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Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art

Exhibition Detail
The Human Touch: Selections from the RBC Wealth Management Art Collection
1430 Johnson Lane
Eugene, OR 97403


April 26th - September 14th
Opening: 
April 26th 11:00 AM - 5:00 PM
 
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© Courtesy of the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art
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> DESCRIPTION

This exhibition, drawn from the RBC Wealth Management Art Collection, features major works by international contemporary artists, all of which explore creative interpretations of the human figure.  Ranging in scale and media, these whimsical, provocative, beautiful, and unusual pieces include works by Radcliffe Bailey, John Baldessari, Chuck Close, Lalla Essaydi, Roland Fischer, Dinh Q. Lê, Roy Lichtenstein, Hung Liu, Elizabeth Peyton, T.L. Solien, and Jaune Quick-to-See Smith.  Created over the past twenty years, the RBC collection is regularly displayed at the firm's headquarters in Minneapolis; because of its continued growth, now numbering more than 400 pieces, selection of the collection are able to be shared with the public through the company’s touring program.

Whether a striking realistic portrait or a figural study of the human body, the works in the exhibition probe the depths of the individual psyche, while offering an intimate investigation of the human condition. Don McNeil, curator of the collection and exhibition, notes that RBC features the human figure in its art collection because it believes that the age-old need to understand the human condition is still vital and that the human form remains its most direct manifestation. “The earliest known drawings and sculptures depicted human and animal figures. These artistic expressions centered on matters most important to early man - success in the hunt and fertility. As society evolved, the human figure maintained its importance in artistic endeavors and is the major focal point in artistic expression to this day."

 


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