ArtSlant - Recently added http://www.artslant.com/ew/Events/show en-us 40 - Cleveland Museum of Art - July 19th - June 26th, 2016 <p style="text-align: justify;">At Islamic courts, tents were symbols of royal power and prosperity; wealthy dynasties owned thousands of tents in various shapes and sizes. Tents were often presented as luxurious gifts but also pitched for imperial ceremonies and military campaigns, and while travelling. The Cleveland Museum of Art has acquired a spectacular imperial tent, on display to the public for the first time from July 26, 2015, to June 26, 2016, created for Muhammad Shah who ruled Iran from 1834 to 1848 during the Qajar dynasty.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">This royal tent retains its complete ceiling, with each roof panel displaying birds flanking the base of blossoming branches. Seven of the original fourteen wall panels form a semicircle, which allows visitors to see and enter the ornate interior. Featuring inlaid, brilliantly colored woolen cloth embellished with silk-thread embroidery, each interior wall panel is decorated with a single large vase of exuberant blossoms set between robust birds on a rocky mound under a niche with blossoming vines. The exterior, in contrast, is covered with a plain red cotton cloth.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">This exhibition will include a portrait of the owner and a video with images of the royal family and courtly life, contextualizing the times in which such tents were commissioned and used.</p> Sat, 04 Jul 2015 16:43:08 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Events/list Arnold Chang, Michael Cherney - Cleveland Museum of Art - July 12th - February 16th, 2016 <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>Chinese Landscape Duets of Arnold Chang and Michael Cherney</em>&nbsp;features contemporary landscapes by Arnold Chang (Chinese-American, b. 1954) and Michael Cherney (American, b. 1969), including solo and collaborative works that are profoundly rooted in the aesthetic tradition of Chinese painting. Respectively employing both painting and photography to create artistic dialogues, the combined operations of Chang (the painter) and Cherney (the photographer) turn their creative processes into artistic improvisations. Their collaboration breaks the barriers of cultural and geographical constraints; both artists were born in New York, where Chang still resides, and Cherney lives in Beijing. A common denominator of the two artists&rsquo; works is an emphasis on the harmony of abstract and natural rhythms; when their respective art forms are combined, the rhythms of brush and ink echo the rhythms of nature from which the brushwork is derived.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Cherney&rsquo;s photography presents China&rsquo;s sublime natural beauty, imbued with an evocative quality. His poetic vision and &ldquo;painterly&rdquo; style is inspired by the art of Chinese painting. Cherney&rsquo;s photographic excerpts are the first stage for Chang&rsquo;s composition. Whether they are crystalline structures of mountains, intriguing patterns of rock textures, or velvety masses of vegetation, the enlarged photo excerpts draw our attention to microscopic detail and arouse an awareness of the rhythms of nature.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Chang&rsquo;s keen interest is in the abstract art of Chinese literati painting and its associated brush-and-ink&nbsp;<em>(bimo)</em>techniques. His creative pursuit can be compared to the act of imitation&nbsp;<em>(fang)</em>&nbsp;practiced by the traditional Chinese artists, which depends upon mastery of the ancient methods.&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">The Chang-Cherney dialogue also ingeniously reveals the creative tensions between the different media and various kinds of visual and mental experiences. In this exhibition, direct experience is combined with the transforming power of memory and intuition. No matter whether the fusion is harmonious or dissonant, seamless or hard-edged, the viewer is invited to engage with the active interplay of time, space, medium, and concept.</p> Sat, 04 Jul 2015 16:40:47 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Events/list Ragnar Kjartansson - Cleveland Museum of Art - June 28th - August 16th <div class="panel-pane pane-node-content"> <div class="pane-content"> <div class="ds-1col node node-exhibition view-mode-full view-mode-full clearfix "> <div class="field field-name-events-info-and-links field-type-ds field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"> <div class="field field-name-field-event field-type-field-collection field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"> <div class="entity entity-field-collection-item field-collection-item-field-event clearfix"> <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-field-event-description field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"> <p style="text-align: center;">The weight of the world&nbsp;<br />is love. . . .&nbsp;<br />No rest&nbsp;<br />without love,&nbsp;<br />no sleep&nbsp;<br />without dreams&nbsp;<br />of love&mdash;&nbsp;<br />Allen Ginsberg, "Song," 1954</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">In March 2011, Ragnar Kjartansson&rsquo;s three nieces&mdash;Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsd&oacute;ttir, Rakel Mj&ouml;ll Leifsd&oacute;ttir, and &Iacute;ris Mar&iacute;a Leifsd&oacute;ttir&mdash;began singing a gentle folk song in the Carnegie Museum of Art&rsquo;s Hall of Sculpture; they repeated the elegiac refrain for six hours. The performance was documented by a single camera that rotated around the three youthful singers. Kjartansson has stated that he was inspired by the sculptures and trappings of the Carnegie&rsquo;s Hall of Sculpture, commissioned around 1900 by Andrew Carnegie, one of the wealthiest steel tycoons and philanthropists of 19th-century America. As a response to this unusual setting, the artist cast his nieces as classical muses in this grand hall wrought by the industrial revolution. In the artist&rsquo;s words:</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&ldquo;I was strumming my guitar in a hammock in a hippie commune in Nikiasalka, Poland. It was an old mansion, surrounded by forest and endless Polish fields. Children running around naked and artists building sculptures in trees and letting balloons go into thin air. . . . As I lay in the hammock I tried to remember that poem 'Song' by Allen Ginsberg and strummed E major and A major: 'The Weight of The World is Love.' Then I remembered something of sleep and dreams. Strumming, falling asleep, strumming, falling asleep. Then slowly this song emerged based on what was left of the poem in my memory. . . . Then I was invited to do a show at the Carnegie. I saw those Gilded Age, industrialist halls of marble, those idle sculptures looking down at you. I remembered that song and I thought of my nieces. They should play it here. A bed-in at the Hall of Sculpture.&rdquo;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">The endless repetition of the lyrics, set to melancholic strumming on an acoustic guitar, resonates with the historic space of the Carnegie&rsquo;s Hall of Sculpture. The ever-repeating chorus&mdash;a slightly misremembered phrase from Allen Ginsberg&rsquo;s poem "Song"&mdash;and the three girls sitting on a plinth covered with royal blue satin transform the marbled hall into a conflated space wherein different ages and various participants are in dialogue: Ginsberg&rsquo;s poem and its romantic declaration that accumulates the cathartic force of a prayer through repetition; the neoclassical plaster casts of the ancient sculptures looking down at the scenery as if watching an otherworldly spectacle; and the three nieces passively embodying both classical and contemporary ideals of beauty as if in a trance. Yet here, in the installation at the Cleveland Museum of Art where the gallery walls are draped in same the blue satin featured in the video, the viewer is spatially connected to Kjartansson&rsquo;s resounding orchestration.</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="pane-event-sponsor-block" class="panel-pane pane-entity-field pane-node-field-event pane-sponsor-block"> <div class="pane-content"> <div class="field field-name-field-event field-type-field-collection field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"> <div class="entity entity-field-collection-item field-collection-item-field-event clearfix"> <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-field-sponsor-block field-type-entityreference field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"> <div class="ds-1col node node-sponsor-block view-mode-full view-mode-full clearfix "> <div class="field field-name-field-text field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"> <p style="text-align: justify;">Media Sponsor:</p> <p><a href="http://www.clevelandmagazine.com/ME2/Default.asp" target="_blank"><img class="media-element file-media-original" title="Cleveland Magazine" src="http://www.clevelandart.org/sites/default/files/clevelandmagazine_1.jpg" alt="Cleveland Magazine" width="171" height="57" /></a></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <p>&nbsp;</p> Sat, 04 Jul 2015 16:37:01 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Events/list Group Show - Cleveland Museum of Art - March 22nd - July 26th <p style="text-align: justify;">A selection of prints from the past 25 years, this exhibition showcases the printmaking techniques of a variety of contemporary artists. While some, including Julia Wachtel and Annette Lemieux, use printmaking to comment on contemporary political events, others, such as Lesley Dill and Louise Bourgeois, use the medium to express personal, feminist concerns. Traditional landscape themes interest Ellsworth Kelly and Rosemarie Trockel while Lucian Freud and Chuck Close prefer figurative subjects. Abstraction also remains important, exemplified by such artists as Terry Winters, Richard Serra, and Julie Mehretu.</p> Sat, 04 Jul 2015 16:35:08 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Events/list - Cleveland Museum of Art - June 9th - September 13th <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>Hostage: The Bachar Tapes (English version)</em>&nbsp;is a video work in the form of an experimental documentary by Lebanese artist Walid Raad. The video focuses on the Lebanon hostage crisis&mdash;the systematic kidnapping of 96 people, mostly Americans and western Europeans, which took place in Lebanon between 1982 and 1992.&nbsp;<em>Hostage: The Bachar Tapes</em>&nbsp;uses this subject to explore notions of fact, fiction, and how the two are so easily and often interwoven.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">In the 1980s and early &rsquo;90s five American men were held captive in Lebanon: Terry Anderson, David Jacobsen, Lawrence Jenco, Thomas Sutherland, and Benjamin Weir. After being freed from their traumatizing captivity, each man published a book describing the brutality they endured. In each testimony, an unnamed Arab man was mentioned as being detained among them.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">In&nbsp;<em>Hostage: The Bachar Tapes,</em>&nbsp;we witness two videotapes in which the Arab detainee is personified by Souheil Bachar. Bachar is portrayed by the well-known Lebanese actor Fadi Abi Samra. In the tapes, Bachar addresses the cultural, textual, and sexual aspects of his detention with the Americans. In offering Bachar&rsquo;s &ldquo;testimony,&rdquo; the work questions who has the right to shape historical narratives such as this one. Raad has described his complex artwork as &ldquo;factual fictions,&rdquo; by which &ldquo;documents, characters, and stories operate between the false binary of fiction and nonfiction.&rdquo;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Screenings of&nbsp;<em>Hostage: The Bachar Tapes&nbsp;</em>will begin every half-hour.</p> Sat, 04 Jul 2015 16:34:11 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Events/list Rebecca Norris Webb - Cleveland Museum of Art - May 17th - August 16th <div class="panel-pane pane-node-content"> <div class="pane-content"> <div class="ds-1col node node-exhibition view-mode-full view-mode-full clearfix "> <div class="field field-name-events-info-and-links field-type-ds field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"> <div class="field field-name-field-event field-type-field-collection field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"> <div class="entity entity-field-collection-item field-collection-item-field-event clearfix"> <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-field-event-description field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"> <p style="text-align: justify;">&ldquo;They say your first death is like your first love&mdash;and you&rsquo;re never quite the same afterwards,&rdquo; says Rebecca Norris Webb. The artist, who has long lived in New York City, embarked in 2005 to photograph her home state of South Dakota. After one of her brothers unexpectedly died the following year, her images began to change. Tones became more muted and delicate, the palette more autumnal. Descriptive views ceded to lyrical, enigmatic visions of a present imbued with the past. The series evolved into an elegy for her brother. &ldquo;For months,&rdquo; wrote the artist, &ldquo;one of the few things that eased my unsettled heart was the landscape of South Dakota.&rdquo;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Norris Webb describes the state as &ldquo;dominated by space and silence and solitude, by brutal wind and extreme weather.&rdquo; Her initial goal was to &ldquo;capture what all that space feels like to someone who grew up there&rdquo; and produce &ldquo;a more intimate and personal view of the West&rdquo; that would counteract and complement the majestic landscape views and roughneck adventure scenes of earlier photographers and painters. Her color photographs of fields, farms, town life, and wildlife grapple with humans&rsquo; impact on the land and how it has shaped their lives. They also form a eulogy for disappearing family farms and the small towns supported by them.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">On view will be about thirty color photographs and a poem written by the artist; she is a poet of place whose five books include&nbsp;<em>My Dakota</em>&nbsp;in addition to projects on zoos, Cuba, and Rochester, New York.&nbsp;<em>My Dakota</em>captures not just the state&rsquo;s changing economy and landscape but also a personal catharsis. Norris Webb came to understand the series as a means of addressing her grief&mdash;&ldquo;to try to absorb it, to distill it, and, ultimately, to let it go.&rdquo;</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="pane-event-sponsor-block" class="panel-pane pane-entity-field pane-node-field-event pane-sponsor-block"> <div class="pane-content"> <div class="field field-name-field-event field-type-field-collection field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"> <div class="entity entity-field-collection-item field-collection-item-field-event clearfix"> <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-field-sponsor-block field-type-entityreference field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"> <div class="ds-1col node node-sponsor-block view-mode-full view-mode-full clearfix "> <div class="field field-name-field-text field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"> <p style="text-align: justify;">This exhibition is made possible in part by a gift from Donald F. and Anne T. Palmer.</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> Sat, 04 Jul 2015 16:29:31 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Events/list Robert Rauschenberg, Rachel Harrison - Cleveland Museum of Art - July 1st - October 25th <p style="text-align: justify;">Robert Rauschenberg (1925&ndash;2008) is considered one of the most influential American artists of the 20th century. His nuanced approach to the popular culture that surrounded him and the history of art that preceded him made his voice unique. But does his inclusion in the canon of art history prevent us (viewers firmly rooted in contemporary ways of looking) from seeing his artwork as the incisive commentary that it remains?</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Taking its name from&nbsp;<em>Gloria</em>&nbsp;(1956), an iconic work by Rauschenberg in the collection of the Cleveland Museum of Art, this exhibition explores the interests and actions of Rauschenberg in the 1950s through a younger set of eyes, those of internationally acclaimed artist Rachel Harrison (b. 1966), who has become known for her original approach to art-making that simultaneously addresses and analyzes the conventions of art and mass culture.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">An amalgam of artistic innovation, pop culture trivia, wry humor, and sharp critique,&nbsp;<em>Gloria: Robert Rauschenberg &amp; Rachel Harrison</em>&nbsp;juxtaposes these two unconventional thinkers, featuring landmark Combine works and photographs by Rauschenberg alongside a grouping of pivotal sculptures and drawings by Harrison.</p> Sat, 04 Jul 2015 16:25:00 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Events/list Bill Viola, William Kentridge, Marco Brambilla, Mat Collishaw, Jacco Olivier, Ger Van Elk, Marina Alexeeva, Elisa Sighicelli, Marzia Migliora - Museu Nacional d'Art de Catalunya - May 28th - August 30th <p style="text-align: justify;">Even though painting and moving image art do not represent space and time in the same way, in a significant part of the video production process, that has occurred from the origins of this medium until the present, emerges the 'pictorial unconscious' that becomes the principal&nbsp;<em>leimotif</em><em>&nbsp;</em>of this exhibition.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Illumination, color, composition, iconography or staging inform us of a shared vocabulary between both mediums that are extremely interrelated in the works of current video artists in the&nbsp;<strong>Sorigu&eacute; Collection</strong>, such as&nbsp;<strong>Bill Viola, William Kentridge, Marco Brambilla, Mat Collishaw</strong>,&nbsp;<strong>Jacco Olivier</strong>,&nbsp;<strong>Ger Van Elk</strong>,<strong>Marina Alexeeva</strong>&nbsp;or&nbsp;<strong>Elisa Sighicelli &amp; Marzia Migliora,</strong>whose video creations establish a retroactive dialogue with some of the most esteemed works in the collections of the&nbsp;<strong>Museu Nacional d&rsquo;Art de Catalunya</strong>.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">The film director Eric Rohmer put it very bluntly:<strong>&nbsp;</strong><strong>&ldquo;All organization of forms in the interior of a flat surface stems from prictorial art"</strong><strong>&nbsp;</strong>and Nam June Paik, one of the pioneers of video art, expressed it in a comparable way:&nbsp;<strong>&ldquo;In the same way that a collage has substituted oil painting, the cathode ray tube will replace the canvas".</strong></p> <p style="text-align: justify;">In&nbsp;<strong>The pictorial unconscious</strong>, the video creations establish a retroactive dialogue with some of the most esteemed works in the collection of the&nbsp;<strong>Museu Nacional d&rsquo;Art de Catalunya.</strong></p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">En el marco del Festival Loop 2015, se establece&nbsp;<strong>Un di&aacute;logo entre la colecci&oacute;n de videoarte de la Fundaci&oacute;n Sorigu&eacute; y la colecci&oacute;n del Museu Nacional d&rsquo;Art de Catalunya.</strong></p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Aunque la imagen en movimiento y la pintura no representan el espacio y el tiempo de la misma manera, en una parte significativa de la producci&oacute;n videogr&aacute;fica realizada desde los or&iacute;genes de este soporte hasta la actualidad aflora una suerte de&nbsp;<strong>&ldquo;inconsciente pict&oacute;rico&rdquo;</strong>&nbsp;que se convierte en principal<em>leitmotiv</em>&nbsp;de esta exposici&oacute;n.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Iluminaci&oacute;n, color, composici&oacute;n, iconograf&iacute;a o puesta en escena, nos informan de un vocabulario compartido entre la pintura y el videoarte, que alcanza grados de conexi&oacute;n sorprendentes en el trabajo de algunos vide-artistas presentes en la&nbsp;<strong>Colecci&oacute;n Sorigu&eacute;</strong>, como&nbsp;<strong>Bill Viola, William Kentridge, Marco Brambilla, Mat Collishaw</strong>,&nbsp;<strong>Jacco Olivier</strong>,&nbsp;<strong>Ger Van Elk</strong>,<strong>Marina Alexeeva</strong>&nbsp;o&nbsp;<strong>Elisa Sighicelli &amp; Marzia Migliora</strong>, cuyas videocreaciones establecen un di&aacute;logo retroactivo con algunas de las obras m&aacute;s destacadas de la colecci&oacute;n del&nbsp;<strong>Museu Nacional d&rsquo;Art de Catalunya</strong>.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">El director de cine Eric Rohmer lo planteaba de forma tajante:<strong>&ldquo;Toda organizaci&oacute;n de formas en el interior de una superficie plana, deriva del arte pict&oacute;rico&rdquo;</strong><strong>&nbsp;</strong>y Nam June Paik, uno de los pioneros del videoarte, lo expres&oacute; hace ya m&aacute;s de 40 a&ntilde;os &nbsp;de forma equivalente:&nbsp;<strong>&ldquo;De la misma manera que el collage ha sustituido a la pintura al &oacute;leo, el tubo de rayos cat&oacute;dicos sustituir&aacute; al lienzo.&rdquo;</strong></p> <p style="text-align: justify;">En un sentido an&aacute;logo, el cr&iacute;tico y cineasta Jacques Aumont insist&iacute;a a&ntilde;os despu&eacute;s en que&nbsp;<strong>&ldquo;la historia del cine, por lo menos desde que se convirti&oacute; en apto para ser pensado como arte (&hellip;) no tiene sentido si se separa de la historia de la pintura&rdquo;.</strong></p> <p style="text-align: justify;">En algunos trabajos de los artistas presentes en esta exposici&oacute;n el movimiento f&iacute;lmico est&aacute; retenido, o m&aacute;s bien &ldquo;suspendido&rdquo; por una suerte de &ldquo;temporalidad pict&oacute;rica&rdquo;, de manera que sus im&aacute;genes se construyen como si se tratara de cuadros aut&oacute;nomos, mediante largos planos fijos en los que los movimientos de las figuras se producen de un modo tan ralentizado, que a veces resulta casi imperceptible, por lo que podr&iacute;amos hablar de&nbsp;<em><strong>tableaux vivants</strong></em>&nbsp;en la misma medida en que otros citan composiciones, motivos iconogr&aacute;ficos y puestas en escena que derivan de la pintura mural medieval, renacentista o decimon&oacute;nica. Hablamos pues, de una historia de paradojas ya que los nuevos monitores LCD y las pantallas de plasma extraplanas est&aacute;n abriendo todo un nuevo abanico de posibilidades a quienes intentan "reinventar" la idea de "cuadro" como "pintura en movimiento", para unos, o como "video objeto", para otros, aunque con ello regresen nada menos que a los tiempos del "cuadro transportable", tal y como se entend&iacute;a a finales de la edad media.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Se plantea, de este modo, una reflexi&oacute;n sobre las relaciones entre los dispositivos electr&oacute;nicos de registro y edici&oacute;n de im&aacute;genes y los procesos de creaci&oacute;n en pintura, que revelan mecanismos tales como la diferencia entre &ldquo;tiempo de la historia&rdquo; y &ldquo;tiempo del relato&rdquo; que en estas piezas se equiparan, forzando al espectador al placer -<em>ya</em><em>&nbsp;</em>casi olvidado- de la contemplaci&oacute;n. &Eacute;sto no impide que en todas y cada una de estas obras tambi&eacute;n se deslicen contenidos cr&iacute;ticos de orden pol&iacute;tico, social o cultural, plenamente imbricados en la contemporaneidad.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Habr&iacute;a que dar la raz&oacute;n, en consecuencia, a quienes se&ntilde;alan que hoy las artes visuales se han convertido en el lugar com&uacute;n de una &ldquo;<strong>pictorialidad difusa&rdquo;</strong><strong>&nbsp;</strong>en la que ya nada es exactamente fotograf&iacute;a, ni exactamente pintura, ni exactamente v&iacute;deo, sino simplemente &ldquo;imagen&rdquo;, y es de hecho, ese valor polis&eacute;mico y deconstructivo de las im&aacute;genes el que ha servido en los &uacute;ltimos a&ntilde;os para la reformulaci&oacute;n de los g&eacute;neros pict&oacute;ricos tradicionales, as&iacute; como para sedimentar las distintas estrategias de hibridaci&oacute;n caracter&iacute;sticas de la producci&oacute;n art&iacute;stica actual. En este sentido, esta exposici&oacute;n no debe ser vista como un s&iacute;ntoma de retorno a las fuentes de la historia del arte, como a la era de la circulaci&oacute;n promiscua de la imagen, aquella que sabe que s&oacute;lo puede ser ya &ldquo;imagen de otra imagen&rdquo;.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> Tue, 30 Jun 2015 16:11:59 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Events/list Reinhold Engberding - Conduit Gallery - June 27th - August 1st <p>Hamburg based sculptor Reinhold Engberding&rsquo;s work addresses the topics of identity, intimacy, privacy, longing and desire. During a recent Artist Residency at CentralTrak with the University of Texas Dallas, Engberding covered the large exhibition space with images of young men, questioning whether they could possibly be his sons. In the installation,&nbsp;<em>Is That My Son</em>, Engberding used images gathered from an online archive of police mug shots.</p> <div id="exhib_info" class="container_24"> <div class="grid_8"> <p>For his Conduit exhibition, Engberding channeled memories of his own experience as an altar boy after having been given Dallas high school band uniforms. The uniforms reminded the artist of liturgical garments which led to a process of de-constructing and flatly re-constructing several uniforms into constellations of pattern and ambiguous form. Along with exposed stitching, the garments are embroidered with words from a poem composed by poet and frequent collaborator, Holger B. Nidden-Grien, a fictional character created by the artist in 1996.</p> <p>Reinhold Engberding studied landscape architecture and Fine Arts in Kassel, Kiel and The Hague. He has lived in Hamburg, Germany since 1982.</p> <div>&nbsp;</div> </div> </div> Mon, 29 Jun 2015 03:31:05 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Events/list Wally Cardona - Kelowna Art Gallery - July 4th - September 20th Mon, 29 Jun 2015 03:26:36 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ew/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ew/Events/list