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Silverlens Singapore

Exhibition Detail
Beautiful Pain
Gillman Barracks
47 Malan Road
109444 Singapore
Singapore


September 14th, 2012 - October 13th, 2012
Opening: 
September 14th, 2012 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
 
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© Courtesy of Silverlens Singapore
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> DESCRIPTION

We are pleased to announce the opening of Silverlens Singapore with a solo exhibition by Luis Lorenzana on September 14, 2012. There will also be a commissioned outdoor sculpture piece by Silverlens artist Gary Ross Pastrana for the opening.
In Beautiful Pain, Luis Lorenzana uses white to create a soothing emptiness, a space in which scars can be borne without danger or damage, and in which they are sources of beauty. His use of color is controlled, and as a result it is more stark, more meaningful, against such whiteness. Color evokes a sense of joy, even as it creates turmoil.
There is something extreme about the cracks that fissure the human form, about the thorns that wind themselves around it, about faces sliced open and coming apart. But for Lorenzana, the series speaks of an “extraordinary joy.” Instead of breaking the subject down, mutilation unleashes a wild, strange beauty. It seems as though there is something potentiating inside the wracked body: leaves and flowers bud among thorns; they sprout out of the ground, out of the women themselves. The skin parts to reveal a tiny candy garden; it is sewn up only to drip color onto the ground. Lorenzana’s mastery of conventional methods allows him to play around with what one might expect from traditional portraits. He preserves clothing and posture “in reverence to classical painting practice,” but takes his subjects past their physical limits as human figures. There is a pristine quality to the paintings, even as the bodies in them are on the verge of coming undone: “The beauty here is that they are still impossibly alive,” Lorenzana says, “and at peace, and unaffected, and detached, vis a vis the pain.” These figures have transcended suffering and come out the other side. The extraordinary joy is there, and it is perhaps only through breakage that such ecstasy can emerge.


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