">Ibid. p. 48</span></span></p> </div> <div style="line-height: 26px;"> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: small;"><a title="" href="#_ftnref3">[3]</a> <span style="color: #525552;">Ibid</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-small;">(Image at top:<strong> Josef Strau,</strong> <em>The New World, Application for Turtle Island</em>,&nbsp;Installation view, 2014. Courtesy the artist; House of Gaga, Mexico City; Greene Naftali Gallery, New York; and the Renaissance Society, Chicago; Photo: Tom Van Eynde.)</span></p> </div> </div> Sun, 19 Oct 2014 22:32:04 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list George Grosz' Grotesque Humanity <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">Every bit as run-down as I remember it, the escalator at the tube station ejects me onto the dull&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">evening streets of Archway. In the queue for the cash machine, a flower-seller smiles and asks me&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">to move aside so he can manoeuvre his heavy but empty trolley closer to the curb. As I insert my&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">card, in the light coming from the doors of the bar on&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">the corner, three men with the yellow-grey skin of a longtime drinker bicker and spit. They give&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">me looks as I pass. From within comes the lilting sound of a jig, and I can see that there is further&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">entertainment provided from the three television screens mounted on the walls, each showing a&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">different channel with the sound almost muted. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">I walk up the hill, and a joke told to me years ago&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">surfaces in my mind: if you&rsquo;re shoeless at the bottom of Highgate Hill you&rsquo;re a junkie; if you&rsquo;re&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">shoeless at the top you&rsquo;re an artist. It strikes me as awful both in its class mockery and its complete&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">failure at being funny. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">An incredibly old woman passes me very slowly, fear of the wet leaves on&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">the pavement forcing her to hold onto the wall for support as she descends with shuffling steps. I&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">don&rsquo;t notice her footwear. It&rsquo;s the 10th of October. It&rsquo;s starting to get cold again. Earlier today Ukip&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">had their first MP elected, who told journalists &ldquo;change is coming,&rdquo; and I&rsquo;m on my way to see the&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">Hayward touring exhibition of George Grosz.</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141016121830-The_War_Was_as_Good_as__a_Cure_for_Me.jpeg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; color: #525552;"><strong>George Grosz,</strong><em> T</em><em>he War Was As Good As Cure For Me</em>; Courtesy the estate of George Grosz and the Hayward Gallery</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><em>The Big No</em> brings together two portfolios of work produced in the interregnum between the wars,&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">taking its title from his autobiography&mdash;the wonderfully refusenik <em>A Small Yes and A Big No</em>&mdash;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">which I&rsquo;ve been reading recently to get an idea of the man behind the work. It has a peculiarly&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">humanist, though fundamentally cynical flavor that reminds me of Curzio Malaparte&rsquo;s brilliant&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;"><em>Kaputt</em>, and I have been surprised by Grosz&rsquo;s writing skill; his eagerness to entertain and his&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">lightness of touch make reading it a joy. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">In the exhibition hall the work is presented in tight&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">lines, double-framed at a little less than my head height. I&rsquo;m familiar with the pictures from a book&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">that my father had when I was a child. <em>Ecce Homo</em>, Grosz called the first of the sets, showing for&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">a cover the impassive face of a man with a bruised eye and a hat, a cigar chomped between lips as&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">fat as slugs: a miserable creature wincing into an unseen wind. Here is man. And with Grosz it&rsquo;s&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">always the human&mdash;always the human in pain, wretchedness, or the strange hollow ecstasy of the&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">delight in knowing that whilst they may not suffer personally, there are others close by who do.&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">Humanity is presented as unerringly grotesque, and although much of the work uses the overlaid&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">lines and flat perspectives of expressionism, it&rsquo;s hard to know whether to treat them as a perhaps&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">personalized form of war correspondence; as perhaps in some instances satire so direct as to be&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">libelous; as perhaps incisive&mdash;and caustically realistic&mdash;social commentary disguised as the Sunday&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">funnies; or as perhaps direct propaganda against the excesses of the day. Grosz suggests in his&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">writing that he himself is unable to reconcile these roles.</span></p> <p class="FreeForm" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; color: #525552;"><em>&nbsp;<img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141016122813-The_End.jpeg" alt="" /></em></span></p> <p class="FreeForm" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-small;"><strong>George Grosz</strong>, The<em> End</em>; Courtesy the estate of George Grosz and the Hayward Gallery</span></p> <p class="FreeForm" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="FreeForm" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; text-align: justify;">The work continues with <em>Hintergrund</em>: designs for a stage performance of Ha&scaron;ek&rsquo;s vehemently anti-</span><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">war satire <em>The Good Soldier &Scaron;vejk</em>, deemed so sacrilegious that Grosz faced charges of blasphemy&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">at their publication. The depiction of the suffering and casual violence is hideous, beholden to the&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">ridiculous humor of desperation, and although I joke with a fellow exhibtion-goer that these would&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">make superb repeated prints for clothing or wallpaper, we both agree that the pictures do really&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">retain the power to shock. </span></p> <p class="FreeForm" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">Above the various depictions of the wretchedness are mounted a line&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">of busts; worthies of the hall that the gallery calls its home. The finely-wrought noses of Locke,&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">Newton, and Palladio point forever upwards, slightly away from the tumult, as if in disgust. The&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">irony hasn&rsquo;t been lost on the gallery owners, who have left the spotlights pointed on them. I say my&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">goodbye and make for the descent down the hill, passing the wine bars and restaurants. From one&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">drifts the refrain of a blues song, old, desperate, cracked. I treat myself to a cheap takeaway burger.&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">As I board the bus I take a first bite. The meat is underdone. The pellets of fat clag in my mouth like&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">rubber shot.</span></p> <p class="FreeForm" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; color: #525552;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/387041-thogdin-ripley?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Thogdin Ripley</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; color: #525552;">(Image on top: <strong>George Grosz,&nbsp;</strong>Courtesy the estate of George Grosz and the Hayward Gallery)</span></p> Thu, 16 Oct 2014 16:51:12 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list Frieze on the cheap: Frieze Sounds <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; color: #525552;">Frieze Art Fair is very much not free. A day ticket will cost you &pound;33 this year. If you want to pop in after work, a 5&ndash;7 PM entry is &pound;15. Heaven forbid you want to bring a child. Doing so will set you back &pound;21, even if they sleep through it. Jake Chapman <a href="http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/art/news/a-gallery-visit-leave-the-children-at-home-says-top-artist-9644678.html" target="_blank">recently caused controversy</a> by stating in public that children shouldn&rsquo;t be taken to see contemporary art because they don't get it. In the case of Frieze, I&rsquo;d have to agree with him&mdash;it's unlikely to be worth spending the cash.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">For the thrifty, there are some options for a free "Frieze experience" however. Frieze Sounds is part of the larger umbrella of Frieze Projects, curated by Nicola Lees. Following its New York debut, Frieze Sounds is showcasing three artists whose audio works can be downloaded online, and hence re-experienced to your heart&rsquo;s content&mdash;without having to approach the ticket booth.&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">But if you do make it inside, discreet listening stations are also situated on a few of the walls. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20141016045524-20141015191305-photo.JPG" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">Frieze Projects features artists whose works span genres; Sounds is a great example of the attempt to broaden what happens at the fair. Cally Spooner&rsquo;s </span><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><a href="http://friezeprojectsny.org/sounds/cally-spooner/" target="_blank"><em>The Ballad of Work</em></a></span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;"> is an unaccompanied choral piece, the theme song from her film </span><em style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">And You Were Wonderful, On Stage</em><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;(2013), commercial excerpts of which are also being screened in the auditorium. As such it feels like only a small part of a larger project, at times like listening to a rehearsal for a Philip Glass opera or a part of a rather serious musical, but this makes sense as it acknowledges that Spooner&rsquo;s practice is expansive and multifaceted. The song repeats phrases like &ldquo;learn to work&rdquo; and &ldquo;finalize.&rdquo; The effect of a mass of voices listened to through the privacy of headphones in a giant space is unexpectedly exciting.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">Hannah Weinberger&rsquo;s&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: medium;"><a href="http://friezeprojectsny.org/sounds/hannah-weinberger/" target="_blank"><em><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">Hey</span> </em></a></span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">is composed around her baby&rsquo;s heartbeat, overlaid with a didgeridoo, jazz instruments, and electronic boomerang-type sounds. If you want a trippy experience download it and then wander around the fair.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Because some of the sounds aren&rsquo;t really obvious&mdash;and because aurally as well as visually we always try to identify them, I found myself searching for visual clues about their making.&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">Keren Cytter&rsquo;s work </span><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://friezeprojectsny.org/sounds/keren-cytter/" target="_blank"><em>Constant State of Grace</em></a></span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;"> is the most unsettling of the three. Phrases are repeated above an intensely repetitive sound, dislocating you totally. She&rsquo;s interested in the hypnotizing power of minimalist composition and deconstructed dialogue. I found I shifted between anxiousness and irritation to intense focus, but without my being able to control it. Phrases like &ldquo;I am taking over,&rdquo; &ldquo;concentrate,&rdquo; &ldquo;let it fill with fading colors&rdquo; are disorienting when allowed to be background and freaky when foregrounded.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">If you get the combined ticket to Frieze and Frieze Masters at &pound;50 you could just about see every piece of work, watch a couple of performances and catch two talks. Then again, if you chose not to go to Frieze you can still download <a href="http://friezeprojectsny.org/sounds/" target="_blank">these three tracks</a>, and the audio <a href="http://www.friezeprojects.org/index.php?/talks/" target="_blank">from all the talks</a>, and feel like you&rsquo;ve cheated the system just a tiny bit. I highly recommend Cally Spooner&rsquo;s piece through earphones on the way to work.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/377935-phoebe-stubbs?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Phoebe Stubbs</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-small; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-small; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">(Image on top: Photograph by Linda Nylind; Courtesy of Linda Nylind/Frieze.)</span></p> Thu, 16 Oct 2014 15:58:18 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list Frieze London: Overheard at the VIP Preview <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">Here is a series of eavesdroppings from the first day of the Frieze Art Fair. A pleasure and a parody of itself, the fair is a collection of arms and legs and moans and groans tumbling and trellising over each other. The atmosphere is absurd from the upstart: people want to buy a line, a point, an idea, an experience. This carnival is both carnivorous and celebratory. The reactions to the work and random parley make up a tantalizing network of conversation, collaboration, and cacophony. If we were to map Regent's Park just by everything people said in there, we'd draw routes across every topic under the sun and below the ocean. In the rare moments of total silence, the work of art has transcended even that map, become a moment that extends beyond itself and into awe.&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">At the BMW car park for VIPs</strong></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">"People just don&rsquo;t want to walk that whole nine yards. Literally."</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141015211124-IMG_5284.JPG" alt="" />&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">At the Frieze London VIP preview</strong></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">"It&rsquo;s the sort of show that keeps getting bigger and bigger and bigger!"</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">"He&rsquo;s always off to some foreign country or the other.&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">I&rsquo;ve heard that about a lot of curators."</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">"It&rsquo;s a bit like it&rsquo;s quarter a museum, quarter a gallery, and half a storage space."</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">"I always have two reactions to every work of art, you see."</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">"</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">This work is about seasons. It&rsquo;s bridging the tradition of anti-art and the sublime. It&rsquo;s intentionally poetic."</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">"I&rsquo;ll just follow you around."</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">"We have to hang it horizontally."</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">"Honey, this would look much better in a public space&hellip;"</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">"We can come down to 850,000 pounds&hellip;"</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">"I like it when it doesn&rsquo;t look like art."&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">"It is 1:1 to reality."</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">"Is the art the photograph or the scale?"</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">"Would you say there&rsquo;s an added value of buying female artists since there's not that many in the country yet?"</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">"No&hellip; I don&rsquo;t like it, but I would buy it."</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">"It&rsquo;s so perfectly curved."</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">"He would call himself an artist without distinction."&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">"This photograph is infused with an art historical memory."</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">"It&rsquo;s a conversation between red and green."</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">"It&rsquo;s 45,000 pounds plus tax."&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">"How many editions?"&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">"6."&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">"Unique?"&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">"Uh. No. 6 editions."&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">"How old is the artist?"&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">"She&rsquo;s about 30. She looks great."</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">"I can&rsquo;t wait to see you tomorrow in your sequins!" [Laughter]</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">"Ahhh! This is the White Cube gallery. I find them VERY interesting and really despicable."&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">"I&rsquo;ve heard there&rsquo;s free lager there."&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">"His narrative is very much diaspora."</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">"I know this great hair salon near Hyde Park. You must go there. "</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">"She is a performance artist."&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">"What&rsquo;s a performance artist?"</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">"Emphasis on the vision."</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">"This is a bit unnerving."</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141015211323-IMG_5292.JPG" alt="" /></span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">"If the artist is still alive, the tax is lower. Italy wants to control these things. It was originally made for ancient roman things, but really, just dead fifty years and they make it so hard for us?"</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">"It&rsquo;s good, your mapping of life through art."</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">"You should sell that ten times."</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">"I was with all of them in 1969. There were poor then."</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">"I live on Kensington Palace Gardens."</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">"You have all this rain. There&rsquo;s plenty of time to feel inspired."</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">"There&rsquo;s only one direct flight to Scotland."</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">"</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">Do you remember me?"&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">"No."</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">"I don&rsquo;t want to work with that gallery anymore. They sold my work for a price I didn&rsquo;t agree to."&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">"She lived in the eighteenth century and made decoupage."</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">"I think it&rsquo;s either from Mexico or somewhere in Africa."</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">"It references that moment in British history when there were riots in Tottenham and Brixton."&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">"No matter where you look, it&rsquo;s as if someone else has gone through your thoughts&hellip;"&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">"Time is money!"</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">"I&rsquo;m not drinking till December. I got into my car this morning and realized I was still drunk."</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141015211452-IMG_5295.jpg" alt="" />&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><strong>At Frieze Masters</strong></span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">"Now this has soul."&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">"Do you feel this paint is thin?" [Italian accent]</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">"What condition is it really in?"</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">"Which family owns this?"</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">"They want the mother to sell the painting but the older son is convincing her, no. He wants to push the market."</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">"It&rsquo;s always like this." [Italian accent]</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">"Whose house is the original in? Anyone we know?"&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">"Allora! 150,000 euros? Thank you." [Quick exit]</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">"It&rsquo;s amazing how some people say that is important and all of a sudden, they&rsquo;re important."</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">"He said something about the collection being robbed from his house?" [Hushed whisper]</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">"Strange work, isn&rsquo;t it?"</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">"He asked me if it was vintage. I didn&rsquo;t know what to tell him, since he&rsquo;s a collector and I wasn&rsquo;t sure if he wanted vintage or not."</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/90633-himali-singh-soin?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Himali Singh Soin</a></span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">(All images courtesy of the author)</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> Thu, 16 Oct 2014 23:55:32 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list Frieze Camden: Sarah Lucas' Fried Eggs <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Given that I am now older (although no wiser, perhaps) than I was when I was 21, there are very few things which can coax me over to the Camden area these days. To make your first trip back there after you've reached something sort-of-approximating adulthood is like having the lights flicked on, abruptly, in a low rent simu-dive-bar: Soylent Green may be people, but the human skulls on the bar here are made of B-grade plastic, and the candles shoved into them are melting their crania. Its patina of good-times-rawk-and-roll at the cost of personal dignity has some kitsch appeal, of course, and I do have a soft-spot reserved for it. It's just that in 2014, I seldom find myself in the neighborhood. I cut my hair and got a job, I guess, man&mdash;turned off, tuned out, dropped in again.</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">But there is life in Camden after adulthood, it seems, as demonstrated by the presence of Sarah Lucas there during this year's Frieze Art Fair, executing her performance piece <em>Fried Eggs</em>, for what I believe is the first time. I've a soft-spot for Lucas, too&mdash;like a fake fontanelle on a plastic skull&mdash;and have always had one (in 2005, BBC News actually described her as "the drinking man's Rachel Whiteread," for fuck's sake. How great is that? Honestly, I can't decide whether I'm riled because I'd have like to have thought of the phrase "the drinking man's" myself, or whether it's because I've never had it said about me). As a boozer-filled quasi-dump, it's a wonderful place for an artist of Lucas' renown to find herself not long before representing us in the Venice Biennale&mdash;from the ridiculous, perfectly, to the sublime. It's grit and glamour in extremis. Details about the performance are vague, but I know that it's set to involve the artist&mdash;hold on to your lager cans, reader&mdash;making fried eggs, as a pomo nod to her old work. I'd say if you're able, it's worth the trip to DRAF yourself to watch it unfold in the flesh, or in the yolk and the white, or simply in the pan: though the thing is most list-only, a few open spaces are available at seven on the dot if you're willing to turn up early&mdash;not an ideal prospect for those who keep vampire hours, but fine for the layman.</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141016102619-Sarah-Lucas-2013-by-Julian-Simmons--290x500.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><strong>Sarah Lucas;</strong>&nbsp;Copyright the artist / Courtesy Sadie Coles HQ, London; Photo: Julian Simmons</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">(If you're looking for any tips in egg construction from a personal perspective, meanwhile, Lucas has this to say in a book which, I must confess in the interests of full disclosure, was made in my own place of work: "I aim to get a thick crusty bit on the bottom, especially if I'm going to hang them up&mdash;I use pipe cleaners for this as ordinary wire cuts right through them. And sunny side up, naturally." Naturally!)</span></span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><em>Fried Eggs</em> will be bookended by other works by Quinn Latimer, Megan Rooney, Joe Moran, and Eloise Hawser. There will also, incidentally, be a performance by planningtorock, a name which I recognise from the Spotify playlists of those who are more in touch with contemporary music than I am. And there's the rub, ain't it? Perhaps I'm a better match for the old-timer headbang beat of the Camden strip than I thought. But so be it! I accept my terminally unhip fate. You can look out for me in a bar that's playing Stooges repeats on the jukebox after the DRF shindig, looking defeated, and lighting my cigarette using the flame from a plastic skull. Yeah! Rawk and roll! And for those who are planningtorock like it's the Brit-Art peak&mdash;I salute you.</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/265136-philippa-snow?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Philippa Snow</a></span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">(Image at top:&nbsp;<strong>Sarah Lucas</strong>,&nbsp;<em>Self Portrait with Fried Eggs</em>, 1996;&nbsp;&copy; Sarah Lucas)</span></p> Thu, 16 Oct 2014 15:56:58 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list #FriezeMania: The London Instagrammies <p><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; line-height: 26px; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">If only real life were more like Frieze: a psychotropic world full where adults jump without fear through giant dice and emoji come to life. Look closer, and you'll see the colorful people, bobbles jangling copiously from every seam; the artwork might even pass you by as another vermillion suit-clad publisher slides by; this is the time the chrysalis is shed, and the beautiful butterflies inside, emerging to live and flourish for only a few days, flee towards their nectar: the front-facing camera.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; line-height: 26px; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">Here are ArtSlant's Frieze London Instagrammies: proof that the art world is a hallucination.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong><span style="color: #525552; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">BEST DANIEL CRAIG LOOKALIKE</span></strong></p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 658px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-version="2"> <div style="padding: 8px;"> <div style="background: #F8F8F8; line-height: 0; margin-top: 40px; padding-bottom: 55%; padding-top: 45%; text-align: center; width: 100%;"> <div style="position: relative;"> <div style="-webkit-animation: dkaXkpbBxI 1s ease-out infinite; animation: dkaXkpbBxI 1s ease-out infinite; background: url(data:image/png; base64,ivborw0kggoaaaansuheugaaacwaaaascamaaaapwqozaaaagfbmveuiiii9pt0ehh4gib4hibkchbwchbwchbydr+jqaaaachrstlmaba4yhyqsm5jtamwaaadfsurbvdjl7zvbegmhcaqbaf//42xcnbpaqakcm0ftumfaaibe81iqbjds3ls6zs3bipb9wed3yyxfpmhrft8sgyrcp1x8ueuxlmznwelfoycv6mhwwwmzdpekhlhlw7nwjqkhc4uizphavdza2jpzudsbzzinae2s6owh8xpmx8g7zzgkeopuoyhvgz1tbcxmkd3kwnvbu0gkhkx+izilf77iofhry1nyfnb/lqpb79drwoyjva/davg9b/rlb4cc+nqgdz/tvbbbnr6gbreqn/nrmdgaqeej7whonozjf+y2i/fzou/qaaaaaelftksuqmcc); display: block; height: 44px; margin: 0 auto -44px; position: relative; top: -44px; width: 44px;">&nbsp;</div> <span style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 12px; font-style: normal; font-weight: bold; position: relative; top: 15px;">Loading</span></div> </div> <p style="font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px; word-wrap: break-word;">Andro Wekua at Spr&uuml;th Magers #Frieze2014</p> <p style="line-height: 32px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; padding: 0; text-align: center;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; text-decoration: none;" href="https://instagram.com/p/uGvOaXyJ6F/" target="_top"> View on Instagram</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <script type="text/javascript" src="//platform.instagram.com/en_US/embeds.js" defer="defer"></script> <p><span style="color: #525552; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="color: #525552; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><strong><span style="color: #525552; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">BEST DOUCHE</span></strong></p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 658px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-version="2"> <div style="padding: 8px;"> <div style="background: #F8F8F8; line-height: 0; margin-top: 40px; padding-bottom: 55%; padding-top: 45%; text-align: center; width: 100%;"> <div style="position: relative;"> <div style="-webkit-animation: dkaXkpbBxI 1s ease-out infinite; animation: dkaXkpbBxI 1s ease-out infinite; background: url(data:image/png; base64,ivborw0kggoaaaansuheugaaacwaaaascamaaaapwqozaaaagfbmveuiiii9pt0ehh4gib4hibkchbwchbwchbydr+jqaaaachrstlmaba4yhyqsm5jtamwaaadfsurbvdjl7zvbegmhcaqbaf//42xcnbpaqakcm0ftumfaaibe81iqbjds3ls6zs3bipb9wed3yyxfpmhrft8sgyrcp1x8ueuxlmznwelfoycv6mhwwwmzdpekhlhlw7nwjqkhc4uizphavdza2jpzudsbzzinae2s6owh8xpmx8g7zzgkeopuoyhvgz1tbcxmkd3kwnvbu0gkhkx+izilf77iofhry1nyfnb/lqpb79drwoyjva/davg9b/rlb4cc+nqgdz/tvbbbnr6gbreqn/nrmdgaqeej7whonozjf+y2i/fzou/qaaaaaelftksuqmcc); display: block; height: 44px; margin: 0 auto -44px; position: relative; top: -44px; width: 44px;">&nbsp;</div> <span style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 12px; font-style: normal; font-weight: bold; position: relative; top: 15px;">Loading</span></div> </div> <p style="font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px; word-wrap: break-word;">#goodtoknow #thisisart #frieze2014</p> <p style="line-height: 32px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; padding: 0; text-align: center;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; text-decoration: none;" href="https://instagram.com/p/uDQyrpFS_d/" target="_top"> View on Instagram</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <script type="text/javascript" src="//platform.instagram.com/en_US/embeds.js" defer="defer"></script> <p><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; line-height: 26px; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; line-height: 26px; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><strong><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; line-height: 26px; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">BEST SAD DICK NOSE</span></strong></p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 658px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-version="2"> <div style="padding: 8px;"> <div style="background: #F8F8F8; line-height: 0; margin-top: 40px; padding-bottom: 55%; padding-top: 45%; text-align: center; width: 100%;"> <div style="position: relative;"> <div style="-webkit-animation: dkaXkpbBxI 1s ease-out infinite; animation: dkaXkpbBxI 1s ease-out infinite; background: url(data:image/png; base64,ivborw0kggoaaaansuheugaaacwaaaascamaaaapwqozaaaagfbmveuiiii9pt0ehh4gib4hibkchbwchbwchbydr+jqaaaachrstlmaba4yhyqsm5jtamwaaadfsurbvdjl7zvbegmhcaqbaf//42xcnbpaqakcm0ftumfaaibe81iqbjds3ls6zs3bipb9wed3yyxfpmhrft8sgyrcp1x8ueuxlmznwelfoycv6mhwwwmzdpekhlhlw7nwjqkhc4uizphavdza2jpzudsbzzinae2s6owh8xpmx8g7zzgkeopuoyhvgz1tbcxmkd3kwnvbu0gkhkx+izilf77iofhry1nyfnb/lqpb79drwoyjva/davg9b/rlb4cc+nqgdz/tvbbbnr6gbreqn/nrmdgaqeej7whonozjf+y2i/fzou/qaaaaaelftksuqmcc); display: block; height: 44px; margin: 0 auto -44px; position: relative; top: -44px; width: 44px;">&nbsp;</div> <span style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 12px; font-style: normal; font-weight: bold; position: relative; top: 15px;">Loading</span></div> </div> <p style="font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px; word-wrap: break-word;">#Kaws #FriezeLondon</p> <p style="line-height: 32px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; padding: 0; text-align: center;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; text-decoration: none;" href="https://instagram.com/p/uLLDjlnW8z/" target="_top"> View on Instagram</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <script type="text/javascript" src="//platform.instagram.com/en_US/embeds.js" defer="defer"></script> <p><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; line-height: 26px; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; line-height: 26px; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><strong><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; line-height: 26px; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">BEST PLACE TO STORE YOUR COFFEE&nbsp;</span></strong></p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 658px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-version="2"> <div style="padding: 8px;"> <div style="background: #F8F8F8; line-height: 0; margin-top: 40px; padding-bottom: 55%; padding-top: 45%; text-align: center; width: 100%;"> <div style="position: relative;"> <div style="-webkit-animation: dkaXkpbBxI 1s ease-out infinite; animation: dkaXkpbBxI 1s ease-out infinite; background: url(data:image/png; base64,ivborw0kggoaaaansuheugaaacwaaaascamaaaapwqozaaaagfbmveuiiii9pt0ehh4gib4hibkchbwchbwchbydr+jqaaaachrstlmaba4yhyqsm5jtamwaaadfsurbvdjl7zvbegmhcaqbaf//42xcnbpaqakcm0ftumfaaibe81iqbjds3ls6zs3bipb9wed3yyxfpmhrft8sgyrcp1x8ueuxlmznwelfoycv6mhwwwmzdpekhlhlw7nwjqkhc4uizphavdza2jpzudsbzzinae2s6owh8xpmx8g7zzgkeopuoyhvgz1tbcxmkd3kwnvbu0gkhkx+izilf77iofhry1nyfnb/lqpb79drwoyjva/davg9b/rlb4cc+nqgdz/tvbbbnr6gbreqn/nrmdgaqeej7whonozjf+y2i/fzou/qaaaaaelftksuqmcc); display: block; height: 44px; margin: 0 auto -44px; position: relative; top: -44px; width: 44px;">&nbsp;</div> <span style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 12px; font-style: normal; font-weight: bold; position: relative; top: 15px;">Loading</span></div> </div> <p style="font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px; word-wrap: break-word;">Walking piece of art in #CollCortes #Frieze #FriezeMasters</p> <p style="line-height: 32px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; padding: 0; text-align: center;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; text-decoration: none;" href="https://instagram.com/p/uLe8P0jaCj/" target="_top"> View on Instagram</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <script type="text/javascript" src="//platform.instagram.com/en_US/embeds.js" defer="defer"></script> <p><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; line-height: 26px; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; line-height: 26px; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><strong><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; line-height: 26px; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">BEST DYSTOPIC VISION OF THE FUTURE</span></strong></p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 658px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-version="2"> <div style="padding: 8px;"> <div style="background: #F8F8F8; line-height: 0; margin-top: 40px; padding-bottom: 55%; padding-top: 45%; text-align: center; width: 100%;"> <div style="position: relative;"> <div style="-webkit-animation: dkaXkpbBxI 1s ease-out infinite; animation: dkaXkpbBxI 1s ease-out infinite; background: url(data:image/png; base64,ivborw0kggoaaaansuheugaaacwaaaascamaaaapwqozaaaagfbmveuiiii9pt0ehh4gib4hibkchbwchbwchbydr+jqaaaachrstlmaba4yhyqsm5jtamwaaadfsurbvdjl7zvbegmhcaqbaf//42xcnbpaqakcm0ftumfaaibe81iqbjds3ls6zs3bipb9wed3yyxfpmhrft8sgyrcp1x8ueuxlmznwelfoycv6mhwwwmzdpekhlhlw7nwjqkhc4uizphavdza2jpzudsbzzinae2s6owh8xpmx8g7zzgkeopuoyhvgz1tbcxmkd3kwnvbu0gkhkx+izilf77iofhry1nyfnb/lqpb79drwoyjva/davg9b/rlb4cc+nqgdz/tvbbbnr6gbreqn/nrmdgaqeej7whonozjf+y2i/fzou/qaaaaaelftksuqmcc); display: block; height: 44px; margin: 0 auto -44px; position: relative; top: -44px; width: 44px;">&nbsp;</div> <span style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 12px; font-style: normal; font-weight: bold; position: relative; top: 15px;">Loading</span></div> </div> <p style="font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px; word-wrap: break-word;">Say Frieze!</p> <p style="line-height: 32px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; padding: 0; text-align: center;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; text-decoration: none;" href="https://instagram.com/p/uK30dKwKB-/" target="_top"> View on Instagram</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <script type="text/javascript" src="//platform.instagram.com/en_US/embeds.js" defer="defer"></script> <p><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; line-height: 26px; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; line-height: 26px; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><strong><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; line-height: 26px; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">BEST HOMOEROTIC MOMENT</span></strong></p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 658px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-version="2"> <div style="padding: 8px;"> <div style="background: #F8F8F8; line-height: 0; margin-top: 40px; padding-bottom: 55%; padding-top: 45%; text-align: center; width: 100%;"> <div style="position: relative;"> <div style="-webkit-animation: dkaXkpbBxI 1s ease-out infinite; animation: dkaXkpbBxI 1s ease-out infinite; background: url(data:image/png; base64,ivborw0kggoaaaansuheugaaacwaaaascamaaaapwqozaaaagfbmveuiiii9pt0ehh4gib4hibkchbwchbwchbydr+jqaaaachrstlmaba4yhyqsm5jtamwaaadfsurbvdjl7zvbegmhcaqbaf//42xcnbpaqakcm0ftumfaaibe81iqbjds3ls6zs3bipb9wed3yyxfpmhrft8sgyrcp1x8ueuxlmznwelfoycv6mhwwwmzdpekhlhlw7nwjqkhc4uizphavdza2jpzudsbzzinae2s6owh8xpmx8g7zzgkeopuoyhvgz1tbcxmkd3kwnvbu0gkhkx+izilf77iofhry1nyfnb/lqpb79drwoyjva/davg9b/rlb4cc+nqgdz/tvbbbnr6gbreqn/nrmdgaqeej7whonozjf+y2i/fzou/qaaaaaelftksuqmcc); display: block; height: 44px; margin: 0 auto -44px; position: relative; top: -44px; width: 44px;">&nbsp;</div> <span style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 12px; font-style: normal; font-weight: bold; position: relative; top: 15px;">Loading</span></div> </div> <p style="font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px; word-wrap: break-word;">I'm off to @friezeartfair today. So looking forward to it. #friezelondon #FriezeLive #FriezeProjects #RegentsPark #ArtWatch #PeolpeWatch #LoveMyJob</p> <p style="line-height: 32px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; padding: 0; text-align: center;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; text-decoration: none;" href="https://instagram.com/p/uKkazCGj7J/" target="_top"> View on Instagram</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <script type="text/javascript" src="//platform.instagram.com/en_US/embeds.js" defer="defer"></script> <p><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; line-height: 26px; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; line-height: 26px; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><strong><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; line-height: 26px; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">BEST METROSEXUAL LOOK</span></strong></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" lang="en"> <p>Post apocalypse man, in CELINE coat, natch. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/FriezeLondon?src=hash">#FriezeLondon</a> Roe Ethridge <a href="http://t.co/qunO58OA9Z">pic.twitter.com/qunO58OA9Z</a></p> &mdash; Sanela Lazic (@SaniSupreme) <a href="https://twitter.com/SaniSupreme/status/391567724742049792">October 19, 2013</a></blockquote> <script charset="utf-8" type="text/javascript" src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js"></script> <p><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; line-height: 26px; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; line-height: 26px; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;"><strong><span style="line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">BEST SERIAL KILLER SMILE</span></strong><span style="color: #525552; line-height: 26px;"><br /></span></span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" lang="en"> <p><a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/friezelondon?src=hash">#friezelondon</a> happy artists at an art fair: Grayson Perry and Carsten Holler <a href="http://t.co/BIwW0JUHqq">pic.twitter.com/BIwW0JUHqq</a></p> &mdash; Gareth Harris (@garethharr) <a href="https://twitter.com/garethharr/status/522012418864873472">October 14, 2014</a></blockquote> <script charset="utf-8" type="text/javascript" src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js"></script> <p><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; line-height: 26px; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; line-height: 26px; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><strong><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">BEST FAIR ENTRANCE</span></strong></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" lang="en"> <p><a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/FriezeLondon?src=hash">#FriezeLondon</a> opens today and it's more entertaining than ever... <a href="http://t.co/nmYL8RdOka">http://t.co/nmYL8RdOka</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/friezemasters?src=hash">#friezemasters</a> <a href="http://t.co/8LNarAvod2">pic.twitter.com/8LNarAvod2</a></p> &mdash; Standard Going Out (@ESgoingout) <a href="https://twitter.com/ESgoingout/status/522394044966531073">October 15, 2014</a></blockquote> <p><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; line-height: 26px; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; line-height: 26px; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><strong><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">BEST SEX DOLL DRESSED AS A WOMAN</span></strong></p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 658px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-version="2"> <div style="padding: 8px;"> <div style="background: #F8F8F8; line-height: 0; margin-top: 40px; padding-bottom: 55%; padding-top: 45%; text-align: center; width: 100%;"> <div style="position: relative;"> <div style="-webkit-animation: dkaXkpbBxI 1s ease-out infinite; animation: dkaXkpbBxI 1s ease-out infinite; background: url(data:image/png; base64,ivborw0kggoaaaansuheugaaacwaaaascamaaaapwqozaaaagfbmveuiiii9pt0ehh4gib4hibkchbwchbwchbydr+jqaaaachrstlmaba4yhyqsm5jtamwaaadfsurbvdjl7zvbegmhcaqbaf//42xcnbpaqakcm0ftumfaaibe81iqbjds3ls6zs3bipb9wed3yyxfpmhrft8sgyrcp1x8ueuxlmznwelfoycv6mhwwwmzdpekhlhlw7nwjqkhc4uizphavdza2jpzudsbzzinae2s6owh8xpmx8g7zzgkeopuoyhvgz1tbcxmkd3kwnvbu0gkhkx+izilf77iofhry1nyfnb/lqpb79drwoyjva/davg9b/rlb4cc+nqgdz/tvbbbnr6gbreqn/nrmdgaqeej7whonozjf+y2i/fzou/qaaaaaelftksuqmcc); display: block; height: 44px; margin: 0 auto -44px; position: relative; top: -44px; width: 44px;">&nbsp;</div> <span style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 12px; font-style: normal; font-weight: bold; position: relative; top: 15px;">Loading</span></div> </div> <p style="font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px; word-wrap: break-word;">#friezeweek the lovely #pandemonia @pandemonia99 #operagallery #nightsouts#plasticfantastic #chic #style own it</p> <p style="line-height: 32px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; padding: 0; text-align: center;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; text-decoration: none;" href="https://instagram.com/p/uJuOZowHC9/" target="_top"> View on Instagram</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <script type="text/javascript" src="//platform.instagram.com/en_US/embeds.js" defer="defer"></script> <p><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; line-height: 26px; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; line-height: 26px; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><strong><span style="color: #525552; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">BEST INTERACTION WITH A MOVING MUSHROOM</span></strong></p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 658px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-version="2"> <div style="padding: 8px;"> <div style="background: #F8F8F8; line-height: 0; margin-top: 40px; padding-bottom: 55%; padding-top: 45%; text-align: center; width: 100%;"> <div style="position: relative;"> <div style="-webkit-animation: dkaXkpbBxI 1s ease-out infinite; animation: dkaXkpbBxI 1s ease-out infinite; background: url(data:image/png; base64,ivborw0kggoaaaansuheugaaacwaaaascamaaaapwqozaaaagfbmveuiiii9pt0ehh4gib4hibkchbwchbwchbydr+jqaaaachrstlmaba4yhyqsm5jtamwaaadfsurbvdjl7zvbegmhcaqbaf//42xcnbpaqakcm0ftumfaaibe81iqbjds3ls6zs3bipb9wed3yyxfpmhrft8sgyrcp1x8ueuxlmznwelfoycv6mhwwwmzdpekhlhlw7nwjqkhc4uizphavdza2jpzudsbzzinae2s6owh8xpmx8g7zzgkeopuoyhvgz1tbcxmkd3kwnvbu0gkhkx+izilf77iofhry1nyfnb/lqpb79drwoyjva/davg9b/rlb4cc+nqgdz/tvbbbnr6gbreqn/nrmdgaqeej7whonozjf+y2i/fzou/qaaaaaelftksuqmcc); display: block; height: 44px; margin: 0 auto -44px; position: relative; top: -44px; width: 44px;">&nbsp;</div> <span style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 12px; font-style: normal; font-weight: bold; position: relative; top: 15px;">Loading</span></div> </div> <p style="font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px; word-wrap: break-word;">Touchy feely musical magic mushroom at #PrivateView at #FriezeLondon @hannahweall</p> <p style="font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px; word-wrap: break-word;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px; word-wrap: break-word;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px; word-wrap: break-word;">&nbsp;</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; line-height: 26px; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; line-height: 26px; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><strong><span style="color: #525552; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">BEST SHOT OF A DISPLACED CULT WHO ARE DISGUISED AS BREAST CANCER AWARENESS CAMPAIGNERS</span></strong></p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 658px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-version="2"> <div style="padding: 8px;"> <div style="background: #F8F8F8; line-height: 0; margin-top: 40px; padding-bottom: 55%; padding-top: 45%; text-align: center; width: 100%;"> <div style="position: relative;"> <div style="-webkit-animation: dkaXkpbBxI 1s ease-out infinite; animation: dkaXkpbBxI 1s ease-out infinite; background: url(data:image/png; base64,ivborw0kggoaaaansuheugaaacwaaaascamaaaapwqozaaaagfbmveuiiii9pt0ehh4gib4hibkchbwchbwchbydr+jqaaaachrstlmaba4yhyqsm5jtamwaaadfsurbvdjl7zvbegmhcaqbaf//42xcnbpaqakcm0ftumfaaibe81iqbjds3ls6zs3bipb9wed3yyxfpmhrft8sgyrcp1x8ueuxlmznwelfoycv6mhwwwmzdpekhlhlw7nwjqkhc4uizphavdza2jpzudsbzzinae2s6owh8xpmx8g7zzgkeopuoyhvgz1tbcxmkd3kwnvbu0gkhkx+izilf77iofhry1nyfnb/lqpb79drwoyjva/davg9b/rlb4cc+nqgdz/tvbbbnr6gbreqn/nrmdgaqeej7whonozjf+y2i/fzou/qaaaaaelftksuqmcc); display: block; height: 44px; margin: 0 auto -44px; position: relative; top: -44px; width: 44px;">&nbsp;</div> <span style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 12px; font-style: normal; font-weight: bold; position: relative; top: 15px;">Loading</span></div> </div> <p style="font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px; word-wrap: break-word;">Keep your friends close... @friezeartfair #frieze #london #art</p> <p style="line-height: 32px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; padding: 0; text-align: center;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; text-decoration: none;" href="https://instagram.com/p/uKldk_o_Bq/" target="_top"> View on Instagram</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; line-height: 26px; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; line-height: 26px; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><strong><span style="color: #525552; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">BEST DISINGENUOUS PRADA HASHTAG</span></strong></p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 658px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-version="2"> <div style="padding: 8px;"> <div style="background: #F8F8F8; line-height: 0; margin-top: 40px; padding-bottom: 55%; padding-top: 45%; text-align: center; width: 100%;"> <div style="position: relative;"> <div style="-webkit-animation: dkaXkpbBxI 1s ease-out infinite; animation: dkaXkpbBxI 1s ease-out infinite; background: url(data:image/png; base64,ivborw0kggoaaaansuheugaaacwaaaascamaaaapwqozaaaagfbmveuiiii9pt0ehh4gib4hibkchbwchbwchbydr+jqaaaachrstlmaba4yhyqsm5jtamwaaadfsurbvdjl7zvbegmhcaqbaf//42xcnbpaqakcm0ftumfaaibe81iqbjds3ls6zs3bipb9wed3yyxfpmhrft8sgyrcp1x8ueuxlmznwelfoycv6mhwwwmzdpekhlhlw7nwjqkhc4uizphavdza2jpzudsbzzinae2s6owh8xpmx8g7zzgkeopuoyhvgz1tbcxmkd3kwnvbu0gkhkx+izilf77iofhry1nyfnb/lqpb79drwoyjva/davg9b/rlb4cc+nqgdz/tvbbbnr6gbreqn/nrmdgaqeej7whonozjf+y2i/fzou/qaaaaaelftksuqmcc); display: block; height: 44px; margin: 0 auto -44px; position: relative; top: -44px; width: 44px;">&nbsp;</div> <span style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 12px; font-style: normal; font-weight: bold; position: relative; top: 15px;">Loading</span></div> </div> <p style="font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px; word-wrap: break-word;">Frieze, in the name of art! #friezeselfie #badpunnight #friezelondon #art #ootd #wiwt #hotd #prada #saffiano #elietahari #valentino</p> <p style="line-height: 32px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; padding: 0; text-align: center;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; text-decoration: none;" href="https://instagram.com/p/uJOLAyxMdr/" target="_top"> View on Instagram</a></p> </div> </blockquote> Thu, 16 Oct 2014 14:07:49 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list An American Response on the Default Man <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552; line-height: 24px;">Grayson Perry, Turner Prize winning potter, weaver, draftsman, transvestite and Brit wrote a poignant essay on the "Default Man" last week for<a href="http://www.newstatesman.com/culture/2014/10/grayson-perry-rise-and-fall-default-man" target="_blank">&nbsp;The New Statesman</a><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552; line-height: 24px;">. While he applied his critique of&nbsp;embedded&nbsp;privilege&nbsp;to England&nbsp;alone,&nbsp;this concept most definitely exists internationally and particularly, in Western cultures where white, straight, middle-class males are the dominant, benevolent rulers.</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552; line-height: 24px;">This, like any other western nation, is a country of the Default Man. The Default Man&mdash;white, middle-class, heterosexual and usually middle-aged&mdash;is so dominant and prevalent and foundational to the structure of the Western world that it is difficult to distinguish their cultural norms from those of the country itself. The Default Man&rsquo;s identity is rooted in power and structure and because he has always had it (at least in our collected ideas of history), our society is still rooted in that stronghold. </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552; line-height: 24px;">And this Default Man culture was built and thrives under the idea of the Other, meaning anyone non white, non-middle or upper class, non-heterosexual, non-middle-aged and not a man. Perry writes, &ldquo;The Default Male gaze... looks down on society like the eye on Sauron&rsquo;s tower in The Lord of the Rings. Every other identity group is 'othered' by it.&rdquo; And later: </span></p> <blockquote><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552; line-height: 24px;">Default Man feels he is the reference point from which all other values and cultures are judged. Default Man is the zero longitude of identities. He has forged a society very much in his own image, to the point where now much of what other groups think and feel is the same. They take on the attitudes of Default Man because they are the attitudes of our elders, our education, our government, our media. If Default Men approve of something it must be good, and if they disapprove it must be bad, so people end up hating themselves, because their internalized Default Man is berating them for being female, gay, black, silly or wild. </span></blockquote> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552; line-height: 24px;">James Baldwin once described this idea in terms of blackness, perhaps the most othered human in the United States, when he wrote, &ldquo;To be black and conscious in America is to be in a constant stage of rage.&rdquo; We have internalized and understood the structure of the system for generations, from birth. </span></p> <div style="float: left; width: 250px; font-size: small; text-align: center; margin-right: 30px;"><img style="padding-bottom: 10px;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20141015181140-James_baldwin.jpg" alt="James Baldwin in 1971" width="250" /> <p style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: small; color: #525552;">James Baldwin in 1971</p> </div> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552; line-height: 24px;">Whiteness as a concept exists strongly in the United States, but it can also be the most challenged here as well. Rooted in our legacy is a culture of disruption. The United States, a nation of birth and rebirth, is formed on the idea that the norm is not the standard. Even if, historically, our challenges were more greed-driven than anything else, the very structure of this country is founded on the possibility of change. Nothing is set in stone. </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552; line-height: 24px;">But the hold is not impenetrable. For one, to accept the structure completely is to give in to the power of it. One can&rsquo;t penetrate something that they don&rsquo;t believe is penetrable. For any one human, a structural wall is still a wall. How can we break through it? To break through requires thought that looks at the system of the Default not as if &ldquo;same as it ever was&rdquo; is the only truth, but instead as something that can be molded, smashed&hellip; even eradicated. </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552; line-height: 24px;">The easiest and most powerful method of disruption is the full and active acceptance of the self, the Othered community and the culture that community has built for itself. </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552; line-height: 24px;">Perry looks at communities with a critical eye. In the essay, he wrote: </span></p> <blockquote> <p><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552; line-height: 24px;">"Communities" are defined in the eye of Default Man. Community seems to be a euphemism for the vulnerable lower orders. Community is &ldquo;other&rdquo;. Communities usually seem to be embattled, separate from society. &ldquo;Society&rdquo; is what Default Man belongs to. </span></p> </blockquote> <div style="float: right; width: 250px; font-size: small; text-align: center; margin-right: 30px;"><img style="padding-bottom: 10px;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20141015182641-WEB_DuBois_1918.jpg" alt="James Baldwin in 1971" width="250" /> <p style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: small; color: #525552;">W.E.B. DuBois</p> </div> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552; line-height: 24px;">But communities, regardless of whether or not they are structured on the standards of the default, are necessary in combatting the acts against the Other. Individualism is ultimately rootless in contemporary society. The one cannot speak for the many, and the successes of the one do not displace the insidious cultural structure that allows Others to be othered in the first place. The W.E.B. Du Bois way of viewing progress of the Other only works to a limit. If you are black or gay or poor or a woman, what you need most is a community of other others to support and help dismantle the structures of the Default and specifically, the Default Man. </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552; line-height: 24px;">The default can thrive so long as its identity is seen not as an identity but as the norm. The norm is a place of power because it is structured as a place without questioning. As Perry wrote: </span></p> <blockquote> <p><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552; line-height: 24px;">...identity only seems to become an issue when it is challenged or under threat. Our classic Default Man is rarely under existential threat; consequently, his identity remains unexamined. It ambles along blithely, never having to stand up for its rights or to defend its homeland.</span></p> </blockquote> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552; line-height: 24px;">Otherness is predicated on the dominance of the norm. Otherness is predicated on creating an identity for the other and automatically rejecting it. </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552; line-height: 24px;">The disintegration of the default comes not through challenge, but through the &ldquo;Other&rdquo; finding and building value through their otherness. Embracing Otherness is a radical, transformative act. To embrace otherness is to reject the shame and self-hatred the default works tirelessly to maintain in the other. </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552; line-height: 24px;">In </span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 24px;">James Baldwin's&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 24px;">revolutionary text </span><em style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 24px;">The Fire Next Time</em><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 24px;">&nbsp;he wrote, &ldquo;We, with love, shall force our brothers to see themselves as they are, to cease fleeing from reality and begin to change it. For this is your home, my friend, do not be driven from it; great men have done great things here, and will again, and we can make America what America must become.&rdquo; And I, too, believe this is possible even now, decades and decades later. The power of change is found not in conflict or in theory, but in the embrace of ourselves. By embracing ourselves, we are rejecting the negativity, the Otherness given to us. To embrace ourselves is to weaken the Default Man, his legacy, and his future.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552; line-height: 24px;">Radical self-acceptance is the true agent of change. Inherent in breaking down the default is transforming, bit by bit, those within the default. The transformation occurs with the biggest bang of all: the gaining and taking back of one&rsquo;s humanity. The default thrives in withholding humanity. The other thrives in taking it back for themselves. </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552; line-height: 24px;">Baldwin&rsquo;s words ring truer than ever right now for anyone Othered, for anyone facing the reality of the Default Man and the very real possibility of their demise. &ldquo;Any upheaval in the universe is terrifying because it so profoundly attacks one's sense of one's own reality,&rdquo; Baldwin wrote. &ldquo;Well, the black man has functioned in the white man's world as a fixed star, as an immovable pillar: and as he moves out of his place, heaven and earth are shaken to their foundations. You, don't be afraid." </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552; line-height: 24px;">Let us welcome the threat of the default man to our public consciousness. Let us use this time as a chance to reclaim ourselves.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552; line-height: 24px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552; line-height: 24px;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/403553-britt-julious?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Britt Julious</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552; line-height: 24px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-small; color: #525552; line-height: 24px;">(Image at top: <strong>Grayson Perry</strong>,&nbsp;<em>The Upper Class at Bay</em>, 2012, Wool, cotton, acrylic, polyester and silk tapestry,&nbsp;200 x 400 cm)</span></p> Wed, 15 Oct 2014 20:38:19 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list Carry Your Ghosts: Ryan McGinley, Dan Colen, and the Specters of Youth <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">When I moved to New York in 2007 one of the first things I picked up was a copy of <em>New York Magazine</em> with Dash Snow, Dan Colen, and Ryan McGinley in bed together on the cover. <a href="http://societalvengeance.tumblr.com/post/65035373248/i-literally-got-a-ladder-climbed-on-top-of" target="_blank">The image</a>, shot by Cass Bird, has stayed with me. It shows a bird&rsquo;s-eye view of three friends in their underwear, snuggled together like a small litter of puppies. The picture is intimate but it becomes oddly intrusive on a magazine cover, in part because no one is making eye contact with the photographer. Instead all three either sleep or feign sleep, creating a perceived lack of connection between the subject and photographer, which makes the image seem more like a voyeur&rsquo;s one-way street. It kindles the fictional fires of nearness between the viewed and the viewer.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">For me, it is an archetypal image of friendship. These three friends represented an effortless blend of life and art, and that was exciting because the lives that came through in their art looked dangerous and radical, loving and wildly alive, running on the highest-octane fuel one could imagine. They were friends who appeared to genuinely inspire one another. That seemed mythical, almost magical. Very few are lucky enough to have those kinds of friendships.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Less than two years later Dash Snow was dead in a hotel room. Dan Colen had sobered up and Ryan McGinley was out of New York leading epic photo escapades around the United States. I remember going to a memorial exhibition at Deitch Projects for Dash. I went a few times because I lived nearby. By the end of the run I&rsquo;d noticed there were photos missing. They&rsquo;d been stolen, I learned from the gallerist, and to me that seemed a fitting tribute to a man who ran with a crew notorious for kleptomania and general anarchy. That was the last show of Dash&rsquo;s work that I&rsquo;ve seen.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">I dredge these thoughts up because they always come to the surface when I see shows by Dan Colen and Ryan McGinley, both of whom were given the opening exhibition slot of the fall season: Colen at Gagosian gallery and McGinley at Team gallery. These artists have come a long way from the rambunctiousness that ushered them into the art world. They&rsquo;ve cooled off and leveled out and though their work has little in common, the conjunction of their two exhibitions felt like some kind of reunion, even if only coincidental.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141015103437-yearbook_install.jpg" alt="ryan mcginley team gallery" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-small;">Ryan&nbsp;McGinley</strong><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-small;">, Installation&nbsp;view,&nbsp;</span><em style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-small;">YEARBOOK</em><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-small;">,&nbsp;team&nbsp;(gallery, inc.), 2014; Image&nbsp;courtesy&nbsp;of&nbsp;team&nbsp;(gallery, inc.), New York; Photo:&nbsp;Joerg&nbsp;Lohse</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">I&rsquo;m going to start with McGinley&rsquo;s recently closed show, <em><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/350686-yearbook" target="_blank">YEARBOOK</a>. </em>This show was the third in a trilogy of exhibitions that have come out of McGinley&rsquo;s studio portraits, and it may be the least photographic. For <em>YEARBOOK&nbsp;</em>the artist printed a few hundred portraits on vinyl and covered the gallery&rsquo;s walls and ceiling. It was a rainbow-hued spectacle of fair skinned, pretty young people&mdash;all comfortably nude&mdash;shot against different colored paper. No single photograph was given any more weight than the others; what commanded one&rsquo;s attention was the installation. It overwhelmed and engulfed and through sheer abundance removed any hint of the intimacy that may have formed between subject and photographer. The show was less about the photographs than the accumulation and display.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">When McGinley first went into the studio he said it was out of a curiosity to see what a McGinley studio portrait might look like. His initial inspiration seemed to come from great predecessors such as Irving Penn or Richard Avedon. For <em>YEARBOOK</em> McGinley has come full circle and tapped into the banality of the nameless portraitists who travel from school to school, making yearbook photos. The emotional range is tightened up; detachment becomes a principle characteristic. The images start to function like mug shots, indexing a generation. No one looks worried, no one seems afraid, no one appears to be taking a risk by stripping for the camera, or even to be proud of the act. In short, there is no sense of vulnerability.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Over the years McGinley has proven himself to be a fantastic editorial photographer and I wonder if part of his genius may be an ability to capture outstanding instances, along the lines of Cartier-Bresson&rsquo;s &ldquo;decisive moments.&rdquo; Up until McGinley decided to test out the studio, his photographs were action packed. They exuded a wildness for the lived moment, and they made you want to go out and experience life more fully. McGinley&rsquo;s photographs of American Olympians (for the <em>New York Times</em>) are currently on view in <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/353569-the-new-york-times-magazine-photographs" target="_blank">an exhibition at Aperture</a>. Those photos have edge. They are graceful and gutsy. McGinley is excellent in the field. There is no doubt he can capture the raw energy of a fleeting moment in a way that is poetic and at the same time full of adrenaline. But in the studio, where things slow down, his work seems to flatten out and give up a lot of its urgency.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">In <em>YEARBOOK,</em> McGinley makes up for this low wattage by blitzing his viewers with so many images their heads spin. The melee becomes the ultimate framing device, or perhaps the anti-framing device, for hundreds of photographs that have shallow depth of field and more or less the same lighting&mdash;like photos in a yearbook. The thing about yearbooks, though, is that their value is primarily sentimental and sentimental value is always private. And here lies the paradox of McGinley&rsquo;s <em>YEARBOOK</em>: there is nothing private or sentimental about it.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141015104018-COLEN_2013.0101.jpg" alt="dan colen gagosian" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><strong>Dan Colen</strong>,&nbsp;<em>The Sorcerer's Apprentice</em>, 2013, Oil and raw pigment, 67 x 102 inches; &copy; Dan Colen; Courtesy Gagosian Gallery; Photo: Christopher Burke</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Almost as if playing counterpoint, Dan Colen&rsquo;s exhibition at Gagosian, <em><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/352376-miracle-paintings" target="_blank">Miracle Paintings</a>, </em>is comprised of a neat nine canvases. These oil paintings&mdash;all big enough to command a hotel lobby&mdash;masquerade as abstractions though they are actually representations of film stills from the Disney classic <em>Fantasia.</em> The stills are from transitional sequences in which abstraction and representation merge. That fact makes them more interesting on an intellectual level, but it adds little to their aesthetic character.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">There are two points of interest in the choice of stills. The first is that the moments Colen has chosen come from the interstices of the film and in this way attend to the transient sense of being in-between two places. The other appealing aspect of this decision is that it gets to the idea of the unconscious spaces of a viewing experience. Neither of these points of interest are dependent upon <em>Fantasia,</em> yet they could both be related to Colen&rsquo;s earlier series of oil paintings that drew from <em>Pinocchio. </em>Those paintings depicted the candle on Geppetto&rsquo;s table with various words spelled out in the candle&rsquo;s smoke. In both instances, the film stills represent moments of transformation.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Colen&rsquo;s painting practice seems in constant transition, as if he is constantly trying to do something new. The writer and curator Neville Wakefield, who has been running with Colen for years, picked up on this in his catalogue essay for the earlier Disney series:</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; padding-left: 30px;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Perhaps it is not [a painting] of a dumb Disney still, but of creation itself, made by one for whom the injunction against the graven image provides the biblical ingredients of a more literal enlightenment.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141015104338-COLEN_2013.0120.jpg" alt="dan colen gagosian" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><strong>Dan Colen</strong>,&nbsp;<em>Ride of the Valkyries</em>, 2013, Oil and raw pigment, 89 1/2 x 119 inches; &copy; Dan Colen; Courtesy Gagosian Gallery; Photo: Christopher Burke</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">What is a literal enlightenment? It is to be informed. To learn. But also, somewhat archaically, to shed light upon something. One gets the impression from the range of Colen&rsquo;s paintings that he is always testing, experimenting, aching for the next lesson on light. In most of the <em>Miracle Paintings</em> luminosity seems to come from deep within the compositions, like a soft glow emerging beneath the surface of a newly frozen lake. Layers of resin overlay washes of color and there is hardly a brushstroke to be found. Much of the paint looks poured on, permitted to puddle, and then pushed about.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Perhaps a chief irony in being a virtuosic painter&mdash;and Colen is one&mdash;is the compulsion to disallow the brush&rsquo;s touch in favor of allowing the paint to act as it will, to let chance play a hand in the composition. Such a process routes in aspects of the unconscious through the unintentional, which is where the form of the paintings intersects with their subject matter. What we see in these paintings is like a form of hypnotism, a willful submission to the transient space of one&rsquo;s unconscious. Disney is less the subject of the work than the pathway towards its creation.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <em>Miracle Paintings</em> and <em>YEARBOOK</em> both refer back to images that orient a certain age group to its youth, or more specifically to childhood (via Disney) and adolescence (&agrave; la the yearbook). These are ages latent with discovery, fat with potential, and short on personal tragedy. It&rsquo;s a time when friendships start to take on real value and absolute meaning, only after which can the death of a close friend be truly wounding. Hanging out in the studio of Alberto Giacometti, Jean Genet wrote that beauty has no origin other than the wound. It&rsquo;s a thought I couldn&rsquo;t relate to until someone very close to me died. Now its truth feels real. You learn to carry your ghosts with you, because they&rsquo;ll haunt you as they please. &nbsp;&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/5828-charlie-schultz">Charlie Schultz</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">(Image at top:<strong> Ryan&nbsp;McGinley</strong>, Installation&nbsp;view,&nbsp;<em>YEARBOOK</em>,&nbsp;team&nbsp;(gallery, inc.), 2014; Image&nbsp;courtesy&nbsp;of&nbsp;team&nbsp;(gallery, inc.), New York; Photo:&nbsp;Joerg&nbsp;Lohse)</span></p> Tue, 21 Oct 2014 10:35:39 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list Ten Hallucinations from <em>Spaced Out</em> <p style="line-height: 25px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">1) A young woman in skinny jeans pauses outside the entrance of<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/357736-spaced-out-migration-to-the-interior">&nbsp;<em>Spaced Out: Migration to the Interior</em></a>. She pulls her cell phone away from her ear and peeks in at the pink shag carpet lining the floor and Fred Tomaselli&rsquo;s <em>Diary</em> (1990). She tells whoever is on the other end of her phone call to hold on a minute as she turns her head toward the bouncer, &ldquo;What the hell is going on in there?&rdquo; she wants to know, &ldquo;Is this some kind of surrealist circus or what?&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20141014135231-P-20141010-00015_HiRes-JPEG-24bit-RGB.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="margin-left: 10px; text-align: left;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: small; text-align: left;">Jim Lambie, <em>Zobop</em>, 1999; Red Bull Content Pool // Greg Mionske</span></p> <p style="line-height: 25px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">2) There is a Jim Lambie piece on the floor. It&rsquo;s called <em>Zobop</em> (1999). Benny, the maestro who leads the installation effort, says that these <em>Zobops</em> aren&rsquo;t usually in group shows. Most often they stand alone, because when they are in group shows they have a tendency to overwhelm everything else. He would know. We agree that it works well here. Plus the vinyl tape is reflective, which makes the floor radiate. If you stare at your feet and soften your focus you will experience a kind of vertigo. After a few beers this is not a highly recommended manner of engaging with Lambie&rsquo;s <em>Zobop</em>.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 25px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><iframe src="//www.youtube.com/embed/Z5nclmEYkqk" frameborder="0" width="560" height="315"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: justify; margin-left: 10px;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: small; text-align: left;">Ryan Trecartin, <em>A Family Finds Entertainment</em>, 2004.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 25px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">3) Ryan Trecartin videos are like twisters on the plains of contemporary art, swirling vortices that suck up everything in their path. But that&rsquo;s not happening here. Trecartin&rsquo;s video, <em>A Family Finds Entertainment</em>&nbsp;(2004), is screaming at me as I watch the adjacent flat screen. It&rsquo;s got Takeshi Murata&rsquo;s <em>Shiboogi</em> (2012) and it seems like a worm in the brains of Trecartin&rsquo;s blitzed out family.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;<img style="font-size: 12px; text-align: left;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20141014140004-P-20141010-00184_HiRes-JPEG-24bit-RGB.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="text-align: justify; margin-left: 10px;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: small; text-align: left;">Sylvie Fleury, <em>Later, Later</em>, 2012; Red Bull Content Pool // Greg Mionske</span></p> <p style="line-height: 25px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">4) This show is an example of what it means to go over the top. If a group of young curators decided to take some notes and move ahead with this insane style of curation, they might call themselves Maximalists.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 25px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20141014140602-P-20141010-00020_HiRes_JPEG_24bit_RGB.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify; margin-left: 10px;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: small; text-align: left;">Rona Pondick, <em>Head in a Tree</em>, 2006-08; Red Bull Content Pool // Greg Mionske</span></p> <p style="line-height: 25px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">5) Here is a giant goopy metal head with bad teeth and a wicked smile. Could be male or female. The concrete plinth gives nothing away. Oh. I see. It&rsquo;s Ugo Rondinone&rsquo;s <em>SUNRISE. east. january</em> (2005). Why do you think it&rsquo;s facing west? Well, it&rsquo;s obviously waiting to see the sunset. And here, twelve paces to the left, is Rona Pondick&rsquo;s stainless steel <em>Head in a Tree</em> (2006&ndash;2008), which is a very literal title. These two metal heads are like sentinels in front of the long dark bar where drinks are being made and slung like no tomorrow. Red Bull vodka seems to be the drink of choice. You start out feeling like SUNRISE, but in the morning you&rsquo;ll surely feel like a Head in the Tree.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;<img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20141014140046-P-20141010-00189_HiRes-JPEG-24bit-RGB.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="text-align: justify; margin-left: 10px;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: small; text-align: left;">Image of the curator, Phong Bui; Red Bull Content Pool // Greg Mionske</span></p> <p style="line-height: 25px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">6) Is the curator here? Yeah. That&rsquo;s him over there. The short guy with the bald head. His name is Phong Bui. He runs the <em>Brooklyn Rail</em>. No one knows how he manages to do everything. He&rsquo;s a publisher who is an artist who is a curator. They say he managed to install this whole show in a week and a half. Can you believe it? Well, just look at it. &nbsp;If you can see it, why not believe it?</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;<img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20141014140116-P-20141010-00186_HiRes-JPEG-24bit-RGB.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="text-align: justify; margin-left: 10px;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: small; text-align: left;">Kazumi Tanaka standing with her installation, <em>Insomnia</em>, 2010; Red Bull Content Pool // Greg Mionske</span></p> <p style="line-height: 25px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">7) Have you been downstairs? It&rsquo;s insane. It&rsquo;s like the B-side of the album, if upstairs is the A-side. What&rsquo;s so crazy about it? Well, for one, the whole floor is covered in pink shag. For two, the walls and ceiling are painted Pepto Bismol pink. For three, there are lights on the floor and on the ceiling. For four, have you ever seen anyone use pink packing peanuts as a curatorial tool? No? Ok, just go downstairs.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 25px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 658px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-version="2"> <div style="padding: 8px;"> <div style="background: #F8F8F8; line-height: 0; margin-top: 40px; padding-bottom: 55%; padding-top: 45%; text-align: center; width: 100%;"> <div style="position: relative;"> <div style="-webkit-animation: dkaXkpbBxI 1s ease-out infinite; animation: dkaXkpbBxI 1s ease-out infinite; background: url(data:image/png; base64,ivborw0kggoaaaansuheugaaacwaaaascamaaaapwqozaaaagfbmveuiiii9pt0ehh4gib4hibkchbwchbwchbydr+jqaaaachrstlmaba4yhyqsm5jtamwaaadfsurbvdjl7zvbegmhcaqbaf//42xcnbpaqakcm0ftumfaaibe81iqbjds3ls6zs3bipb9wed3yyxfpmhrft8sgyrcp1x8ueuxlmznwelfoycv6mhwwwmzdpekhlhlw7nwjqkhc4uizphavdza2jpzudsbzzinae2s6owh8xpmx8g7zzgkeopuoyhvgz1tbcxmkd3kwnvbu0gkhkx+izilf77iofhry1nyfnb/lqpb79drwoyjva/davg9b/rlb4cc+nqgdz/tvbbbnr6gbreqn/nrmdgaqeej7whonozjf+y2i/fzou/qaaaaaelftksuqmcc); display: block; height: 44px; margin: 0 auto -44px; position: relative; top: -44px; width: 44px;">&nbsp;</div> <span style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 12px; font-style: normal; font-weight: bold; position: relative; top: 15px;">Loading</span></div> </div> <p style="line-height: 32px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; padding: 0; text-align: center;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; text-decoration: none;" href="https://instagram.com/p/t883GZH9eR/" target="_top"> View on Instagram</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <script type="text/javascript" src="//platform.instagram.com/en_US/embeds.js" defer="defer"></script> <p style="text-align: justify; margin-left: 10px;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: small; text-align: left;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify; margin-left: 10px;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: small; text-align: left;">Jon Kessler, Lost Boy #2, 2012</span></p> <p style="line-height: 25px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">8) Two young women sit on the pink shag and watch a video being projected on an overturned dinner table. The remnants of a large Chinese meal are strewn all around the floor. The whole thing looks taken straight out of a Chinatown restaurant. In the video old, young, fat, skinny New Yorkers do hip hop dance moves to a generic beat on the city&rsquo;s streets. It&rsquo;s hilarious. Totally random. Everyone in the video is grinning. Cao Fei&rsquo;s <em>Hip Hop NY</em> (2006) always makes people smile. &nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 25px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;<img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20141014140452-P-20141010-00181_HiRes-JPEG-24bit-RGB.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 25px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: small; text-align: left;">Artist Will Ryman standing in his work, </span><em style="font-size: small; text-align: left;">Infinity</em><span style="font-size: small; text-align: left;">, 2014. We prefer calling it the "sole room".; Red Bull Content Pool // Greg Mionske</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 25px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">9) Someone has brought a child. The kid is running in circles around the B-side of the exhibition, yelling &ldquo;wheeeeee&rdquo; as he goes. Daddy! He yells, you never told me art could be fun!</span></p> <p style="line-height: 25px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 658px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-version="2"> <div style="padding: 8px;"> <div style="background: #F8F8F8; line-height: 0; margin-top: 40px; padding-bottom: 55%; padding-top: 45%; text-align: center; width: 100%;"> <div style="position: relative;"> <div style="-webkit-animation: dkaXkpbBxI 1s ease-out infinite; animation: dkaXkpbBxI 1s ease-out infinite; background: url(data:image/png; base64,ivborw0kggoaaaansuheugaaacwaaaascamaaaapwqozaaaagfbmveuiiii9pt0ehh4gib4hibkchbwchbwchbydr+jqaaaachrstlmaba4yhyqsm5jtamwaaadfsurbvdjl7zvbegmhcaqbaf//42xcnbpaqakcm0ftumfaaibe81iqbjds3ls6zs3bipb9wed3yyxfpmhrft8sgyrcp1x8ueuxlmznwelfoycv6mhwwwmzdpekhlhlw7nwjqkhc4uizphavdza2jpzudsbzzinae2s6owh8xpmx8g7zzgkeopuoyhvgz1tbcxmkd3kwnvbu0gkhkx+izilf77iofhry1nyfnb/lqpb79drwoyjva/davg9b/rlb4cc+nqgdz/tvbbbnr6gbreqn/nrmdgaqeej7whonozjf+y2i/fzou/qaaaaaelftksuqmcc); display: block; height: 44px; margin: 0 auto -44px; position: relative; top: -44px; width: 44px;">&nbsp;</div> <span style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 12px; font-style: normal; font-weight: bold; position: relative; top: 15px;">Loading</span></div> </div> <p style="font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px; word-wrap: break-word;">#spacedout Fred Tomaselli, 'Geology Lesson'</p> <p style="line-height: 32px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; padding: 0; text-align: center;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; text-decoration: none;" href="https://instagram.com/p/t89MA-H9e-/" target="_top"> View on Instagram</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p style="line-height: 25px; text-align: justify; margin-left: 10px;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: small; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 25px; text-align: justify; margin-left: 10px;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: small; color: #525552;">&nbsp;Fred Tomaselli, <em>Geology Lesson</em>, 1986.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 25px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">10) There is so much texture to this show it&rsquo;s like having your sense of touch scrubbed through your eyeballs. Dead space? What dead space? This entire place is throbbing with life. &nbsp;&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/5828-charlie-schultz" target="_blank">Charlie Schultz</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> Thu, 16 Oct 2014 18:47:34 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list The Art Fair Card: Can Replication Be a Form of Criticism? <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">It&rsquo;s been played. The recent onslaught of exhibitions quoting and using the art fair as a form is well established&mdash;and some artists use it better than others. While the market is undeniable, and the phenomenon of the art fair is internationally far-reaching, what are the implications of its criticism through replica?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">As case studies, two recent exhibitions come to mind: Jos&eacute; Lerma's&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ew/events/show/337068-la-bella-crisis" target="_blank"><em>La Bella Crisis</em></a> at the <span style="color: #525552;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ew/venues/show/6410-museum-of-contemporary-art-detroit" target="_blank">Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit (MOCAD)</a></span>, which took place over the summer of this year, and William Powhida and Jade Townsend&rsquo;s <em>New New Berlin and N(ev)ada Art Fair</em>, which recently got <span style="color: #525552;"><a href="http://hyperallergic.com/145365/the-frontier-of-the-art-world/">this bit of praise-worthy press</a></span>, and is closing soon as part of their project at the <span style="color: #525552;"><a href="http://galvestonartistresidency.org/">Galveston Artist Residency</a></span>. Both present polarizing approaches to the same dilemma: Beyond a postmodern mirror-as-critique scenario, how can artists truly activate the art fair for their own gains, and transform it from a cold and abstract concept into something more relevant and significant to their practice? Many works bearing similarities to the art fair do not stop at truthful representation, which is to say, they don't singularly resemble an art fair. There is a larger trend of artists curating other artists onto their walls&mdash;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">walls no different in dimension than that of a booth</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">&mdash;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">as part of their contribution to an exhibition. At the risk of putting us into a metaphysical tailspin, at what point can an artist&rsquo;s work appear <em>in</em> an art fair, and that same artist make work <em>about</em> the venue elsewhere?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">It is the difference between a send-up and a stick-up. The quotational aspect of recreating an art fair immediately stages it for a sensational comment on the market. The difference is weighed only in the value of its consequence: does a criticism exist or doesn&rsquo;t it? If it exists at all, more often than not, the criticism is tacit and contemptuously subtle. Lerma&rsquo;s project presents an exception to this rule. Performatively created within the walls of MOCAD, <em>La Bella Crisis</em> suggested that replication does not automatically produce invention&mdash;and recognizing a trend is not the same as interrogating it. Each day, Lerma created work to fill the empty booths of his self-made fair. Monochromes were set against the loosely hanging white tarp that stood in for the walls; sculptures stood precariously in the mismatched aisles; paintings hung limply hung on unstretched sheets. The whole thing appeared on the verge of shambles, just barely pieced together. Fitting for Detroit. The architecture of the space, and the pieces hanging on them, blew in the breeze of viewers simply passing by&mdash;on the brink of collapse. Lerma used the fair as a mechanism to justify his own rate of production. He pointed to the critical similarities and differences within a single artist&rsquo;s practice, a reproach to the idea that an artist should provide their own brand.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141014141620-KaviGuptaGallery004276.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><strong>Jos&eacute; Lerma</strong>, <em>La Bella Crisis,</em>&nbsp;Installation view at the Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit (MOCAD); Image courtesy of Kavi Gupta CHICAGO | BERLIN.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">What is it then that gives viewers the sense that Lerma is really holding himself to the flame? All the elements of the exhibition should indicate otherwise. Perhaps its potential hypocrisy is saved in the ad hoc quality of the production value, the sheer intensity and scale of the project&mdash;but also its lack of posturing; it is clear that everything within this &ldquo;fair&rdquo; is his. This ownership threatens the value of his work in the process. Give the impression that you can be reproduced en masse, and you are. After all, with rumor comes a crash.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">In the months following the exhibition, a striking headline accompanied a wind-swept Lerma on the <a href="http://mocadetroit.org/PDF/JoseLerma-ModernPaintersCover.pdf" target="_blank">cover of </a><em><a href="http://mocadetroit.org/PDF/JoseLerma-ModernPaintersCover.pdf" target="_blank">Modern</a></em><a href="http://mocadetroit.org/PDF/JoseLerma-ModernPaintersCover.pdf" target="_blank"> Painters</a>:&nbsp;&ldquo;The Fair As Art.&rdquo; Beyond the element of fair replication in <em>La Bella Crisis</em>, the exhibition raised some of the ways artists can engage with the art fair as a form. The potential failures of this form outweigh its successes. But regardless of satire, there is an aspect of serious humor awaiting activation&mdash;a humor that uses the self as a target to fly under the radar of merely sarcastically damning the system, since that same self is <em>part</em> of that system. The biggest danger and irony of making work about an art fair is that many of the artists doing so already show in them.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141014192052-15064802957_d53073e649_z.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><strong><span style="font-size: x-small;">William Powhida and Jade Townsend,&nbsp;</span></strong><em><span style="font-size: x-small;">New New Berlin</span></em><span style="font-size: x-small;"> and&nbsp;<em>N(ev)ada Art Fair</em>; Installation view, Galveston Artist Residency; Photo: Hrag Vartanian <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/hragvartanian/15064802957/in/photolist-pcGtpf-oXebtR-peGe9L-perH8k-oXeRAP-oXdb5Z-pcFt2y-oXe452-oXetLh-oXdZos-pcFM8d-perz4V-oXekPY-pcFstE-pcFMAh-oXeKao-oXeekf-oXdrdL-pcFTzG-oXdZLS" target="_blank">via Flickr</a></span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><em>New New Berlin&nbsp;</em>and&nbsp;<em>N(ev)ada Art Fair,</em> cited in <span style="color: #525552;"><a href="http://hyperallergic.com/145365/the-frontier-of-the-art-world/">Hyperallergic</a></span>&nbsp;as a &ldquo;satirical&nbsp;take on the art world and its culture of courtship, its social hierarchies, and its larger-than-life mythology,&rdquo; is a similar ongoing project by Powhida and Townsend, which started in August of this year. While the element of the art fair is certainly present, this assertion is a stretch. The duo does not comment on this &ldquo;art world dystopia&rdquo;; they contribute to it. The installation takes the art fair model literally, not as a method or a metaphor, but as a collection of booths with the intent to sell pieces of work within its walls. The installation features small constructions resembling an old country Western set riddled with art world clich&eacute;s. The mission statement reads, &ldquo;We are excited to present some of the hottest trends in contemporary art from the Neomodern revival currently sweeping MFA programs across the globe. Showcasing the works from a select group of avant-garde MFA students&nbsp;[3], NevADA is excited to offer new entry points into the fast-growing art market for the discerning collector." The footnote: [3]&nbsp;All works depicted are the product of William Powhida and Jade Townsend inspired by the waves of shit flooding the art market.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Interesting choice.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">This work is not an attack on the contemporary; it is a submission to it. Jerry Saltz&rsquo;s words on <span style="color: #525552;"><a href="http://www.vulture.com/2013/10/jerry-saltz-on-arts-insidious-new-clich.html">Neo-Mannerism</a></span>&nbsp;echo here, in this &ldquo;art of infinite regress,&rdquo; which seems a final and desperate grab for subject matter that other casual cognoscenti within the art world can applaud. With such a one-to-one relationship to using the art fair as a stand-in for production, what can really be gained? Better yet, what makes the <em>New New Berlin</em> any different in concept than <span style="color: #525552;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/la/articles/show/38167">Paramount Ranch</a></span>, an art fair that already teases itself, making the parallel between the temporary commercial encounter and the drama of the Wild West? At least it sells art.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141014194103-New_New_Berlin_Map.JPG" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><strong>William Powhida and Jade Townsend</strong>, <em>New New Berlin and N(ev)ada Art Fair</em>, 2014. Installation view, Galveston Artist Residency; Image Courtesy of <a href="http://glasstire.com/2014/08/27/old-times-on-the-island/" target="_blank">Glasstire</a><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">The vicious circle of <em>New New Berlin</em>&rsquo;s shallow critique is that any criticism applied to it potentially validates its position. Any argument in the face of such defensive and strict logic, paired with its unwavering position of negative reinforcement&mdash;you can almost hear &ldquo;but shallow <em>is the</em> <em>point</em>&rdquo;&mdash;is set to fail. Yes the point is pointless. Yes the art world loves to talk to itself. Yes there are egos involved. But work like this is infinitely more exhausting and myopic. The art fair has intricate systems in place&mdash;sociologically, economically, and socially with its nepotistic networks&mdash;that exist out of necessity. Pull it apart if you want to, or don&rsquo;t. Those three things may be required for the business of an art fair, but they are not required for art.</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">The misunderstanding that these two systems have to play by the same rules misses the opportunity to differentiate that art is not the property of the art fair, although it may temporarily appear on its walls. <em>La Bella Crisis</em> points to this impasse in a manner that critically questions the relationship between the two. In a literal translation of its title, the exhibition equates beauty with conflict. Without this tension, a vapid statement on the theoretically shallow affect of the art world poses the biggest danger: that soon art and its criticism may inextricably become one.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" align="center"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/183982-stephanie-cristello?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Stephanie Cristello</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">(Image at top: <strong>Jos&eacute; Lerma</strong>, <em>La Bella Crisis</em>, Installation view at the Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit (MOCAD); Image courtesy of MOCAD and the artist)</span><br /></span></p> Tue, 14 Oct 2014 20:21:00 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list WTF? Art-Fash Fail: The Gap's Latest Collection at Frieze <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">It's the perfect desk fodder for all the art world haters: fresh in our inboxes this morning were images of the latest limited edition releases as part of a collaboration between smock sweatshop "long history of supporting the arts" corporation Gap Inc. and "even the name sounds like a Kanye invention" <a href="http://www.visionaireworld.com/" target="_blank">Visionaire</a>. They have teamed up and made a "super exciting" collection, printing artworks featured in their previous issues onto sweatshirts and t-shirts.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">As Visionaire's co-founder Cecilia Dean told Opening Ceremony "It&rsquo;s like, 'Oh my god, that&rsquo;s possible?' And then you realize there [are] all these other things that are possible. You just never thought about it."&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">Well, Cecilia, some things we never think about should just never be thought about.</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">I promptly shared the images with our resident fashion expert and cynic Philippa Snow. Here is our evaluation of the first of the new releases, which can be seen alongside a further 30 previous editions in an interactive display at Frieze London's Gap Lounge (it's just past the door on the left, halfway to Hades).<br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141014101811-MarcoBrambilla_rendering2.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">Marco Brambilla x GAP ART x Visionaire</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">Philippa Snow: I'm going to need a little background on this. Is Kanye West involved somehow?</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141014102537-StevenKlein_Rendering.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-small; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">Steven Klein x GAP ART x Visionaire&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">Charlotte Jansen: If you wore this and then stood in a forest in front of a tree it would look really trippy. I can't think of any other appropriate uses for this jumper.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">PS: If a Deptford video artist falls in the woods and no curator is around to hear it, do they make a sound?&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">Does that sound qualify as a conceptual sound piece if they do?&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">These are the troubling questions that this collection is posing.</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141014110623-Visionaire_ART_BUCKLOW_R1.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-small; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">Christopher Bucklow x GAP ART x Visionaire&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">PS: Whatever happened to "dress normal," Gap?</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">CJ: <em><span style="color: #525552;"><a href="http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2627369/Its-magic-Gap-launches-new-UV-sensitive-T-shirt-collection-sees-prints-change-color-exposed-direct-sunlight.html">The Daily Mail </a></span></em>describes the Gap's last editions with Visionaire as "hi-tech."&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">PS: Does <em>The Mail</em> seem distrustful of a "hi-tech" sweatshirt?</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">CJ: <em>The Mail</em> seems to love them!</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">PS:&nbsp;All new technology is technology which might one day be used to keep out foreigners, I guess.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141014110736-MassimoVitali_rendering.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-small; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">Massimo Vitali x GAP ART x Visionaire&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">PS: This one is particuarly heinous.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">CJ: I am beginning to appreciate normcore. &nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">PS: If you swim over that horizon, you find nothing but an empty gallery space with three crushed-up beer cans in it.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">CJ: Jerry Seinfeld would never wear this sweatshirt.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141014111516-Visionaire_ART_CHALMERS_R1.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-small; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">Catherine Chalmers x GAP ART x Visionaire</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">CJ: Perfect to wear the first time you meet your new partner's parents.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">PS:&nbsp;I would wear it to a halloween party as Kanye West, or a HYPEBEAST reader.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141014111828-VISIONAIRE_ART_GILLES_R1.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <div class="_5wd4 _1nc7 direction_ltr _5yt9" data-reactid=".54.$mid=11413283294711=25fe0748141b6151306"> <div class="_5wd9" data-reactid=".54.$mid=11413283294711=25fe0748141b6151306.2:0"> <div class="_5wde" data-reactid=".54.$mid=11413283294711=25fe0748141b6151306.2:0.0"> <div class="_5wdf _5w1r" data-reactid=".54.$mid=11413283294711=25fe0748141b6151306.2:0.0.0"> <div style="text-align: center;" data-reactid=".54.$mid=11413283294711=25fe0748141b6151306.2:0.0.0.0"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-small; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">Pierre &amp; Gilles x GAP ART x Visionaire</span></div> <div style="text-align: justify;" data-reactid=".54.$mid=11413283294711=25fe0748141b6151306.2:0.0.0.0"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></div> <div style="text-align: justify;" data-reactid=".54.$mid=11413283294711=25fe0748141b6151306.2:0.0.0.0"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">PS: There's a weird kind of confidence in making an ugly-looking item of clothing with a picture of Medusa on it.&nbsp;I think I like how it looks a bit like a Labisse painting though. Is this how Stockholm Syndrome feels?</span></div> <div style="text-align: justify;" data-reactid=".54.$mid=11413283294711=25fe0748141b6151306.2:0.0.0.0"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></div> <div style="text-align: justify;" data-reactid=".54.$mid=11413283294711=25fe0748141b6151306.2:0.0.0.0"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">CJ: I am hungover. This shirt is making me feel physically unwell.</span></div> <div style="text-align: justify;" data-reactid=".54.$mid=11413283294711=25fe0748141b6151306.2:0.0.0.0"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></div> <div style="text-align: justify;" data-reactid=".54.$mid=11413283294711=25fe0748141b6151306.2:0.0.0.0"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">PS:&nbsp;I just Googled this collaboration and I would like to add here the <span style="color: #525552;"><a href="http://observer.com/2014/04/frieze-art-fair-partners-with-gap-inc-because-this-is-the-art-world-we-deserve/#ixzz3G77BgyPK" target="_blank"><em>New York Observer</em>'s</a></span>&nbsp;headline about it, which is: "Frieze Art Fair Partners With Gap Inc. Because This Is the Art World We Deserve."<br /></span></div> <div style="text-align: justify;" data-reactid=".54.$mid=11413283294711=25fe0748141b6151306.2:0.0.0.0"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></div> <div style="text-align: justify;" data-reactid=".54.$mid=11413283294711=25fe0748141b6151306.2:0.0.0.0"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></div> <div style="text-align: justify;" data-reactid=".54.$mid=11413283294711=25fe0748141b6151306.2:0.0.0.0"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/162742-charlotte-jansen" target="_blank">Charlotte Jansen</a> and <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/265136-philippa-snow?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Philippa Snow</a></span></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> Tue, 14 Oct 2014 13:46:40 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list Frieze Previews: Frieze Projects Heads to the London Zoo <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">Also part of Frieze Projects 2014 is Cerith Wyn Evans' <a href="http://www.friezeprojects.org/commissions/detail/cerith-wyn-evans-b.1958-uk/" target="_blank">offsite project</a>&nbsp;that will take place at the London Zoo at Regent&rsquo;s Park. Wyn Evans, known for his neon works, will create an installation at the impressive Snowdon Aviary, designed in the 1960s by Antony Armstrong-Jones, 1st Earl of Snowdon, Frank Newby, and Cedric Price. The work will be viewed together with the rare birds from the see-through structure, and on Thursday the 16th,&nbsp;at 5:30 PM, a special performance will take place, with guest performer American rock musician Susan Stenger. </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">Wyn Evans' work has always been interested in the place of animals within art; in one of his previous exhibitions in Berlin he worked with a local circus&mdash;one of their camels even visited the gallery. In this project he wishes to stage &ldquo;a correspondence between inside and outside, both variously captive,&rdquo; from which both animal and human spectators could benefit. </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">It's debatable as to whether this project will manage to offer new insights regarding the comparison between museums and zoos and the design of zoo architecture, but, seen for free from the canal side, this will surely be a worthwhile outdoorsy-audio-visual-animal experience. You can also catch Wyn Evans in a different park, at his <a href="http://www.artslant.com/lon/events/show/350546-solo-exhibition" target="_blank">solo exhibition</a> currently on view at the Serpentine Sackler Gallery.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/lon/articles/show/41033">&lt;&lt;&lt; previous Frieze preview </a></span></p> <p style="text-align: right;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/lon/articles/show/41034">next Frieze preview &gt;&gt;&gt;&nbsp;</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/373185-keren-goldberg?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Keren Goldberg</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-small; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">(Image at top: Snowdon Aviary as seen from Regent's Canal)</span></p> Mon, 13 Oct 2014 17:27:18 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list Frieze Previews: Korakrit Arunanondchai's "Midnight Hip Hop Party" Comes to London <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">The <a href="http://www.artslant.com/lon/venues/show/2631-institute-of-contemporary-arts-ica?tab=VENUE" target="_blank">ICA London</a> will feature its <a href="https://www.ica.org.uk/whats-on/seasons/ica-site-old-selfridges-hotel" target="_blank">Off-Site series</a>&nbsp;of performances and talks throughout Frieze days, at the special location of The Old Selfridges Hotel. </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">On one of the most intriguing nights, Thursday the 16th, <a href="https://www.ica.org.uk/whats-on/ica-site-korakrit-arunanondchai-boychild-and-ajgvojic-last-3-years-and-future">Korakrit Arunanondchai</a>&nbsp;will present four videos combined with performances:&nbsp;<em>2012-2555&nbsp;</em>(2012), <em>2556&nbsp;</em>(2013), <em>Painting with history in a room filled with men with funny names 2 (2557) (Part 1)</em> (2013), and his recent on-going work,&nbsp;<em>The Future&nbsp;</em>(2014). The Thai artist, known for his body painting on denim canvases and his semi autobiographical video works, will collaborate with performance artist Boychild, while the environment and lighting will be designed by AJGvojic. </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">His previous performance including videos at MoMA PS1 in New York was described as more like &ldquo;a midnight hip hop show than an afternoon of performance art.&rdquo; It is well worth attending, but not only for its entertainment value; Arunanondchai&rsquo;s combination of video and painting and his attention to the performative aspect of body painting and its documentation offer food for thought as well. A sample of Arunanondchai&rsquo;s&nbsp;denim paintings can currently be seen at the ICA group show <em><a href="http://www.artslant.com/lon/events/show/351387-beware-wet-paint" target="_blank">Beware Wet Paint</a></em>,&nbsp;and at East End gallery <a href="http://www.artslant.com/lon/venues/show/45051-carlos-ishikawa" target="_blank">Carlos/Ishikawa</a>,&nbsp;paintings and a mannequin installation by the emerging artist are on display alongside part two of the video&nbsp;<em>Painting with history in a room filled with men with funny names 2 (</em><em>2557)</em>.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Check out the event trailer:</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><iframe src="//player.vimeo.com/video/107467582" frameborder="0" width="500" height="281"></iframe></p> <p><a href="http://vimeo.com/107467582">The Last 3 Years and the Future (trailer)</a> from <a href="http://vimeo.com/user2466416">Korakrit Arunanondchai</a> on <a href="https://vimeo.com">Vimeo</a>.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/lon/articles/show/41027">&lt;&lt;&lt; previous Frieze preview</a>&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;</span><a style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; text-align: right;" href="http://www.artslant.com/lon/articles/show/41035">next Frieze preview &gt;&gt;&gt;</a></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/373185-keren-goldberg?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Keren Goldberg</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-small; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">(Image at top: Courtesy Korakrit Arunanondchai)&nbsp;</span></p> Mon, 13 Oct 2014 17:31:48 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list Ed Fornieles: Post-Internet Art and the <em>Modern Family</em> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; color: #525552;">In the run up to Ed Fornieles&rsquo; solo show,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: medium; text-align: left; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; color: #525552;"><a href="http://instagram.com/chisenhalegallery">Chisenhale Gallery's Instagram </a>feed&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">w</span>as peppered with quick-moving pictures of wholesome family activities&mdash;brightly colored breakfast cereals, food porn and sleeping infants, angelic kids growing up to uplifting muzak, hand-holding&mdash;some of which descend into destruction, fire, or violence. Other images remained open-ended, such as the repeated phrase "Be Yourself." Fornieles, a British artist now working in LA, who was part of Sarah McCrory's Frieze Frame project in 2012, took over Chisenhale Gallery's feed making it both a primer for his show and an online work exploring the most hallowed societal institution in its visual form (culled from stock imagery and images on Pinterest and Facebook): the family.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">His exhibition, <em>Modern Family</em>, up until November 9, takes its name from an American sitcom. Visually, it&rsquo;s mucky&mdash;and deliberately so. There are limbs cast in grubby looking resin, a giant banana and apple made from hay, stale cholla, goo, stuffed toys and Tic Tacs. A big plywood gazebo topped with a lightening bolt provides a place to sit and watch. There&rsquo;s a bed, a BBQ, giant chinos, fake plants, and a trellis caked in Cheerios. It&rsquo;s a bit gross. Music&mdash;from cheesy house to the tinny sounds of a Disneyland family ride&mdash;is played at exactly that volume that takes over your body, coaching your experience. Lights rise and fall. Screens flicker. It&rsquo;s hard to leave. You want to look at stuff but find yourself torn between the icky remnants of the parties that Fornieles threw when installing the show and the many monitors that surround the space that play sequences of images culled from the web.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141012124936-Ed_Fornieles_at_Chisenhale_Gallery_05_Andy_Keate.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-small;">Ed Fornieles, Modern Family, 2014, installation view. Commissioned by&nbsp;Chisenhale Gallery. Courtesy of Carlos/ Ishikawa, London. Photo: Andy&nbsp;Keate.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">A lot of post-internet artwork lands itself in weird territory trying to make tangible what goes on online. What works for Fornieles is that he doesn't seem to try to make physical work that "looks like" the Internet. It&rsquo;s all material: images and stuff. Online/offline are not separate realities here; they are concurrently present and vital. He achieves this balance in part by sidestepping the role of artist as lone "maker" and instead is instigator, collector, aggregator, set-builder, enabling him to create spaces where behaviors can be explored in all formats. <em>Modern Family</em> is therefore a set for a party, a stage for actors he employs to enact archetypal responses to family life. I was alarmed to see a young girl silently weeping&mdash;her back turned to explicit homemade booty fetish porn, while stirring music soared and the lights mimicked a sunset&mdash;until I realized she was staged.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">The development of an individual aesthetic isn&rsquo;t therefore a straightforward process for Fornieles, though he definitely has one. He likes things a bit grubby and off-key. The exhibition works as a way to consider this aesthetic interest, which here is shared with all who partake in the show, with a term like "the family" and all its clean connotations. Thinking about the Internet&rsquo;s presence in our lives is the perfect way to do this. Fornieles&rsquo; <a href="http://edfornieles.com/stream/" target="_blank">website</a></span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;constantly juxtaposes two algorithmically selected images, meting out search-term popularity for chance visual compatibilities. There are selections that seem themed: the best mums, the best dads, nail-art gifs, food, pregnancy. He is collecting popular web imagery and making a repository, a massive visual evidence of culture as it is reposted, bragged about. Everyone&rsquo;s access to imagery on the Internet is so edited by their choices that we don&rsquo;t actually often visually experience the collectivity we assume it to be. It is therefore a bit jarring to come face to face with a slew of "popular" web images like these. Together they express all of those anxieties split between the narcissistic perfections of lacquered nails, sculpted bodies, and perfectly risen cakes tacked to Pinterest with the seedy unmade beds of homemade porn, bombed cities, distraught children, guns, and money worries&mdash;ideals, desires, realities.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141012124529-Ed_Fornieles_at_Chisenhale_Gallery_32_Andy_Keate.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-small;">Ed Fornieles, Modern Family, 2014, installation view. Commissioned by&nbsp;Chisenhale Gallery. Courtesy of Carlos/ Ishikawa, London. Photo: Andy&nbsp;Keate</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">Interestingly, despite its derivation from web imagery, much of the sculptural work in the show has a visual aesthetic that is immediately recognizable from visual art: tombs on chairs with potpourri and cherry pie glued on look like peppier Anselm Keifers. There&rsquo;s a remixed look of Robert Gober, Paul McCarthy, and Cindy Sherman, all artists whose work stacks up to look like a history of identity anxiety in visual art, which is apt for a show about the modern family in our networked culture.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">The exhibition's&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">multiple elements allow these identity paradoxes to coexist. They're examined psychologically, experientially, visually. "Be Yourself" is set against "We Are One." The two phrases Fornieles uses seem both genuine and ingenuous. The individual is a product of and role in the modern family, itself a model of a wider society; it&rsquo;s hard trying to "be yourself" when so much visual evidence from the web suggests you&rsquo;re just like everyone else. It&rsquo;s enough to reduce anyone to silent weeping&mdash;except that it is also immensely enjoyable!</span></p> <p><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/377935-phoebe-stubbs?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Phoebe Stubbs</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-small;">(Image at top: Courtesy Ed Fornieles and Chisenhale Gallery)</span></p> Mon, 13 Oct 2014 15:23:46 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list Frieze Previews: Jérôme Bel's Inflammatory <em>Disabled Theatre</em> Makes Its London Debut <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">It seems like this year, perhaps influenced by the performance series <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/show/39853" target="_blank">14 Rooms</a> that took place at Art Basel a few months ago, Frieze has taken a performative turn. Many of its special projects incorporate live shows, and a new section called Frieze Live will introduce performance-based works and reenactments of historical performances at the fair itself. For example, the Japanese duo United Brothers will offer the visitors a soup made of vegetables grown in the region of Fukushima&rsquo;s 2011 nuclear disaster (<em>Does This Soup Taste Ambivalent?</em>, 2014).&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Frieze Projects, the commercial fair&rsquo;s not-for-profit programme curated by Nicola Lees, which this year wishes to bring in live disciplines such as dance, theatre, film and music, will include several performances, among them the American dance artist Isabel Lewis&rsquo; series of party-like <a href="http://www.friezeprojects.org/commissions/detail/isabel-lewis/" target="_blank">"Occasions" </a>taking place throughout London, and <a href="http://www.friezeprojects.org/commissions/detail/nick-mauss-b.1980-usa/" target="_blank">Nick Mauss' "living stage"</a>&nbsp;at the fair, on which a new ballet will be performed each day.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">But the main show this year is no doubt <a href="http://www.friezeprojects.org/commissions/detail/jerome-bel-b.1964-france/">J&eacute;r&ocirc;me Bel's&nbsp;</a><em><a href="http://www.friezeprojects.org/commissions/detail/jerome-bel-b.1964-france/">Disabled Theatre</a>,&nbsp;</em>which aroused inflamed moral debates after being showed at Performa 13 last year in New York. The famous French choreographer worked with Theatre HORA, a Zurich-based group of professional actors with various cognitive disabilities. On an almost empty stage, the actors follow, one by one, Bel&rsquo;s series of instructions, delivered by a translator: standing still in front of the audience for one minute, introducing themselves and their disabilities, each one dancing a self-choreographed solo, and finally stating what they thought of the show.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Arousing the connotations of "freak show" and charity act, socially engaged art or a group therapy session, performances have had previous spectators admit to experiencing a continuous moral inner struggle while watching the provocative show. Decide for yourself: Whether theorized through identity politics or victim-art, with only three performances (on 14 and 15&nbsp;October) in its UK premiere, this event is definitely not to be missed.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: right;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: right;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/lon/articles/show/41033">next Frieze preview &gt;&gt;&gt;</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552;">&mdash;<span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/373185-keren-goldberg?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Keren Goldberg</a>&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552;">(Image at top: J&eacute;r&ocirc;me Bel,&nbsp;<em>Disabled Theatre</em>; Photo: Ursula Kaufmann)<a href="http://www.friezeprojects.org/commissions/detail/jerome-bel-b.1964-france/"><br /></a></span></p> Mon, 13 Oct 2014 17:21:00 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list Longing for Flight: Sarah Charlesworth’s <em>Stills</em> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&ldquo;Falling, rushing, ruining! buried in the ruins, on Urthona's dens&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; padding-left: 150px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&ndash; William Blake, <em>The Marriage of Heaven and Hell</em>, 1790-1793.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Icarus&rsquo; father Daedalus made him wings and warned him not to fly too close to the sun. But Icarus, ecstatic with the ability to fly, forgot his father&rsquo;s caution&mdash;the feathers came loose and Icarus descended to his death in the sea. This Greek myth can be literally interpreted as the human desire to overcome his or her limits. In psychology, to put it simply, this myth has been understood as a &ldquo;mania&rdquo; in which a person is fond of heights, fire, and water.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;"><span style="color: #525552;">At the Art Institute of Chicago, conceptual photographer Sarah Charlesworth (American, 1947-2013) dedicated her series <em>Stills</em> to the mysterious behavior of &ldquo;falling.&rdquo; The series is composed of enormous black and white silver gelatin photographs of people, men and women, falling from buildings. The fourteen blown up 78-inch tall prints&mdash;six of which have never been shown before&mdash;are part of a single artist proof edition made especially for the Art Institute. Curator Matthew S. Witkovsky creates a composition that is fascinating, and also disconcerting. Each work shows a different person exposed to gravity: facing down, facing up, or sideways. In some images, the backgrounds are more legible than others, some more abstract than others. Are they real falls? Suicides? Acting? Though the images are revealed to have come from various media archives, the viewer ultimately does not know the cause of action and it becomes distressing. An elegant catalogue accompanies the exhibition, where Witkovsky writes that it is unreasonable to &ldquo;disconnect <em>Stills</em> from the terrorist attacks of 2001 even though the original pictures greatly predate them.&rdquo;</span><a title="" href="#_ftn1">[1]</a><span style="color: #525552;"> While Charlesworth&rsquo;s images do not aim to distance themselves from horror, they also do not look towards a specific historical or social event. The photographs are the <em>fall </em>itself.</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;"><span style="color: #525552;">Charlesworth has long-since been interested in the in-between stage, a place amid two states of being, which in this exhibition could be seen as Heaven and Earth. In 1979, Charlesworth went to news agencies and the New York Public Library to ask for photographs of people falling in fires and suicides. In other words, she was asking for people <em>falling</em> or <em>flying</em>, which at times sounds the same. Unfortunately, like Icarus, we will always need external assistance in order to achieve flight. Or in the words of Peter Greenaway, &ldquo;Alas, the best we can do is fall and believe ourselves flying.&rdquo;</span><a title="" href="#_ftn2">[2]</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141010125337-Image2_Charlesworth_Unidentified-Woman-Hotel-deAragon_.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Sarah Charlesworth,</strong><em>&nbsp;Unidentified Woman, Hotel Corona de Aragon, Madrid</em>, 1980, printed 2012, No. 1 of 14 from the series Stills. The Art Institute of Chicago, promised gift of Liz and Eric Lefkofsky; &copy; Estate of Sarah Charlesworth / Courtesy the Estate of Sarah Charlesworth and Maccarone</span>.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;"><span style="color: #525552;">Charlesworth&rsquo;s images are tragic. While they are abstract, and in a way distant from reality, it is obvious that tremendous hardships led these people to decide to jump, fly, fall. But there is also another dilemma within these images&mdash;the question of the media itself. Who took these pictures in the first place? Were they able to help the person falling but instead decided to snap a photo? How were so many images captured before the time of the iPhone? In the gallery, you could hear visitors quietly reacting: &ldquo;Wow,&rdquo; &ldquo;Is this real?&rdquo; &ldquo;I&rsquo;ll wait for you outside,&rdquo; and &ldquo;this is not a 9/11 image, is it?&rdquo; It only took the public a minute or less to feel uncomfortable. Visitors who had trouble looking at the works might argue that it does not matter that the works are conceptual, because one can still <em>see</em> the person falling. However, the large size of the images forces the viewer closer to the person falling in the photograph. It also allows &ldquo;viewers to imagine themselves stepping into the picture.&rdquo;</span><a title="" href="#_ftn3">[3]</a><span style="color: #525552;"> There is a mocking perversity in the depiction of a person falling. Flight violently contradicts those two states of being: living and dying.</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Witkovsky, as well as activist Kate Linker, claims that these photographs are abstract. Which is to say, we do not know what is actually happening in them. For most of the works, we do not even know the identity of the person falling. Who or what is waiting for them on the ground? Do they die? After selecting a number of images, Charlesworth cropped and manipulated them to the extent that some appear more abstract than others. For example, <em>Jerry Hollins, Chicago Federal Courthouse</em> appears as a blurry figure falling sideways in between waves of motion in black and white. Additionally, nine of fourteen are captioned as &ldquo;unidentified&rdquo; solitary individuals falling from heights. Regardless of whether the works specify a location, they still feel incomplete. Even when the person&rsquo;s name is revealed on some occasion (Jerry Hollins, Vivienne Revere, or Dar Robinson) we do not know who they really are. What exactly are these images showing us, and for whom are they intended? One thing that is certain is that Charlesworth did not want her images to be reduced to a news story.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141010125025-Image1__Charlesworth_Patricia-Cawlings-LosAngeles_.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><strong>Sarah Charlesworth,</strong>&nbsp;<em>Patricia Cawlings, Los Angeles</em>, 1980, printed 2012, No. 10 of 14 from the series <em>Stills</em>. The Art Institute of Chicago, Krueck Foundation and Photography Gala Funds, 2013.129; &copy; Estate of Sarah Charlesworth / Courtesy the Estate of Sarah Charlesworth and Maccarone.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">Charlesworth&rsquo;s manipulation of the archival imagery is embedded within the very violence it seeks to investigate; these tools of vision are inextricably intertwined with the history of &ldquo;falling.&rdquo; The ambiguous imagery she generated systematically hides the reality it attempts to address. The artist hoped that with </span><em style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">Stills</em><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">, our feet would not leave the ground, but our minds might. The philosophical questions Charlesworth's <em>Stills</em>&nbsp;pose are interesting: imagine</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;trying to fly without being prepared, trying to swim without water. &nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/171869-ionit-behar" target="_blank">Ionit Behar</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <div style="line-height: 26px;"><hr style="line-height: 26px;" align="left" size="1" width="33%" /> <div style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: small;"><a title="" href="#_ftnref1">[1]</a> <span style="color: #525552;">Witkovsky, Matthew S.&nbsp; <em>Sarah Charlesworth: Stills. Chicago: Art Institute of Chicago</em>, 2014, 19.</span></span></p> </div> <div style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: small;"><a title="" href="#_ftnref2">[2]</a> <span style="color: #525552;">Greenaway, Peter. <em>Flying Out Of This World</em>. Chicago: University Of Chicago Press, 1994, 2.</span></span></p> </div> <div style="line-height: 26px;"> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: small;"><a title="" href="#_ftnref3">[3]</a> <span style="color: #525552;">Witkovsky, 13.</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">(Image at top: <strong>Sarah Charlesworth,&nbsp;</strong><em>Unidentified Man, Ontani Hotel, Los Angeles</em></span></span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">,</span><span style="font-size: x-small;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"> 1980, printed 2012, No. 14 of 14 from the series <em>Still</em></span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">. The Art Institute of Chicago, promised gift of Liz and Eric Lefkofsky; &copy; Estate of Sarah Charlesworth / Courtesy the Estate of Sarah Charlesworth and Maccarone.)</span></span></p> </div> </div> Fri, 10 Oct 2014 15:54:57 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list How to get an honest opinion about your artwork <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">"Empty, alienating, soul-less, superficial, formulaic, repetitive, awkward, thick, one-dimensional&hellip; Imitation of bad work does not flatter."</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">"Yet another denim jeans riff on Yves Klein."<br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">"DESTROY."<br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">These are the types of criticisms Jonas Lund&rsquo;s paintings have been receiving lately, but the Amsterdam-based Swedish artist is likely unconcerned. The offending artworks were not yet </span><em style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">his</em><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">&mdash;and it appears they never will be. While the works were made at his behest following guidelines from a 300-page manual he wrote, Lund didn&rsquo;t take credit for any of his recent paintings until they&rsquo;d been vetted by a panel of judges including artists, gallerists, art advisors, and critics.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">Studio Practice </em><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">at Boetzelaer|Nispen concludes this week with 5 out of some 90 paintings made over the past month signed by the artist (an additional 4 paintings are slated for &ldquo;recycling&rdquo;). An addictive <a href="http://studio-practice.biz/" target="_blank">project website</a></span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;made everything transparent throughout the process: the completed artworks, the jury&rsquo;s evaluations, the assistants&rsquo; contracts, hours, and wages. Even comings and goings from the gallery-turned-studio were monitored 24/7 via CCTV cameras.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141009174101-Screen_Shot_2014-09-12_at_16.03.01.png" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">For much of September Lund&rsquo;s four assistants churned out paintings inspired by his manual, which was more a primer on contemporary trends and ArtRank favorites than an instructive guide. Completed paintings were photographed and uploaded onto the </span><em style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">Studio Practice</em><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;"> website where judges rated the works on a sliding scale from &ldquo;destroy&rdquo; to &ldquo;sign.&rdquo; The idea was that Lund would sign and take ownership of positively assessed artworks, which would then be sold.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;"><em>Studio Practice</em> naturally opens onto debates about art market trends and the common practice of outsourcing production to studio assistants. Lund's projects&mdash;like <em><a href="http://returnofinvestment.biz/" target="_blank">Return Of Investment</a>&nbsp;</em>(2014)<em>&nbsp;</em>and this summer's&nbsp;<em><a href="http://flip-city.net/" target="_blank">Flip City</a>&nbsp;</em>at <a href="http://www.artslant.com/la/events/show/340538-flip-city" target="_blank">Steve Turner Contemporary</a>&mdash;often cast an analytical eye on the market, playfully responding to the unspoken rules and mechanisms of the art world.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">According to gallerist Marnix van Boetzelaer, one of the unexpected effects of </span><em style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">Studio Practice</em><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;"> is that Lund was able to get honest opinions about the artwork, &ldquo;a rare thing in the art world.&rdquo; Whether this is because of the relative anonymity of the assistants, the remote nature of the jury's internet interactions, the decontextualized imagery, or simply the lack of artist&rsquo;s imprimatur is unclear. What </span><em style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">is</em><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;"> clear is that the judges didn&rsquo;t hold their punches. A body of work that was, by nature, derivative got called out for its gimmicks.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141010104730-Screen_Shot_2014-10-10_at_12.43.44.png" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">The next time you're looking for an original way to word your critique, here's a list you can refer to for inspiration*:</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">1) "Imagine waking up every day having it in front of your bed..."</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">2) "Fake ethno art for bank lobbies. Too generic to sign, too sellable to destroy."</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">3) "Would be a great thrift store painting."</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">4) "Asger Jorn meets Jeff Koons meets Furry anal porn meets the Czech animated cartoon of the Little Mole. Highly sellable as contemporary pop art."</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">5) "shows how quickly one gets into a dead end in zombie formalism."</span><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">6) "Could work as a design for a shower curtain. Therefore: Don't destroy it, but don't sign it either."</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">7) "Stop making art with a blender!"</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">8) "Don't have to destroy it, it looks like it's falling apart anyways soon"</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">9) "It's difficult to enter into this work because of how the aura of the sexy fish visually and conceptually activates the distinctive formal juxtapositions."</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">10) "Increase its value by claiming that it's a parody of Tracy Enim's bed."</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141009192442-sign_this_work.jpg" alt="" /><span style="color: #525552;">&nbsp;<em>Untitled (floor),</em><span style="font-size: small;">&nbsp;which was one of five paintings signed (center); Photo: the author</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: small;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">In the end it's fitting that most of the paintings signed&mdash;paintings 55-58&mdash;acted as studio drop cloths for much of the project. They show paint splatters and footprints, drips and stains: the haphazard reminders of ill-fated artworks that didn&rsquo;t survive the jury&rsquo;s gauntlet. In Lund&rsquo;s final evaluation he writes of these canvases: &ldquo;A series of paintings void of artistic intention seems like a perfect summary of </span><em style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">Studio Practice</em><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/95201-andrea-alessi" target="_blank">Andrea Alessi</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">* Thanks to Florian Cramer, Gabriel Lester, Steve Turner, Hampus Lindwall, Annet Dekker, Alain Servais, and Jonas Lund for their creative commentary</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">(Unlses otherwise noted: All images and screengrabs from the&nbsp;<a href="http://studio-practice.biz/" target="_blank"><em>Studio Practice</em> website</a>; Courtesy of Jonas Lund and Boetzelaer|Nispen, Amsterdam)</span><br /></span></p> Tue, 14 Oct 2014 15:07:23 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list Copper Pyramid and Promethean Fire <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">A copper pyramid skeleton on a white square contains a mirrored firepit with a purple flame. The subtle elements of Kathryn Garcia's sculpture in the courtyard of the newly opened <a href="http://www.artslant.com/la/venues/show/48185-harmony-murphy-gallery">Harmony Murphy Gallery</a> downtown uses subtle, elementary materials to craft a metaphysical gathering place, borrowing aesthetically from the basic materials of minimalism with a presence drawn from the ethereal end of conceptualism. Dave Hickey wrote in his beautiful essay "Detroit Dharma Diva" in a <a href="http://www.michaelwerner.com/publications" target="_blank">Michael Werner catalogue</a>, that James Lee Byars embodies the spirit of a Chinese food restaurant in Michigan where that legendary artist grew up, some taste of exotic arcana without real origin. Here, the spirit is a distinctly LA variety of witchery, what you wished Stevie Nicks would organize naked black masses around with a coterie of naked spellcasters. During the opening, people gathered on pillows around its spectral glow and one handsome rogue passed out, his dreams soaking up unknown energies of a unspecific New Age from this magical simulacra begging for a ritual.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141009135437-i_am_violet.png" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/12307-andrew-berardini">Andrew Berardini</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-size: x-small;">(All images:&nbsp;</span><strong style="color: #525552; font-size: x-small;">Kathryn Garcia<em>,</em></strong><em style="color: #525552; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</em><em style="color: #525552; font-size: x-small;">I am Violet</em><span style="color: #525552; font-size: x-small;">, 2014; Courtesy of the artist and Harmony Murphy Gallery)</span></p> Fri, 10 Oct 2014 15:27:30 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list What If Staten Island Seceded from New York? <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">It&rsquo;s late morning and the ride across the New York Harbor, from Manhattan to Staten Island, is brisk. Tourists crowd the starboard side, photographing Lady Liberty, as our ferry powers along. &ldquo;Did you know that Staten Island voted to secede in the early nineties?&rdquo; I slant my eyes at the artist, Will Corwin, whose artwork, <em>The Great Richmond,</em> is currently installed at the Staten Island Ferry terminal.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">&ldquo;No. Really?&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">&ldquo;It&rsquo;s true,&rdquo; he says, &ldquo;but the whole effort got lost in bureaucratic paperwork. Imagine what Staten Island would be like if it had become the 51<sup>st</sup> state!&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141009104737-Overview1.JPG" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552;"><strong><span style="font-size: x-small;">Will Corwin and Neil Greenberg,</span></strong><span style="font-size: x-small;"> Installation view of&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: x-small;"><em>The Great Richmond</em> at the Culture Lounge at Staten Island Arts, 2014; Courtesy of the artists</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">Imagining a different Staten Island is the core of <em>The Great Richmond</em>, which came to shape as a collaboration between Corwin and Neil Greenberg, who works primarily as a professional cartographer. They imagined four unique versions of Staten Island&mdash;Urban, Suburban, Seceded, and Agrarian&mdash;each of which Greenberg realized in the form of a map. These maps surround what might be called the game board: four tables color coded to correspond to each alternative Staten Island. Upon these tables participants place plaster sculptures, each one created and cast by Corwin, which correspond to municipal components such as housing, culture, government, transportation, and farmland. The basic idea is to think like a developer and use the pieces to create your own ideal Staten Island.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">The work is entertaining and because every aspect of it&mdash;from the makeup of the sculptures to the details of the maps&mdash;are culturally relevant to Staten Island, it is also fundamentally educational. But you can&rsquo;t know a game until you&rsquo;ve played it and once I get the lay of the land, I got started.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141009105118-Mike_Ballou_Futzing_around__The_Great_Richmond__2014__photo_courtesy_Staten_Island_Arts.JPG" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">Mike Ballou futzing around at&nbsp;<em>The Great Richmond</em>, 2014; Courtesy of the artists and Staten Island Arts</span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">First, I built up some infrastructure on the Urban table. I stacked agrarian blocks on government buildings and thought how great it would be if every courthouse, every jail, and civic center had a garden. What if part of the bureaucrat&rsquo;s job was to till a bit of soil or feed a prisoner fresh tomatoes? What would that do to our sense of shared humanity? In a sense the whole project is based off the profound, yet simple prompt: &ldquo;What if?&rdquo; Those two words have the tremendous ability to launch one&rsquo;s brain into the unbound field of creative thought.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">On the ferry ride back to Manhattan, I asked Corwin if he&rsquo;d been surprised by anyone&rsquo;s participation. Corwin smiled and nodded his head. Then he told me about a man who had used the pieces designated as &ldquo;infrastructure&rdquo; to build a bridge between two tables. It was a possibility that had never occurred to Corwin, or to me as I played with the artwork, and it brought us to a new round of &ldquo;what if&rdquo; curiosities.&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141009105411-Urban_Utopia__The_Great_Richmond__2014__photo_courtesy_Staten_Island_Arts.JPG" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">Urban Utopia at&nbsp;<em>The Great Richmond</em>, 2014; Courtesy of the artists and Staten Island Arts</span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/5828-charlie-schultz">Charlie Schultz</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-small;">(Image at top:&nbsp;<strong>Neil Greenberg</strong>,&nbsp;<em>Richmondia What If Map</em>, 2014, Drawing; Photo: Oran Viriyincy; Courtesy of the artist)</span></p> Thu, 09 Oct 2014 18:25:35 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list Documenta 14 to be held in Athens <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><em>Documenta</em>, hosted in Kassel, Germany, every four or five years since 1955, announced yesterday that 2017&rsquo;s <em>documenta 14</em> will add a second host city: Athens. The mega-exhibition won&rsquo;t abandon its Kassel home, but rather will run its signature 100 days in both locations.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Artistic Director Adam Szymczyk hopes this gesture will address &ldquo;the current social and political situation both in Europe and globally, which motivates artistic action.&rdquo; Rather than dislocate the art world institution, the move will recenter <em>documenta </em>within a contested European self image.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">The timely announcement comes as European leaders meeting this month <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/08/business/rift-opens-among-eurozone-leaders-over-germanys-insistence-on-austerity.html">express increasingly critical positions</a>&nbsp;toward Germany&rsquo;s insistence on austerity within the Eurozone. Unseating Kassel from the throne of <em>documenta</em> meshes with the very real need for different perspectives and strategies in the European conversation.</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">But the financial relationship between Germany and Greece, subject to worldwide scrutiny following the latter&rsquo;s 2010&rsquo;s EU bailout, is not central to Szymczyk&rsquo;s decision. The Kunsthalle Basel director <a href="http://www.artnews.com/2014/10/06/documenta-14-will-be-held-in-athens-and-kassel/">told Art News</a>&nbsp;that he was more interested in Athens as a Mediterranean portal: &ldquo;It borders Turkey, it has an influx of migrants coming all over the place&mdash;Asia, Africa, and so forth. It&rsquo;s a figure of a larger situation that Europe has to confront, and I hope it will confront with this exhibition.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141008120052-documenta_14_team.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">Team&nbsp;<em>documenta 14</em>; Photo: &copy;&nbsp;Nils Klinger, 2014</span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">The quinquennial&rsquo;s most recent iterations also looked beyond Kassel for more global perspectives. For 2002&rsquo;s <em>Documenta11</em>, Artistic Director Okwui Enwezor held a series of pre-exhibition "<a href="http://www.documenta12.de/archiv/d11/data/english/index.html">Platforms</a>"&nbsp;in Vienna, Berlin, New Delhi, St Lucia, and Lagos in an attempt to unsettle <em>documenta</em>&rsquo;s historically euro-centric position. 2012&rsquo;s <em>dOCUMENTA(13)</em>&nbsp;presented exhibitions, seminars, and a retreat in Kabul, Afghanistan; Alexandria, Egypt; and Banff, Canada.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">What does this shakeup mean for would-be-visitors? Will viewers who cannot attend both sites experience a sense of &ldquo;loss and longing brought about by geographic and mental displacement,&rdquo; as suggested by the <em>documenta 14&nbsp;</em>team? Certainly the notoriously large exhibition doesn&rsquo;t need a second location to foster fears of missing out:&nbsp;<em>dOCUMENTA(13)</em>&nbsp;occupied some 31 venues including the train station, museums, cinemas, and parks, and recent editions have presented more time-based material than visiting hours covered by a standard two-day ticket. Viewers will always miss something, but in 2017 perhaps what goes unseen will have conceptual meaning for attendees.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">The announcement follows a symposium held Monday at the Academy of Fine Arts in Kassel titled &ldquo;documenta 14, Kassel: Learning from Athens.&rdquo; The event introduced Szymczyk&rsquo;s <em>documenta 14 </em>team and some of the key themes and ideas expected under his direction. The exhibition is tentatively scheduled to open in Athens in April followed by the Kassel show in June. Each will run for 100 days, overlapping for one month.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/95201-andrea-alessi">Andrea Alessi</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">(Image on top: Photo: Andrea Alessi)</span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> Wed, 08 Oct 2014 13:53:27 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list Hardcore War Drawings by Goya Shown in the Middle East <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; color: #525552;">Irena Gordon might be the most audacious curator in the Middle East&mdash;and it&rsquo;s thanks to an exhibition of pro-peace artworks that are over a century old.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">In a daring and rare show of 70 etchings, aquatints and drypoints by the Spanish court painter Francisco Goya has opened at the Hermann Struk Museum, Israel. In the context of the modern day Middle East, Goya&rsquo;s metaphors and allegories become not only relevant once again, but also subversive.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">Goya witnessed 19<sup>th</sup><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;"> century Spain during the Peninsular War, a military clash notable for the emergence of guerilla warfare and as one of the first wars of national liberation. Characteristics of the Peninsular War and the Dos de Mayo Uprising recall the ferocious contemporary conflicts in the region, from Gaza to Turkey, Syria and Iraq. The barbarism of war, human cruelty, and the tragic consequences of brotherhood take on a strong leftist message&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">in Goya&rsquo;s intensely emotional works.</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141008120517-G02369a01nf2008_TRABAJO.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; color: #525552;"><strong><strong>Francisco Goya</strong>,&nbsp;</strong>A<em> heroic feat! with dead men!</em>, Plate 39 from the series <em>Los Desastres de la Guerra</em>, 1810-1820 (1906 edition)&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">The works are currently displayed in Israel for the first time. Garnered from three pivotal etching series produced in the mid to late 1800s, the works depict the effects of societal violence on the individual. Taken from the series <em>Los Proverbios</em>&nbsp;(the Proverbs), these etchings show the violence concealed in literature; <em>La Tauromaquia </em>images,&nbsp;portray the Spanish bull fight and depict violence contained in sport and entertainment; and finally, the <em>Los Desastres De La Guerra</em>&nbsp;(The Disasters of War) series, which was never published in Goya&rsquo;s lifetime due to its politically sensitive nature, directly addresses war.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141008120130-G02333a01nf2008_TRABAJO.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-size: x-small;"><strong>Francisco Goya,</strong><em> The same, </em>Plate 3 from the series<em>&nbsp;Los Desastres de la Guerra, </em>1810-1820 (1906 edition)</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em>&nbsp;</em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">Despair emanates from Goya&rsquo;s works, with their elegiac captions "Truth Has Died", &nbsp;"Sad Foreboding of What is Going to Happen", "Against the Common Good".&nbsp;The bitterness of the artist's responses are more accusatory, more painful presented right now in the context of the Middle East &ndash; more than 150 years on.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141008120217-G02331A01NF2008_TRABAJO.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><strong>Francisco Goya,</strong></span><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">&nbsp;</span><em><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">Sad forebodings of what is going to happen, </span></em><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">Plate 1 from the series</span><em><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">&nbsp;Los Desastres de la Guerra, </span></em><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">1810-1820 (1906 edition)</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">&nbsp;</span></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/162742-charlotte-jansen">Charlotte Jansen</a></span></span><em><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-small;">(Image on top:</span><em><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></em><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-small;"><strong>Francisco Goya,</strong></span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span><em><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-small;">Bury them and keep quiet, </span></em><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-small;">Plate 18 from the series</span><em><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;Los Desastres de la Guerra,</span></em><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-small;"> 1810-1820 (1906 edition)&nbsp;</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Thu, 09 Oct 2014 13:27:22 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list Why Haven’t I Given Up on the Art World? <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">It&rsquo;s a cold rainy day in what has been an unusually cold and rainy summer in Switzerland. My face is melting in the most pleasant way as I lean my head against the windowpane. I&rsquo;m feeling the air pressure rise and fall as the train zips in and out of tunnels through open fields. The landscape is beyond real. Electric green grass, rolling hills that lead to deep navy blue mountains capped in snow, and clouds that look exactly the way Plato would imagine clouds.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">I&rsquo;m making a daytrip to Basel to see the <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ew/events/show/339057-sculpture-1997-2014">Charles Ray</a> retrospective that is split between the <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ew/venues/show/19318-kunstmuseum-basel">Kunstmuseum</a> and the Museum f&uuml;r Gegenkunstwerk. It focuses on Ray&rsquo;s sculpture between 1997 and 2014. The bulk of the show is at the Kunstmuseum, which proves to be an ideal venue: a series of rooms, one leading to the next, each housing a single work. The exhibition begins with his 1997 <em>Unpainted Sculpture</em>, a Pontiac Grand Am that has been totaled and cast piece-by-piece in fiberglass. It allows us to do something art is good at&mdash;examine things in ways that in other cases would be inappropriate. <em>Unpainted Sculpture</em>, which is painted gray by the way, lets us consider the violent physics of a car crash in a sculptural way and it also lets us gawk at a car accident but call it a cultural experience.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">The rest of the exhibition reveals Ray to be an increasingly conservative artist obsessed with the banalities of sculptural craft and figuration. The piece that bookends the whole experience and does things I would argue art maybe shouldn&rsquo;t is <em>Sleeping Woman</em> (2012). It&rsquo;s based on a photo he took of a homeless woman sleeping on a bench near his studio. The 2.5 metric ton sculpture is machined out of a solid block of stainless steel. The whole thing feels perverse. Even the way you encounter it, walking up to the woman from behind, looking down on her.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">It&rsquo;s almost impossible for me to look at art anymore without thinking about all the mechanisms in place behind it. I think about the costly and involved production of this object based on a homeless woman who appears to be black. I&rsquo;m not saying artists have to make work addressing class and race issues, but they should be aware of the times they live in. Ray seems completely absorbed in his privileged neurotic artist head and unconcerned about the statement, intentional or otherwise, his work makes in the world. It&rsquo;s kind of fucked up: A person living on the street is the catalyst for an object that has generated at least hundreds of thousands of dollars in production, shipping and sales. An object that ends up on the other side of the world for me to consider in terms the exhibition text describes thusly: &ldquo;with special attention paid to the laced hem of the panties peeking out from underneath the rucked-up jacket.&rdquo;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141008091459-IMG_3420.JPG" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">Palestine Grill, Limitsrasse, Z&uuml;rich, Switzerland</span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">I return to Z&uuml;rich and my friend&rsquo;s flat. It&rsquo;s quite cold now and I enjoy the autumnal flavor of the air. I have the place to myself and go to the grocery store for a few things to make a salad for dinner. It feels like it felt when I lived in Berlin. I can&rsquo;t explain it. It&rsquo;s romantic. Evenings like this make me hyper aware of every sensation&mdash;the light, the smell, the temperature. I spend months in my home city and remember only a few details, but a week in Switzerland and every moment is etched in high relief.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">The friend I&rsquo;m staying with is Patricia Bianchi, an independent curator and curatorial assistant at the Haus Konstruktiv. I&rsquo;m in Switzerland for the <a href="http://www.sommerakademie.zpk.org/">Sommerakademie</a> at the Zentrum Paul Klee. This is a residency in the capital of Bern I&rsquo;ve been involved with since 2009 when I attended as Fellow. I met Patricia there in 2010 when she was on the curatorial team and I was there for the launch of a book I co-edited with the Fellows from my year called <a href="http://www.sternberg-press.com/index.php?pageId=1289&amp;l=de"><em>Internal Necessity: a reader tracing the inner logics of the contemporary art field</em></a>. What brings me back every year is the group of people that is continuously growing. It&rsquo;s more than a network of contacts; many describe it as feeling like a family. We make the yearly trek to Bern to catch up with old friends and make new ones. It&rsquo;s like coming home for the holidays, complete with a family dinner and sneaking off to hang out with your favorite cousins. The people I&rsquo;ve met here have become great friends and led to experiences far beyond the quaint Swiss capital.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141008085635-u5.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">From left: Berit Seidel (member of U5) and Sebasti&eacute;n Peters (curator of Sonnenstube, an off space in Lugano, Switzerland) /&nbsp;Artwork in the U5 studio</span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">In Z&uuml;rich I find myself in a group of energetic young artists and curators as Patricia introduces me to the city&rsquo;s thriving scene of off spaces and project galleries. We go to the Automaten Bar in the studio of the art collective U5. The bar consists of a vending machine that dispenses beers instead of pop. There I meet artists, students, and S&eacute;bastien Peter who is co-curating <a href="http://www.larada.ch/laradach/info/index.php">an exhibition</a> with Patricia.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">Another evening we go to an artist-run space called Arbenz for an artist talk that essentially becomes a critique. We go to another DIY bar called Zitrone where the group Sugar, Sugar, Sugar is debuting new flavors they&rsquo;ve concocted for their ice cream machine. The artist Gregory Hari is collaborating with them for a project he&rsquo;s working on with Patricia called La Deutsche Vita. I tell him if German and trashy is the theme, they should do a J&auml;germeister-flavored ice cream. Later we end up at the house of Lucas Herzig talking in the kitchen and finishing up bottles of wine.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141008091358-IMG_3608.JPG" alt="" />&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">The Automaten Bar</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">It&rsquo;s not any one of these events that I can point to and say, &ldquo;This is what it&rsquo;s all about.&rdquo; It&rsquo;s the overall experience they offer. Nor is there a specific conversation I&rsquo;m able to cite and say, &ldquo;THIS was the meaningful dialogue.&rdquo; It all sort of blended together into a feeling of belonging and excitement. Happiness? Joy de vivre? &hellip;Feeling like, &ldquo;THIS is the way it's supposed to be. THIS is the feeling I get from being a part of all this. The feeling I want to hold on to.&rdquo; If I&rsquo;m sacrificing quality of life&mdash;a stable income, peace of mind, all the things people like me who aren&rsquo;t artists have&mdash;then this is the experience I should always be seeking out. And if something is not providing that, then it isn&rsquo;t worth my energy and I shouldn&rsquo;t feel bad about not participating in it.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">In the moment I was not thinking about how to condense it all into a story; I was just living. But I can tell you this: What is most important is to involve yourself with groups of people that care about the same stuff you do and who enhance your appreciation of those things. It&rsquo;s about the conversation, the interaction, the people. I realize this is why I&rsquo;m in it. Why I haven&rsquo;t given up on art, as cynical as I am and as desolate as the whole global contemporary art enterprise can feel.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/23500-erik-wenzel?tab=REVIEWS">Erik Wenzel</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">(Image on top:&nbsp;Picassoplatz, Basel, Switzerland)</span><br /></span></p> Wed, 08 Oct 2014 09:35:07 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list Can You Understand Graffiti without Breaking the Law? <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">Growing up in an urban metropolis such as New York City, street art and graffiti had always been an inescapable part of everyday life. Catching a glimpse of Chinatown&rsquo;s rooftops during a morning commute over the Manhattan bridge, driving along the narrow streets of the Lower East Side, passing by <a href="http://5ptz.com/" target="_blank">5Pointz</a>&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">in its glory&mdash;it is never difficult to find traces of the local artists&rsquo; reclamation of public space once your eyes are opened to it. The distance, both literally and figuratively, from which we view this work however, alters the way we perceive it. When it comes to illegal graffiti, does one really experience the work without first understanding the risk, rebellion and energy that drives it? Can a historian or critic accurately convey this movement if they remain a voyeur looking in from the outside, safely distanced from the shadows that define it?</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">After recently moving to Australia from Brooklyn I found myself immersed in an entirely new urban environment filled with artists and writers who were no longer familiar. Rather than doing my researching online, I decided to introduce myself to Sydney&rsquo;s street art and graffiti scene through a little urban exploration of my own.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20141005050002-IMG_6148_DSFactory_WEB.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">On a cloudy Sunday afternoon&mdash;mid-winter in Australia&mdash;two friends and I jumped on the train to Alexandria for the old Dunlop/Slazenger Factory. As we exited the station in inner-west Sydney, the neighborhood&rsquo;s warehouses and scrap yards offered rows of large-scale, surprisingly barren walls with little graffiti, street art, or commissioned murals to be found.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">From its exterior, the Dunlop/Slazenger Factory does not appear to be anything more than a typical industrial building with dilapidated brick walls covered by a few quick tags, roller pieces extended from the rooftops and, of course, the property owner&rsquo;s bright orange &ldquo;Do Not Enter&rdquo; signs stenciled around the fa&ccedil;ade and surrounding fencing. From outside, it is hard to understand the energy concealed within this abandoned building's walls. At this distance, we were voyeurs peering through. Once a glimpse is caught of the color that spreads across the factory&rsquo;s interior, however, it is hard not to be consumed by an intense need to get inside. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">I wish I could say our entry was easy. I'd acquired a few of my own dicey experiences getting into illicit spaces while out in NYC with street art and graffiti friends&mdash;from tearing my meniscus after a night hopping around <a href="http://icyandsot.com/" target="_blank">Icy &amp; Sot's</a></span><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">&nbsp;roof in Bushwick to talking my way out of being arrested with <a href="http://www.12ozprophet.com/news/rusk-photos-by-julian_gilbert-trumbull_island-brooklyn-preview" target="_blank">Rusk</a></span><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">&nbsp;in Chinatown&rsquo;s alleyways&mdash;but we seemed to be out luck this Sunday afternoon. Patched up holes in the barbed wire fence and empty cans of spray paint were taunting reminders of others who had succeeded before us. Out of desperation, the three of us even traversed through the dark sewage way that passes underneath the factory grounds only to find that our light at the end of the tunnel left us wedged in a narrow gap somewhere between two of the factory&rsquo;s buildings&mdash;still unable to get inside. With every dead end we hit, a little more of the interior became visible and our determination grew stronger. We were on the hunt. Our desperation overpowered the initial fear of getting caught. Suddenly, a new layer of the artists&rsquo; process became clear; as we continued to climb, duck, and scour around the property grounds, the same graffiti originally seen from outside was now pulsing with our own adrenaline. Of course, in the end, the answer to getting inside would end up being all too simple. </span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; color: #525552; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20141005050126-IMG_6128_DSFactory_WEB.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">Once inside, the abandoned factory was our own. Walls filled with graffiti turned into multiple floors, courtyards and buildings for us to explore. Years of artists and writers who visited this factory became evident in the layers of paint that had built up and began peeling away. The dampness over Sydney finally began to clear and suddenly two men appeared in the second-story room where we stood. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">Initially our groups approached each other nervously; having the place to ourselves for some time already, we were startled to run into anyone that afternoon, but the familiar sound of Ironak spray paint clanking in a cardboard box told us they were not police. &ldquo;Do you mind if we paint?&rdquo; they asked as we all met in the roofless expanse. 4gots and Ouch, two Sydney-based writers, put down their bags and boxes of paint as they began working on two adjacent walls. We talked of &ldquo;bad behavior warrants,&rdquo; our love for the smell of fresh paint, and favorite writers, trying to keep our voices hidden from pedestrians on the street. By entering this culture that may have been foreign to us before, not being writers ourselves or even from Sydney, the distance between the work and us was as short as it could ever be. An unspoken trust between the two groups formed knowing that at this point, if anyone were to show up, this day would end the same for us all.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">The game of trial and error, the risk associated with being on one side of the &ldquo;Do Not Enter&rdquo; wall versus the other, our hunt for the perfect means of entry&mdash;everything we experienced that day changed the way we viewed the work hidden within Sydney&rsquo;s abandoned factory. We were no longer voyeurs looking in from the outside. A new layer of fear, excitement and rebelliousness in the work suddenly revealed itself in a way that would not have otherwise been experienced. On that Sunday afternoon in late July, our concern was entirely focused around the experience. In a movement where the action (i.e., the act of &ldquo;getting up&rdquo;) is in many ways as important as the final piece that is a result of this action, the experiential and subversive elements of their work cannot be ignored. This is not to say that every street art and graffiti enthusiast should be out there climbing billboards to see the latest ad takeover from the artist&rsquo;s point of view, but a distinction needs to be made by critics from which distance they are interpreting the work. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">To accurately understand the graffiti movement, one needs to be prepared to physically enter the artist&rsquo;s urban playground in order to experience the culture within its original context&mdash;at your own risk. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/400544-allison-crawbuck?tab=REVIEWS">Allison Crawbuck</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">(All images: Dunlop/Slazenger Factory; Courtesy of the writer)</span><br /></span></p> Thu, 09 Oct 2014 14:55:54 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list Ido Shemi: Instigator of the Israeli underground <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Wherever <a href="http://www.idoshemi.com">Ido Shemi</a> goes, underground culture seems to follow. When the artist was growing up in the serious shithole of Kibbutz Rosh Ha&rsquo;Nikrah in the &lsquo;70s, British volunteers would bring punk music on cassette tapes from the UK. These early encounters with subculture led Shemi to form his first band in 1980, The Dead Begins. After serving in the first Lebanon War, which ended in &rsquo;82, he felt&mdash;like many of his generation who lived through the war&mdash;that he had to get out of Israel, and he wound up in New York in &rsquo;85, a period that would shape the future of so many of the scenes that feed us today: &ldquo;I lived near the CBGB in the East Village. In my first week in the city, I was standing in line for the bathroom at a club, and I wasn&rsquo;t sure if I was tripping from the drugs&hellip; but Andy Warhol was standing to next me.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20141005042144-3s.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Shemi returned to Israel inspired by what he saw in New York: the music, the graffiti, the club scene. In &rsquo;95 he opened his first venue, the Dvash Moloko Bar. Together with Ilan Elkayam, they were the first club to host underground DJs in Tel Aviv, and were completely estranged from anything else that was happening in the city at the time. The venture quickly turned into something much bigger: the Dinamo Dvash. &ldquo;It attracted a lot of good vibes, happy people with open minds&mdash;it was like a Kibbutz, only with a lot of happy drugs.&rdquo; Apart from bringing major international acts to Israel for the first time (Aphex Twin, DJ Vadim, Rodney P., Herbaliser, Lee Scratch Perry, Aba Shanti-I to name just a few) they also brought the soundsystem culture to Israel. Endless Israeli DJs and producers made their name on the Dinamo Dvash&rsquo;s turntables or were exposed to the music that would inspire them.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20141005042448-4s.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">But the Dinamo also stood out for its pioneering approach to the visual side of the culture. &ldquo;We started making black and white xerox posters and flyers, we were covering walls all over the city and from &rsquo;99 we started putting out a monthly fanzine with information about the muscians who were coming, plus artwork by myself and friends who were involved in the scene. It was before Internet and iPhones, and the crowd was thirsty for this kind of information, and they would collect the zines and flyers obsessively, but for me more than anything it was just another way to create.&rdquo; The Dinamo closed in 2002, during the second intifada. &ldquo;It was very hard, all the DJs were canceling the day before a show, night clubs were being blown up in Tel Aviv&hellip; so we decided it was time to move on.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20141005042627-1s.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Since then, Shemi has been busy with projects and exhibiting his art around the world. This month he has presented his mosaics, installations, lightboxes and new hologram works at solo shows in Tel Aviv and Haifa, and is working on a new book project. He is still involved in the local underground culture, but he experiences it as a veteran observer. &ldquo;Today with this whole Facebook culture for promoting, it seems really important to me to go back, to put posters up in the streets&hellip; it doesn&rsquo;t matter if more people will see it on the iPhone, when you see something live it has a stronger impact, this is something that is lost in the sea of information that goes through the net, but never really leaves an imprint.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20141005042724-iSHEMI.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20141005042841-IDOSHEMIPOSTER_s_color.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20141005043010-2s.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20141005043252-6s.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/162742-charlotte-jansen?tab=REVIEWS">Charlotte Jansen</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">(All images: Courtesy of the artist)</span><br /></span></p> Tue, 07 Oct 2014 20:24:55 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list Hong Kong Protest Art: the Facebook group documenting activist artworks <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">Last week, as demonstrations in Hong Kong intensified with police and mafia clashes, <a href="http://news.artnet.com/market/hong-kong-protests-panic-auction-houses-on-eve-of-sales-119562">Artnet reported</a> on the ensuing panic at auction houses in the wake of the political situation. They questioned the possible impact on the art market given that the protests were strategically placed to paralyze some of HK&rsquo;s most important business areas.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">This weekend, the <a href="http://www.asiacontemporaryart.com/home/main/en/">Asia Contemporary Art Show</a>&nbsp;took place as scheduled at the Conrad in Pacific Place, an area occupied by protestors. &ldquo;We are pleased with the outcome, considering the protests which continued through all four days of the Show, closing off nearby streets and making it more difficult for collectors to get here. The fact that many still made the effort, enjoyed the Show and purchased artworks is encouraging,&rdquo; said Director Mark Saunderson in a <a href="http://www.asiacontemporaryart.com/news/product_attachments/000000012_0.pdf">press release</a> that acknowleged the protests merely as a logistical inconvenience.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">But beyond the potential financial impact, questions arise too as to the possible effects on cultural relations between mainland China and Hong Kong. The Asia Contemporary Art Fair presented works by artists from both locations and galleries from Shanghai and Beijing were braced for a tough time, but reported good sales and new collectors in the end. But the &ldquo;teenage rebellion&rdquo; outside, with its spotlight on students, could have a more widespread influence in years to come as they graduate into the adult world: their resistance to Beijing&rsquo;s power could widen the cultural divide.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141007142642-1902854_284587705084970_977407973085131066_n.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">Meanwhile, beyond fair and auction halls, the&nbsp;<a href="http://tinyurl.com/ktjgpnm">Facebook group</a>&nbsp;"Hong Kong Artists concern protest art" was&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">established on September 29th by a collective of artists and designers describing themselves as &ldquo;keyboard fighters.&rdquo; It has started to document the reaction on the streets through artworks.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">Using the yellow ribbon as their profile icon (the color worn by protestors, while blue ribbons show support for the police) the page</span><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">&mdash;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">whose given purpose is to &ldquo;give support to all Hong Kong people&rdquo;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">&mdash;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">uploads posts from the streets showing a grassroots view of the activism. Children's chalk drawings of flowers spill onto the roads, and handwritten posters and banners present a direct and simple message through a shared word, written in both English and Cantonese: democracy.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">As the exhausted demonstrators return to school and work this week these visual vestiges of their ongoing fight remain on HK&rsquo;s streets, at least for now; the Facebook page will remain a digital platform for the campaign to collate words, images, and hopes for the future.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141007143344-10639577_283709171839490_3789993752967359788_n.jpg" alt="" /><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141007150532-1374359_283887941821613_613273449791639102_n.jpg" alt="" /><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141007150549-10574311_283878408489233_6471469660951532079_n.jpg" alt="" /><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141007143408-10710952_283632605180480_8420112061066630085_n.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">&mdash;Charlotte Jansen</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">(All images via Facebook: <a href="http://tinyurl.com/ktjgpnm">Hong Kong Artists concern protest art</a>)</span><br /></span></p> Tue, 14 Oct 2014 01:59:16 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list Hebbel am Ufer Ends Controversial Berlin Art Piece Publicly Projecting Grindr PMs <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">Five days into his public performance art piece, </span><a style="font-size: medium;" href="http://english.hebbel-am-ufer.de/programme/schedule/verhoeven-wanna-play/" target="_blank"><em>Wanna Play? Love in Times of Grindr</em></a><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">, the Berlin performance center Hebbel am Ufer (HAU) announced yesterday it&rsquo;s pulling the plug on Dries Verhoeven, whose project has drawn widespread criticism for violating gay men&rsquo;s privacy and exploiting users on the gay dating app, Grindr. &nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">For <em>Wanna Play?,</em> which was partially funded by the Dutch embassy, the Dutch performance artist committed to live in a glass trailer erected in one of Kreuzberg's public squares for 15 days, during which he would chat with men on Grindr and invite (read: lure) them over using one of five smart phones he brought with him. His conversations were projected onto a large wall behind him, and video of his box was streamed live <a href="http://wannaplayberlin.de/" target="_blank">online</a>.&nbsp;<br /></span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" lang="en"> <p>Dries Verhoeven and HAU Hebbel am Ufer have decided to end the project &bdquo;Wanna Play?&ldquo; ahead of time after numerous complaints from the public</p> &mdash; HAU Hebbel am Ufer (@HAU123) <a href="https://twitter.com/HAU123/status/518828625609891840">October 5, 2014</a></blockquote> <script charset="utf-8" type="text/javascript" src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js"></script> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">The interactions weren't meant to be sexual. On the contrary, Verhoeven hoped to challenge what he perceived to be an increasingly sexualized and superficial gay community. In an age where dating apps are more frequently replacing the need for public meeting places for gay men, Verhoeven wrote in the project&rsquo;s manifesto that he fears gays have constructed a new &ldquo;invisible closet,&rdquo; again hiding their sexuality from public view.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Instead of sex, Verhoeven wanted to &ldquo;seduce men to satisfy his non-sexual desires,&rdquo; including: playing chess, making pancakes, shaving each other&rsquo;s beards, and reading to one another from their favorite books.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">In order to protect the privacy of the men with whom he interacted, he hid screen names and distorted their pictures&mdash;arguably not enough&mdash;by rendering them in the negative.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">But here's the thing, and it's a huge thing: Verhoeven never told the men that they were part of a public art performance. Not until they showed up to his big glass spectacle, being live streamed to the Internet and watched by a public crowd in one of Kreuzberg&rsquo;s busiest squares, did his conversation partners realize they were actors in his social experiment.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/684523/tcd3/20141006131120-1094302.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">image via <a href="https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10100948809934294&amp;set=a.666684407154.2236549.21303147&amp;type=1&amp;theater" target="_blank">Parker Tilghman</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">That&rsquo;s what happened to Berlin-based artist and performer Parker Tilghman, a former contributor to this publication, who&rsquo;s been a leading figure in the outcry against Verhoeven&rsquo;s performance.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">On Thursday, the second day of the installation, Tilghman chatted with Verhoeven who invited him over to shave his beard. Curious, Tilghman made his way to what he believed was Verhoeven&rsquo;s private residence. When he stepped off the U-Bahn he found a large screen displaying their conversation before the public square, with details about where he lived, his dog, and his picture.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium;"><span style="color: #525552;">Outraged, Tilghman, physically confronted Verhoeven, punching him and shouting at crew members. He</span> <a href="https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10100948809934294&amp;set=a.666684407154.2236549.21303147&amp;type=1&amp;theater">took to Facebook</a> <span style="color: #525552;">recounting the experience, writing, &ldquo;I &hellip; feel violated in a way that is impossible to fathom. That feeling of violation is devastating.&rdquo;&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium;"><span style="color: #525552;">His story was picked up almost immediately by <a href="http://www.dazeddigital.com/artsandculture/article/22063/1/artist-causes-outrage-with-public-broadcast-of-grindr-pms" target="_blank"><em>Dazed Digital</em></a>, <a href="http://bullettmedia.com/article/berlin-artistdickhead-projects-grindr-messages-giant-screen/" target="_blank"><em>Bullett</em></a>, and <a href="http://www.berliner-zeitung.de/berlin/performance--wanna-play---in-kreuzberg-kunstaktion-stellt-schwule-bloss,10809148,28640576.html" target="_blank"><em>Die&nbsp;Berliner Zeitung</em></a>, inciting outrage from the public. Since then, much of the controversy has been playing out on Facebook. The following day, Verhoeven</span> <a href="https://www.facebook.com/driesverhoevencie/posts/736549573049596">posted a response</a> <span style="color: #525552;">that, rather than acknowledge concerns over privacy, stated his belief that privacy never existed in the first place. He writes:</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; padding-left: 30px;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">It is unfortunate that opposition has arisen surrounding my project &ldquo;Wanna play?&rdquo;. I find it regrettable that people actually feel their privacy has been infringed upon. I find the opposition exemplary in a time in which we, as homosexuals, are once again hiding and choosing to express our sexual feelings in (apparent) anonymity. That anonymity is, I believe, a myth.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Verhoeven did change tact and began telling participants at the beginning of their interactions that they were being broadcast publicly. But the damage had been done. Sunday night HAU hosted a public forum to discuss the piece and ultimately decided to end the performance 10 days early.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium;"><span style="color: #525552;">In a</span> <a href="https://www.facebook.com/icaughtaglimpse/posts/10100952087570884">follow up post</a> <span style="color: #525552;">on Facebook, Tilghman, who has since hired a lawyer and has threatened to press charges, expressed his concern over Verhoeven&rsquo;s willingness to use unsuspecting gay men for his project.</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; padding-left: 30px;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">The autonomy and power over my sexual expression was taken and abused without my consent for Mr. Verhoeven&rsquo;s own personal gain. Myself and others were used as fodder for his egotistical and narcissistic quest for artistic achievement. &nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">While Verhoeven was busy bemoaning the loss of gay public spaces to the Internet, he was simultaneously erecting his own digital dystopia, where gay men can no longer expect privacy on the Internet. He misses the point that gay bars in gay neighborhoods frequented by gay people were never fully public places to begin with. They were safe enclaves away from a larger public, the kind Verhoeven was broadcasting his chat mates&rsquo; messages to.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">The loss of these places is concerning. Indeed, Verhoeven brings up a number of important questions about the state of gay community in the digital age, although he waxes nostalgic for a time I&rsquo;m skeptical ever existed and bemoans the loss of an intimacy I don&rsquo;t think can be found in a bar. True, online dating makes showing interest easier and rejection less painful, and yes, perhaps we&rsquo;re worse at face-to-face flirting for it, but does going to a park under the cover of night really imbue a sense of gay community or does it just feel like a more authentic way to find a quick fuck?&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">In building a glass structure in the middle of Berlin, Verhoeven didn&rsquo;t do anything to rebuild public gayness or restore gay intimacy. He simply used Grindr for something other than sex. That&rsquo;s not revolutionary; if anything, it illustrates Grindr&rsquo;s value, not its deficit. &nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium;"><span style="color: #525552;">He&rsquo;s certainly not the first to exploit Grindr for some artistic value. There&rsquo;s Marc Adelman, who drew international <a href="http://hyperallergic.com/53302/privacy-sexuality-and-museum-politics-at-the-jewish-museum/" target="_blank">criticism for his project</a>, <em>Stelen (Columns)</em>, in which he collected over a hundred dating website profile pictures of gay men posing at Berlin&rsquo;s Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe. There was also the artist (who ironically kept her own name private), who</span> <a href="http://www.queerty.com/interview-the-girl-who-masqueraded-as-a-dude-on-grindr-to-score-dick-pics-for-an-art-project-20130817">pretended to be a gay man on Grindr</a> <span style="color: #525552;">in order to win a bet with her girlfriends to see who could get the most dick pics. She won. She then exhibited them at a gallery in Brooklyn.</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">In creating the project, <a href="http://www.driesverhoeven.com/sites/default/files/uploads/wanna_play_love_in_the_time_of_grindreng_0.pdf" target="_blank">Verhoeven wrote </a>that one of the main issues with dating apps was that, for him, they reduced users to simple consumers of his sexual offerings. He found himself becoming more superficial and his own relationships deteriorating. He writes in his confession, &ldquo;The men that I met then were the trophies of my digital hunt. The more their outward appearance fit my ideal image, the higher their value in the imaginary ranking that I kept of them and of my own accomplishments.&rdquo;&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">And that&rsquo;s the problem for Verhoeven. He has become the man of his own dystopian vision. He can&rsquo;t see users as people.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/280566-max-nesterak">Max Nesterak</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">(Image on top courtesy of HUA)</span></p> Mon, 06 Oct 2014 18:45:15 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list Miranda July's Curious Handbag Is Just For You <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">This is just for you.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">If every outfit you owned were cut to your body, every shoe shaped just for your foot, all the doorways in the house adjusted perfectly for your height.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">If in the fridge, your favorites things to eat filled the shelves, rare culinary delights and hearty comfort foods, prepared especial, ready to be placed directly into your mouth to let their deliciousness spread through your being and satisfy all possible hungers. You could never decide which was your favorite ice cream, so there are hundreds of small containers neatly arranged and clearly marked to choose from in the freezer.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Perfectly filled, the medicine chests features all the necessary drugs and ointments, first-aids and pick-me-ups that you may require in the course of a long day, a long night, a long life.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">And there in bed (Goldilocks perfection, just the right amount of pillows) is your childhood blanket: battered, stained, fraying at the edge, of indeterminate color and mysterious origin. One precious jewel of a tear plumps out of your eye and rolls to the ground to the lush Persian rug that underlies the California king and you know you&rsquo;ll be able to sleep the deepest, most perfectly dreamless sleep of your life. Placed near the bed, but facing just slightly away, is a picture of your favorite people all beaming with joy whenever you need to see them and be comforted.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Are you creeped out yet?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/1629/2ij/20141005225656-themiranda1.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Perfection is a particularly bloodless form of death. Bespoke items are generally the province for the rich, but there is that odd DIY spirit that still percolates in old school post-punks. Whenever confronted with shitty music, a bad community, an unfair society, you make your own. All-ages club and grassroots activism never thought it would birth a haute-couture purse/conceptual art project, but fashion was always an aspect of creating community so why not this bag, editioned to 100?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Performance art became performance albums. A bestselling book was followed by a popular movie. Another movie followed to less acclaim, but no less struggle. The endless crossover for Miranda July continues. I bought a Miranda July record some time in the vague end of the &lsquo;90s. Every voice was hers. I&rsquo;m still haunted by Megan from Kelso, Washington, calling again and again, with her plaintive voice penetrating the loneliness of a long, dark drive to the end of night. &nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">And now July has designed a bag, her bag: <a href="http://welcomecompanions.com/collections/classics/products/the-miranda-limited-edition">the Miranda</a>. Seemingly fashioned after a doctor&rsquo;s valise, this little satchel contains what July might carry in her purse, but brought to a hyperspecificity that passes bespoke and lands on the other side of spooky. Made in collaboration with <a href="http://welcomecompanions.com/">Welcome Companions</a> and recently launched at Opening Ceremony in Los Angeles, it includes a scrap of a security blanket, a faux-photo of July's son (totally legit that she respects the privacy of her real son, but it adds to the creep to have a decoy son), a hidden $20 bill for emergency cab fare, a bottle of homeopathic sleep aid, and one leather-stitched pocket designed to carry a single almond, "in case of low blood sugar." The immediate impulse is to dismiss this as simply the empty fashions that a generation of hard-headed, black-clad artists have mostly rejected, or worse, an artist going corporate, jumping the shark, but there is something more subtle at work.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">The ego/marketeering that leads to the naming of bags after people (Hermes&rsquo; "the Birkin" named after actress Jane Birkin probably the most famous of these luxe purses) gets quietly prodded by July. Her bag reveals the particular mania inherent to such items. Hyperspecificity generally tends to comes with huge inequalities of wealth, the minutiae of which occupy the extremely bored/wealthy while the peasants sharpen their pitchforks (think France in 1791). The Miranda both quietly mocks the fashion-consciousness of the idle rich, but also sells to them (at $1,725, as an artwork it&rsquo;s almost reasonable, but as a bag its likeliest consumer is the extremely wealthy). Though it includes a video in a flash-drive tucked into the purse that hasn&rsquo;t been made available as far as I can tell, the subtlest bit of work comes in the form of writing on a stack of cards tucked into its own special sleeve.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">As a writer, July&rsquo;s sentences embody a self-conscious, socially awkward, and heartfelt earnestness that seemed to define narrative culture during the earliest bit of the 2000s (along with McSweeney&rsquo;s and Wes Anderson). Reacted against by the following generation of writers as too twee and precious, there are moments here where that gentle, self-aware voice really shines and supercedes its context. The cards in the Miranda were intended by July to help the bearer communicate, but come off as strange poems, more Yoko Ono art instructions or David Shrigley one-sheets than anything too functionally self-helpish; they're more about the difficulty of communication than a direct aid to actually communicating. &nbsp;&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/1629/2ij/20141005225616-Screenshot_2014-10-05_at_3.55.52_PM.png" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&ldquo;Let&rsquo;s be honest, the conversation we are having right now isn&rsquo;t very interesting to either of us. I suggest we shake hands and go find other people to talk to. PS. If your enjoy our conversation, please disregard the above.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&ldquo;I just handed you this card. Now you are reading it. Also, I love you. If you love me too, rip this up throw the pieces on the floor, spit on them, stamp on them, and then walk out of the room like you&rsquo;re furious. I&rsquo;ll come running after you and we can kiss.&rdquo; &nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&ldquo;In three seconds, I&rsquo;m going to burst out into song and I&rsquo;d like you to join me. We&rsquo;ll be singing &lsquo;This Little Heart of Mine.&rsquo;&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&ldquo;Sadness Punch Card: Each time you feel sad, punch a number below. When the card is full, just keep feeling sad without a card to punch.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">In an overexamined life, the kind where the hyperspecificity of a single almond becomes a desire, these actions will invariably fail to create meaning, that has to be made by us. But the making of art becomes an action&mdash;like punching a card for our sadness&mdash;that at a minimum gives ritual and action to what would otherwise be sinking depression.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">The cards are sold separately at a more modest $22. A decent price to have an excuse to burst out into song or run after your lover and sink into a kiss with them or give yourself some small gesture to combat the sadness.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/12307-andrew-berardini">Andrew Berardini</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">(Images courtesy of Welcome Companions)</span></p> Tue, 07 Oct 2014 17:58:39 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list A Different Kind of Fair Vibe: Specialization Rules at Unseen, Unfair, and Amsterdam Drawing <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">As the fall art fair season in Europe gets properly underway with Frieze next week followed by FIAC and Artissima (not to mention that other fair across the pond come December) it's easy to get overwhelmed by overload: the glitz, cash, hype, ADD, FOMO, last big thing, current big thing, next big thing, and all the other BIG THINGS that are par for the course market-side of the art world.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">But it doesn't have to be that way. Amsterdam kicked things off last month with a trio of specialized mid-September art fairs. Held from the 18 &ndash;&nbsp;21st, Unseen, Unfair, and Amsterdam Drawing&mdash;dedicated to photography, young artists, and works on paper, respectively&mdash;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">have unique identities and together represent a more relaxed and nevertheless effective approach to the art market.</span><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;It&rsquo;s possible to attend all three, find great (and affordable) artworks, and not feel competely spent afterward. (This assessment comes from someone with self-diagnosed Art Fair Anxiety, so take my word for it.) It could be the modest scale&mdash;Unseen has nearly sixty exhibitors, Unfair shows forty artists, and Amsterdam Drawing features fifty-two galleries</span><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">. Or p</span><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">erhaps it's the fairs' narrowed parameters and given&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">media&mdash;works on paper and photography are affordable and accessible entryways for new art collectors, after all.</span><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;In the end, they're here to sell artwork, but somehow these fairs leave me about as uncynical as I can be when triangulated by the art market.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><strong>Unseen Photo Fair</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><a href="http://www.unseenamsterdam.com/" target="_blank">Unseen</a>,&nbsp;now in its third year,&nbsp;is quickly becoming an Amsterdam favorite. It's the blockbuster of the three fairs and by far the most built up in terms of promotion, collaboration, network,&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">programming,</span><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;international outreach, etc. The fair is held in the photogenic Westergasfabriek&rsquo;s main buildings and nearby &ldquo;fair and festival grounds,&rdquo; which host a book fair, temporary project spaces, and a lecture program. This year's edition featured more awards than ever, a new catalogue-turned-magazine, and world premier photographs at nearly every booth (with an accompanying guide to finding them).</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">It's an enticing fair, starting with Lorenzo Vitturi's colorful promotional materials. Indeed, even more than last year, color was everywhere, as were composed, often salon-style installations. New Formalism was in full swing&mdash;a perfect complement to the much-anticipated&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ams/events/show/349973-under-construction-new-positions-in-american-photography"><em>Under Construction</em></a> exhibition at <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ams/venues/show/2488-foam---fotografie-museum">Foam</a>, which opened the same week.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141005095218-unseen_talent_billboards2.jpg" alt="" /><span style="font-size: small;"><em>Foam Magazine</em>'s billboard presentation.&nbsp;Billboards featuring the 21 photographers from the magazine's 2014 "Talent" issue were shown throughout the Westergasfabriek complex. View here of Eva O'Leary and Harry Griffin's<em>&nbsp;Devils Den.</em></span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141005095459-radial_booths.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: small;">A view inside the Westergasfabriek's unique, circular gashouder pavilion.</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141005095524-ceiling2.jpg" alt="" /><span style="font-size: small;">Looking up to the center of the main venue.</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141005095550-hannah_whittaker.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small; color: #525552;">Hannah Whitaker presented by Galerie Christophe Gaillard, Paris.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141006090223-hanging.jpg" alt="" />Augustin Rebetez presented by Galerie Nicola von Senger, Zurich</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141005095305-jason_oddy.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small; color: #525552;">Jason Oddy's <em>Concrete Spring</em>. Presented by Gallery Vassie, Amsterdam.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141005103851-more_color.jpg" alt="" /><span style="font-size: small;">Trends this year included lots of color, serial imagery, and studio-constructed still lifes of unexpected objects. Takashi Suzuki's series of tiny, colorful sponge constructions ticks all three boxes. Presented by Kana Kawanishi, Tokyo.</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141005095410-kiosk.jpg" alt="" /><span style="font-size: small;">Young&nbsp;London gallery&nbsp;South Kiosk's presentation in Unseen Niches, a platform for artist-run initiatives.</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141005131042-vitturi.jpg" alt="" /><span style="font-size: small;">Early views of&nbsp;Lorenzo Vitturi's <a href="http://www.unseenamsterdam.com/lorenzo-vitturi-live-installation" target="_blank">festival grounds installation</a>, which was completed during the fair.&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141005100911-trust_the_cloud1.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small; color: #525552;">Phanta Visual's&nbsp;<em><a href="http://www.trustthecloud.eu/" target="_blank">Trust</a><a href="http://www.trustthecloud.eu/" target="_blank"> the Cloud</a></em>, a project on the festival grounds that asked visitors to jump from the top of an escalator into a "cloud" where their picture was taken and added to <a href="http://www.trustthecloud.eu/"><span style="color: #525552;">the digital cloud</span></a>.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><strong>Unfair</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">A ferry-ride across the IJ brought me to Amsterdam Noord&rsquo;s NDSM Wharf, where the fantastic Scheepsbouwloods, a former shipbuilding warehouse-turned-studio-space, hosted the second edition of <a href="http://www.unfairamsterdam.nl/" target="_blank">Unfair</a> in an encapsulated mezzanine, overhanging a book fair and pop-up restaurant. Started by three young artists including Eelco van der Lingen of NEST in The Hague, Unfair has a unique premise: Selected artists no more than ten years out of school represent themselves.&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">It's a rare opportunity for artists and collectors alike;&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">there is no booth fee and collectors interact directly with the artists. Of the three fairs, Unfair gave off the coolest, most in-the-know vibes, without feeling exclusive or full of itself.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141005095701-nl_shipbuilding_company.jpg" alt="" /><span style="font-size: small;">Amsterdam Noord's massive Scheepsbouwloods.</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141005164152-shipbuilding_ndsm.jpg" alt="" /><span style="font-size: small;">Inside the Scheepsbouwloods complex.</span><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141005095839-unfair_start.jpg" alt="" /><span style="font-size: small;">Trendy exhibition architecture!</span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141005095903-unfair1.jpg" alt="" /><span style="font-size: small;">No&euml;l Loozen</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141005095932-unfair2.jpg" alt="" /><span style="font-size: small;">Erik de Bree's wallpaper paintings</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141005095950-unfair3.jpg" alt="" /><span style="font-size: small;">Aldwin van de Ven</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141005100008-unfair6.jpg" alt="" /><span style="font-size: small;">Isabelle Andriessen</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141005095821-unfair_book_thing.jpg" alt="" /><span style="font-size: small;">"The book thing"&mdash;Unfair's book fair.</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><strong>Amsterdam Drawin</strong></span><strong style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">g</strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">A stone&rsquo;s throw away in a temporary pavilion was the most traditional of the week&rsquo;s fairs: <a href="http://www.amsterdamdrawing.nl/" target="_blank">Amsterdam Drawing</a>, a three-year-old enterprise dedicated to works on paper. The fair was solid in concept and execution, if unremarkable. That&rsquo;s not necessarily a bad thing: Given its paper premise, galleries offered up great works by some of their top artists at affordable prices. It's the perfect place to start a collection and a "My First Drawing" section of works under&nbsp;&euro;500 targeted new and young collectors.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141005100228-ams_drawing_entry.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141005100252-ams_drawing4.jpg" alt="" /><span style="font-size: small;">David Scher at&nbsp;Galerie Jean Brolly, Paris</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141005100333-ams_drawing5.jpg" alt="" /><span style="font-size: small;">Marcel van Eeden and Martin Assig at&nbsp;Galerie Maurits van de Laar, The Hague<br /><br /></span><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141005140020-schleiffert.jpg" alt="" width="400" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: small; color: #525552;">Charlotte Schleiffert presented by Akinci, Amsterdam</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141005100404-ams_drawing1.jpg" alt="" /><span style="font-size: small;">Tomio Koyama Gallery, Tokyo</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141005100430-n_dakota_xl.jpg" alt="" /><span style="font-size: small;">Nearby, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ams/venues/show/18070-nieuw-dakota">Nieuw Dakota</a> hosted&nbsp;<em>AD2014 XL</em>, an exhibition dedicated to larger works from Amsterdam Drawing. Here, a work by Peter Feiler.</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141005100452-vous_et_ici.jpg" alt="" /><span style="font-size: small;">Next door, VOUS ETES ICI hosted the&nbsp;&Egrave;POS | PRESS Drawing Prize. Here, works by Koen Taselaar.</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><img style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141005100149-make_art_not_money.jpg" alt="" /><span style="color: #525552; font-size: small;">Artists gotta get paid, but a final message from the NDSM wharf&mdash;visible from both the Unfair and Amsterdam Drawing venues&mdash;offered an outsized reminder we could all use when caught up in an art fair frenzy.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-size: small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-size: small;"><span style="font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/95201-andrea-alessi?tab=REVIEWS">Andrea Alessi</a></span> </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-size: small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-size: small;"><span style="font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: small;">(Image at top: Another view of <em>Foam Magazine</em>'s billboard presentation. The photos we can see are Lucas Foglia's <em>Frontcountry</em>&nbsp;portfolio.)</span><br /></span></span></p> Mon, 06 Oct 2014 23:55:48 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list Where the Streets Become a White Cube: A Look Back at Nuart Festival <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">There&rsquo;s a subversive brilliance to <a href="http://www.nuartfestival.no/home">Nuart</a> which must be appreciated: the fact that every year, in the languid late summer days of September, a bunch of notorious vandals and their apologists descend en masse upon an idyllic Norwegian seaside town under the auspices of a street art festival&mdash;largely bankrolled by the Norwegian Arts Council and the city itself.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">To the American observer it seems beautifully backwards. Cities like New York and Los Angeles are usually doing all they can to suppress and punish artists such as these, denying the credence of their art and their cultural history, despite concessions made to certain mural programs that generally eke by with slim-to-none budgets. <br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Stavanger, Norway&mdash;the fourth largest city in the country, with its fjords, historic wooden homes, enormous cruise ships, and massively rich oil industry&mdash;lacks the historically heavy baggage of social and economic turmoil, dispossessed populations, racism, and strife&mdash;the kinds of conditions that give rise to vital and vicious graffiti writing and protests sprayed on walls in the first place. It makes one wonder, then, if perhaps the very absence of that history makes a street art festival sound like a quite decent idea.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Nuart is now in its thirteenth year, the visual component to the <a href="http://www.numusic.no/home">Numusic</a> electronic music festival. Both are volunteer-run not-for-profit events founded by British expat Martyn Reed who lives in Stavanger. The music festival preceded Nuart by a few years, and it&rsquo;s just since 2005 that Nuart has focused exclusively on street art. The walls Nuart provides its invited artists are sourced from the private sector. Ironically, Stavanger has a zero tolerance stance toward graffiti, even legal walls. So with regards to the street art festival the city is turning a blind eye, or is only vaguely aware of the culture that Nuart murals represent. &ldquo;Stavanger likes the attention that Nuart brings it,&rdquo; Reed told me, &ldquo;and Nuart likes to bite the hand that feeds it. We have an interesting relationship.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;<img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/1538/2dh/20141004051809-1200_IMG_4163_Andreco_Photo___Ian_Cox_2014_for_Nuart.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Andreco</strong>, Nuart Festival 2014; Photo courtesy Ian Cox, <a href="http://www.wallkandy.net" target="_blank">www.wallkandy.net</a>.</span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">When you arrive in Stavanger, you won&rsquo;t find a city covered with graffiti and street art. It&rsquo;s not saturated in the same way Shoreditch or Bushwick or Kreuzberg is. There are some large murals scattered through the downtown area and a smattering of small wheatpastes and stencils here and there, but the overall impression isn&rsquo;t one of a vibrant and chaotic street scene&mdash;it still reads as a quaint and quiet, clean and healthy Nordic seaside town. And maybe I got a bit carried away with the image of a horde of vandals arriving each year to paint the city&mdash;it&rsquo;s much more contained than that. This year the invited artists numbered 17.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">This containment is a necessary concession to the continuing success of the project, of course; were the streets overrun each year one could certainly run the risk of public disapproval and the withdrawal of necessary funds and support. The chaos is curbed ever so slightly. This is an art festival after all. (The chaos factor, by the way, is amped up in the evenings, fueled by Tou beer and electronic music at the accompanying Numusic Festival&mdash;where the artists and their entourages bump along with Norwegian twenty-somethings. Let&rsquo;s just say things got a bit wild on some of those evenings, with impromptu stage rushing and after-hours gin parties tempered only by the pressure to make it to the complimentary breakfast each morning.)</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">But with this containment, aesthetically, something curious happens. The clean and tidy streets here provide a noticeably different environment in which to appreciate and consider street art. There&rsquo;s a lack of distraction, layering, going over&mdash;works that are years old remain untouched&mdash;and the streets are relatively orderly and uncluttered, allowing the viewer to examine and evaluate each piece as a singular work of art, rather than in the context of the interplay with other works and other kinds of visual information on the street. It&rsquo;s almost like the equivalent of a &ldquo;white cube&rdquo; environment for displaying street art. For the most part, I found myself appreciating the merits of each work&rsquo;s subject, aesthetic, style, and formal qualities without considering so much how it fit within its urban environs.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;<img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/1538/2dh/20141004052353-1200_IMG_3812_John_Fekner_Photo___Ian_Cox_2014_for_Nuart.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><strong>John Fekner,</strong> Nuart Festival 2014; Photo courtesy Ian Cox, <a href="http://www.wallkandy.net" target="_blank">www.wallkandy.net</a>.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">But street art&rsquo;s relationship to its environs is part of what differentiates it from other forms of art: a successful work of street art engages with its surroundings, whether in form or subject. Two examples from this year&rsquo;s Nuart commissions illustrate this phenomenon on both ends of the scale. The geometric yet organic form painted by the Italian artist Andreco echoes the frame of the building which serves as its support, while the dark, melancholic black drips falling from the jewel-like shape reference the oil industry housed in the building (the selfsame industry that indirectly funded the artist&rsquo;s efforts in Stavanger). It&rsquo;s both beautiful and poignantly evocative; the artist&rsquo;s signature style is present, but certain formal elements are undeniably specific to the site. Just up the road, however, John Fekner&rsquo;s piece willfully ignores its own context. The phrase &ldquo;BROKEN PROMISES&rdquo; is stenciled on a building in an industrial area of Stavanger&mdash;a restaging of Fekner&rsquo;s iconic work on abandoned Bronx high rises in the late 1970s. The power of that piece in its original incarnation was entirely due to its surrounding context (and its accompanying translation stenciled on the same building, &ldquo;FALSAS PROMESAS&rdquo;). Here, in quiet, content, well-off Stavanger, it falls flat. It&rsquo;s utterly meaningless. Granted, Fekner was sadly not able to physically travel to Stavanger to take part in the festival, but a more appropriate message to put on that wall might have been a giant &ldquo;CTRL-C CTRL-P.&rdquo; Instead we got something akin to an old rock star reluctantly rehashing one of his original hits.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">I should mention the indoor exhibition, on view at Tou Scene until October 12th. The space is interesting, but most works failed to make much use of it, and all in all it&rsquo;s a rather traditional art exhibition. One artist&rsquo;s rather ill-advised attempt to spark controversy using Nazi symbolism is an unfortunate reflection of street art&rsquo;s too frequent tendency to force symbols down the viewer&rsquo;s gullet in the most unsubtle, uncritical of ways. However, the same artist, Fra.Biancoshock, produced one of my favorite works in the show: a collection of bits of flaked off spray paint, neatly preserved in small plastic bags and labeled with crews&rsquo; and writers&rsquo; names&mdash;FLYCAT, GEIL, TURO, WILD BOYS, TQR CREW&mdash;a kind of poetically pointless graffiti archaeology, a hopelessly literal gesture of archiving the indices of destroyed works of art.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;<img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/1538/2dh/20141004052621-1200_IMG_5434_Fra.Biancoshock_Photo___Ian_Cox_2014_for_Nuart.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Fra.Biancoshock</strong>, Nuart Festival 2014; Photo courtesy Ian Cox, <a href="http://www.wallkandy.net" target="_blank">www.wallkandy.net</a>.</span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Perhaps the most ingenious and innovative installation was <a href="http://vimeo.com/106399905" target="_blank">Mathieu Tremblin&rsquo;s participatory project</a>, where audience members were invited to pose in front of a blue-screen set up, send their photograph to the artist, who would then configure a new photograph with the blue screen replaced with a different scene&mdash;a playful reimagining of reality and space and our relationship to the urban environment.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">One of the most evocative works in the show, and one that serves as a very convenient analogy for my own purposes in this essay, is Tilt&rsquo;s installation depicting a men&rsquo;s bathroom, replete with actual urinals&mdash;one half of the room coated with graffiti from floor to ceiling, the other half pristinely white. Though I have a quibble with the piece being merely a recreation of <a href="http://www.highsnobiety.com/2012/03/01/the-half-graffiti-hotel-room-by-tilt/"><span style="color: #525552;">an earlier work</span></a>, it resonates in this environment, and echoes street art&rsquo;s own relationship to Stavanger. It&rsquo;s a bit over-simplified, but a striking metaphor nonetheless and one that certainly stimulates the imagination.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Tilt also delivered some of the most exciting and authentic interventions within public space in Stavanger, culminating in the jaw-dropping hit on the top of the massive grain silos by the harbor. At a dizzying height towering 20 stories over the city, <a href="https://www.facebook.com/Graffitilt/photos/a.467074305777.249795.43692345777/10152331624705778/?type=1&amp;theater" target="_blank">Tilt and Koolt gave Stavanger a final hard-core send-off</a> before heading to the airport to travel back home, proving that, as a matter of course, when you invite street artists to paint your city, you can&rsquo;t possibly contain all the chaos. And who&rsquo;d want to?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/11505-natalie-hegert?tab=REVIEWS">Natalie Hegert </a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">(Image at top: Tilt, Panic Bathroom 2,&nbsp;Nuart Festival 2014; Photo courtesy Ian Cox, <a href="http://www.wallkandy.net" target="_blank">www.wallkandy.net</a>.)</span></p> Sat, 04 Oct 2014 10:33:26 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list A Certain Disney Utopia: Ysabel LeMay’s Photo-Fusions <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Who said Disney was dead? Ysabel LeMay&rsquo;s staggeringly beautiful photo-fusions, currently on view at </span><span style="font-size: medium;"><a href="http://vervegallery.com/index.php?p=artist_gallery&amp;a=24&amp;g=1&amp;r=1&amp;e=24-037">Verve Gallery</a></span><span style="font-size: medium;">,</span><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"> prove otherwise.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Ysabel LeMay is a commercial graphic artist turned painter turned photographer. Each image is made up of hundreds of photographs, collaged together using Photoshop to create grand representations of nature, bounty, and beauty. Her work is more cinematic than painterly: each digital C-print has a plexi-face, whose glossy sheen intensifies the work&rsquo;s decorative sensibility, and ultimately gives LeMay&rsquo;s finished compilations a certain Disney utopia feel.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20141003124210-Wander.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Ysabel LeMay,</strong> <em>Wander</em>, 2014, C-Print, 24 x 72 inches; Courtesy of the artist and Verve Gallery of Photography</span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">In <em>Wander</em>, we peek through leafy branches at serene water as birds comingle and sweep through misty sprays. Each plant and animal adopts a character whose personality emerges via digital enhancement and thoughtful positioning. While the individual photographs used to compile the whole aren&rsquo;t necessarily distinguishable, the birds and wildlife that intertwine and overlap in LeMay&rsquo;s work form make-believe paradises. The scenes do not logically make sense, but visually they are enjoyable and luscious vignettes. <em>Whispers </em>is a large vertical photograph with a gushing white waterfall boasting white flowers that sprinkle down amidst the droplets. It&rsquo;s almost matrimonial, pure, and lacelike. <em>Circa 1930</em> appears aged, compiled from splattered watermarks and weathered patches that encircle an incredible blush-colored bouquet brimming with the antiquated virtuosity of a classical still life.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20141003123633-023_The_Transmitter.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Ysabel LeMay,</strong> <em>The Transmitter,</em> 2011, C-Print, 48 x 72 inches; Courtesy of the artist and Verve Gallery of Photography</span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">LeMay&rsquo;s landscapes do not show brush marks, and their surfaces are too glossy to be confused with oil painting, but their saccharine whimsy is reminiscent of Rococo and would not be entirely misplaced amid Fragonard&rsquo;s flowering foliage. LeMay&rsquo;s photographs are devoutly unpeopled, seeking instead to entertain an entirely unencumbered indulgence in nature.</span><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141003160558-passing_by.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: xx-small;"><strong>Ysabel LeMay</strong>,&nbsp;<em>Passing By</em>, 2011, C-Print, 48 x 48 inches; Courtesy of the artist and Verve Gallery of Photography</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: xx-small;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141003161130-Cosmic_Nursery.jpg" alt="" /></span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: xx-small;"><strong>Ysabel LeMay</strong>,&nbsp;<em>Cosmic Nursery</em>, 2014, C-Print, 48 x 63 inches; Courtesy of the artist and Verve Gallery of Photography</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: xx-small;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141003161326-Nightlife.jpg" alt="" /></span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: xx-small;"><strong>Ysabel LeMay</strong>,&nbsp;<em>Nightlight</em>, 2014, C-Print, 24 x 72 inches; Courtesy of the artist and Verve Gallery of Photography<br /></span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/394156-hannah-hoel?tab=REVIEWS">Hannah Hoel</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">[Image on top: <strong>Ysabel LeMay,</strong> <em>Circa 1930</em>, 2013, C-Print, 36x36"; Courtesy of the artist and Verve Gallery of Photography]</span></p> Fri, 03 Oct 2014 16:16:31 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list @richardprince4: Who are the other Richard Princes? <p><strong style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">Update October 6, 2014</strong><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">: In a further twist to the RP4 tale, Instagram has started to dump previous images posted by the artist (including the ones we had linked to here, now obsolete). The reasons behind these mysterious recent movements on the (at the time of writing) still active account are unclear: a warning from the Instagram authorities? Or a classic Prince joke? In his latest post, two women are captured mid-conversation on a sofa. Above them hangs the infamous <em>Untitled (Cowboy)</em>, the artist's first "rephotograph" work. RP4: undeniably the original King of the Repost.&nbsp;</span>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">Richard Prince, one of the most controversial contemporary art figures around (Terry Richardson is not an artist, sorry), has emerged from his finally resolved Patrick Cariou scandal to open </span><em style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">New Portraits</em><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">,&nbsp;an exhibition addressing the ever slippery subject of appropriation, in Gagosian's 976 Madison Avenue space. 38 Instagram photographs are being presented blown up, Warhol-like on canvas. Weeded from the net, these include images from the world of celebrity (Kate Moss, Pamela Anderson) and others of unknowns (@nightcoregirl, etc) who, brought together, share a stake in what is being called "modern self-portraiture" and labelled "</span><a style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" href="http://news.artnet.com/in-brief/richard-prince-is-selling-conceptual-instagram-art-at-gagosian-106536" target="_blank">conceptual Instagram art</a><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">." It is Art of course, because it is Prince putting it in a white cube in New York, and because it&rsquo;s a meditation on what we have become since the invention of the front facing camera.</span></p> <p><iframe src="//instagram.com/p/tlN7wckSHm/embed/" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" width="612" height="710"></iframe></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; color: #525552;">It&rsquo;s all fairly obvious but in the clever Prince-esque way of being so simple you&rsquo;d never have thought of it. But more interesting than the portrait of a desperate collective will for minute fame is the fact that&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">in tandem with the show&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">Prince has once again signed up to Instagram</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">&mdash;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://instagram.com/richardprince4" target="_blank">@richardprince4</a></span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">&mdash;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">where his meta-posts slide insidiously into the socio-digital world. Earlier in the year, the 64-year-old artist had his account deleted for inappropriate content. Now he is giving it a new twist, by using his Instagram feed to repost his muses' Instagram posts of their Instagram posts at his exhibition. It's a hyper-real <em>mise-en-abyme</em>. But coming to the real point of intrigue: @richardprince4? <em>FOUR</em>? The pictures generationist has been usurped: and what could be more apt than for the appropriator to be reappropriated in the infinite, immortal democracy of the web?</span></p> <p><iframe src="//instagram.com/p/tlpH_bkSPs/embed/" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" width="612" height="710"></iframe></p> <p><span style="font-size: x-small;">@richardprince4's Instagram post of Jane Harmon's image of nightcoregirl with Richard Prince's appropriation of her Instagram post at Gagosian. What?</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; color: #525552;">An intensive investigation reveals that the position of the <a href="http://instagram.com/richardprince" target="_blank">@richardprince</a> is occupied by a handsome twenty-something who could have been a subject in the exhibition itself. He bears an incredible resemblance to Peter Andre. There is little more information to be gleaned from the original @richardprince&rsquo;s Insta profile, except that he once possibly ate a can of Nestle condensed milk. He also wore headphones once that were, again, I can only surmise, possibly playing music into his ears. Otherwise, he enjoys lying down and sitting in cars. #instafamous</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; color: #525552;"><a href="http://instagram.com/richardprince1" target="_blank">@richardprince1</a>&nbsp;got a tattoo 3 months ago of what appears to be a deer&rsquo;s head, then disappeared. It&rsquo;s unclear if those two things are related. It also appears he likes navy. #iphonesia</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; color: #525552;"><a href="http://instagram.com/richard_prince" target="_blank">@richard_prince</a> seems to have a predeliction for gold shiny things, including Ferraris and rose bouquets. He also <em>really </em>likes frescoes. His bio simply states "Peter" which must be all the more galling for the real RP. #love #gold #tweegram</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; color: #525552;">Meanwhile the <a href="http://instagram.com/richardprincebooks" target="_blank">@richardprincebooks</a> account commented on the above Kate Moss post: "That explains the 3K extra followers in the last 2 hrs."&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; color: #525552;">As for @richardprince2 and @richardprince3: it appears they don&rsquo;t exist yet. The perfect opportunity to start reposting pictures from @richardprince and @richardprince_1...</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">[Image on top:&copy; Richard Prince. Courtesy Gagosian Gallery. Photography by Robert McKeever / All other images: Richard Prince, Instagram, <a href="http://instagram.com/richardprince4?modal=true" target="_blank">@richardprince4</a>]</span></p> Tue, 07 Oct 2014 23:31:07 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list Confrontational Aesthetics: Choirboys Sing Insults in Allora & Calzadilla Performance <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">The Earth breaks along fault lines. Mountains are pushed up; buildings crumble. Active faults are sites of extreme subterranean tension that operate on an unpredictable timeline with potentially devastating environmental, economic, and social aftershocks. To live near a fault is to live with unending uncertainty. Entire cities and nations have suffered when the earth shudders along her lines.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">All of this would seem like ample fodder for the socially and politically minded artists Allora &amp; Calzadilla until one sees (and hears) their current exhibition, <em>Fault Lines, </em>which has little to do with the upheaval to the strata quo. Instead, the artists rely on their trademarks of subtlety, humor, and unexpected associations to communicate an apt and nuanced metaphor for our current political culture.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">At first glance, <em>Fault Lines</em> seems quite simple. Two plain-clothes choirboys use ten stone sculptures culled from fault lines around the world to perform a score written by Guarionex Morales-Matos. The lyrics are comprised of insults that Allora &amp; Calzadilla mined from literary and political history. Performances occur every hour, last about thirteen minutes, and entail a choreographed interaction between the daily rotating performers that they developed in rehearsals with the artists.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/1538/2dh/20141002020236-AC_BGG14_TB_0927_04_e.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><strong>Allora &amp; Calzadilla</strong>, <em>Fault Lines</em>, 2013, Ten metamorphic and igneous rocks; Performance by Carlos and Jorge Tapia, from the Transfiguration Boychoir, Dimensions variable, Installation view: Gladstone Gallery, New York; Photo: David Regen.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">One may wonder what fault lines, choirboys, and insults have in common.&nbsp;Firstly, each of the uniquely patterned and colorful stone sculptures formally resembles a two-tier choral riser. Modeled after either a normal fault or a reverse fault, these partially rough but mostly polished sculptures become platforms on which the performers sit, stand, ascend, and level insults at each other. Part Minimalism, part Earthwork, they look a little like what Robert Smithson and Carl Andre might have produced if they had worked collaboratively in the late 60s. Without an apparent conceptual reason for their particular arrangement, the sculptures are placed spaciously throughout the gallery, allowing ample room for the performers to move among them and change platforms multiple times in a performance. Members of the audience likewise must alter their geography in order to follow the singers.&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">The openness of the work differs drastically from the enclosure Allora &amp; Calzadilla built for <em>Sediments, Sentiments (Figures of Speech)</em> (2007), inside of which operatic performers sang fragments from political speeches. In contrast to that work, here the young singers&rsquo; voices fluctuate in their ability to maintain notes consistently, perhaps an effect of voice break&mdash;a kind of vocal equivalent to planar destabilization. Though the music is beautifully ethereal at times, it is also a little frustrating. The polyphonic delivery often overpowers the lyrics and prevents the two voices from coming together in harmonic unison for extended phrases. Because of this, only a literal linguistic association emerges in the work between the <em>lines</em> of a fault, the <em>lines</em> of a musical score, and the <em>lines</em> of performed speech.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">The most opaque connection may be gleaned from the etymology of &ldquo;insult,&rdquo; which comes from the Latin word &ldquo;insultare&rdquo; (to assail, to jump or leap upon). The original use of the word appropriately relates to the violent nature of plate tectonic shifting that occurs along faults, while the modern use of the word to signify an abusive remark or action describes the humorous slander each performer is hurling at the other. What is significant about this is how these associations apply to current politics.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/1538/2dh/20141002020327-AC_BGG14_TB_0927_27_e.jpg" alt="" /> <span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Allora &amp; Calzadilla</strong>, <em>Fault Lines</em>, 2013, Ten metamorphic and igneous rocks; Performance by Brogan Donston and Charles Rosario, from the Transfiguration Boychoir, Dimensions variable, Installation view: Gladstone Gallery, New York; Photo: David Regen.</span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">It is not hard to imagine the American political landscape as a fault with two opposing (ideological) forces clashing and creating destructive divisions in their wake. Politicians, pundits, and ordinary citizens all chime in, faulting the other party for the world&rsquo;s problems and heaving insults along the way. This collective cacophony drowns out any singular voice, much the same way the choirboys&rsquo; singing tends to overwhelm the legibility of the lyrics. The performative power of the utterance is diminished. And this is not an accident in <em>Fault Lines</em>.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">In fact, the work metaphorically points to the bloated, divisive nature of current politics and seeks to render it harmless and humorous. Like the stone sculptures, the damage is smoothed over, polished, and domesticated. When legible, the insults are silly and kid-friendly. The work functions like a mirror to political bickering: grown ups acting like children, children acting like grown ups.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/357421-art-vidrine?tab=REVIEWS">Art Vidrine </a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="color: #000000; font-family: Calibri,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 1.15; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">(Image at top: <strong>Allora &amp; Calzadilla</strong>, <em>Fault Lines</em>, 2013, Ten metamorphic and igneous rocks; performance by Carlos and Jorge Tapia, from the Transfiguration Boychoir, Dimensions variable, Installation view: Gladstone Gallery, New York; Photo: David Regen.)</span></p> Mon, 06 Oct 2014 15:41:01 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list [VIDEO] Warsaw Gallery Weekend 2014 <p><iframe src="http://blip.tv/play/gjCDrd8kAg.x?p=1" frameborder="0" width="700" height="413"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">On the occasion of the <a title="Warsaw Gallery Weekend homepage" href="http://warsawgalleryweekend.pl" target="_blank">Warsaw Gallery Weekend</a> (WGW) 2014 we have just visited eight very diverse positions. The main program of the WGW was supported by 21 local galleries and one guest gallery from Prague. Collateral events were supported by institutions such as Zacheta &ndash; National Gallery of Art, <a title="The Centre For Contemporary Art Ujazdowski Castle, Warsaw /&nbsp;Interview with Director Fabio Cavallucci" href="http://vernissage.tv/2014/03/24/the-centre-for-contemporary-art-ujazdowski-castle-warsaw-interview-with-director-fabio-cavallucci/" target="_blank">Center for Contemporary Art Ujazdowski Castle</a>, National Museum in Warsaw, Museum of Modern Art in Warsaw, Theatre Institute, Adam Mickiewicz Institute or Academy of Fine Arts. This year, the Warsaw Gallery Weekend showed a very precise and accomplished selection of what the reputation of the Polish art scene is based on.

This video provides you with a tour through selected exhibitions that feature works by artists such as Aleksandra Chciuk, Andac Karabeyoğlu, Łukasz Filak, Magdalena Kulak, Kajetan Plis (Leto), Szymon Malecki, Tomek Sacilowski (Piktogram/BLA), Gudrun Kampl (Propaganda), Janek Zamoyski (Czułość), Erwin Kneihsl (SVIT), Aneta Grzeszykowska (Raster), Norman Leto (Center for Contemporary Art Ujazdowski Castle), Piotr Łakomy (Stereo) and Andrzej Partum, Zbigniew Warpechowski, Roman Dziadkiewicz (Monopol). We also speak with Marta Kołakowska and Jacek Sosnowski, board members of the Warsaw Gallery Weekend. </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">See more on <a href="http://vernissage.tv/2014/10/01/warsaw-gallery-weekend-2014/" target="_blank">Vernissage TV </a></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">(Image at top: <strong>Gudrun Kampl</strong>, <em>Sk&oacute;ra / Skin</em>, installation view, 2014; Courtesy <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ew/venues/show/42157-galeria-propaganda">Galeria Propaganda</a>, Warsaw.)</span><br /></span></p> Wed, 01 Oct 2014 16:53:34 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list Art Project at East London Train Station Tweets Speculative Headlines to Affect Stock Market Algorithms. No, Really. <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">In April 2013 the Associated Press&rsquo; Twitter account was hacked, and announced the false report to the world that President Obama had been injured. The offending tweet was immediately removed, but with today&rsquo;s nanosecond-accurate high-frequency trading algorithms, &lsquo;immediately&rsquo; now comprises enough time for a 143 point downturn on the Dow Jones, a &lsquo;flash crash&rsquo; that only lasted minutes. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Although the stock market recovered quickly, the event spurned concern about the worrying algorithmic link between news in the age of social media and the financial markets. What are our responsibilities over our words typed into social media and news outlets? How can we understand the markets when the systems they work on are so complex, fast and irrevocably intertwined with the language on the web?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">On show until 30 November at Banner Repeater, a project space and reading room situated on platform 1 of Hackney Downs station, is <em>Low Animal Spirits</em>, a mixed media exhibition of work by Ami Clarke and Richard Cochrane that directly addresses these questions. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140930081905-Low_Animal_Spirits_by_Ami_Clarke_and_RIchard_Cochrane_-_installation_-_photo_by_Tomas_Rydin.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <div style="color: #000000; font-size: 13px; font-family: HelveticaNeue,'Helvetica Neue',Helvetica,Arial,'Lucida Grande',sans-serif; background-color: transparent; font-style: normal;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><strong>Ami Clarke and Richard Cochrane</strong>, <em>Low Animal Spirits</em> installation; Photo by Tomas Rydin<br /></span></div> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">The exhibition comprises a video, a projection of the program <em>Low Animal Spirits</em> running above a slab of dark Perspex, a metal sculptural relief of the 2013 flash crash graph, a print of the offending tweet and a text compiled by Ami Clarke called 'In the Pull of Time'. The Twitter account <a href="https://twitter.com/LowAnimalSpirit" target="_blank">@LowAnimalSpirit</a> tweets new headlines generated by the program, some of which almost attempt sense, such as 'wind to capture farms for David Cameron'.&nbsp; </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Together the works generate a number of complex questions around algorithms, value and language and our human versus machine understanding and responsibilities. Accompanying the exhibition is a really worthwhile series of talks.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">The phrase &lsquo;low animal spirits&rsquo; refers to mass mentality and the confidence that when lost <em>en masse</em> sends the financial markets into chaos. Visually the projected program is enthralling: what at first appears to be a word cloud begins to move erratically. Sometimes giant words grow and crowd over each other, making them illegible. 'Thick', 'molten', 'peanuts', 'rethinks', 'cosmonaut'. It&rsquo;s clear that it is doing something, but unclear what. Because it is made of words we want to read it, but the scattershot arrival of new words overwhelms any attempt to draw direct meaning from the text. The algorithm mines hundreds of constantly updating online news feeds. Like a financial trading algorithm it is looking for profit margins by examining rareness. Here, news as words with certain values act as expressions of world confidence and concerns&mdash;a visualization of global activity and events as they are reported, repeated, liked and linked to. Interestingly, its rhythm tells you more than the words that comprise it.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">With so much going on the project as a whole is difficult to get a handle on, but I sense deliberately so. The programs <em>Low Animal Spirits</em> mimic are dangerously complex, and their financial effect on us only amplifies this. This exhibition creates a rare glimpse of the phenomenon at work. It produces a way to visualize all that activity, and attempts the difficult task of allowing us to observe a phenomenon we contribute to in minute ways. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140930082022-The-Slots-by-Ami-Clarke-1.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><strong>Ami Clarke</strong>, <em>The Slots</em>; Photo by Tomas Rydin</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">The multiple modes of display in the exhibition address how we visualize information. Ami Clarke&rsquo;s sculpture, <em>Breaking News - Flash Crash </em>(2014) in contrast to <em>Low Animal Spirits</em> neatly presents a mass of information simply. The system by which news affects trading is impossible to convey in few words, and yet the graph&rsquo;s drastic v shape articulates it perfectly. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">The exhibition scratches the surface of many ideas related to algorithmic trading. Clarke&rsquo;s video has all of the visual tropes of the gambling world. Her text is compiled from fiction, theoretical and informational texts, and remixed like much of the internet&rsquo;s news content. The <em>Breaking News - Flash Crash </em>works as a signifier for something much larger. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Before I leave the room the text in <em>Low Animal Spirits</em> slows. 'Hindu' appears. 'Separatism' stays constant for a time. Weirdly the word 'Isis' appears only small&nbsp;&ndash; and vanishes quickly&nbsp;&ndash; while the word 'Revels' is huge and remains fixed. There is no direct meaning generated by <em>Low Animal Spirits</em> but instead the works point at and indulge in the web&rsquo;s complexity to delightfully poetic ends. You leave the exhibition with a thirst for information about the weird world of algorithms.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/377935-phoebe-stubbs?tab=REVIEWS">Phoebe Stubbs</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">(Image on top:<strong> Ami Clarke</strong>, <em>Breaking News: Flash Crash (detail); </em>Photo by Tomas Rydin)</span></p> Wed, 01 Oct 2014 02:07:41 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list Bowie Victims: Confessions from <i>David Bowie Is </i> at the MCA Chicago <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">I&rsquo;m not sure exactly what Jon Savage meant when he referred to &ldquo;Bowie victims&rdquo; in his book about the birth of punk rock, <em>England&rsquo;s Dreaming</em>, but ever since I read that phrase it stuck with me. In a way I identified with it&mdash;being a big David Bowie adherent&mdash;and didn&rsquo;t necessarily consider it as a derogatory term. I figure he meant teens obsessed with Bowie, the young androgynes with their flared high waters and platform boots, teased mullets and green eye makeup, coyly copying the style of Ziggy Stardust with items patched together from charity shops and the backs of their mothers&rsquo; closets.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">***</span></p> <blockquote> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><em>&ldquo;She&rsquo;s all swishy in her satin and tat, in her frock coat and bipperty-bopperty hat. Oh God, I could do better than that!&rdquo;</em></span></p> </blockquote> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">***</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/1538/2dh/20140929233656-61ebe14diamonddogs.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">Promotional photograph of David Bowie for <em class="first_child last_child">Diamond Dogs</em>, 1974. Photo: Terry O'Neill. Image &copy; Victoria and Albert Museum.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">It seems rather trendy right now to hate on David Bowie, or at least to hate on the MCA Chicago&rsquo;s exhibition <em>David Bowie Is, </em>which opened this week. The common refrain being a grumble about blatant blockbuster populism and some hunger for ticket sales trumping the &ldquo;real art.&rdquo; To be perfectly honest, I haven&rsquo;t looked forward to an exhibition with such fervent anticipation in a really long time. But as I also mentioned before, I&rsquo;m a self-identified Bowie victim. Perhaps the way viewers will react toward this show is entirely reliant on how they already feel about David Bowie, or about music more generally vis &agrave; vis art.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">***</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">The most present, most attuned, most aware experiences I&rsquo;ve ever felt took place not in art museums or galleries, such as in immersive installations or participatory performance art, but rather whilst dancing at underground music venues or house shows. Feeling the deep dark tones of bass vibrate through my feet, through my bones. Inhaling the movements of the crowd. Throwing myself into the pulsating mass of bodies. Thomas Hirschhorn wishes he could only replicate something so raw and vital in one of his installations.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Such experiences resist interpretation. Look at it too critically or too closely and you risk ruining it.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">***</span></p> <blockquote> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><em>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s not the side effects of the cocaine. I&rsquo;m thinking that it must be love. It&rsquo;s too late, to be grateful. It&rsquo;s too late, to be late again. It&rsquo;s too late, to be hateful. The European canon is here.&rdquo;</em></span></p> </blockquote> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">***</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/1538/2dh/20140929234009-eeac32blackout.jpg" alt="" /><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">Cut up lyrics for &lsquo;<em class="first_child">Blackout</em>' from "<em class="last_child">Heroes</em>," 1977. David Bowie. &copy; The David Bowie Archive 2012. Image &copy; V&amp;A Images.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><em>David Bowie Is</em> can&rsquo;t really be talked about in the same way as you talk about an exhibition of contemporary art created for the context of the contemporary exhibition hall. It&rsquo;s a different animal entirely. But of course context is everything, and the context here is a museum of contemporary art, ergo this is art. It&rsquo;s the tautology that makes everyone uncomfortable.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Does it mean that this exhibition doesn&rsquo;t belong in a museum for contemporary art? No. I don&rsquo;t know. I should hope that our conception of what constitutes contemporary art isn&rsquo;t confined to such narrow definitions that it precludes popular culture, music, design, performance, poetry. The arguments against David Bowie as an artist rest more squarely on a set of unwritten assumptions about pedigree, popularity and pedagogy than any actual appraisal of his truly multi-media output.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">The exhibition is quite challenging to judge, however, precisely because of this tendency&mdash;the astounding variety of objects on display, the collaborations, the costumes, the music, the writings, the performances, the videos and installations designed to synthesize his ideas and aesthetics into one consumable, entertaining whole. Bowie himself had very little to do with the exhibition personally, so it&rsquo;s astounding how his archivists, the curators and the exhibition designers have come together to provide this succinct picture of one man&rsquo;s artistic vision.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">***</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">I&rsquo;m a fan of his early work. Ziggy Stardust&mdash;with the glam guitar riffs (performed by the inimitable Mick Ronson) and outer-stellar lyrics&mdash;yes, but particularly his Berlin trilogy&mdash;with that Eno-ambient techno-melancholia&mdash;and lately I&rsquo;ve been enraptured by his Thin White Duke period&mdash;with his delicate growl giving way to that intensely tensile vibrato. He loses me in the 80s and 90s, but what Bowie did in the 1970s was absolutely revolutionary.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">***</span></p> <blockquote> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><em>&ldquo;This ain&rsquo;t rock&rsquo;n&rsquo;roll. This is genocide!&rdquo;</em></span></p> </blockquote> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">***</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/1538/2dh/20140929234052-fcb397archer.jpg" alt="" /><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><em class="first_child">The Archer</em>, <em class="last_child">Station to Station</em> tour, 1976. Photo: John Rowlands. &copy; John Robert Rowlands.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">At the press preview someone astutely raised that point that the tone of the show and catalogue was &ldquo;worshipful&rdquo;, rather than critical. Perhaps a lost opportunity: We got mentions of his cocaine addiction and recovery, but there wasn&rsquo;t much of <a href="http://www.cs.tau.ac.il/~alper/Bowie_and_fascism.htm" target="_blank">his forays into Fascist imagery</a>, which could have revealed a much more complex character and cultural viewpoint, for instance. Perhaps the curators too fell victim to the allure and charm of Bowie. It&rsquo;s not that hard to imagine.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">But major exhibitions such as these do not strictly function as platforms for critical apprehension, or even just for fans to admire and get close to the works, but they serve to inspire other artists. Young artists might not be so familiar with David Bowie, and those with interests in performance, music, or writing will no doubt leave the MCA inspired in some way. It&rsquo;s not all nostalgia, or frivolity, or ticket sales. There&rsquo;s something here.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/11505-natalie-hegert?tab=REVIEWS">Natalie Hegert</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">(Image at top: Installation view, <em class="first_child last_child">David Bowie Is</em>, MCA Chicago. September 23, 2014 - January 4, 2015. Photo: Nathan Keay. Courtesy of the MCA Chicago.)</span><br /></span></p> Tue, 30 Sep 2014 02:12:24 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list Exposing Visual Rhymes: An Interview with Mario Ybarra Jr. <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><em><strong>This interview was <a href="http://www.artslant.com/chi/artists/rackroom/450" target="_blank">originally published</a> way back on ArtSlant Chicago, in May, 2008, on the occasion of&nbsp; Mario Ybarra Jr.'s exhibition at the Art Institute of Chicago. The LA-based artist is known for his installations drawing from pop and street culture, including a recent solo show examining the mythos of Scarface at LA's Honor Fraser Gallery. Right now his work can be found <a href="http://nomadicdivision.org/exhibition/mario-ybarra-jr/" target="_blank">on a billboard in Mobile, AL</a>, part of Los Angeles Nomadic Division's Manifest Destiny Project.</strong></em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"> Mario Ybarra, Jr. is a LA-based visual and performance artist who has created room-sized installations all over the world and most recently right here in Chicago for the Art Institute of Chicago. This year Ybarra was also selected to participate in the Whitney Biennial. Beneath Ybarra's friendly demeanor lies a keen observer who is quick to expose visual rhymes in seemingly unrelated sources and to expand and build upon those connections until a cohesion is reached, or as he might say, a story. Ybarra graciously met with ArtSlant's Abraham Ritchie while putting the finishing touches on his installation at the Art Institute. Ever the raconteur, Ybarra talked about his native LA, baseball and King Arthur. Below is an excerpt of our conversation.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img style="margin: 10px auto; vertical-align: middle; display: block;" src="/userimages/3151/PICT0018.JPG" alt="" /></span></p> <hr style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" /> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong><em>Abraham Richie: I think a lot of Chicagoans, and everyone, might want to know what the connection is between Southern Los Angeles, Catalina Island and Wrigley Field? It&rsquo;s kind of funny to think that Wrigley Field had a &ldquo;secret brother&rdquo; or something like that on the West Coast, because I am not sure that many people remember or know about this other Wrigley Field.</em></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong>Mario Ybarra, Jr.:</strong> Well that&rsquo;s where this whole project started for me. About a year ago Lisa Dorin, the Assistant Curator in the Contemporary Art Department, asked me if I wanted to come up with a proposal to do a Focus project here at the Art Institute of Chicago, and I said I would think about it a little bit. The way that I try to work is that I try to make some kind of relationship between a personal experience, or my personal understanding or knowledge and the place that I show. I don&rsquo;t like the idea of coming in and claiming an expertise on a place that I know nothing about. I&rsquo;ve found that doing something that starts in the realm of the personal and then taking it out to another place and trying to make relationships between those two places is the most successful tactic for me. . . I try to make bridges, so to speak.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">As a kid we would take trips out to Catalina Island, which is part of the Channel Islands, about 26 miles off the coast of Los Angeles. I remember part of the tour was the local history. They&rsquo;d always tell us that William Wrigley, Jr. owned Catalina Island and he had famous movie stars of the time going out there, like Clark Gable. His Chicago Cubs would go out and have their spring training there. The main town there is called Avalon and it gets its name from [Wrigley&rsquo;s] niece, who told [Wrigley] to name it that after the Avalon of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table and those stories. So it has this mythological side of it too. It has real histories, the local histories, of it being owned by Wrigley, and it has this mythological history through the King Arthur association. My studio back in LA is on Avalon Boulevard and they named [the street] that because that&rsquo;s where the boats used to take people out to Avalon Harbor on the island. I started doing research about that, I&rsquo;m like a de facto historian, and I found that Wrigley, along with owning the island, owned this other Wrigley Field that was in South Central Los Angeles on Avalon and 66th street. So we had the Avalon Harbor on Catalina Island, my studio on Avalon, this field that Wrigley owned was also on Avalon, I just kept following the line. I thought I could take this story from Avalon, to Avalon Boulevard, to my studio, to Avalon were the stadium was, to all the way down Highway 66 to Chicago and the Art Institute.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">I&rsquo;m figuring out ways to make these relationships between historical figures like William Wrigley, who was important to historical cities like Los Angeles and Chicago, and bring these stories together somehow, make bridges between the stories. Between what I know and my experiences and the places that I go.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong><em>AR: Sports are the site of an obvious physical conflict and throughout the exhibit are interesting juxtapositions: the Mexican flag and the U.S. flag, the sword and the baseball bat, the fist of the Revolution and an image of a capitalist&rsquo;s private island. The history of the island reflects conflict as well, in the seventies it was occupied by the Brown Berets. How are sports, especially baseball, viewed both literally and metaphorically for this project, and the issues it raises?</em></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong>MY:</strong> Well I have always thought of the history of baseball as particularly related to the United States. It&rsquo;s billed as &ldquo;the American Game;&rdquo; it&rsquo;s not really played around the world at all other than some Latin American countries, like the Dominican Republic where all these new players are coming from and where young people are specifically groomed to be ball players. But in relation to the United States, and this comes from the different things that I have watched or read, the developments of social movements in the United States almost always came ten years later than in the ball game itself. Baseball has been very slow to change, and it hasn&rsquo;t changed really over the few centuries its been played here. But it still has these kind of leading edges. Let&rsquo;s take for example the story of integration and civil rights. Jackie Robinson starts playing with the Brooklyn Dodgers in the 1950's and certain places, like schools, weren&rsquo;t integrated until the early sixties or late sixties. Baseball reflects a little bit in advance the kind of social movements that will happen in the United States.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Another thing that I think is very interesting in terms of conflict and it being a spectator sport, even though there are rival teams and most big cities have their own team, [there is a sense of unity]. Before professional baseball, each little town would have a team, even though there was a sense of rivalry or competition, the people were brought together as spectators to cheer on their team. So even though there was a site of conflict, it wasn&rsquo;t like it was Rome and gladiators were getting fed to lions [laughter]. There is a sense of sportsmanship [. . .]</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Related to issues of capitalism and revolution, or acts of civil disobedience, there is a sense of teams. I play off that with the posters, we have here a baseball with two bats crossed, but instead of a regular team you have the Brown Beret guys who tried to occupy the island in 1972 so they&rsquo;re like &ldquo;the team.&rdquo; The idea of &ldquo;the team&rdquo; is important too and the metaphor of a team. The idea that everyone has their positions but also act as a unit is very important and is a metaphor for myself.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="/userimages/3151/PICT0019.JPG" alt="" width="338" height="443" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><br /><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong><em>AR: The idea of teams is also apparent in this wall of flags you have installed. What are the flags we have here?</em></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong>MY:</strong> This is the state of Illinois&rsquo; flag. The flags are also stadium-esque, they always have them. The other thing, again about making relationships, is this is the state of Illinois&rsquo; flag, which has an eagle perched on a rock holding a shield and in his mouth is a banner. I thought that is very interesting, because over here is the Mexican flag, and again we have the eagle, this time perched on the cactus, and the snake in his mouth pretty much mimics the banner in the Illinois flag. Those kinds of aesthetic relationships and symbolic choices are very interesting.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img style="margin: 10px; vertical-align: middle;" src="/userimages/3151/PICT0015.JPG" alt="" width="430" height="328" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><br /><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong><em>AR: Even looking at the Illinois flag, that&rsquo;s more of an Aztec style eagle than a typical American-style eagle.</em></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong>MY:</strong> Yeah. Those are the kinds of things I noticed in my visits to Chicago to prepare for this show, last year and earlier this year. I started seeing these kinds of relationships, like the Illinois flag&rsquo;s similarity to the flag of Mexico.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">This row of flags will start off with the U.S. flag, the state of Illinois flag, Chicago flag, Los Angeles flag, state of California flag, and the Mexican flag. We have these different relationships between these two places starting with the cities and then going to the states. We have the state of Mexico flag, even though California is not part of Mexico, it used to be part of Mexico, but it&rsquo;s related to the histories that we have here. Catalina Island was occupied by the Brown Berets because in the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo, which separated the Southwest from Mexico after the Mexican-American War, the island wasn&rsquo;t specifically mentioned. This is why the Brown Berets tried to occupy it.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">There are interrelationships between the two places [Chicago and LA]. I thought that was another kind of metaphor for the show, in terms of Wrigley being this character and starting with him, saying no man is an island, or no city, or no country or land is an island. They&rsquo;re all in relationship, in context, to their neighbors. Imagine if we thought that we could do everything, under our own power, we&rsquo;d get ourselves in trouble. We can talk about it in relationship to land, in relationship to people. Or no island is a man, we could even switch it.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">I wanted to draw these kinds of relationships together, one between Los Angeles and Chicago, two between Mexico and the States, three between baseball and mythology. Different symbolic orders, things like ships or bubble gum.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><em>ArtSlant would like to thank Mario Ybarra, Jr., Jenny Gheith and Lisa Dorin for their assistance in making this interview possible. Additional thanks to the Anna Helwing Gallery and the Art Institute of Chicago</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">-<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/16747-abraham-ritchie?tab=REVIEWS"><span style="color: #000000;"> Abraham Ritchie</span></a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #000000;">(Top image: <strong>Mario Ybarra Jr</strong>, Manifest Destiny Project billboard, 2014; Courtesy of LAND. All other images are installation views of <em>Take Me Out. . . No Man Is an Island</em>, 2008; Courtesy of the Artist)</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><em>&nbsp;</em></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> Wed, 19 Mar 2014 21:52:42 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list F.A.T. Lab, F.A.T. GOLD Europe: Five Years of Free Art & Technology <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">I crouched down, picked up a marker, and tried to remember the illegible scribble that used to be my &ldquo;tag&rdquo;: a gesture of sharp points and steady curves punctuated by a strategic line slashed through the whole inscription. In high school I would trace it onto book covers and notepads and think I was cool. It came to me eventually, the first delivery unsteady as I carefully considered which shapes fit where; in a second, more successful attempt, I let my arm do the work, confidently forging my mark in muscle memory.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140302140558-me_tagging.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">Yours truly, tagging the graffiti wall, <em>F.A.T. GOLD Europe</em>; Photo: Ben Harvey.</span></p> <div><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"> <br /></span></div> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">I was in Eindhoven attending the Free Art and Technology (F.A.T.) Lab&rsquo;s exhibition <em>F.A.T. GOLD Europe</em>&nbsp;at <a href="http://www.mu.nl/" target="_blank">MU</a>, which ended in January. The show, which also took place in April last year at <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/venues/show/335-eyebeam?tab=VENUE" target="_blank">Eyebeam</a> in New York, was a sort of five-year anniversary round up of the Internet collective&rsquo;s practice. (F.A.T. Lab has now entered its seventh year, but the originally scheduled retrospective was put on hiatus in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy.) But back to the incident at hand. Why, at an exhibition dedicated to a network ostensibly operating online, was I contributing my meager tag to a sanctioned graffiti wall?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140302140845-installation_view1.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div><span style="font-size: x-small;"><em>F.A.T. GOLD Europe</em>, installation view, MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; Photo: Andrea Alessi.</span></div> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">The connection isn&rsquo;t so far fetched. Some of F.A.T. Lab&rsquo;s twenty-five <a href="http://fffff.at/people/" target="_blank">members</a>&mdash;an international network of artists, engineers, scientists, lawyers, and musicians&mdash;are themselves graffiti artists. Their core values, which include &ldquo;spreading open source and free ideals into popular culture&rdquo; through DIY entrepreneurship, open source, and activism, have more than a few intersections with street art. On the one hand, art on the Internet can be viewed through a street lens: it can bypass normal distribution channels, appealing directly to viewers. Turning the comparison on its head, street art can be seen as a form of &ldquo;hack&rdquo;&mdash;an unendorsed appropriation of space, medium, or idea.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140302135918-ideas_worth_spreading.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Evan Roth</strong><em>, <em><a href="http://fffff.at/ideas-worth-spreading/" target="_blank">Ideas Worth Spreading</a> (TED Talks)</em></em>, at MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; Photo: Andrea Alessi</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">In his recent book, <a href="http://viralart.vandalog.com/read/" target="_blank"><em>Viral Art</em></a>, <a href="http://blog.vandalog.com/" target="_blank">Vandalog</a> blogger RJ Rushmore looks at how the future of street art, with its focus on &ldquo;unmediated distribution,&rdquo; might find a natural home in the digital domain. He uses the term &ldquo;Viral Art&rdquo; to describe both shareable and invasive online practices that have an affinity, if not a direct evolutionary line, to street art (n.b. &ldquo;Viral&rdquo; here implies a level of approachability that excludes some older forms of Internet Art. The pioneering duo JODI, for example, have a great exhibition at <a href="http://www.showroommama.nl/nl/" target="_blank">Showroom MAMA</a> in Rotterdam right now that isn&rsquo;t particularly accessible or viral). F.A.T. Lab&rsquo;s <a href="http://fffff.at/category/projects/" target="_blank">projects</a> don&rsquo;t always fall within the categories Rushmore outlines either&mdash;viewers may seek out content rather than encounter it serendipitously&mdash;yet they do open onto notions of self-dissemination, egalitarianism, activism, and anonymity. In fact, there are examples at MU of some of the <a href="http://viralart.vandalog.com/read/chapter/google-bombs/" target="_blank">very</a> <a href="http://viralart.vandalog.com/read/chapter/katsu-getting-up-in-digital-space/" target="_blank">works</a> discussed in Rushmore&rsquo;s text&mdash;namely, <a href="http://fffff.at/ideas-worth-spreading/" target="_blank"><em>Ideas Worth Spreading</em></a>, a mock-up TED Talk stage where visitors can record images of their own &ldquo;talk&rdquo; to share online, and <em>40,000 GML Tags</em>, a massive screen showcasing graffiti gestures in <a href="http://fffff.at/tag/gml/" target="_blank">GML</a>, or Graffiti Markup Language, &ldquo;a file format designed to be a universal structure for storing digitized graffiti motion data.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140302140719-kopyfamo.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">Geraldine Juarez, <a style="font-style: italic;" href="http://fffff.at/kopyfamo-free-copyright/" target="_blank">Kopyfamo'</a>, watermark on mirror, at MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; Photo: Andrea Alessi</span><em> <br /></em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Some F.A.T. Lab projects exist in the real world, others are strictly manifest online, and many straddle the two&mdash;that is, projects shaped in the real world and shared online. The MU exhibition, curated by <a href="http://www.lindsayhoward.net/" target="_blank">Lindsay Howard</a>, highlighted them all, offering documentation, online viewing stations, and even physical objects and artworks. Where <em>F.A.T. GOLD</em> differed from the typical exhibition was that most works were not autonomous objects, but rather reproducible examples of a wider practice. Motivated viewers could (and can) recreate many of these works on the web or at home*, and the materials for some projects, like an <a href="http://fffff.at/obama-google-glass-prism-mask/" target="_blank">Obama PRISM mask</a>, were even available at the exhibition.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140302140049-free_universal_construction_kit.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #000000;"><em>F.A.T. GOLD Europe</em>, installation view with&nbsp;<a href="http://fffff.at/free-universal-construction-kit/" target="_blank"><em>Free Universal Construction Kit</em></a>, MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; Photo: Andrea Alessi</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Good fun is always on the menu: in <em>F.A.T. GOLD</em> there was a sub-genre of works touting the douchiness of Google Glass and its adopters, and a presentation of Greg Leuch&rsquo;s viral Add-on <a href="http://fffff.at/shaved-bieber/" target="_blank"><em>Shaved Bieber</em></a>, which censors all mentions of Justin Bieber online (earning Leuch more than a little hate mail from teenage fans). But some of the best and most shareable projects are greater than their capacity for the lulz. The <a href="http://fffff.at/free-universal-construction-kit/" target="_blank">Free Universal Construction Kit</a> is a set of adapters that makes ten brands of children&rsquo;s construction sets, like Lego and K&rsquo;Nex, interoperable. It&rsquo;s eminently cool/novel/clever, but it also visualizes the ways in which childhood playthings ostensibly meant to spark creativity are limited by proprietary measures. The F.U.C.K. undermines these protective implements, removing barriers to cross-trademark creativity. The exhibition featured a complete set of adapters, a construction/play station, and a 3D printer that staff members kindly set to printing new pieces whenever visitors turned up. (3D models of the adapters in .STL format are available online for <a href="http://www.thingiverse.com/uck/designs" target="_blank">free download</a>.)</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140302140151-facebook_id_card.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Tobias Leingruber</strong>, <em><a href="http://fffff.at/tag/fb-bureau/" target="_blank">Facebook Identity Card</a></em>, video presentation of ARTE Creative, <em><a href="http://fbbureau.com/" target="_blank">Social ID Bureau</a></em>, 2012,&nbsp;portrait of Mark Zuckerberg,&nbsp;at MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; Photo: Andrea Alessi</span><em> <br /></em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><em>&nbsp;</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">F.A.T. Lab&rsquo;s perspective seems carefully poised between an irreverent techno-optimism (&ldquo;look at these cool things we can do!&rdquo;) and deep skepticism at the ways in which technologies can be regulated, marketed, and used for power and control. Given these positions, in which use of certain technologies seems self-evident, it&rsquo;s easy to forget that not everyone has access to the distributional paradigm shift that is the digital domain. Rushmore&rsquo;s account also overstates viral art&rsquo;s present accessibility: an encounter with this type of work is more likely to be spread within specific enclaves of Internet activity, with limiting factors being not geography, but usage. The case for &ldquo;unmediated&rdquo; distribution is further undermined by the cryptic algorithms used by Facebook and Google for post placement and search results&mdash;the very systems F.A.T. Lab exploits when images of their fake TED Talks turn up in search results. In a destabilizing twist, F.A.T. Lab often coopts the very technologies and systems it protests (or defends).</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140302140313-skatekeyboard.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Tobias Leingruber</strong>, <em><a href="http://fffff.at/skatekeyboard/" target="_blank">Skatekeyboard</a></em>, keyboard attached to skateboard deck,&nbsp;at MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; Photo: Andrea Alessi</span><em> <br /></em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><em>&nbsp;</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">In a way, that&rsquo;s why it was such a treat to see some of F.A.T. Lab&rsquo;s works in physical form, Away From Keyboard as it were. <em>F.A.T. GOLD</em> did a great job of making works and ideas accessible to people who might not be tech-savvy or know what terms like &ldquo;net neutrality&rdquo; and &ldquo;Open Web&rdquo; mean. Or those who aren&rsquo;t necessarily ready to accept or understand this sort of practice as &ldquo;art.&rdquo; The exhibition was forward looking, but also rooted in the past and present&mdash;a thought-provoking bridge between time, technologies, and disciplines. Be it in a subway tunnel or on a homepage, a mark on the wall is a sign of presence; it can be a declaration of ego, of resistance. Or like my clumsy signature, it can be an affirmation, a &ldquo;Like&rdquo; or an &ldquo;upvote&rdquo;: I was here, with so many others, and I want to be counted.</span></p> <p><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/1538/2dh/20140303002936-compubody_interface.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Becky Stern</strong>,&nbsp;<em><em><a href="http://fffff.at/knitted-compubody-interface/" target="_blank">Knitted Compubody Interface</a>&nbsp;</em>(<a href="http://www.instructables.com/id/Laptop-Compubody-Sock/" target="_blank">knit one</a> yourself!), at MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; </em>&copy; Photo: Andrea Alessi</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">*The MU exhibition ended on January 26th, but interested readers can see the projects <a href="http://fffff.at/category/projects/" target="_blank">online</a> or in the new <a href="http://fffff.at/the-fat-manual/" target="_blank"><em>F.A.T. Manual</em></a> (available for purchase or <a href="http://www.lulu.com/shop/domenico-quaranta-and-geraldine-ju%C3%A1rez/the-fat-manual/ebook/product-21251172.html" target="_blank">free download</a>), released on the occasion of the exhibition and the collective&rsquo;s five-year anniversary.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&mdash;Andrea Alessi</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140302141000-installation_view3.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <div>&nbsp;<span style="font-size: x-small;"><em>F.A.T. GOLD Europe</em>, installation view, MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; Photo: Andrea Alessi</span></div> <div><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></div> <div><span style="font-size: x-small;">Image on top: <em>F.A.T. GOLD Europe</em>, installation view, MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; Photo: Andrea Alessi.<span style="color: #000000;">]</span></span></div> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Mon, 03 Mar 2014 00:40:07 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Articles/list