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Special Edition: Venice Biennale #4
by ArtSlant Team


A few remarks around the stones of Venice

The Biennale collateral events, with Federico Florian


[Venice is] a ghost upon the sands of the sea, so weak – so quiet, – so bereft of all but her loveliness, that we might well doubt, as we watched her faint reflection in the mirage of the lagoon, which was the City and which the Shadow.

This is the description of Venice that the British writer and art historian John Ruskin gives in the incipit of his famous three-volume The Stones of Venice, published in London from 1851 to 1853. In the following lines, the author expresses the real reason of a treatise about Venetian art and architecture: I would endeavour to trace the lines of this image [the fading, feeble reflection of the city on the sea] before it be for ever lost, and to record, as far as I may, the warning which seems to me to be uttered by every one of the fast-gaining waves, that beat, like passing bells, against the STONES OF VENICE. The purpose of the book, therefore, is a warning, an alert… but against what? Mr. Ruskin (an eccentric bearded Victorian gentleman) seems to condemn the aesthetic decadence and the moral corruption of the Italian city, a process started in the XV century with the Renaissance, which provoked a decline rather than a rebirth, giving rise to an art degenerated into formalism and devoid of the righteous truth of the Gothic style.

Of course we do not agree with this radical point of view. However, I can’t help but reflect – once again – on the double-sided nature of the city of Venice, as it is revealed by Ruskin’s words: ghostly and real, faint and mighty at the same time. But Venice is a town made of rocks, rather than of phantom ruins; the stones of its churches, palaces and buildings tell the story of the city. Even Ruskin’s warning – premise for a Gothic revival in art – comes from the walls and the domes of Venetian architecture. That’s why I would like to mark the best collateral events and exhibitions in Venice during this Biennale starting from the palaces and buildings that host them – the STONES to which John Ruskin devoted his passionate, zealous essay...

...Read more...

 

Loris
 Gréaud, 
Does
 the 
angle
 between
 two
 walls 
have
 a 
happy 
ending?, 
Installation 
view 
at
 Punta 
della
 Dogana, 2013,
 Mixed
 media;
 Loris
 Gréaud,
 GREAUDSTUDIO 
/
 Courtesy
 Galerie
 Yvon 
Lambert
 (Paris),
 The
 Pace
 Gallery
 (New 
York)
,
 photo: 
© 
Palazzo 
Grassi,
 ORCH 
orsenigo_chemollo. Image on top: Installation view of “When Attitudes Become Form: Bern 1969/Venice 2013” From left to right: Richard Long, A Walking Tour in the Berner Oberland, 1969; Claes Oldenburg, Model (Ghost) Medicine Cabinet, 1966; Richard Artschwager, Blp, 1968; Claes Oldenburg, Study for Pants Pocket, 1963; Joseph Beuys, Ja Ja Ja Ja Ja Nee Nee Nee Nee Nee, 1968; Fondazione Prada, Ca’ Corner della Regina Venice, 1 June – 3 November 2013 / Photo: Attilio Maranzano / Courtesy: Fondazione Prada.

  



 

Federico Florian: KLAT magazine - Special Venice Biennale

Biennale Arte 2013 Diario #01
Biennale Arte 2013 Diario #02. Arsenale
Biennale Arte 2013 Diario #03. Giardini
Biennale Arte 2013 Diario #04. Padiglione Italia
Biennale Arte 2013 Diario #05. Francia
Biennale Arte 2013 Diario #06. Libano
Biennale Arte 2013 Diario #07. Gran Bretagne
Biennale Arte 2013 Diario #08. Olanda

Biennale Arte 2013 Diario #09. Irlanda

Vernissage TV at the Venice Biennale

[VIDEO] Mark Manders, Room with Broken Sentence, Dutch Pavilion
[VIDEO] Jeremy Deller, English Magic, British Pavilion
[VIDEO] Valentin Carron, Swiss Pavilion
[VIDEO] Ai Weiwei, Bang, German Pavilion
[VIDEO] Alfredo Jaar, Venezia, Venezia, Chilean Pavilion
[VIDEO] Lara Almarcegui, Spanish Pavilion

[VIDEO] Sarah Sze, Triple Point, US Pavilion

[VIDEO] Berlinde de Bruyckere, Kreupelhout - Cripplewood, Belgian Pavilion

Special Edition: Venice Biennale #3

The national pavilions, Part II: Politics vs. Imagination

Special Edition: Venice Biennale #2

The national pavilions. An artistic dérive from the material to the immaterial

Special Edition: Venice Biennale #1

Notes on 'the Encyclopedic Palace'. A Venetian Tour Through the Biennale

Frances Guerin on the mystery of Venice

The End of the Line,
The Last Days in Venice


   
 
    


Posted by ArtSlant Team on 8/3/13

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