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BLOGS FROM ARTSLANT'S OWN

ROMANOVA SVETLANA-ART  
by
3/31/20 Posted 3/5/09

         Hello frends! I am an artist. My roots take place in St.Petersburg, which has great architecture, culture and history that influenced me once and forever. Today, in the times of technical progress, mass production and new artificial materials I search for inspiration in the foundation of the Arts - old Russian Orthodox icons, Renaissance and folk cultures. I seek out look for new shapes and images within my themes using different materials, but my favorite is glass for its plasticity and abi... [more]

STAINED-GLASS WINDOWS  
by
3/5/19 Posted 3/5/09

http://svetlana-romano.livejournal.com/ http://svetlana-romano.livejournal.com/ http://svetlana-romano.livejournal.com/ [more]

Hiroshi Senju at Sydney Contemporary 2013  
by
3/29/15 Posted 3/29/15

Presented by Whitestone Gallery (Tokyo) Hiroshi Senju is at the forefront of contemporary approaches to traditional Japanese-style painting, or nihonga. Living and working between New York and Japan since the 1980s, the Tokyo- born artist is recognised internationally for his serialised paintings of waterfalls, presenting a unique vision of his repeated subject. Whitestone Gallery (Tokyo) brings three of these visually mesmerising works to Sydney Contemporary 2013. Senju follows the nihonga techni... [more]

宋美龄的中华传统文人生活及与故宫文物的牵连  
by
3/29/15 Posted 3/29/15

宋美龄的中华传统文人生活及与故宫文物的牵连 在宋美龄生日时举办故宫展览似乎成为了每年的惯例。1978年,故宫展出了宋美龄创作的14幅山水画、12幅兰竹画、11幅花鸟画。当时的报道也是不吝奉承之辞:“蒋夫人的山水画构图虽不繁杂,但能给观者带来安定感。”% U7 T8 H, X/ e- |' W& Y2000年1月,在当地华人报纸《世界日报》的主办下,宋美龄在纽约布鲁克林举办了人生中最后一场“蒋夫人展览会”。据说,参观者达到了1.3万人。宋美龄本人也坐着轮椅出现在了现场,与来访者进行交谈。+ D( S& \( k4 ~展览中,一幅描绘着绽放的睡莲花的水墨画受到了众人的瞩目。画名为《荷花花间君子》,上面留有她的终生伴侣—蒋介石的题字:“风清时觉香来远,坐对浑忘暑气侵。”( f3 G3 D* y8 e% c* |从这幅画中可以看出,夫妻二人在用心经营着一种中华传统的文人生活。画卷与诗句本身或许并未达到极高的境界,但两人在中华的历史当中,也许是扮演... [more]

世界名画后鲜为人知的故事  
by
3/29/15 Posted 3/29/15

世界名画后鲜为人知的故事 《蒙娜丽莎》文艺复兴时期画家列奥纳多·达·芬奇的《蒙娜丽莎》令全球无数人着迷,至今仍有许多人揣测画中女子的身份。有研究学者认为,画中人是一个名叫Lisa Gherardini的富家女。女孩的爸爸和达·芬奇的爸爸是好朋友,达·芬奇很可能是受父亲之命绘制了这幅肖像。 《最后的晚餐》在达·芬奇最初创作的《最后的晚餐》里,耶稣在桌子下的脚是可以看见的。但是1652年,建筑工人在修建一个通道的时候不小心把壁画下方挖掉了一块,这幅达芬奇的巨作才变成了今天这个样子。 《星夜》梵高的代表作《星夜》描绘的是法国南部的一个小镇圣雷米的夜景。事实上,创作这幅作品的时候,梵高正在这个镇上的一座精神病院里接受治疗。 《戴珍珠耳环的少女》关于维梅尔这幅著名肖像画的画中人究竟是谁,一直众说纷纭。有研究学者猜测,画中这位戴珍珠耳环的少女正是画家的女儿——玛利亚。 《美国哥特式》当格兰特·伍德准备创作这幅作品时,他原本打算让他的母亲担任画中女性角色的模特,但是他又担... [more]

Coverage of Art Central Hong Kong from Australia's ABC  
by
3/29/15 Posted 3/29/15

http://iview.abc.net.au/programs/mix/NU1596H006S00 [more]

美国如何保护艺术品版权  
by
3/29/15 Posted 3/29/15

美国如何保护艺术品版权 美国在艺术市场较为成熟的,艺术品著作权法已经深入到影视制作、媒体应用等诸多方面,并有较为完善的机构,如艺术家版权协会等,较好地帮 助艺术家维护自身著作权益,并对艺术品的授权使用加以监督,维护了文化产业的合法、合理发展,通过影视作品中的艺术品版权问题及近期较为热点的“谷歌艺术 计划”,可以看出美国对艺术品著作权的严格保护。随着社会文化的发展,艺术品图像的使用已经渗透到生活的方方面面,艺术品图像版权已经成为日益严峻的问题。在艺术品创造巨大商业价值的同时,艺术家在展览、出版、收藏、流转、使用等各个层面被侵权的事件却无法及时解决,这在一定程度上阻碍了文化产业的良性发展。 影视作品是艺术品版权“重地”。3D版《泰坦尼克号》亮相国内院线,该片导演詹姆斯·卡梅隆用高科技手段重新制作了1997年颇受赞誉的影片《泰坦尼克号》,如果细心观察,会发现3D版影片中,某场景里出现的名画已经由毕加索的《亚维农的少女》变成了德加的作品。这其中的原因,便是艺术品版权问题。在1997年的《泰坦尼克号》中,毕加索的名作《亚维农... [more]

FINDING MAGDA  
by
3/28/15 Posted 3/28/15

Shireen Sabavala looks at a portrait of her late husband, artist Jehangir Sabavala painted by Magda Nachman in 1942 How US professor Dr Lina Bernstein's three-year research on little-known Russian artist Magda Nachman, led her into drawing rooms of Mumbai's elite. In 2011, when a colleague researching Russian poet Marina Tsvetaeva, casually inquired about Russian artist Magda Nachman, Dr Lina Bernstein had little to say. However, three years later, the professor of comparative literature at Franklin & Marshall College found herself travelling more than 7,000 miles to Mumbai in search of the artist's story. Bernstein was intrigued by the legacy of Nachman, who painted a famous portrait of Tsvetaeva and another of Vladimir Nabokov, author of Lolita. "Yet, almost nothing was known about her aside from her association with a circle of writers and artists around Tsvetaeva," says the 64-year-old on her first visit to the city last week. "My colleague, through the course of her research, had discovered some letters from Magda to friends within this circle." It's this correspondence that led Bernstein on a journey from America to Russia, Germany, and finally to India, where she arrived in January this year. In the six weeks that Bernstein spent in Mumbai, Pune, and Baroda, she discovered 13 original portraits by Nachman, and their owners. "At the Asiatic Society of Bombay, I found old newspapers and journals with articles on Magda and her time. Homi Bhabha's archive at the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research offered more insights into her life and the history of art in Bombay," she says. This material, says Bernstein, will prove crucial in her quest to reconstruct Nachman's biography that we hear will culminate in an exhibition at the Chhatrapati Shivaji Vastu Sanghralaya (CSMVS), next year. Journey to Bombay Born in 1889 in St Petersburg, Nachman studied art under famous Russian artist Leon Bakst. But like most people of her generation, her life was driven around the world by the cataclysmic events of the 20th century — the Revolution of 1905, World War I, the Russian Revolution of 1917, and the Civil War. "In the letters I read, she complained about not finding kerosene, paint or brushes to work with. She used pencil and charcoal to create portraits in exchange for food," says Bernstein. In 1921, Nachman met MPT Acharya in Moscow. The Indian nationalist, who was one of the founders of the Communist Party of India, fled Chennai for London after threat of persecution by the British government. "He was part of an Indo-German conspiracy. But Germany lost the war, and the delegation moved to Moscow to convince the Bolsheviks to join them in the fight against the British," says Bernstein. Nachman and he married in 1922 and left for Germany. A little more than a decade later, Adolf Hitler was in power, and the South Indian revolutionary, along with his half-Jewish wife had to flee to Switzerland. "Magda left her paintings behind," points out Bernstein. "Almost all her work from those years has vanished. They visited Paris next, to say their goodbyes to Madam Cama (who Acharya worked with) before they sailed to Bombay in 1935." Artist to the elite The city became Nachman's home, a place where she lived, worked, made friends, and died in 1951. "Whatever art Magda created during that period, it's likely to be in Bombay," says Bernstein of the woman who became the go-to portrait artist among the elite. One of her portraits is of late artist Jehangir Sabavala, which still hangs at his Altamount Road home. As his wife Shireen fondly looks at the oil-on-board painted in 1942, she says it was the norm for families to get their portraits done, "usually by foreigners". She recalls sitting hours before Nachman for her own portrait, too. "Magda went on and on, I was bored and didn't care much about it," she smiles. "I was 18 and remember wearing a red sari with a sleeveless blouse. I was slightly plump, and she said I have the eyes of a cow. I thought that was a bit harsh." Aside from painting Dinsha Paday, Rati Petit, and Shanta Rao, Nachman showed her work at the Bombay Art Society exhibitions. She lived and worked at a house opposite artist K H Ara's Walkeshwar studio, in House No. 63. Artist Akbar Padamsee told Bernstein about a visit to Ara's studio. "All of a sudden, Akbar tells me, an angry Russian lady, whom he described as 'shortish, fattish and not beautiful' barged into the studio shouting, 'They rejected me, who are they to reject me? They don't know anything about art'." Nachman's rage was sparked by the news that she wasn't allowed to participate in an Indian art exhibition organised in 1948 in London. "She was rejected because she was considered not sufficiently Indian," smiles Bernstein. Original link: http://www.mumbaimirror.com/others/sunday-read/Finding-Magda/articleshow/32095748.cms?prtpage=1 ... [more]

ART IN PROTEST  
by
3/28/15 Posted 3/28/15

From top: Guggenheim Abu Dhabi will be 12 times the size of the original NY outpost; Artist Ashok Sukumaran (at the centre) presenting at last week’s panel discussion; Workers on a bus to get to their shift Artists from Mumbai join a global creative boycott to fight migrant labour exploitation in the making of the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi - the mother of all museums. In many senses, the invitation to Gulf Labor - an artist advocacy group that is leading a boycott of Guggenheim Abu Dhabi - by the much-feted Venice Biennale, to participate in its 56th iteration, can be perceived as sending out a strong message to the art world at large. Gulf Labor has been striving to highlight the coercive recruitment and deplorable living and working conditions of migrant labour - a majority of them are from India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Nepal and Sri Lanka - in Abu Dhabi's Saadiyat Island (Island of Happiness). Saadiyat was launched in 2009 by Abu Dhabi's government as a luxury property development project where buyers could live in villas that would allow them to access world-class museums and education. A satellite campus of New York University has been operational since last year, and outposts of the Louvre, the Sheikh Zayed Museum (in partnership with the British Museum) and Guggenheim are in various stages of construction. Guggenheim Abu Dhabi, estimated to cost, according to previous news reports, $800 million to build, will span 4,50,000 square feet (nearly 12 times the size of the NY landmark), in a design created by 'starchitect' Frank Gehry and overseen by the Tourism Development & Investment Company. Mumbai artists Shaina Anand and Ashok Sukumaran were among the signatories to back a petition urging Guggenheim to improve living standards of migrant labourers, which had been documented in a Human Rights Watch report. Among other signatories to the petition are Mariam Ghani, Walid Raad, Andrew Ross, Hans Haacke, Naeem Mohaiemen, and Tania Bruguera. In 2011, sensing a lack of commitment from the museum, artists decided to collectively boycott the leading contemporary art museum. Gulf Labor currently has over 1,800 signatories and is led by a 35-person central organising committee. The issue came home last week, when Anand and Sukumaran of CAMP, Kadambari Baxi of Who Builds Your Architecture (WBYA), Rajeev Thakker of the open space for experimental design and research, Studio X, Sharit Bhowmik, who is national fellow of the Indian Council of Social Science Research (ICSSR), Rupali Gupte and Prasad Shetty of Collective Research Initiatives Trust (CRIT) met to discuss conditions of labour in architecture including in India and the UAE, while also addressing the problems at Saadiyat. NYU Abu Dhabi's assistant professor of theatre, Debra Levine, along with 10 students - belonging to various disciplines ranging from visual art to theatre and political science - pursuing the art, performance and social practice class at the University, were also invited to attend the panel discussion and presentation, as part of an art workshop in Mumbai. With the Guggenheim museum hoping its permanent collection will celebrate international art from the 1960s to present day - a period that reflects the world from the point of the UAE achieving nationhood - Sukumaran thinks "it's a perfect opportunity to build their multi-billion-dollar project right; use their resources justly without defaulting to a status quo of exploited labour". Andrew Ross, professor of social and cultural analysis and faculty member at NYU New York, specialising in labour issues, has been a critic of underpaid migrant labour in the UAE, writing columns on the exploitation of migrant workers building projects on Saadiyaat Island, including the NYU campus there. In an op-ed piece High Culture, Hard Labor, published in The New York Times in March 2014, he said, "Bound to an employer by the kafala sponsorship system, they (workers) arrive heavily indebted from recruitment and transit fees, only to find that their gulf dream has been a mirage. Typically, in the United Arab Emirates, the sponsoring employer takes their passports, houses the workers in substandard labour camps, pays much less than they were promised and enforces a punishing regimen under the desert sun." Last Saturday, Ross was barred from flying into the UAE. "But, what's different about my case," argues Ross over an email interview to Mirror, "is that I am an NYU professor, and since NYU has a campus there, we are supposed to enjoy protection of academic freedoms and safe passage into the UAE. They can't be in a position to decide which NYU professors they will admit and not. That is unsustainable. Could the same fate befall artists asked to participate at a museum show? Quite possibly." Parimal Sudhakar, senior project manager at the Society for Labour and Development, Delhi, defines this as a systematic problem. Most countries have a poor record of treating migrant labour, but in the Gulf states, close to 80 per cent residents are migrants with no rights. "Unfortunately, the host government, and the government of source countries have chosen to ignore the problem," he says. "Authorities in states that make up a large chunk of this labour force, including Bihar and Uttar Pradesh, often maintain no data on international migration of workers from their state." Cheated by sub-agents of recruitment firms and exploited by employers in destination countries, the workers are caught in a debt trap, making a return to home impossible. "According to the Emigration Act, 1983, a worker should be charged no more than Rs 20,000 for emigration procedure. But most end up paying over a lakh to sub-agents," says Sudhakar. Ross, who has spent a reasonable time during his scholarly research on low-wage labour, mostly in China, moved his attention to the Gulf region after NYU announced plans of a satellite campus in 2007. "My position was that the presence of the campus was an opportunity to leverage labour reforms," he explains. The average worker on Saadiyat Island makes a base (monthly) pay of only Rs 10,000 to Rs 13,000. Over time, this can go up to between Rs 15,000 and Rs 18,000. Basic math suggests that a 25 per cent increase in the wages of the 7,500 workers estimated to be involved in the Guggenheim's construction, amounts to about five million USD, "which, given the scale of an institution like the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi is nothing," insists Anand. Sudhakar takes the focus away from funds to the struggle for power. "There's plenty of money in Abu Dhabi. The issue concerns power. Elites from the Emirates crave a vast servant class, 24/7. This army of workers needs to be heavily indebted and exceptionally vulnerable, in order to work under the circumstances," he says. "The second reason for hesitating to make a change has to do with setting a precedent regarding migrant worker rights. The UAE doesn't want to be the first in the region to do it." Meanwhile, the Solomon R Guggenheim Foundation has distanced itself from the debate with the claim that Guggenheim Abu Dhabi "will be an independent museum owned by the government of Abu Dhabi which is in charge of and overseeing all aspects of construction. The Guggenheim's role will be to provide access to its global network of curatorial and educational resources." The TDIC is in charge of developing Saadiyat, building a 'model' worker village and drafting policies that sound noble but aren't necessarily enforced. Their claim to have built a beautiful workers' accommodation in Saadiyat - albeit five kilometres away in a far corner of the site - with a cricket field, billiards room and basketball court, is contested by Gulf Labor. Sukumaran says, "Saadiyat's village is a showcase but not a long term solution that benefits workers. Wages remain poor, and recruitment debt is rampant. Contractors have to rent these rooms, and the monthly rent here is higher than the average worker's pay." The collective has held negotiation meetings with both the Guggenheim Museum in New York and TDIC in Abu Dhabi. Turning into independent researchers, the artists provided TDIC and the Guggenheim with a report in March 2014 to support their theory, with statistics as well as site visits to labour camps for research. "A lot of malam-patti, and public relations efforts were carried out by them but the core issues remain unresolved. The museum needs to push harder for what they say they want. We do believe they have the leverage," she says. TDIC did not reply to Mirror's repeated requests for a response. The question, artists are then reiterating is; why isn't an exemplary museum built on exemplary standards? "If Guggenheim says they are lending their name and expertise to bringing global art and global educational standards to the UAE, why can't they bring basic global democratic principles? Why should that not be part of their ethos? " Anand asks. Original link: http://www.mumbaimirror.com/others/sunday-read/Art-in-protest/articleshow/46648168.cms ... [more]

The Canetti Reading Group - Script  
by
3/28/15 Posted 3/28/15

THE CANETTI READING GROUP By Adam Knight An essay in Elias Canetti's seminal work 'Crowds and Power' becomes the point of focus for a fictional reading group. Each character in the group inhabits six typologies of the crowd identified by Canetti. The work presented takes the form of a script; where moments of awareness and a strengthening relationship to the artwork reveal themselves. THE CANETTI READING GROUP Characters and classifications A – The Chair (the crystal c... [more]

Review from Patimat Guseynova Sharuhanova artist. Russia, Dagestan 21-3-2015  
by
3/28/15 Posted 3/28/15

This review is translate with google Is not the creator who is able to give life .... Acrylic painting on cnvas Size: 116 x 200 Year: 2013 Acrylic painting on cnvas Size: 60 x 80 Year: 2012 Strolling through the expanses of the Internet, I came across a magnificent Dutch expressionist Shefqet Avdush Emini. Later, I was fortunate to get to know him and work for international ART-symposia. Expression in color, line, and at the same time, a sense of proportion and harmony - it... [more]

Excerpts from book manuscript Studies in Enchantment  
by
3/27/15 Posted 3/27/15

On Everyday Enchantment Enchantment. A spell wrapped in a noun. Three syllables. One state of being. To live with Enchantment is to see beyond the brick and mortar that make up your home and into the magic infused within its frame. It is to peel back the layers of your day to day and search for that elusive energy that winds its way up your spine and outward into your life. To learn from Enchantment is to listen to Coyote's call when he plays his tricks. He is a messenger really—t... [more]

美国艺术场馆建设5年投入160亿美元,中国呢?  
by
3/27/15 Posted 3/27/15

美国艺术场馆建设5年投入160亿美元,中国呢? 近年来,美国境内一大批艺术机构纷纷新建、扩建其场馆建筑,从博物馆、演艺中心到乡村艺术俱乐部,盲目跟风的现象不在少数,另外,野心勃勃的信托商、自私的建筑师、不切实际的财务预算也对新建、扩建场馆起到了推波助澜的作用。据芝加哥大学文化政策研究中心最近一项调研报告显示,在2004年至2008年期间,各类艺术机构用于艺术场馆建设的资金高达约160亿美元。该报告针对全美500多家艺术机构的700多个艺术场馆建设项目进行调查后发现,这些场馆建设项目的经费从400万美元到3亿美元不等,费用排名前三的地区是纽约、洛杉矶、芝加哥。芝加哥艺术学院的投资项目是此次调研中经费最高的项目。调研报告指出,该学院投资3亿美元新建展馆,每年需要为展馆支出400万美元的运营费,为扩大募款规模,还将耗费870万美元用于募款基金的筹办和运营。巨额的建设和运营成本使得工程进展一直不顺利。2009年3月,展馆配楼建设完工时,参与此项目的工作人员人数一度达到顶峰。然而,由于该学院的财政预算无法满足高额的支出,随后不得不推出停工放假、拖欠工资、两轮裁员等资金削减政策。芝加哥大学文化政策研究中心的一名研究员提到,出现此类问题是因为这些机构分不清楚“想要”和“需要”的区别。很多项目建设的必要性和可行性受到报告专家组质疑:是否真的需要建设这个场馆?能否支付得起巨额的建设费用?庞大的后续运营开支如何解决?长期担任艺术管理顾问、该报告的顾问之一的杜肯·韦伯一针见血地指出:“应停止启动那些不具备资金可持续性的项目。” 报告同时指出,建筑师对泛滥的艺术场馆项目也难辞其咎,因为他们可以从中获利。他们会说:“项目是为你而建。”但其实,项目是为他们自己而建。每一个建成的场馆,都会成为建筑师个人事业成就的见证,可以拍照入册宣传并写入个人简历。此外,研究报告根据成功经验提出建议,供艺术机构、政府机构和赞助方参考。那些运营成功的艺术场馆往往具备以下特征:艺术定位清晰明确、监管严格、建设费用有节制、建成后有收入进账。目前,由于前车之鉴和经济衰退等原因,盲目新建场馆的趋势得到初步遏制,很多艺术机构开始倾向于改造已有的旧建筑。 在中国,从上个世纪90年代中期地产商介入美 术馆建设开始,诸多地产商投入到创办美术馆的大潮中来,其中不乏泰达、万达等地产巨头。在某种程度上,民营美术馆是伴随着地产行业的兴盛而逐渐兴起,并在 近几年形成一个新兴词汇“艺术地产”。据不完全统计,中国的民营美术馆中,有近七成为地产商出资。一场民营美术馆运动正在兴起,富有的地产企业及地产商本人成为这场运动背后最大的推手。不过伴随着兴盛,地产介入美术馆运动也充满争议。一个不争的事实是,迄今为止,在中国三线城市建造大型美术馆和艺术主题公园,几乎没有成功的先例,这些项目多是昙花一现,而借艺术... [more]

Chapter from Part I of a Novel  
by
3/27/15 Posted 3/27/15

What follows is the first chapter of a novel I've been working on for over several months. Many of my novel's chapters have been submitted to MFA fiction workshops at The New School in New York City. The story of my novel takes place nearly 75 years past our present time. The chapter below is about one of my main characters, a painter from post apocalyptic Paris in the year 2101. It is important to note that this character lives in an asylum, which is located in the country of Aurora (post apo... [more]

nikkitamorgan.wordpress.com  
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3/26/15 Posted 3/26/15

[more]

Business Portrait (2015) by Guillaume Wolf and Jessica Morgan Amos  
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3/26/15 Posted 3/26/15

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