STREET now open! Chicago | Los Angeles | Miami | New York | San Francisco | Santa Fe
Amsterdam | Berlin | Brussels | London | Paris | São Paulo | Toronto | China | India | Worldwide
 
Worldwide

Magasin 3 Stockholm Konsthall

Exhibition Detail
Solo Exhibition
Curated by: Tessa Praun
Frihamnen Magasin 3
Stockholm
Sweden


February 8th, 2013 - June 2nd, 2013
 
 B-Car, Saugus California, Road Test, Chris BurdenChris Burden,
B-Car, Saugus California, Road Test,
June 30, 1976
© Courtesy of the artist & Magasin 3 Stockholm Konsthall
> QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://www.magasin3.com
COUNTRY:  
Sweden
EMAIL:  
info@magasin3.com
PHONE:  
+46 8 545 680 40
OPEN HOURS:  
Thursdays 11am – 7pm Fridays—Sundays 11am – 5pm
TAGS:  
photography, objects
> DESCRIPTION

The long-awaited return of key works by Chris Burden, last seen together during his solo exhibition at Magasin 3 in 1999. Each work explores technological solutions for moving the human body through space.

In 1975 he designed and built B-Car, a fully functional single-seater car. Most parts were handmade and the design reflects many decisions made during the process. The intention was to build a car that could travel up to 100 mph (160 km/h) and a distance of 100 miles per gallon. The exhibition also includes drawings, photographs and texts that document the project and reveal Burden’s vision of how a car should be.

For his solo exhibition at Magasin 3 in 1999, Burden built four bridges of metal toy construction parts, the first in a series of works to use these materials. Two of these bridges are in the Magasin 3 collection and are now shown together again. Mexican Bridge is a model of a cast iron bridge designed in the 1860s for the Mexican railroad system to span the Metlac Gorge (1000 foot wide). But the bridge was never built. Chris Burden found a drawing of the bridge in a book about the Mexican railroad and decided to build a large-scale model of it with toy construction parts.

Before attempting this project he first designed and constructed ¼ Ton Bridge in order to test the possibilities of the Meccano and Erector Set parts and designed to hold his own body weight. Upon completion he tested it and the structure could in fact hold 500 pounds (a quarter ton), which he documented in the photograph Static Test (2000). The poster for his exhibition at Magasin 3 (1999) shows Burden himself standing on 1/4 Ton Bridge.

In 2008 he installed a 20-meter high skyscraper sculpture at Rockefeller Plaza in New York. What My Dad Gave Me included an estimated one million Erector Set pieces and weighed seven tons. Burden’s interest in transportation has continued with his latest work Metropolis II (2010), a miniature city in which 1,100 toy cars travel at a speed equal to 240 mph (386 km/h).


Copyright © 2006-2013 by ArtSlant, Inc. All images and content remain the © of their rightful owners.