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Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art

Exhibition Detail
The 7th Asia Pacific Triennial
Stanley Place, South Bank, Queensland
4101 Queensland
Australia


December 8th, 2012 - April 14th, 2013
Opening: 
December 8th, 2012 10:00 AM - 10:30 AM
 
Civilised #13, Michael CookMichael Cook, Civilised #13,
2012, Inkjet print on paper, 100 x 87.5cm
© Courtesy Queensland Art Gallery
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> DESCRIPTION

The 7th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art (APT7) in Brisbane, Australia, from December 8, 2012 – April 14, 2013 will mark the twentieth anniversary of the APT series.

The most ambitious to date, APT7 will occupy both Gallery buildings and will feature new and recent works by 75 senior and emerging artists and groups from 27 countries. These include major new commissions by Tiffany Chung (Vietnam/USA), Atul Dodiya (India), Shirley Macnamara (Australia), Richard Maloy (New Zealand), LN Tallur (India/South Korea) and Huang Yong Ping (China/France).

Since 1993, the Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art (APT) has been the Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art’s flagship contemporary art exhibition. The only major exhibition series in the world to focus exclusively on Asia, the Pacific and Australia, the APT’s acquisition program and commissioning focus enabled the Gallery to build an internationally renowned collection of contemporary Asian and Pacific art.

APT7 includes major groups of works by younger-generation artists from Indonesia and Vietnam, reflecting the exciting scenes emerging in these countries. The diversity and depth of Australian Aboriginal art is expressed in the work of five artists, representing some of the most dynamic aspects of Australian art today.

Two co-curated projects offer specific regional focuses. 0 – Now: Traversing West Asia, co-curated by Istanbul-based curator November Paynter, brings together works by seven artists and artist groups from the Middle East and Central Asia who consider the shifting borders and cultural interactions of the region. A presentation of contemporary work from Papua New Guinea, co-curated by architect Martin Fowler, includes a spectacular group of performance masks and painted and carved structures from New Britain and the Sepik. It is the most extensive representation of work from PNG in an APT to date.

The APT acknowledges its 20 year history through commissions undertaken by a number of artists who work with archives. The Gallery’s own APT archive has been interpreted in an immersive sound work by Heman Chong (Singapore); installations by MAP Office (Hong Kong, China) and Raqs Media Collective (India) who survey artistic positions and social developments across Asia; while a project by Torika Bolatagici (Australia/Fiji), Teresia Teaiwa (USA/Kiribati/NZ), and Mat Hunkin (NZ) addresses militarisation in the Pacific through photography, spoken word and illustration.

APT7 also includes two film programs curated by the Gallery’s Australian Cinémathèque, one considering two decades of cinema culture throughout the region, the other a broad survey of Chinese animation from the 1930s to the present, including the work of pioneering animators from the 1920s, the Wan Brothers.

Through twenty years of ongoing attention to diverse practices in the region, framed by dialogues and debates, the APT has mapped changing cultural landscapes and encouraged a detailed and nuanced appreciation of Asian and Pacific contemporary art. These important conversations continue in APT7, through the exhibition, opening weekend program, cinema program, Kids’ APT7, public talks and performances, and publishing and online platforms.


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