BEGIN:VCALENDAR VERSION:2.0 CALSCALE:GREGORIAN PRODID:iCalendar-Ruby VERSION:2.0 BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

The first in a series of projects using the Information Spac e at DCA while the main galleries are closed for changeover. LOVE is the cu lmination of a two year research project by the artist Mairi Lafferty into Dundee’s Tayside House which is currently being dismantled.

DTEND:20130207 DTSTAMP:20141123T173011 DTSTART:20130129 GEO:56.4575667;-2.975153 LOCATION:Dundee Contemporary Arts\,152 Nethergate \nDundee\, DD1 4DY SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:LOVE\, Mairi Lafferty UID:258305 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Sculptures\, paintings\, prints\, drawings and decorative wo rks by enigmatic artist Alberto Giacometti will be on view in Giacom etti: Memory and Presence\, opening August 31 in the museum’s four th-floor gallery. The exhibition will reveal the artistic evolution of Giac ometti\, a key figure in 20th-century art\, and illuminate the sense of int imacy that is reflected in works depicting his family\, other artists and i mportant cultural and intellectual figures.

DTEND:20130208 DTSTAMP:20141123T173011 DTSTART:20120831 GEO:35.224469;-80.847493 LOCATION:Bechtler Museum of Modern Art\,420 South Tryon Street \nCharlotte\ , NC 28202 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Giacometti: Memory and Presence\, Alberto Giacometti UID:229413 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20120831T170000 DTSTAMP:20141123T173011 DTSTART:20120831T100000 GEO:35.224469;-80.847493 LOCATION:Bechtler Museum of Modern Art\,420 South Tryon Street \nCharlotte\ , NC 28202 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Giacometti: Memory and Presence\, Alberto Giacometti UID:229414 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION: DTEND:20130208 DTSTAMP:20141123T173011 DTSTART:20130108 GEO:0.0;0.0 LOCATION:CAIS Gallery Seoul\,97-16\, Chungdam dong\, Kangnam Gu \nSEOUL\, SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Cais Collection UID:256895 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

International artist-in-residence Miguel Palma (Portugal) ha s developed a “Remote Desert Exploration Vehicle” that investigates ways in which meaning of place\, particularly in remote desert environments\, is c reated and communicated. Palma's work in this exhibition engages issues thr ough the lens of exploration: military history in Arizona and the Southwest \, the military’s role in desert preservation\, the history of Manifest Des tiny and colonialism in populated places\, strategies of adaptation and the role of technology in desert survival.

DTEND:20130209 DTSTAMP:20141123T173011 DTSTART:20120929 GEO:33.4190698;-111.9399975 LOCATION:Arizona State University Art Museum\,Tenth Street and Mill Avenue \nTempe\, AZ 85287-2911 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Trajectory\, Miguel Palma UID:232880 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20120928T210000 DTSTAMP:20141123T173011 DTSTART:20120928T183000 GEO:33.4190698;-111.9399975 LOCATION:Arizona State University Art Museum\,Tenth Street and Mill Avenue \nTempe\, AZ 85287-2911 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Trajectory\, Miguel Palma UID:232881 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

In keeping with tradition\, we proudly present the big annua l group show XMAS\, where more than 23 artist from around the world is pres ented. The target is to introduce new promising talents and to show there o ur establish artists are at the moment.

DTEND:20130209 DTSTAMP:20141123T173011 DTSTART:20121206 GEO:55.6871469;12.5924385 LOCATION:GALLERI CHRISTOFFER EGELUND\,Bredgade 75 \n1260 Copenhagen K\, SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:XMAS 12 / THE BIG GROUP SHOW\, Yuichi Hirako\, Ida Kvetny\, Ghost o f A Dream\, Scott Everingham\, Mikkel S. Andersen\, Crystel Ceresa\, Frodo Mikkelsen\, Thierry Feuz\, Michael Johansson\, Emilie Lundstrøm\, Anders Mo seholm\, Rithika Merchant\, Annette Merrild\, Christoffer Joergensen\, SILA S INOUE\, Jacob Dahlstrup\, Henrik S. Simonsen\, Louise Hindsgavl\, Jason J ägel\, Morten Steen Hebsgaard\, Laurent Impeduglia\, Maria Torp\, Kevin Cyr UID:249085 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20121206T190000 DTSTAMP:20141123T173011 DTSTART:20121206T160000 GEO:55.6871469;12.5924385 LOCATION:GALLERI CHRISTOFFER EGELUND\,Bredgade 75 \n1260 Copenhagen K\, SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:XMAS 12 / THE BIG GROUP SHOW\, Mikkel S. Andersen\, Crystel Ceresa\ , Kevin Cyr\, Jacob Dahlstrup\, Ghost of A Dream\, Scott Everingham\, Thier ry Feuz\, Morten Steen Hebsgaard\, Louise Hindsgavl\, Yuichi Hirako\, Laure nt Impeduglia\, SILAS INOUE\, Jason Jägel\, Christoffer Joergensen\, Michae l Johansson\, Ida Kvetny\, Emilie Lundstrøm\, Rithika Merchant\, Annette Me rrild\, Frodo Mikkelsen\, Anders Moseholm\, Henrik S. Simonsen\, Maria Torp UID:249086 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

We are proud to present the wood sculptures of James Perry a nd the mixed media drawings of Eric Holzman

DTEND:20130209 DTSTAMP:20141123T173011 DTSTART:20130110 GEO:29.7229681;-95.4168911 LOCATION:Gremillion &Co Fine Art Inc\,2501 Sunset Blvd. \nHouston\, Texas 77005 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY: Sculpture and Drawings\, James Perry\, Eric Holzman UID:254857 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:
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Robert Kinsell's na rrative paintings invite the viewer to participate in a new world of the ar tists' making. Beautifully rendered\, Kinsell transforms the traditional la ndscape and still life into a springboard for new conceptual associations b oth comical and tragic.  
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Robert Kinsell complete d his Master of Fine Art in Painting at the University of Wisconsin/Madison . He is a Professor of Art at Stephen F. Austin University in Nacogdoches\, Texas\, where he has taught Painting\, Drawing\, Figure Drawing\, Design\, and Advertising Design. Kinsell's solo exhibitions include "Past and Prese nt" at the Longview Museum of Fine Art in Longview\, Texas\; "Reality-Virtu al and Otherwise" at Texas Christian University in Fort Worth\, Texas\; and "The Secret Life of Objects: Ten Years in Texas\," at the Museum of East T exas in Lufkin. He has also exhibited at the Galveston Art Center in Galves ton\, Texas\; the Glassell School of Art in Houston\, Texas\; Arkansas Art Center in Little Rock\, Arkansas\; and Laguna Gloria Art Museum in Austin\, Texas\, and Ann Nathan Gallery in Chicago Illinois. His work can be found in a number of public and private collections\, including the South Texas I nstitute for the Arts in Corpus Christi\, Texas.
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DTEND:20130209 DTSTAMP:20141123T173011 DTSTART:20130112 GEO:29.7345428;-95.4200286 LOCATION:McMurtrey Gallery\,3508 Lake Street \nHouston\, Texas 77098 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Object Lessons\, Robert Kinsell UID:254869 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20130112T200000 DTSTAMP:20141123T173011 DTSTART:20130112T180000 GEO:29.7345428;-95.4200286 LOCATION:McMurtrey Gallery\,3508 Lake Street \nHouston\, Texas 77098 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Object Lessons\, Robert Kinsell UID:254870 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Group Exhibition of Gallery Artists featuring works by James Drake from the "Red Touch" Series

DTEND:20130209 DTSTAMP:20141123T173011 DTSTART:20130112 GEO:29.734622;-95.421784 LOCATION:Moody Gallery\,2815 COLQUITT \nHOUSTON\, TX 77098 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Group Exhibition of Gallery Artists UID:253577 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20130112T180000 DTSTAMP:20141123T173011 DTSTART:20130112T160000 GEO:29.734622;-95.421784 LOCATION:Moody Gallery\,2815 COLQUITT \nHOUSTON\, TX 77098 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Group Exhibition of Gallery Artists UID:253578 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Gürbüz meets viewers with her one-person exhibition at Rampa \,
“Long Night. Faraway Voyages.”\, on January 5–February 9\, 2013. Th e
exhibition\, composed of Gürbüz’s paintings\, drawings\, and sculptu res
realized in 2011–12\, displays the visual mythologies of Gürbüz’s< br />extensive art practice.
The works are a continuation of Gürbüz’s mysterious\, magical
world that we had seen in previous exhibitions. I n these large-scale
paintings and sculptures\, Selma Gürbüz gives a vo ice to the images she
has compiled from both real and dream voyages: t he human figures are
accompanied by animals and plants\; inspiration f rom ancient Egyptian
art\, Chinese and Japanese painting traditions\, Velazquez\, Monet\, Islamic
miniatures and manuscripts can be traced i n the works.
Gürbüz’s art is about images. These images are not purely painterly\,
but are rather enriched by poetry\, fairy tales\, and par ables. Each
painting has its own story\; they are not born from storie s\, but rather
have formed their own unique tales. As has been pointed out about
Gürbüz’s work\, “These paintings stem from a dream in the m iddle of the
night\, lit by a full-moon.”
Selma Gürbüz looks at t hemes derived from history\, nature\, the
subconscious\, and mythology —the human figures are quite often
alone\, displaying animal-like char acteristics. This points to them being
integrated into nature and that they are protected by nature. Their
discomforts and pain express the artist’s own creative process.
Recently\, figures are situated on the artist’s meticulously woven\,
dream-like landscapes\, integrated as he r palette transitions from black
to soft hues of brown. Her characters are mysterious and poetic at the
same time\, inviting the viewer to i nterrogate and express their inner
worlds. We remember what we have se en and on the other side\, the
reality is not out of our minds\; it ch ases us. By displaying our fears\,
dreams\, and anxieties\, Gürbüz act ually points to what exists through
what is constructed. Perhaps this is why Gürbüz positions herself at the
intersection of curiosity and m agic.
To see the world within this other world\, the viewer does not n eed
glasses. Imagination is more than enough.
Selma Gürbüz (1960) was born in Istanbul\, Turkey.
After having studied at Exeter College of Art Design
between 1980-1982\, she graduated from Marmara
Uni versity Fine Arts Faculty in 1984. Her recent solo
exhibitions include “Mind’s Eye”\, Lawrie Sahbibi
Gallery\, Dubai (2011)\; “Shadows of My self”\, Rose Issa
Projects at Leighton House Museum\, London (2011)\;< br />“Archetypes”\, Warehouse (Antrepo) No: 3\, Istanbul
(2010)\, “Sun ny Shadows”\, Gallery Apel\, Istanbul
(2008) and Makii Masaru Fine Art s\, Tokyo (2007)\;
“Feline I”\, Galerie Maeght\, Paris (2006)\; “Felin e II”\,
Gallery Apel\, Istanbul (2006)\; “The Fairy and the
Genie ”\, Gallery Apel\, Istanbul (2004)\, “Yünname”\,
Gallery Apel\, Istanb ul (2000) and “Karaname”\, Gallery
Apel\, Istanbul (1999). Gürbüz has also participated
in many national and international group exhibitions
including “From Traditional to Contemporary” (2010)\,
“New Works \, New Horizons” (2009) and “Modern
Experiences” (2008)\, Istanbul Mod ern\, Istanbul\; “Cara
a Cara” (travelling show)\, with Marco Del Re\, Galerie
Maeght\, Paris and Barcelona (2003)\; “Fantaisies du
Har em et les Nouvelles Shéhérazades” (travelling
show)\, Museum of Contem porary Art\, Barcelona and
Museum of Natural History\, Lyon (2003)\; “ Le Cirque”
(travelling show)\, Gérard-Georges Lemaire\, Editions
Eric Koehler\, Athenee-Theatre Louis Jouvet\, Paris\,
Espace Mira Phal aina\, Montreuil and Novomestka
Radnice\, Prague (1996). Her other pro jects include
“Shadow theatre design for ‘More Wind’”\, Portside
Gallery\, Yokohama (2005) and “Futurist Stage Curtain
Design”\, Revues Parlées\, Centre Georges Pompidou\,
Paris (1996)\; “Automatic Games”\ , Kwangju Biennale\,
Korea (1995) and “L’Orient des Cafés” (traveling< br />show)\, French Cultural Centre\, Cairo\, Alexandria\,
Athens\, Th essaloniki\, Jerusalem\, Tel Aviv (1992).
Selma Gürbüz lives and works in Istanbul\, Turkey.

DTEND:20130209 DTSTAMP:20141123T173011 DTSTART:20130108 GEO:41.0438183;28.998708 LOCATION:RAMPA\,Şair Nedim Caddesi No: 21a Akaretler \n İstanbul\, 34357 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY: Long Night Faraway Voyages\, Selma Gürbüz UID:252237 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20130105T203000 DTSTAMP:20141123T173011 DTSTART:20130105T183000 GEO:41.0438183;28.998708 LOCATION:RAMPA\,Şair Nedim Caddesi No: 21a Akaretler \n İstanbul\, 34357 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY: Long Night Faraway Voyages\, Selma Gürbüz UID:252238 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

With Conversation 17\, CORINNE DE SAN JOSE methodically wraps everyday objects with fabric\, neither to obscure nor hi de\, but to transform the materiality of her subjects— hammer\, vase\, wine bottle—into objets d’art.

Like her previous exhibit titles\, Conversation 17 is a song reference\, a play on the title of a song by The National. She connects the song to the idea of suffering fro m oblivion\, or losing identity\, grasping to control how your surroundings affect you. 

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The subjects are all concealed\, comple tely wrapped\, but there is no doubt as to what they are. By wrapping\, the ir essential form is revealed rather than concealed. She has picked the mos t mundane of objects\, binds it so that we will never know of its make or t ype. The selection is deliberate\; we easily associate these objects with g ender—from the sharp phallic tools to the curvy and round vessels. In the f inal process\, the only visible layer is what we would easily associate wit h the feminine—floral fabric set against another floral fabric. Layer upon layer\, the juxtaposition is at once jarring and beautiful.

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But it’s the patterns of fabric that have a mesmeric effect\, like s taring into a stereogram. We are drawn in to look a few seconds longer than we originally intended\, the clashing prints a visual\, tactile overload\, a still life that demands more of your time.

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To wrap something is also to protect it\, and the impulse to protect\, to heighten that which is basic or essential is perhaps the strongest conceptual link to CORINNE’s past works.

DTEND:20130209 DTSTAMP:20141123T173011 DTSTART:20130110 GEO:14.5368215;121.0206194 LOCATION:Silverlens Manila\,2320 Pasong Tamo Extension \nMakati City\, SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Conversation 17 \, Corinne De San Jose UID:253614 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

ALLAN BALISI's Mirages at Silverlens featur es large format monochromatic paintings of jarring lyrical images cinematic in their aplomb suspense that explore the phantasmagoria of uncertain mean ing melancholic over fictional ends.

The look on the man's face is one of perturbed intensity.  He squints hard from despair with an effort to find something he couldn't see yet.  Lateral strokes line the image per inch mechanically distorting the portrait like bad visual reception on TV as if losing his composition from this conundrum.  The next panel reveals t he object of his vexation: a booklet with blank pages apparently.  His fing ers poised readily to flip to the next page wanting affirmation of the vaca nt meaning from the book on hand\, while permeated with a foreboding existe ntial horror creeping into the core of his beliefs that maybe there is only nothing.  This climactic episode is forever on hold.

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A woman sits on the bedside.  We cannot see her face as it is turned away from the viewe r.  But the gesture that she makes seems to be that she is talking intently on the phone\, with one leg crossed and raised to relax over idle amusemen t about what is being said.  Although\, we don't truly see her hands so it is difficult to tell if she is actually talking on the phone. Or maybe\, th at she is just miming the gesture of being on the phone\, like the rehearsa l of some forgotten memory.  A ghostly existence this is\, having lost her sense of reality.  The harsh light that hovers about her effectively washes out her constitution from her surroundings.  Thus\, the painter cleverly w hites out certain parts of her body to blend it with the adjoining bed that creates a surreal effect.  Indeed\, that maybe the purpose of the work\, w hich is to create doubt\, or to establish fiction based on fact.  This is w hat pictures do\, to confabulate\, especially paintings that can resemble r eality through facility guided by the artist's creative imagination.  Thus the lamp at the top corner of the picture on the bedside table seems to agr ee with the conceit of appearances by bending its body to blend with the fa ntastic quality of the painting.  

A piece of cloth fluttering i n the wind reaches the height of the moment when it touches the peak of the mountain\, apparently\, making a shape that resemble the much rigid bigger mass.  A visual pun of course\, connecting two seemingly similar forms but each having different content\, which remarks on our visual interpretation of phenomena or the cognitive processing of events.  In such a case\, pain ting manages to freeze the fleeting moment into still episodes of ecstatic awareness - a simultaneity of contradicting conditions that opens up to wid e vistas of new experience and understanding\, possibilities amid impossibi lities\, that can only add to the mystery of the operations of a static med ium capable of activating our conscious experience. 

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In cheerful an ticipation of what is still to come a group of young men looks ahead.  They perhaps are in celebration over the conferment of new responsibilities lad en with expectations.  Hanging above their heads is the word "end" which ha s a double-edged connotation here\, as in the mark of a new beginning\, or perhaps an end to a previous more innocent life.  The "end" rings an ominou s sound of impending finality caught side by side with an image of hopeful gathering\, which can only play so many endless juxtapositions of meaning\, such as: is this the beginning or the end type of inquiry\, or the blank s ignification of what end and for whom\, moreover\, who are these people and what is their identity\, since the viewer is not made privy to a prior con dition within the narrative context that gives it closure.  The challenge t herefore is how to navigate away from making associations outside of its in tended meaning or the author's narrative imperative.  Thus without leading to misconceptions\, we can approach the painting as an abstraction of sorts \, as an empty signifier\, one that avoids representational attachments to literal interpretation\, but is linked to a structured net of ambiguity\, c reating an open discursive inquiry\, with a permeating mood that can only b e distinctively melancholic\, nostalgic for long lost ideals\, giving the p icture a decentered reality.  Here\, the combination of these disparate ima ges altogether lend a modernist montage effect to the works\, one that shoc ks the viewer into making connections amidst jarring missing links\, which can only intensify the tension lying behind their mute sensibility\, creati ng an anticipation of an end that only recedes further back as we approach it.

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The culture of copies does bring many questions pertaining to t he nature of how we perceive and interpret reality.  From painting's standp oint\, some things can be taken out\, or maximized to effect\, without losi ng grip of reality held by outward impressions\, but allowing the mind to t ake control of the interpretation of reality as opposed to relinquishing it over to what the eye can normally see.  Alan Balisi manipulates the pictur e deftly like a narrator who tests the limits of our attention\, to challen ge our notions of reality\, that is\, if we can still believe what we see\, given the fact that all things appear normal.  Perhaps this is still what makes painting credible\, not so much because of its capacity to create an illusion\, but rather\, with the way it can transform semblances of the rea l into replicas with a negative aura - the other that would critique the ac tual.  Reorganization\, repetition\, revision\, and patterning of internal components are characteristics of a language that can make familiar utteran ces into a unique individual style.  This idiosyncratic stylization becomes essential especially within a practice such as painting that through time has become compacted with various modes of expression\, which in itself mak es it such a unique language different from other mediums of representation .  Resemblances have become mere appearances\, like the real that repeats i tself everyday without alteration of our cognition of it and yet life essen tially is different from day to day depending on how we live it\, in how we use it to each of our own purpose.  Alan Balisi's works had shown us that through a touch of ironic humor\, mystery\, poetic reflection\, and melanch olic introspection\, that the language of painting facilitates critical att ention more than its mere appearance.

DTEND:20130209 DTSTAMP:20141123T173011 DTSTART:20130110 GEO:14.5368215;121.0206194 LOCATION:Silverlens Manila\,2320 Pasong Tamo Extension \nMakati City\, SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Mirages \, Allan Balisi UID:253616 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

When about 10 million of your compatriots are strewn around appro ximately 200 countries\, tropes of displacement and flux get invariably ban died about so often that the subject plunges to cliché status and thus get dismissed far too quickly.  And yet the push and pull of diaspora remain ar guably compelling\, making the case for Zamuco’s fascination with the volat ile state of objects\, bodies\, and places as metaphor for his own in-betwe eness patently logical. Setting up and packing house from the American Midw est to the East Coast till finally returning to homebase in the Philippines two months ago\, Zamuco’s fascination with the tenuousness of image and ra mshackle materiality manifests this time around in Site of Marks in it’s li terally shredded traces of the artists’ recent past alluding to tenements s itting next door to edificies now increasingly becoming iconic of our own s upposedly dragon-on-the-verge economy.  These faux visceral space markers h ope to beg questions of memory’s non-fixity and seminal corporeal and psych ogeographic hindsight.

DTEND:20130209 DTSTAMP:20141123T173011 DTSTART:20130110 GEO:14.5368215;121.0206194 LOCATION:Silverlens Manila\,2320 Pasong Tamo Extension \nMakati City\, SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Site of Marks \, Eric Zamuco UID:253619 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Makati\, Philippines—before the year came to a close\, Silve rlens Galleries held its culminating show for the fifteen artists it repres ented. This saw one of the most multifaceted assemblies of works\, both in form and conviction\, to be held across Silverlens’ three exhibition spaces . The works ranged from mediums as diverse as paintings\, drawings\, photog raphic prints\, sculpture\, and collage\, done mostly by artists who starte d their practice not more than two decades ago. This places Silverlens Gall eries as one of the art establishments that runs a more comprehensive cover age of contemporary art practices within the land\, and one of the so-calle d alternative spaces enterprising enough to take root with a younger genera tion of artists. And while these artists work across diversified discipline s\, all of them do so within the same breadth of a truly contemporary appro ach. 

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Even the concerns that emanate from each work pass off as var ying as the medium themselves. It was a rich assortment of size\, orientati on and affectation—from the explicitly serene and esoteric to the implicitl y gritty and offbeat\, from the heavily expressionist and accidental to the downright technical and calculated of processes\, which may serve as a str ingent affair to sort. The task reserved for curating the show entails with it not only the premise to operate on a pre-formulated condition\, but als o the question on how to assert a kind of ideological or hegemonic structur e that can surpass the mere straightforwardness of exposing a given collect ion and make it at least independent from a possibly random outcome. In ant hologies in literature which is identical in the sense that it sums up a co llection of works by different authors\, the approach can be varied dependi ng on the editor. It can be thematic\, or towards a careful placement of wh ich story is apt to follow the next to strengthen a message or to lead us i nto an idea\, or merely alphabetical in ascending or descending order\, neu tral and objective. With the latter the reader flips the pages in his own c hoosing and is subject to his own idea or what suits his taste on what a sa tisfying sequence should be.

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Inside the gallery we are confined to that physical plane where the movement of our own bodies is dependent. Skip ping from one painting to a sculpture at the far end of the gallery without encountering other works is almost\, if not truly\, impossible. And this i s where curatorial work is significantly varied from editorial work: it has to deal with a given space\, and the inter-relationships of each artwork c annot be autonomous from the manner they are positioned within the space. A nd this is where Silverlens Galleries' flagship show for their represented artists becomes noteworthy\, as it goes from mere exposition of art constru ctions into being itself a construct to expose.

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The appointed curat or\, GARY-ROSS PASTRANA\, known for his conceptual pieces and also part of the Silverlens' artists\, took on the task as another avenue to explore the salient conditions of exhibiting a predetermined roster. His several years of experience curating group shows have already informed him of the primar y role of the curator to mediate between the artworks and the viewing publi c's experience of it. With a given roster at hand and the condition that th ey are to work with their own dominant styles and themes representative of themselves\, Pastrana is faced with two dilemmas: on how to reposition the case as a gallery event as opposed to an art fair\, and how to hold the wor ks together to save it from slipping into mere extravaganza. There were als o two options to solve it in which he chooses neither: to forge an underlyi ng theme or to position the works into a coherent narrative. The path he ch ose was the path circumscribed by the fabled ley hunters. 

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Ley line s\, much like constellations\, are man-made constructs out of the sheer des ire to draw connections and superimpose significance. In ley hunting\, a pr actice which started as early as the 19th century\, the objective was to se ek out ley lines which were the alleged alignments of historical sites and monuments into straight lines. The lines formed between archeological sites of great importance like the pyramids\, stone hedges\, or ancient temples are believed to be interconnected. And for this reason alone their existenc e can be justified with whatever purpose those lines could have served:  an cient track ways\, spiritual pathways of cosmic energy\, and for some\, ali en navigation routes. 

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The concept of the show Ley Hunting< /strong> is neither thematic nor demographic. Tautologically speaking\, it does not revolve around a concept but on the possibility of one. It seems t o amplify further what the curator Andrew Renton has already taken into acc ount about the practice: that curating is about “seeing where the creative act can possibly go...and we don't know where it can go.” Pastrana\, who ha s also worked with site-specific sculptures draws an affinity with the land scape and treats the gallery as such. Positioning the artworks as archeolog ical sites\, they only correspond to the lay of the land\, or in this case the galleries' interior architecture. Like structures as diverse and remove d from each other as the ruins in Angkor Wat and the statues in Easter Isla nd\, the connection ascribed to them by ley hunters are arbitrary and their alignment could be merely happenstance. Yet on the other hand\, each may h old the corresponding link to a grand design. As Barthes claimed that all m yth is merely speech\, the show Ley Hunting\, more than anything else\, inv ites us to its own possible language. 

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With the opening of Ley Hunting in the Makati galleries\, we are confronted at the ons et of two possible landmarks—the two galleries situated across each other. One is the main Silverlens Gallery while the one across is Slab\, and withi n Slab is another smaller section called 20Square. The narrow elevated walk way which connects the two galleries immediately reinforces the idea of the line drawn from one continent to another. If these are indeed two separate worlds then they contain their own unique terrain. Inside the main gallery the formation appears more vast and quiet\, like an open country. FRANK CA LLAGHAN's photographs of seascapes lie at the heart of it. They are flanked by WAWI NAVARROZA's and GINA OSTERLOH's own photographs on each side. Thre e sets of photographs\, three dots on the same line to connect. And all thr ee demonstrate the same fluidity in their flatness\, from NAVARROZA's suspe nded narratives to OSTERLOH's homogeneously constructed dimensions. The lin e continues across the other wall as HANNA PETTYJOHN explores the visual tr ansformations involved in doing portraits of faces through a glass plane. A nd moving to the adjacent wall is COSTANTINO ZICARELLI's drawings\, where t he fluidity continues if only through a sequence of literal and cultural im ages of doomed excess in a triptych called Lake of Fire. 

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Across th e other side in the next room the landscape is more unpredictable. Immediat ely grabbing our attention are the larger (in terms of scale) and self-effa cing works by MARIA TANIGUCHI and PATRICIA PEREZ EUSTAQUO\, both shrouded o minously in black. Then set across each other from opposing walls are the s eries of photograms by ISA LORENZO and the drawings by CHRISTINA DY which a re both monochromatic referents to expressions achieved out of a more calcu lated and technical process.  Holding its own like a placid island in anoth er corner are photographs by RACHEL RILLO with her brilliant refinement of life's minutiae transformations\, and at the other enclosed section of the gallery called 20 Square are the wall-bound works of LUIS LORENZANA\, RYAN VILLAMAEL\, DINA GADIA\, and GARY-ROSS PASTRANA\, acting as coordinates of representational and abstract images of collage and paintings that converge on the primitive centerpiece in the form of a sculpture by MARIANO CHING.< /p>\n

These are just but one cluster of connections out of the many that can be drawn between their arrangements inside these galleries. As the show moves to Silverlens Singapore\, we are to rekindle our assessment based on a possibly newer configuration\, as the artworks submit right away to the demands of the space. A reduction in scale is inevitable\, but almost all o f the fifteen represented artists maintain the original concerns from the f irst show in Manila:

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FRANK CALLAGHAN will still show an edition of his Seascape series\, in continuing to demonstrate his inclination towards a restrained composition in photography. Likewise showing her prev ious work is WAWI NAVARROZA who\, like CALLAGHAN\, would prefer bolder imag es rather than the cluttered\, and whose pictures echo a poetic strain that reverberates from the frozen moment\, like they were part of someone's ver se rather than of a snapshot.  As for GINA OSTERLOH's work titled Wide Group Dynamic\, her picture of a homogeneous tableau of card-boards is printed as adhesive posters comprised of 1000 sheets\, re-interpreting the work as a mass-produced sheet of paper that further subdues the dimensiona lity of her perceived subject inside the picture. 

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ISA LORENZO cont inues her series of photograms where she uses a combination of objects dire ctly exposed to the photographic paper. The ambiguity resulting from the  j uxtaposition of two  disassociated objects (like in Waxing\, a fig urine of a stag together with a zodiac medallion/seal) is subdued by the pr ocess of having them rendered  equally  into a unified object of light and shadow as if they were taken from the same surface. The same goes with RACH EL RILLO's works\, whose masterful control over light coupled by the ingeni ous composition of her surprisingly mundane subjects\, whether in photograp hic prints or Polaroid\, eliminate all signs of banality to pass them off a s great landmarks inside one of life's micro-events.

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To bridge the gap between the photograph-based artworks towards the more material-based w orks of drawings\, paintings and the plastic arts are the works of MARIA TA NIGUCHI and PATRICIA PEREZ EUSTAQUIO. Their works offer a more contemplativ e reading through their conceptual framework\, and are derived out of a dir ect response against popular imagery. As in MARIA TANIGUCHI's series of wor k called News\, she goes back to the image-defying constructions o f lines and blemishes. Like newsreels\, the paper is constructed within the frame as if trying to align to each other in succession\, and leaves an im pression of a film outtake jammed inside the projector. The same attempt to construct her own visual compendium out of the hinges of popular imagery i s PATRICIA PEREZ EUSTAQUIO\, whose sculptural work also defies familiar for ms\, yet are usually riddled by familiar objects: crochet laces\, ornamenta l figures and postcards. Her work is contemplation over the text brought ab out by the conjunction of each object to the concept behind the forms she m akes. 

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Then to further this idea of placing concept behind craft ar e the paper works of RYAN VILLAMAEL and CHRISTINA DY. As Ryan Villamael cut s out from paper to create the symmetrical expression of an image in mind\, CHRISTINA DY does so by drawing in detailed precision a wallpaper-like pat tern\, and then folds her paper to the shape of the embedded image from the pattern\, in this case—of butterflies. The frailty of VILLAMAEL’s cutouts is countered by the compactness of DY's ornate origami. In the other side o f drawing on paper are the triptychs of COSTANTINO ZICARELLI. For the show in Singapore\, he seems to portray another narrative that progresses from l ight to dark\, closing full circle as the title suggests\, Verse\, Chor us\, Verse. The two set of symbols superimposed against a generic back drop offsets the plain-speak of the grim riders at the center who are portr ayed as observers. 

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Moving on to a different type of portraiture is HANNA PETTYJOHN's painting\, where she continues to place between her and her subjects the glass plane\, using it as a transfiguring agent. DINA GADI A on the other hand employs the jovial sensibilities of pop imagery to crea te unease. Then rounding up the 15 works are the works of LUIS LORENZANA an d MARIANO CHING who both dwell on the offbeat permutations of surrealist ch aracters\, though they seem to move in opposite directions as LORENZANA's w orks foray more to the fantastical while CHING ascribes back to the renderi ngs of Art Brut. 

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Within the space of Silverlens Singapore these wo rks again converge\, and are again subject to be read for their multi-facet ed qualities or even their hodgepodge appearance. But in the mix of all the se it is inevitable: to draw combinations\, to find sequences\, to connect them through lines and to either say that all have been placed in perfect u nison or have been perfectly out of place. And this kind of arbitrariness t hat is present everywhere among us whether with our relationships with plac es\, objects or events\, is the kind of construct that Ley Hunting does not necessarily yield helplessly to but embraces as part of the curatorial sys tem. As the new works by the 15 artists represented are again gathered\, it is up to us once more to lay the myth around them.

DTEND:20130209 DTSTAMP:20141123T173011 DTSTART:20130118 GEO:1.274468;103.80417 LOCATION:Silverlens Singapore\,Gillman Barracks 47 Malan Road\nSingapore \, 109444 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Ley Hunting\, Pt. 2\, Frank Callaghan\, Mariano Ching\, Christina D y\, Patricia Perez Eustaquio\, Dina Gadia\, Luis Lorenzana\, Isa Lorenzo\, Wawi Navarroza\, Gina Osterloh\, Gary-Ross Pastrana\, Hanna Pettyjohn\, Rac hel Rillo\, Maria Taniguchi\, Ryan Villamael\, Costantino Zicarelli UID:253620 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

November 10\, 2012 – February 9\, 2013

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Openi ng Reception: Friday\, November 9\, 5-7pm. ACA's Poetry Slam @ 7pm.

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LEAH KING-SMITH\, NANCY GOLDRING\, BARBARA NORFLEET

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Held in partnership with the Atlantic Center for the Arts (ACA) in New Smyrna Be ach\, FL.

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The exhibition will open Friday\, November 9\, 5- 7pm at ACA's Mark and Margery Pabst Visitor Center &\; Gallery. This eve nt will be held in conjunction with ACA’s “notorious” Wham Bam Poetry Slam at 7pm. Both events are free and open to the public.

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LOCATION: The Atlantic Center for the Arts\, 1414 Art Center Av enue\, New Smyrna Beach\, FL 32168

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For information about ACA please email: program@atlanticcenterforthearts.org or call:(386) 427-69 75< /span>

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For more information about this exhibition: http://s mponline.org/aca_winter2012.html

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DTEND:20130209 DTSTAMP:20141123T173011 DTSTART:20121109 GEO:29.201418;-81.047031 LOCATION:Southeast Museum of Photography\,1200 International Speedway Blvd. \, Bld. 1200 Daytona State College\nDaytona Beach\, FL 32114 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Selections from the Southeast Museum of Photography Collection\, Le ah King-Smith\, Nancy Goldring\, Barbara Norfleet UID:243232 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20121109T190000 DTSTAMP:20141123T173011 DTSTART:20121109T170000 GEO:29.201418;-81.047031 LOCATION:Southeast Museum of Photography\,1200 International Speedway Blvd. \, Bld. 1200 Daytona State College\nDaytona Beach\, FL 32114 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Selections from the Southeast Museum of Photography Collection\, Na ncy Goldring\, Leah King-Smith\, Barbara Norfleet UID:243233 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Assaf Shaham (b. 1983\, Jerusalem) deals with
photogra phy and its mechanisms\; he examines
the way photography is perceived \, subverts the
prevalent view centering on the photographed
ob ject\, and brings to the front the taken-for-granted
act of photograp hy. Shaham deconstructs and
foils basic and sophisticated tools for c reating
and processing images\, and juxtaposes concepts
of earl y photography with digital manipulations\,
exposing their clumsiness.

DTEND:20130209 DTSTAMP:20141123T173011 DTSTART:20120908 GEO:32.0765663;34.7874508 LOCATION:Tel-Aviv Museum of Art\,27 Shaul Hamelech Blvd \nTel Aviv\, 61332 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY: NEW WAYS TO STEAL OLD SOULS (THE CONSTANTINER PHOTOGRAPHY AWARD FO R AN ISRAELI ARTIST)\, ASSAF SHAHAM UID:236711 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

The series of drawings "Mr. Wolf" (1968)\, a
collabora tion between Hanoch Levin and Michael
Druks\, was the origin of eight silkscreen prints
in an album whose cover was made by Druks.
T he album Mr. Wolf was published by Gordon
Gallery (1980).

DTEND:20130209 DTSTAMP:20141123T173011 DTSTART:20120924 GEO:32.0765663;34.7874508 LOCATION:Tel-Aviv Museum of Art\,27 Shaul Hamelech Blvd \nTel Aviv\, 61332 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:CABINET SECRETS: PRINTS FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF PRINTS AND DRAWINGS MR. WOLF\, Hanoch Levin\, Michael Druks UID:252033 END:VEVENT END:VCALENDAR