ArtSlant - Art blogroll http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/show en-us 40 Kylie Heidenheimer <div class='separator' style='clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em; text-align: center;'><img src='http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-wWDSMozm1Q0/UdYkCTOSn_I/AAAAAAAAJQ8/wzOAyM8fPOw/s400/IMG_0704.JPG' border='0' height='400' width='357'/></div><br/><div class='separator' style='clear: both; text-align: left;'><strong> <a href='http://www.kylieheidenheimer.com/Paintings_by_Kylie_Heidenheimer%2C_New_York_City_-_abstract_painting_utilizing_marks%2C_color%2C_the_visceral_and_atmospheric./Paintings_by_Kylie_Heidenheimer%2C_New_York_City_-_abstract_painting_utilizing_marks%2C_color%2C_the_visceral_and_atmospheric..html'>Kylie Heidenheimer</a></strong>, at <strong>Galerie Gris</strong>, in Hudson. Closes 7/15.</div><br/><div class='separator' style='clear: both; text-align: center;'><a href='http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-71hQUThKB58/UdYqjjcegOI/AAAAAAAAJRk/WQaniWwmVD8/s1600/IMG_0709.JPG' style='clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;'><img src='http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-71hQUThKB58/UdYqjjcegOI/AAAAAAAAJRk/WQaniWwmVD8/s400/IMG_0709.JPG' border='0' height='300' width='400'/></a></div><br/><div class='separator' style='clear: both; text-align: left;'>not sure if he has a website yet, it's a new gallery... at 621 Warren... same street as<strong> <a href='http://anaba.blogspot.com/2013/06/john-davis-gallery-through-714.html'>John Davis</a></strong><em>!</em></div><div class='separator' style='clear: both; text-align: left;'> </div><div class='separator' style='clear: both; text-align: left;'>The previous show was <strong>Marina Adams</strong>.... I missed that show but got some good photos of her work in the back... will post soon.</div><div class='separator' style='clear: both; text-align: center;'> </div><div class='separator' style='clear: both; text-align: center;'><a href='http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-AZGIZ_EhfTY/UdYkBw3cxWI/AAAAAAAAJQ4/qv6Ks0jP3fE/s1600/IMG_0706.JPG' style='clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;'><img src='http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-AZGIZ_EhfTY/UdYkBw3cxWI/AAAAAAAAJQ4/qv6Ks0jP3fE/s400/IMG_0706.JPG' border='0' height='400' width='326'/></a></div><div class='separator' style='clear: both; text-align: left;'>I thought of <strong>Whistler</strong> more than anyone else.</div><br/><div class='separator' style='clear: both; text-align: center;'><a href='http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-XmhP8LyKN0s/UdYkDg3fhvI/AAAAAAAAJRI/clsJaGwmeNk/s1600/IMG_0705.JPG' style='clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;'><img src='http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-XmhP8LyKN0s/UdYkDg3fhvI/AAAAAAAAJRI/clsJaGwmeNk/s400/IMG_0705.JPG' border='0' height='385' width='400'/></a></div><br/><br/><br/><div class='separator' style='clear: both; text-align: left;'><a href='http://www.kylieheidenheimer.com/Paintings_by_Kylie_Heidenheimer%2C_New_York_City_-_abstract_painting_utilizing_marks%2C_color%2C_the_visceral_and_atmospheric./Paintings_by_Kylie_Heidenheimer%2C_New_York_City_-_abstract_painting_utilizing_marks%2C_color%2C_the_visceral_and_atmospheric..html'>Kylie Heidenheimer</a> </div><br/> Fri, 05 Jul 2013 07:23:48 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list I Like America and America Likes Me <br/><table class='tr-caption-container' cellspacing='0' align='center' cellpadding='0' style='margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;'><tbody><tr><td style='text-align: center;'><a href='http://www.tate.org.uk/art/images/work/AR/AR00945_10.jpg' style='margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;'><img src='http://www.tate.org.uk/art/images/work/AR/AR00945_10.jpg' border='0' height='640' width='448'/></a></td></tr><tr><td class='tr-caption' style='text-align: center;'>Joseph Beuys • <i>I like America and America likes Me</i> • 1974 • print on paper • <span class='infoValue infoSize'>569 x 543 mm • <a href='http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/beuys-joseph-beuys-i-like-america-and-america-likes-me-rene-block-gallery-new-york-ar00945' target='_blank'>Tate</a></span></td><td class='tr-caption' style='text-align: center;'><span class='infoValue infoSize'><br/></span></td><td class='tr-caption' style='text-align: center;'><span class='infoValue infoSize'><br/></span></td><td class='tr-caption' style='text-align: center;'><span class='infoValue infoSize'><br/></span></td></tr></tbody></table><br/>Happy Fourth of July. Joseph Beuys likes America.<br/><br/>In May 1974 the German artist, teacher, shaman and social sculptor Joseph Beuys arrived at JFK Airport in New York. He was rushed to an ambulance and wrapped in felt, the sickness in the air overcoming him. The ambulance, sirens blazing, took him to René Block gallery where a caged off area containing hay and a live coyote waited for him. Beuys spent the week communing with the spirit of America (embodied by the coyote), performing a healing and cleansing act. <i>I like America and America likes Me</i>, marked the artist's first visit to the US and further developed his ideas of the artist/shaman as healer.<br/><br/>This notion is at the core of Beuys' personal mythology, beginning with his origin story fit for a super hero. After crashing in Siberia as a Luftwaffe pilot during WWII, he was nursed back to life by wandering Tartars. They covered him in fat, and as in <i>I like America and America likes Me</i>, they wrapped him in felt. These materials became motifs in his work, addressing the question, "Why do you use ____ in your work?" artists regularly face in quite an inventive way.<br/><br/>It's interesting to look at the complex belief system Beuys authored in comparison to the myths surrounding successful artists today. Beuys' artist persona was based on spiritualism and faith in art, whereas today artists' backgrounds are often amount to unique selling points aimed at giving them an edge in grant applications, filling niches within collections, or simply standing out as a specialized commodity.<br/><br/>Celebrate the spirit of America and heal with Joseph Beuys by watching this video. It contains documentation of the performance and discusses the artist's work in general.<br/><br/><br/><div style='text-align: center;'/><div style='text-align: center;'>&lt;iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="367" mozallowfullscreen="" src="http://player.vimeo.com/video/5904032" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="500"&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt; </div><div style='text-align: center;'><span style='font-size: x-small;'><a href='http://vimeo.com/5904032'>Coyote. Joseph Beuys in America</a> from <a href='http://vimeo.com/huubkoch'>huubkoch</a> on <a href='https://vimeo.com/'>Vimeo</a></span></div><br/><br/><br/><br/><hr/> Fri, 05 Jul 2013 07:24:21 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list Independence Day in Crochet <div style='text-align: justify;'><span style='font-family: Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif;'/></div><div class='separator' style='clear: both; text-align: center;'><a href='http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-NHWTtUXq9eY/UdWllzwYuPI/AAAAAAAAXBc/YWJkIF3nY9Y/s542/il_570xN.434232181_f5fe.jpg' style='margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;'><img src='http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-NHWTtUXq9eY/UdWllzwYuPI/AAAAAAAAXBc/YWJkIF3nY9Y/s400/il_570xN.434232181_f5fe.jpg' border='0' height='351' width='400'/></a></div><br/><div style='text-align: justify;'><br/></div><div style='text-align: justify;'><span style='font-family: Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif;'>Nothing says independence more than being able to wear a red, white and blue crocheted beer can hat!</span></div><div style='text-align: justify;'><span style='font-family: Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif;'>I've done my fair share of patriotic crochet.  Red, white and blue is a wonderful color combination.  Betsy Ross knew what she was doing when she put those colors together for our flag!  Here are a few projects I've crocheted in those glorious colors plus a few projects I found online.  </span></div><div style='text-align: justify;'><br/></div><table class='tr-caption-container' cellspacing='0' align='center' cellpadding='0' style='margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;'><tbody><tr><td style='text-align: center;'><a href='http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-uNNpfQZk0zc/UdWmOwv18MI/AAAAAAAAXBo/d5YCnbxlxlQ/s500/4thJuly_medium.jpg' style='margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;'><img src='http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-uNNpfQZk0zc/UdWmOwv18MI/AAAAAAAAXBo/d5YCnbxlxlQ/s400/4thJuly_medium.jpg' border='0' height='400' width='357'/></a></td></tr><tr><td class='tr-caption' style='text-align: center;'><span style='font-family: Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif;'><i><b>Carol's Patriotic Potholder</b></i></span></td></tr></tbody></table><table class='tr-caption-container' cellspacing='0' align='center' cellpadding='0' style='margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;'><tbody><tr><td style='text-align: center;'><a href='http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-T2iglGUJ3k4/UdWmPZtowOI/AAAAAAAAXB0/c88_mNTANGE/s640/CarlaPotholder_Front_medium2.jpg' style='margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;'><img src='http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-T2iglGUJ3k4/UdWmPZtowOI/AAAAAAAAXB0/c88_mNTANGE/s400/CarlaPotholder_Front_medium2.jpg' border='0' height='400' width='335'/></a></td></tr><tr><td class='tr-caption' style='text-align: center;'><span style='font-family: Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif;'><i><b>Carla's Patriotic Potholder</b></i></span></td></tr></tbody></table><table class='tr-caption-container' cellspacing='0' align='center' cellpadding='0' style='margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;'><tbody><tr><td style='text-align: center;'><a href='http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-9raJcgRYuNY/UdWmOniMV1I/AAAAAAAAXBk/G4iC87FiQ7I/s550/cecac0b37c43325cd9ddad1005e710fc.image.425x550.jpg' style='margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;'><img src='http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-9raJcgRYuNY/UdWmOniMV1I/AAAAAAAAXBk/G4iC87FiQ7I/s400/cecac0b37c43325cd9ddad1005e710fc.image.425x550.jpg' border='0' height='400' width='308'/></a></td></tr><tr><td class='tr-caption' style='text-align: center;'><span style='font-family: Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif;'><i><b>Flag Afghan from Maggie's Crochet</b></i></span></td></tr></tbody></table><table class='tr-caption-container' cellspacing='0' align='center' cellpadding='0' style='margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;'><tbody><tr><td style='text-align: center;'><a href='http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-ONvwsF1rEX0/UdWmP137HxI/AAAAAAAAXB8/sFVRd3n-D8E/s500/get-attachment_medium.jpg' style='margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;'><img src='http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-ONvwsF1rEX0/UdWmP137HxI/AAAAAAAAXB8/sFVRd3n-D8E/s400/get-attachment_medium.jpg' border='0' height='400' width='300'/></a></td></tr><tr><td class='tr-caption' style='text-align: center;'><span style='font-family: Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif;'><i><b>Suzette's Owly Ornament</b></i></span></td></tr></tbody></table><table class='tr-caption-container' cellspacing='0' align='center' cellpadding='0' style='margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;'><tbody><tr><td style='text-align: center;'><a href='http://1.bp.blogspot.com/--ATysfTBwwU/UdWmff9VKLI/AAAAAAAAXCE/kLuHxXja7zk/s400/IMG_4419.jpg' style='margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;'><img src='http://1.bp.blogspot.com/--ATysfTBwwU/UdWmff9VKLI/AAAAAAAAXCE/kLuHxXja7zk/s400/IMG_4419.jpg' border='0' height='300' width='400'/></a></td></tr><tr><td class='tr-caption' style='text-align: center;'><span style='font-family: Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif;'><i><b>Pillows found at an estate sale</b></i></span></td></tr></tbody></table><table class='tr-caption-container' cellspacing='0' align='center' cellpadding='0' style='margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;'><tbody><tr><td style='text-align: center;'><a href='http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-ieMJF_Jy_K8/UdWmnobCddI/AAAAAAAAXCM/OnO5n0Qj-SQ/s640/RWBPotholder-Close_medium2.JPG' style='margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;'><img src='http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-ieMJF_Jy_K8/UdWmnobCddI/AAAAAAAAXCM/OnO5n0Qj-SQ/s400/RWBPotholder-Close_medium2.JPG' border='0' height='300' width='400'/></a></td></tr><tr><td class='tr-caption' style='text-align: center;'><span style='font-family: Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif;'><i><b>My Dainty Doily</b></i></span></td></tr></tbody></table><div style='text-align: justify;'><span style='font-family: Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif;'>We're going to a 4th of July wedding later today.  I love the idea of getting married on a big holiday...easy to remember.  Have a wonderful Independence Day celebration, my friends! </span></div> Fri, 05 Jul 2013 07:28:19 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list Middle of the Map Fest: Cultural Fodder from America’s City of Fountains <p><strong>Guest Post by Carolyn Okomo</strong></p> <p><a href='http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dpjXzhMchcE#at%3D145'>Middle of the Map Fest (Video)</a></p> <p dir='ltr'>Though Kansas City’s <a href='http://badatsports.com/feed/www.middleofthemapfest.com/%E2%80%8E'><em>Middle of the Map Fest</em></a> ended this past May, the curators of the month-long salute to Midwest’s arts scene are getting ready to make preparations for next year’s activities. The festival, which just concluded its third year, is not-so-slowly but surely becoming an important cultural staple in the Kansas City-metropolitan area, the Midwestern United States, and arguably the nation. Its fusion of music, film and technology dialogs could make it Kansas City’s answer to the <em>SXSW Interactive Festival</em>, though Nathan Reusch — one of the festival’s founders — is caution in drawing too direct a comparison to the Austin event.</p> <p>“I would say that we take plenty of notes from SXSW but I think we have tried to make it our own” says Reusch. “Things like spreading across multiple weekends have given each event a chance to have their own identity where SXSW has so much going on all at once.”</p> <p><img class='aligncenter size-medium wp-image-34865' src='http://badatsports.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/record_machine_image-600x353.jpg' height='353' alt='record_machine_image' width='600'/></p> <p>Reusch, along with Mike Russo and Richard Robinett, run <a href='http://therecordmachine.net/blog/'><em>The Record Machine</em></a> — a Kansas City-based independent music label that’s been releasing music for local and national acts since 2003. Since then they’ve assembled a heartily diverse ensemble of artists. At the heart of <em>The Record Machine’s</em> mission is a desire to “make an organic community of artists and help connect them with listeners” according to the the label’s website. The rapid growth of the Map Fest — co-curated along with local lifestyle and entertainment weekly <em>Ink Magazine</em> — certainly serves as a testament to the label’s successes in realizing this objective. This year’s three-day music fest was headlined by Brooklyn-based outfit Grizzly Bear and featured 140 local, regional and national bands; its first year just 50 bands were showcased, according to Reusch. In 2012 the Map Fest also added a 50-speaker Forum component to provide a platform for local creatives, entrepreneurs and community leaders to discuss topics like social connectivity, curating responsibility and sustainable wellness.</p> <p>For the first time since premiering in 2011, the Map Fest incorporated a five-day film event that featured over 25 films.  The event kicked off on May 1 in Kansas City’s <em>Alamo Drafthouse</em> with a screening of 1986 cult fantasy film <em>Labyrinth</em> (and opened with a David Bowie set by local band <a href='http://softreeds.com/'><em>Soft Reeds</em></a>). The film fest’s curator, Kansas City-bread filmmaker Mark Harrison, says he began the process of identifying films for the event at the beginning of the year after being commissioned by <em>The Record Machine</em> to help out. The process included building a dream list of films the planners hoped to screen during the festival then individually pitching either the filmmakers and movie distribution companies.</p> <p>“At the end of the day, I wanted to bring to films to Kansas City that I thought I could stand behind, that I personally wouldn’t  think twice about paying $25 to go see, and that I felt offered unique voices to the festival that could be discussed by any and all who attended” says Harrison.</p> <p>Harrison’s own whimsically shot, self-described “factumentary”, <a href='http://vanuary.com/'><em>Vanuary</em></a>, chronicled the month-long adventure of its star, Dave Drusky, as he completed challenges whilst living in a 1982 Volkswagen Vanagon Westfalia camper van during the month of January. Both Harrison and Druksy fielded questions about their experimental film post-screening to get a sense of whether it could work as a feature length film and were met with positive responses from the crowd.</p> <div class='wp-caption aligncenter' id='attachment_34931' style='width: 610px;'><img class='size-medium wp-image-34931' src='http://badatsports.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/vanuary-1-600x336.png' height='336' alt='vanuary 1' width='600'/><p class='wp-caption-text'>Vanuary (2012)</p></div> <p>“This was the first time people were watching it that didn’t know me or didn’t know Mark” says Drusky.  And, it’s one thing to say ‘hey, friends and family, sit down and watch this hour and a half movie of me and Mark just having fun and doing  all these activities in the van. But to have people not connected to us watch it and saying ‘we want more’ was kind of an inspirational moment.”</p> <p>The film’s curatorial slant was unmistakably musical, Harrison admits (his band, <a href='http://www.capybaramusic.com/'><em>Capybara</em>,</a> is a featured act on <em>The Record Machine</em>’s label). <a href='http://badatsports.com/feed/andrewbirdfeveryear.wordpress.com/%E2%80%8E'><em>Andrew Bird: Fever Year</em> </a>(2011, directed by Xan Aranda) — a film about about Chicago-based singer/songwriter Andrew Bird’s return home after a year-long tour — was just one of the films showcased. Another music-doc featured was <a href='http://inthedeepshade.theframes.ie/'><em>The Frames: In Deep Shade</em></a> (2013, Conner Masterson), which chronicles the Irish band, The Frames, and their 20 year musical relationship;  <a href='http://badatsports.com/feed/abandcalleddeath.com/%E2%80%8E'><em>A Band Called Death</em></a> (2012, Mark Christopher Covino &amp; Jeff Howlett) shed an incredibly gripping light into the lives of the newly-discovered first all-black punk rock band out of Detroit.</p> <div class='wp-caption aligncenter' id='attachment_34935' style='width: 560px;'><img class='size-full wp-image-34935 ' src='http://badatsports.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/A-Band-Called-Death.png' height='414' alt='A Band Called Death' width='550'/><p class='wp-caption-text'>A Band Called Death (2012)</p></div> <p>Other documentaries that screened included <a href='http://badatsports.com/feed/www.eatingalabama.com/'><em>Eating Alabama</em></a> (2012, Andrew Grace), which recounts young couple’s attempt to eat only locally-grown food;  <a href='http://badatsports.com/feed/minecraftstoryofmojang.com/%E2%80%8E'><em>Mincraft: Story of Mojang</em> </a>(2012, Paul Owens) looks into the company behind the hugely popular virtual game. <a href='http://badatsports.com/feed/wearesuperman-themovie.com/%E2%80%8E'><em>We Are Superman</em></a> (2012, Kevin Bryce), expounded on the struggles of a group of Kansas City residents working feverishly to revitalize several blocks of a long-ignored urban neighborhood.</p> <div class='wp-caption aligncenter' id='attachment_34941' style='width: 558px;'><img class='size-full wp-image-34941' src='http://badatsports.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/we-are-superman.png' height='378' alt='We Are Superman (2012)' width='548'/><p class='wp-caption-text'>We Are Superman (2012)</p></div> <p>The film festival’s roster also included a number of independent feature films. Campy martial arts-infused action <a href='http://miamiconnection.org/'><em>Miami Connection</em></a> (Y.M Kim, Woo-Sang Park, 1987) provided comedic nostalgia for fans of over-the-top 1980s action films. <a href='http://www.rebelle-lefilm.ca/english/'><em>War Witch</em></a>, a film that took its director Kim Nguyen a decade to complete, depicts the tragic pains faced regularly by African child soldiers through the story of 12 year-old Komona, played by a non-professional actress Rachel Mwanza and filmed over the course of a decade. Romantic drama <a href='http://michaelmohan.com/projects/save-the-date/'><em>Save the Date</em></a> (2012, Michael Mohan) — a film loosely-based on the comics of graphic novelist  and co-writer Jeffrey Brown (read <a href='http://badatsports.com/2013/artist-qa-graphic-novelist-jeffrey-brown-on-his-career-in-publishing-and-film/'>interview</a>)– also screened.</p> <p><img class='aligncenter size-full wp-image-34939' src='http://badatsports.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/save-the-date.png' height='277' alt='save the date' width='495'/></p> <p>Reusch says he, Robinett and Russo are slowly easing into the planning process for next year, which patrons of the festival should undoubtedly appreciate given its steady successes throughout the years.</p> <p>“We have always tried to keep evolving the event organically and not trying to push things out that don’t seem to work” says Reusch. “We are still taking a little bit of a break and clear our heads start planning for next year.”</p> <p>The Map Fest was a much-appreciated introduction to region’s cultural landscape for this author (an admitted newbie to the area). For years, <em>The Record Machine </em>and others (<a href='https://goldensoundrecords.com/%E2%80%8E'>Golden Sound Records</a>, the <a href='http://badatsports.com/feed/kcfilmfest.org/%E2%80%8E'>Kansas City Film Fest</a> and the <a href='http://badatsports.com/feed/www.midwestmusicfound.org/%E2%80%8E'>Midwest Music Foundation</a>, to name some) have buttressed Kansas City’s profile as a cultural hub amongst larger metropolitan regions like Chicago, Austin, and the obvious New York and Los Angeles. While one may not typically think to stay (or move ) to a place like Kansas City to make it big, the Map Fest could very well a spring board for many successful careers as it continues to expand and evolve in years to come.</p> <div class='wp_rp_wrap wp_rp_plain' id='wp_rp_first'><div class='wp_rp_content'><h3 class='related_post_title'>Related Posts</h3><ul class='related_post wp_rp' style=''><li><a href='http://badatsports.com/2013/kansas-city-inside-out/' class='wp_rp_title'>Kansas City Inside Out</a></li><li><a href='http://badatsports.com/2009/ed-marszewski-on-version-09/' class='wp_rp_title'>Ed Marszewski on Version 09</a></li><li><a href='http://badatsports.com/2009/select-media-festival-8-super-bad-ass-starts-tomorrow/' class='wp_rp_title'>Select Media Festival 8 | Super Bad Ass Starts Tomorrow!</a></li><li><a href='http://badatsports.com/2008/the-ultimate-art-school-building/' class='wp_rp_title'>The Ultimate Art School Building</a></li><li><a href='http://badatsports.com/2012/28587/' class='wp_rp_title'>Thoughts from Across the Cultural Divide: #8 (Umlauts)</a></li></ul></div></div> Fri, 05 Jul 2013 07:28:48 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list Cleon Peterson @ The Outsiders <div><a href='http://happyfamousartists.blogspot.com/www.cleonpeterson.com' target='_blank'>Cleon Peterson</a>‘s debut solo show, <strong><em>There Is War</em></strong>, opens today at <a href='http://cleonpeterson.us7.list-manage1.com/track/click?u=ac90d790332946e4dd174a95e&amp%3Bid=e278f74fbb&amp%3Be=fd3de3d0ea' target='_blank'>The Outsiders</a><br/> gallery in Soho. In mood for a bit of the good ol’ ultraviolence, mixed with sex, religion, drugs, blood, rape, guns, fire and the odd policeman beating a suit? If that mixture (in art, of course!) sounds inspiring, join the crowd tonight from 6-9pm, or every day except for Sunday till the 3rd of August.</div> <div/> <div>For more information, here’s the <a href='http://cleonpeterson.us7.list-manage.com/track/click?u=ac90d790332946e4dd174a95e&id=96cfa7aa21&e=fd3de3d0ea' target='_blank'>press release</a>.</div> <div><a href='http://happyfamousartists.com/blog/2013/07/cleon-peterson-the-outsiders/cleon_peterson-01/' rel='attachment wp-att-10354'><img src='http://happyfamousartists.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/CLEON_PETERSON-01.jpg' height='418' alt='CLEON_PETERSON 01' width='600'/></a></div> <div/> <div><a href='http://happyfamousartists.com/blog/2013/07/cleon-peterson-the-outsiders/cleon_peterson-02/' rel='attachment wp-att-10353'><img class='alignnone size-full wp-image-10353' src='http://happyfamousartists.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/CLEON_PETERSON-02.jpg' height='433' alt='CLEON_PETERSON 02' width='600'/></a></div> <div><a href='http://happyfamousartists.com/blog/2013/07/cleon-peterson-the-outsiders/cleon_peterson/' rel='attachment wp-att-10337'><img src='http://happyfamousartists.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/CLEON_PETERSON.jpg' height='497' alt='CLEON_PETERSON' width='600'/></a></div> <div><a href='http://happyfamousartists.com/blog/2013/07/cleon-peterson-the-outsiders/cleon_peterson-03/' rel='attachment wp-att-10356'><img class='alignnone size-full wp-image-10356' src='http://happyfamousartists.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/CLEON_PETERSON-03.jpg' height='504' alt='CLEON_PETERSON 03' width='600'/></a></div> <div class='feedflare'> <a href='http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/HFA?a=oqpeVnHXv9M%3APauKAJoduvU%3AyIl2AUoC8zA'><img src='http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/HFA?d=yIl2AUoC8zA' border='0'/></a> <a href='http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/HFA?a=oqpeVnHXv9M%3APauKAJoduvU%3Aqj6IDK7rITs'><img src='http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/HFA?d=qj6IDK7rITs' border='0'/></a> <a href='http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/HFA?a=oqpeVnHXv9M%3APauKAJoduvU%3AV_sGLiPBpWU'><img src='http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/HFA?i=oqpeVnHXv9M%3APauKAJoduvU%3AV_sGLiPBpWU' border='0'/></a> <a href='http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/HFA?a=oqpeVnHXv9M%3APauKAJoduvU%3AgIN9vFwOqvQ'><img src='http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/HFA?i=oqpeVnHXv9M%3APauKAJoduvU%3AgIN9vFwOqvQ' border='0'/></a> </div> Fri, 05 Jul 2013 07:25:46 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list PICKS: “SubTehran: Subjective Truth from Iran” 06.21.13-07.12.13 Center of Contemporary Art | Tbilisi, Tbilisi, review written by Lali Pertenava Fri, 05 Jul 2013 07:27:11 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list Happy Independence Day! <table class='tr-caption-container' cellspacing='0' align='center' cellpadding='0' style='margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;'><tbody> <tr><td style='text-align: center;'><a href='http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-lGwRs0hT9bo/T_Sbmww17eI/AAAAAAAAEFI/1aQntPZVxuk/s1600/beecher_flag.jpg' style='margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;'><img title='' src='http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-lGwRs0hT9bo/T_Sbmww17eI/AAAAAAAAEFI/1aQntPZVxuk/s640/beecher_flag.jpg' border='0' height='425' alt='Ross Palmer Beecher' width='640'/></a></td></tr> <tr><td class='tr-caption' style='text-align: center;'>"Radio Flyer Flag" by Ross Palmer Beecher</td></tr> </tbody></table> <br/> Fri, 05 Jul 2013 07:22:48 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list "Dreier Victim Acquires Fraudster’s Fancy Art Collection" The WSJ Law Blog has the <a href='http://blogs.wsj.com/law/2013/07/03/dreier-victim-acquires-fradusters-fancy-art-collection/?mod=WSJBlog'>details</a>.  No word yet on what's happening to the non-fancy art. Thu, 04 Jul 2013 07:24:34 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list In This Case: The Dapper Palmer Hayden <div class='image_right img_splash'><img src='http://americanart.si.edu/eyelevel/images/hayden_janitor.jpg' height='413' alt='Palmer Hayden' width='350'/> <p class='caption_center'>Palmer Hayden's <a href='http://americanart.si.edu/collections/search/artwork/?id=10126'><i>The Janitor Who Paints</i></a></p> </div> <p> We are always sad to see a piece leave the <a href='http://americanart.si.edu/luce'>Luce Foundation Center</a>, especially when it's a visitor favorite. Sometimes though, an artwork's departure (for loan or display elsewhere in the museum) gives us an opportunity put up another piece from our collection. This was the case with Palmer Hayden's <a href='http://americanart.si.edu/collections/search/artwork/?id=10126'><i>The Janitor Who Paints</i></a>. Many visitors have inquired about the painting over the years so we were excited when there was a space large enough to display the painting. We were even more excited (we are an enthusiastic group) when we learned that Nicholas Miller, a <a href='http://americanart.si.edu/research/opportunity/'>fellow</a> at the museum, was writing part of his dissertation on Palmer Hayden's work. Nicholas recently gave a talk on <i>The Janitor Who Paints</i> during our <a href='http://americanart.si.edu/calendar/event.cfm?trumbaEmbed=view=series&seriesid=443511program'>Art+Coffee</a> program. You can <a href='https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0yL4fdhDYE4'>watch Nicholas' talk</a> on <a href='https://www.youtube.com/user/americanartmuseum?feature=watch'>our YouTube channel</a>. We also sat down with Nicholas to chat more about his interest in Hayden's work, the Art+Coffee talk, and his experience as a fellow. </p> <p> <b>Eye Level</b>: What was your initial attraction to Palmer Hayden's <i>The Janitor Who Paints</i>? </p> <p> <b>Nicholas Miller</b>: The first chapter of my dissertation is dedicated to discussing Hayden's paintings and experience living in Paris from 1927 through 1932. It was there, in 1931, that he created the first iteration of the painting. I think I was attracted to the many challenges the painting poses to interpretation. Why did Hayden paint over the original composition in the 1940s? Who is the artist represented in the painting, Palmer Hayden, his friend Cloyd Boykin, or perhaps, both? Was African art used as a model for the figure and, if so, what does it tell us about African diaspora communities? And finally, how do we talk about paintings made by African American artists that possess an unsettling proximity to racist caricatures? I'm not sure if any of these questions have definitive answers but I've done my best to provide a few possible solutions. </p> <p> <b>EL</b>: You mentioned Hayden's dapper apparel in the talk. Why do you think his beret and clothes were so important to his identity? </p> <p> <b>NM</b>: Well, the clothes make the man! Style, as scholars Richard Powell and Monica Miller have shown in their studies <i><a href='http://www.press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/C/bo5822946.html'>Cutting A Figure: Fashioning Black Portraiture</a></i> and <i><a href='http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0822346036/ref%3Das_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=0822346036&linkCode=as2&tag=amerart-20'>Slaves to Fashion: Black Dandyism and the Styling of Black Diasporic Identity</a></i>, has always played a huge role in the ways members of the African diaspora forge their own identities. I think Hayden was very aware of his own background as a janitor and how this biographical fact was brought up by many critics discussing his work. Also, dandyism has close ties with early modernist art practice; one can think of, for instance, the French impressionists and especially author <a href='http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Baudelaire'>Charles Baudelaire</a>. Hayden's beret, foulard, and three piece suits could be seen as a way to surpass his working-class background and create a new "artistic" identity while he lived in Paris. As a side, if you're interested in this aspect of black cultural production check out this year's <a href='http://www.festival.si.edu/'>Smithsonian Folklife Festival</a>, specifically the programing surrounding <a href='http://www.festival.si.edu/2013/Will_to_Adorn/'><i>The Will to Adorn: African American Diversity, Style, and Identity</i></a>. </p> <p> <b>EL</b>: A visitor noticed that the figure in <i>The Janitor Who Paints</i> is painting with his right hand. Did you ever figure out if Hayden was right or left-handed? </p> <p> <b>NM</b>: Unfortunately, I haven't quite solved it yet! I've been looking into his <a href='http://www.aaa.si.edu/collections/palmer-c-hayden-papers-5588/more'>biographical</a> material located at the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art, but it doesn't seem like anyone recorded what hand he painted with. The answer is unclear because in <i>The Janitor Who Paints</i> the artist is using his right hand, but in photographs for the Harmon Foundation he is seen painting with his left. Both images might be staged and not necessarily truthful. Yet another issue with the painting. I'm still hoping to track it down. </p> <p> <b>EL</b>: Did the talk give you any insights or new thoughts about the painting? </p> <p> <b>NM</b>: Certainly. One of the best and most productive aspects of the talk was being able to take a group up to see the actual painting. So often when I look at a painting it is done in isolation and it was therefore fascinating to see what everyone focused on when viewing the work. For instance, what I originally thought was a radiator was actually the headboard of a foreshortened bed on the right side of the canvas. It was a wonderful collaborative viewing session. </p> <p> <b>EL</b>: You've been a fellow at the museum this year. What does being a <a href='http://americanart.si.edu/research/opportunity/'>fellow</a> at the museum entail? </p> <p> <b>NM</b>: Being a <a href='http://americanart.si.edu/research/opportunity/fellows/'>pre-doctoral fellow</a> at the Smithsonian American Art Museum is, first and foremost, a wonderful honor and has been one of the most productive times of my graduate student career. As a fellow, our primary responsibility is to work steadfastly on our dissertations. We are provided with work space, library and archive access, and ample resources. We also attend weekly lunchbag lectures, have monthly writing workshops, Friday lunches with curators, and one symposium where we present our recent work. The fact that all of the fellows are in residence at the Smithsonian and that the museum has fostered such a congenial and collaborative environment is certainly a very unique opportunity and what makes this fellowship so special. </p> Wed, 03 Jul 2013 07:07:44 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list Say it's not true <a href='https://www.dropbox.com/s/r4fx164quzqy0gm/Say%20It%27s%20Not%20You.mp3'>Say it's not you.</a><img src='http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/theorynow/~4/ooult7v49Sw' height='1' width='1'/> Tue, 02 Jul 2013 07:02:56 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list A Conversation with William Powhida on the Contemporary Artist's "Narrative" <span style=''>One of the themes I kept coming back to when talking with Elizabeth Dee (see our two-part conversation on the contemporary gallery model <a href='http://www.edwardwinkleman.com/2013/06/an-interview-with-elizabeth-dee-about.html'>here</a> and <a href='http://www.edwardwinkleman.com/2013/06/a-conversation-with-elizabeth-dee-on.html'>here</a>) was how the narrative (or story) of the art gallery seems to be in flux...some have even said "in crisis." What I mean by that specifically, is that why people open and run galleries, what they hope to do while running one, and what brings them to close one seems to be changing a fair bit all around us, at least compared with 10 years ago, when we first got into this business. <br/><br/>I'm a big believer that making decisions is always easier when you know the narrative you're working within and the goals you're working toward. It's why <a href='http://www.amazon.com/How-Start-Run-Commercial-Gallery/dp/1581156642/ref%3Dsr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1372681627&sr=8-1&keywords=edward+winkleman'>in my book</a> I highly recommend new galleries write a mission statement and business plan. With these tools as your guide, you can make much smarter decisions about where to spend your time and money. <br/><br/>Thinking about this some more, I realized that gallerists are, of course, only one small part of the art industry, and if their narratives are changing it stands to reason that's because the narratives of the players around them (artists, collectors, curators, critics, historians, etc.) are changing as well. And so I have decided to publish a series of conversations with the various players in the art world, examining whether they agree that their narratives are in flux, and if so where they think they're headed. Naturally, not everyone within a certain role will agree on this, which is why I look forward to your feedback on the interviews. <br/><br/>It makes sense to begin the series with an artist, the one player in the art world without whom the rest of us would look silly doing what we do. I'm delighted that one of the artists I know to have given such matters a great deal of thought, William Powhida, has agreed to be part of the first in the series. Full disclosure: I've worked with Bill on various projects, and we have had an ongoing dialog about the art world for quite some time now. <br/><br/>For those of you who haven't had the pleasure of making his acquaintance, here's a bit about William Powhida (from <a href='http://williampowhida.com/wordpress/'>his website</a>):</span><br/><blockquote class='tr_bq'><span style=''>William Powhida (b. 1976, New York) is a G-E-N-I-U-S and habitual critic of the art world. Powhida lives and works in New York. He studied painting at Syracuse University where he easily received a B.F.A with honors and scored an M.F.A. from the <strike>cheap-assed</strike>famed Hunter College Program.<i> Getting a honors there was a joke. </i>He has exhibited internationally in New York, Los Angles, Seattle, London, Madrid, Miami, Chicago, Copenhagen, Austria, Dublin, and even the Canary Islands . Recent shows include <i>Derivatives</i> at Postmasters Gallery, and <i>POWHIDA</i> at Marlborough Chelsea, which made people <i><b>really fucking mad</b></i>. He recently exhibited some giant drawings about the balkanization of the art world done in collaboration with Jade Townsend at Gallery Poulsen in Copenhagen, Denmark.</span><br/><span style=''><br/></span><span style=''>He has organized exhibitions including <i>#class</i> and <i>#rank</i> with Jennifer Dalton, <i>Magicality</i> with Eric Trosko, and <i>Dunkle Wolke</i> at StorefrontBK in the dreaded Bushwick. He also collaborated with Jade on the Lemonade Stand and the ABMB Hooverville drawing. His work has been discussed in the <i>New York Times, Artforum, Art in America, The Brooklyn Rail, Art News, Artinfo, Artnet, Hyperallergic, Art Fag City</i> among others. He completed a publishing residency at the Lower East Side Printshop and was the connecting communities resident at the John Michael Kohler Arts Center in 2011, while his show at Marlborough imploded and may have killed several careers. He is currently finishing new works for a show at Charlie James Gallery in Los Angeles opening April 20th, 2013.  [EW: This show got fantastic press...<a href='http://www.edwardwinkleman.com/2013/04/bill-by-bill.html'>I wrote about it</a> a while back.]</span><br/><span style=''><br/></span><span style=''>Currently he is represented in New York by Postmasters Gallery, in Seattle by Platform Gallery, and in Los Angeles by Charlie James Gallery.</span></blockquote><span style=''><br/> ____________________<br/><br/><b>Winkleman:</b> There seem to me three basic artist's career narratives that are widely discussed. </span><br/><ol><li><span style=''>The first one, which faded with the end of Modernism perhaps, was the "kill the father to supplant the son" story whereby successive groups or individuals argued either in manifestos or via their work that some previous dominant movement was now irrelevant and they themselves then rose to prominence, only to have the same thing happen to them shortly thereafter, upon which they entered the growing group of has-beens still doing important work but not getting much attention for it until they reached old age or died.  </span></li><li><span style=''>The second one, the more Post-Modern and perhaps today most popular narrative, is that an artist is discovered by some hard-working dealer or curator, given exhibitions that garner a bit of press, rises through the ranks via biennials and museum group shows, gets fun and lucrative commissions, eventually gets their own retrospective, and eventually enters the canon, living comfortably off their art. </span></li><li><span style=''>In the third one, and this transcends time, the artist perhaps makes a splash for a while, but then really never gets much traction for a period, during which they teach or give up on the art world, sometimes to be rediscovered and get a second splash, sometimes not. Sometimes they keep making their work happily anyway, and sometimes they get jaded and quit.</span></li></ol><span style=''>Do any of these narratives still hold much appeal for artists today? Do any of them, or any combination of them, seem realistic?<br/><br/><b>Powhida</b>: I can only speak for myself, but I do know a lot of artists and my thoughts about these narratives are also informed by those artists’ experiences.  I think the second model is what I was taught to believe during my BFA and MFA, reading the art media, and following visibly successful artists. The Bruce High Quality Foundation (BHQF) is a perfect example of the second model, as they are currently having their <a href='http://www.brooklynmuseum.org/exhibitions/bruce_high_quality/'>first museum show at the Brooklyn Museum of Art,</a> although as collective, not an individual, making their role in the narrative a little more unique than say, Corey Arcangel.  His career hits most of the marks of the second narrative as well and he seems to be doing just fine on a normal timeline, unlike Jacob Kassay who skipped most of the narrative elements and jumped almost directly to “living comfortably.”<br/><br/>The first model is obviously historical and there is general agreement, even if it’s not entirely true, that the avant-garde model you describe is dead. Interestingly, it seems that the reverse of that avant-garde model might actually be happening, wherein different groups seem to be arguing that previous dominant models such as Modernism are still relevant. Neo-modern artists focusing on process and form come to mind, specifically the new casualists. <br/><br/>Personally, the third model is not appealing at all, but unfortunately seems to be the more realistic narrative for many artists, particularly in the art market where a few sales can be equated with ‘making a splash’. When I think of the third model I often think of Lee Lozano who got ‘jaded and quit’, or disgusted and quit, and was later rediscovered.  I often have to remind myself to not go Lozano and move upstate to raise grass-fed goats. <br/><br/>Still, the third narrative is also unrealistic for most artists. For many artists there simply is no splash, ever, just a kind of long, slow march of making art in relative anonymity with enough opportunities to show work publicly that artists keep their studios open and practice going.  Many of these artists have MFA’s and would consider themselves professional artists, even if they are not generating any income of their art. <br/><br/><b>Winkleman:</b> What components of the current realistic narrative today are missing from those three earlier ones?<br/><br/><b>Powhida: </b>The two contemporary narratives of artistic success today that you outlined are both just highly unlikely for most artists within the kind of MFA sphere of art that we are discussing.   Most artists won’t ever experience much of a splash, the proliferation of art news outlets notwithstanding.  Of the relatively small number that do receive some recognition, even fewer will ever have anything remotely approximating the increasing levels of career spanning success.  Missing from the two most likely narratives is an acknowledgement of the majority of artists working in relative anonymity.  This isn’t a narrative that many artists aspire to, but one arrived at after years of working without making a splash or hitting any of the benchmarks you’ve described. <br/><br/>A friend recently admitted his aspiration had become to paint for his friends and family.  I found it to be a bit depressing at first, but in some ways, his is a very realistic level of expectation at this point in his artistic career.  In my friend’s comment, I think I can see what is missing in between the ‘splash’ (that may never come) and “living comfortably off your art” (which is lottery odds) is a vast, subtle landscape of adequacy and different measures of success other than art world MFA career ladder. I think this includes many components of that ladder, but not always in a forward trajectory to the International Art Event Circuit or blue-chip galleries. Success may be a well-received group show, an opportune residency, a long-sought after grant, the personal fulfillment of a practice, participation in an active, vital community, or long-deserved review. <br/><br/>This isn’t a narrative that makes a sexy magazine profile or will continuously produce the kind of validation collectors need to plunk down on five- and six-figure objects and artistic brands, but it is the one that most artists will experience; an infrequent and episodic series of successes that don’t create a coherent narrative that we identify with the seventy-five artists the art world can support at any one moment. It’s a vertical hierarchy if only because of the economics of the art market; very few artists earn enough to ever ‘live comfortably’.  Increasingly, even that narrative seems to be that even fewer artists will ‘live lavishly’ with large studios filled with assistants.  I know a woman who provides private yoga sessions for an artist and his assistants.  I imagine it’s a pleasant work environment.<br/><br/>Finally, there is an emerging narrative that I don’t think most art dealers will like, except perhaps Vito Schnabel.  BHQF represents something of the authorless, artist collective narrative, which has had its moments previously (Forcefield anyone?) but is now part of the broader critique of Capitalism.  There is a real sense that the emphasis and celebration of individual artists may give way to greater artist or even creative collectives, re-affirming that maybe Barthes was right about the “Death of the Author” after all.  I mention this after nearly two years of Occupy Wall Street activity that has not faded away, but has faded into the fabric of the art world.  It’s why I joked on Twitter about Elizabeth [Dee] saying “horizontal hierarchy” that precipitated this discussion.  I also mention it after hearing that Parsons is shifting their art program away from the individual model towards group dynamics.  It’s an interesting narrative to consider in so much as it doesn’t automatically mean it negates the market, BHQF can achieve five-figures at auction, remain relatively anonymous as subjects, run a free school, and critique the apparatus in which they operate. <br/><br/><b>Winkleman:</b> Some would say younger and mid-level galleries are in crisis because they can't sort out how to help artists who are not yet powerful. They can't sort out what their narratives should be. This would suggest perhaps the artists themselves are unable to articulate what they want/need from those galleries, perhaps being solely focused on what they want/need from bigger galleries. Are artists in crisis over their narratives?<br/><br/><b>Powhida:</b> I think my last response speaks to some of the crises artists face, which is operating within a system that is increasingly bifurcated between a very small group of stars and everyone else.  I think it’s the same condition that you and Elizabeth were discussing, prompting you both to speculate about new models of distribution and production. I think for many of the artists who would be defined as <a href='http://www.gregorysholette.com/books/darkmatter_books.html'>‘dark matter’ by Gregory Sholette,</a> it’s redefining for themselves what is meaningful.  It’s hard to create a narrative of success when you’re the dark matter against which the stars shine, but I find that it’s important for artists to be able to articulate what is valuable about art beyond prices and the market.  I think this is becoming increasingly clear because of our growing awareness of income inequality and how it expresses itself not only in the art market, but the broader Capitalist economy, climate change, and ‘democratic’ society. I think it’s even harder to desire the kind of the success defined in your second narrative if one has any class consciousness at all.<br/><br/><b>Winkleman:</b> What roles, if any, do you see commercial art galleries playing in the emerging narratives? A central one, a marginal one, a fleeting one?<br/><br/><b>Powhida:</b> I think we are seeing the roles commercial galleries will play in the emerging narratives happening now.  It’s clear to me in what Alain Servais, <a href='http://www.edwardwinkleman.com/2012/08/whats-art-got-to-do-with-it-open-thread.html'>whose writings</a> you brought to my attention, calls the ‘go or grow’ model.  There is a diminishing role for the middle where long, slowly developing art careers happen that don’t always result in blue chip status or retrospectives, but regular exhibitions and stable, if modest sales.  I’m getting accustomed to hearing about galleries closing and gallerists becoming directors at bigger galleries.  Obviously, very few galleries are growing into mega galleries with ‘museum-quality’ shows, which one art historian friend recently described as ways for galleries to present “A” level museum works along side “B” and “C” level available secondary market works. Conversely, at the bottom you have an expanding pool of always emerging galleries to produce the ‘splash’ moments for a number of artists who will be pulled up into the larger galleries very quickly if the splash is sufficiently large.  I’ve heard gossip of mega-galleries developing relationships with these smaller spaces to make the transition from the emerging market to the mega-gallery smoothly and without that middle tier.  So, I see the role of commercial galleries perpetuating this kind of ‘go or grow’ crisis narrative, where there is a lot of activity with little remuneration beyond exposure at the bottom, and far less activity at the top where most of the money concentrates in brand names.  “Dude, you got a Colen!” <br/><br/>I know you and Elizabeth discussed new models of collaboration to help support, produce, and distribute artists’ work, but in a model where the middle market is diminishing, I’m not entirely sure that there is a gallery model that can effectively compete.  I imagine that as an alternative to this economic reality, we will see more models like Regina Rex and Essex Flowers where artists will collectively run spaces to socialize the cost of running a space and distributing the rewards of the speculative risk model, anticipated sales after production, differently.  I also imagine that the representation model that BHQF shares with Vito Schnabel, functioning more as an agent to help fund and produce their events and exhibitions will see an increase as more collectives emerge, in part because of altruistic and ideological motives, but also because of the the commercial and critical success of BHQF. <br/><br/> But to the previous point, if we were able to reconsider our notions of the vanity gallery, often derided as ‘pay to play’ we might see a model where artists and dealers collaborate and socialize the speculative model where everyone subsidizes the overhead (shifting that capital requirement from the dealer along to everyone involved) and shares in the rewards in a progressive manner.  This might also help artists and dealers co-produce art works, projects, and events that might not otherwise be affordable by individual artists.  I had a very interesting conversation with <a href='http://mollycrabapple.com/'>Molly Crabapple</a> where she simply wondered in amazement that artists, like myself, would work for months and years on art without getting paid in advance but in hopes of selling it. Her background as a commercial illustrator left her marveling at our collective stupidity in a way.  I really didn’t have much of a counter-argument other than our notions of selectivity, that a dealer must pick the artist to individuate them from their peers to bring their work to attention to the collectors, creates the illusion that art making is pure and autonomous. This perpetuates the illusion that money and exchange just being a kind of necessary evil that happens behind closed doors in hushed tones. This idea is rooted in our 19th century model of the artist as the Bohemian, operating outside social constraints, making poverty synonymous with authenticity and integrity.   That’s not really a problem the mega-galleries have to deal with with, considering they have started dividing their own staff into sales and development to keep production and distribution at a discreet distance and not shatter the illusion that artists and even their dealers are autonomous and the art is made without concern for money. <br/><br/><b>Winkleman:</b> Some have suggested curators can fill in for dealers with regards to providing a sounding board or fostering a studio practice dialog, and artists can sell their work via channels that don't necessarily give them that service that gallerists previously provided. Do you see any advantages/disadvantages to that?<br/><br/><b>Powhida:</b> I’m a terrible person to talk to about this.  I don’t have many curators in my studio and I don’t think we get along very well.  I often find curators to be increasingly specialized creatures that are sensitive to critique of the institutions that they have to negotiate with.  I do know a number of excellent curators, but I assume most of them still don’t want to deal with my work because of art world politics.  My last visit with curators included a group of well-intentioned twenty somethings who were filling in for their boss.  They didn’t seem to know anything about my work after reaching out to me, so I didn’t try to convince them of anything. I obviously was not included in that particular show about the economy.  So, I’m not sure that curators are going to fill in for dealers as being sounding boards, and what would motivate a curator to establish a long-term relationship with a particular artist? I think for me, the big disadvantage of relying on curators to provide feedback and support is that they are at once a small group negotiating their own interests in the work with that of the institutions they represent.<br/><br/>I’m reminded of<a href='http://www.brooklynmuseum.org/exhibitions/go/'> Brooklyn GO</a> when thinking about the relationship between curators or dealers and artists. There are very few curators and dealers relative to artists, and the prize of Brooklyn GO was at base, an opportunity to have work reach a curator’s eyes.  I think this entire question is really only applicable to represented artists or artists who have achieved a certain level of recognition.  In reality, most artists are other artists sounding boards and the ones who foster a studio practice dialog.  I am very lucky to have worked with you, Lisa Schroeder, Sara Jo Romero, Stephen Lyons, Charlie James, and now Magda and Tamas at Postmasters, who have all been involved in my development, but then again, I’m part of a small and diminishing group of artists with representation in the middle market. <br/><br/><b>Winkleman:</b> A famous New York art critic once told me he thought solo exhibitions in the gallery make no commercial sense anymore and are produced solely to keep artists happy. That they are about the artist's egos. He indicted his own profession in that, mind you, feeling that nothing he wrote about solo shows made any difference. Response?<br/><br/><b>Powhida</b>: I have to agree with <a href='http://www.spearswms.com/spears-world/salon/josh-spero/47902/david-zwirner-the-art-world-must-save-smaller-galleries.thtml'>David Zwirner</a> here that the alternative is a little bit dismal, producing and debuting new works in an episodic manner at four day art fair spectacles where even attention becomes a commodity.  I just took down a show I worked on for a year at Charlie’s gallery in LA and based on four sales, the show made economic sense for both of us.  While I certainly could have done versions of the work or shown a few of the works at an art fair, I don’t think the show would have had nearly the same impact.  The show depended thematically on the relationship between each text/object pairing.  Producing the show for a year did not make me happy, it was nerve-wracking and difficult, and I probably would’ve been relieved if Charlie had said “this is a terrible idea, go make some drawings about Koons,” which would have been infinitely easier.  If anything, even <a href='http://www.marlboroughgallery.com/exhibitions/powhida'>my staged performance piece at Marlborough Gallery</a> was a critique of shows that seem like are entirely an extension of an artistic ego as brand.  I find the idea that solo shows are only about making artists’ happy off base and that I hope the aforementioned critic sees an excellent, thoughtful solo exhibition of inter-related works that convey something greater than their individual parts soon. <br/><br/>I also agree with Zwirner that four to six week shows provide an opportunity for a broader, if still limited audience interested in art, to really see the work.  This includes the public, who aren’t going to be traveling to every art fair in the world.  It would be wonderful if art galleries open to the public received a some tax breaks or rent subsidies for providing what <a href='http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/03/arts/design/chelsea-art-galleries-struggle-to-restore-and-reopen.html?pagewanted=all'>Zwirner called “the craziest freebie in the world.” </a> If the market can’t support it, perhaps it’s time to advocate for the kind of value that Chelsea and other art galleries provide freely to anyone interested enough to look. <br/><br/><b>Winkleman:</b> Artist-run models keep emerging, which would on the surface of it seem to be a good response to dealers' crises. Would you consider opening an exhibition space and running it? What might the advantages be over a dealer-run space? How would you imagine dealing with the disadvantages (e.g., less time in the studio, managerial headaches, etc).<br/><br/><b>Powhida:</b> Years ago, <a href='http://www.tomsanford.com/'>Tom Sanford</a> asked me if I was interested in opening a gallery with other artists.  Tom often took pride in finding any way he could to cut his former dealer Leo Koening out of any sales.  He may have been joking about this, but I think Tom was ahead of the game on this, seeing the writing on the wall for his own relationship with Leo, the water had settled after the splash and Tom was beginning to think about the long term.  At that point, I politely considered the idea, but dismissed it because I had just spent years trying to develop relationships with commercial galleries and crack the barrier of selectivity and find an audience. I didn’t want to build that from scratch and saw immediate disadvantages in how collectors or critics might view a group of artists representing themselves and collectively running a gallery.  I allowed my own understanding of how the system worked, its’ deep roots of selectivity and privilege, to short-circuit my own thinking about what Tom was suggesting at the time.  Now as artists have begun to form collectively run galleries that aren’t always about exhibiting and selling their own work, including Jen Dalton and Jennifer McCoy’s low-price gallery model [<a href='http://www.auxiliaryprojects.com/'>Auxiliary Projects</a>], out of necessity, the perception isn’t “look at those desperate artists trying to show their own work.  They must be terrible if they can’t get a gallery...”  The narrative is now received with greater understanding and terms like ‘horizontal hierarchy’ are being used to counter the established narratives of selectivity and the vertical hierarchies that support fix and six-figure branded art objects.  Even the often gratingly conservative <a href='http://galleristny.com/2013/06/new-artist-run-gallery-essex-flowers-will-open-on-the-les-june-28/'><i>GalleristNY</i> found a way to talk nice</a> about Essex Flowers, in part, because it made a "splash."<br/><br/>I think I would be interested in running a gallery collectively for some of the reasons I mentioned earlier about subsidizing the speculative model, if I didn’t have three strong relationships with commercial galleries.  I’d be interested in following a model like <a href='http://suncityprojectspace.com/'>Heliopolis in Greenpoint </a>(which is awesome, but lacked the elusive ‘context’ Elizabeth refers to and hasn’t received the attention it deserves) where the artists are partner/directors of the space and do very interesting shows.  They share the responsibilities which mitigates some of the downsides you mention, but it doesn’t solve the problem of a hundred years of collectors working primarily with dealers as arbitrators of taste.  I think the biggest challenge for a collectively run artist gallery model would be establishing relationships with elites, who may want access to artists, but also desire the validation of an informed opinion and expertise of a dealer in agreement with their own feelings.  Most galleries after all are only as strong as their relationships with collectors, curators, critics, and sometimes, the artists.  I think what happened at Max Protetch Gallery is an example of this.  It barely lasted a season after it was sold to different owner and became Mullensteen Gallery.  Most of the represented artists left immediately, and the new program never really had a chance. <br/><br/>So, at the moment I’ve still got a lot invested with the relationships I’ve established with my dealers, both professionally and personally, and I’m focusing my efforts at working collectively in the area of trying to establish long term artist-owned studio spaces and open a dialogue with the community to address multiple interests. I certainly believe there is room for collaboration with different groups to establish creative, arts-driven community centers, artist-run spaces, and possibly new models of artist-dealer relationships to name a few possibilities.  </span> Fri, 05 Jul 2013 07:25:18 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list A Conversation with William Powhida on the Contemporary Artist's "Narrative" <span style=''>One of the themes I kept coming back to when talking with Elizabeth Dee (see our two-part conversation on the contemporary gallery model <a href='http://www.edwardwinkleman.com/2013/06/an-interview-with-elizabeth-dee-about.html'>here</a> and <a href='http://www.edwardwinkleman.com/2013/06/a-conversation-with-elizabeth-dee-on.html'>here</a>) was how the narrative (or story) of the art gallery seems to be in flux...some have even said "in crisis." What I mean by that specifically, is that why people open and run galleries, what they hope to do while running one, and what brings them to close one seems to be changing a fair bit all around us, at least compared with 10 years ago, when we first got into this business. <br/><br/>I'm a big believer that making decisions is always easier when you know the narrative you're working within and the goals you're working toward. It's why <a href='http://www.amazon.com/How-Start-Run-Commercial-Gallery/dp/1581156642/ref%3Dsr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1372681627&sr=8-1&keywords=edward+winkleman'>in my book</a> I highly recommend new galleries write a mission statement and business plan. With these tools as your guide, you can make much smarter decisions about where to spend your time and money. <br/><br/>Thinking about this some more, I realized that gallerists are, of course, only one small part of the art industry, and if their narratives are changing it stands to reason that's because the narratives of the players around them (artists, collectors, curators, critics, historians, etc.) are changing as well. And so I have decided to publish a series of conversations with the various players in the art world, examining whether they agree that their narratives are in flux, and if so where they think they're headed. Naturally, not everyone within a certain role will agree on this, which is why I look forward to your feedback on the interviews. <br/><br/>It makes sense to begin the series with an artist, the one player in the art world without whom the rest of us would look silly doing what we do. I'm delighted that one of the artists I know to have given such matters a great deal of thought, William Powhida, has agreed to be part of the first in the series. Full disclosure: I've worked with Bill on various projects, and we have had an ongoing dialog about the art world for quite some time now. <br/><br/>For those of you who haven't had the pleasure of making his acquaintance, here's a bit about William Powhida (from <a href='http://williampowhida.com/wordpress/'>his website</a>):</span><br/><blockquote class='tr_bq'><span style=''>William Powhida (b. 1976, New York) is a G-E-N-I-U-S and habitual critic of the art world. Powhida lives and works in New York. He studied painting at Syracuse University where he easily received a B.F.A with honors and scored an M.F.A. from the <strike>cheap-assed</strike>famed Hunter College Program.<i> Getting a honors there was a joke. </i>He has exhibited internationally in New York, Los Angles, Seattle, London, Madrid, Miami, Chicago, Copenhagen, Austria, Dublin, and even the Canary Islands . Recent shows include <i>Derivatives</i> at Postmasters Gallery, and <i>POWHIDA</i> at Marlborough Chelsea, which made people <i><b>really fucking mad</b></i>. He recently exhibited some giant drawings about the balkanization of the art world done in collaboration with Jade Townsend at Gallery Poulsen in Copenhagen, Denmark.</span><br/><span style=''><br/></span><span style=''>He has organized exhibitions including <i>#class</i> and <i>#rank</i> with Jennifer Dalton, <i>Magicality</i> with Eric Trosko, and <i>Dunkle Wolke</i> at StorefrontBK in the dreaded Bushwick. He also collaborated with Jade on the Lemonade Stand and the ABMB Hooverville drawing. His work has been discussed in the <i>New York Times, Artforum, Art in America, The Brooklyn Rail, Art News, Artinfo, Artnet, Hyperallergic, Art Fag City</i> among others. He completed a publishing residency at the Lower East Side Printshop and was the connecting communities resident at the John Michael Kohler Arts Center in 2011, while his show at Marlborough imploded and may have killed several careers. He is currently finishing new works for a show at Charlie James Gallery in Los Angeles opening April 20th, 2013.  [EW: This show got fantastic press...<a href='http://www.edwardwinkleman.com/2013/04/bill-by-bill.html'>I wrote about it</a> a while back.]</span><br/><span style=''><br/></span><span style=''>Currently he is represented in New York by Postmasters Gallery, in Seattle by Platform Gallery, and in Los Angeles by Charlie James Gallery.</span></blockquote><span style=''><br/> ____________________<br/><br/><b>Winkleman:</b> There seem to me three basic artist's career narratives that are widely discussed. </span><br/><ol><li><span style=''>The first one, which faded with the end of Modernism perhaps, was the "kill the father to supplant the son" story whereby successive groups or individuals argued either in manifestos or via their work that some previous dominant movement was now irrelevant and they themselves then rose to prominence, only to have the same thing happen to them shortly thereafter, upon which they entered the growing group of has-beens still doing important work but not getting much attention for it until they reached old age or died.  </span></li><li><span style=''>The second one, the more Post-Modern and perhaps today most popular narrative, is that an artist is discovered by some hard-working dealer or curator, given exhibitions that garner a bit of press, rises through the ranks via biennials and museum group shows, gets fun and lucrative commissions, eventually gets their own retrospective, and eventually enters the canon, living comfortably off their art. </span></li><li><span style=''>In the third one, and this transcends time, the artist perhaps makes a splash for a while, but then really never gets much traction for a period, during which they teach or give up on the art world, sometimes to be rediscovered and get a second splash, sometimes not. Sometimes they keep making their work happily anyway, and sometimes they get jaded and quit.</span></li></ol><span style=''>Do any of these narratives still hold much appeal for artists today? Do any of them, or any combination of them, seem realistic?<br/><br/><b>Powhida</b>: I can only speak for myself, but I do know a lot of artists and my thoughts about these narratives are also informed by those artists’ experiences.  I think the second model is what I was taught to believe during my BFA and MFA, reading the art media, and following visibly successful artists. The Bruce High Quality Foundation (BHQF) is a perfect example of the second model, as they are currently having their <a href='http://www.brooklynmuseum.org/exhibitions/bruce_high_quality/'>first museum show at the Brooklyn Museum of Art,</a> although as collective, not an individual, making their role in the narrative a little more unique than say, Corey Arcangel.  His career hits most of the marks of the second narrative as well and he seems to be doing just fine on a normal timeline, unlike Jacob Kassay who skipped most of the narrative elements and jumped almost directly to “living comfortably.”<br/><br/>The first model is obviously historical and there is general agreement, even if it’s not entirely true, that the avant-garde model you describe is dead. Interestingly, it seems that the reverse of that avant-garde model might actually be happening, wherein different groups seem to be arguing that previous dominant models such as Modernism are still relevant. Neo-modern artists focusing on process and form come to mind, specifically the new casualists. <br/><br/>Personally, the third model is not appealing at all, but unfortunately seems to be the more realistic narrative for many artists, particularly in the art market where a few sales can be equated with ‘making a splash’. When I think of the third model I often think of Lee Lozano who got ‘jaded and quit’, or disgusted and quit, and was later rediscovered.  I often have to remind myself to not go Lozano and move upstate to raise grass-fed goats. <br/><br/>Still, the third narrative is also unrealistic for most artists. For many artists there simply is no splash, ever, just a kind of long, slow march of making art in relative anonymity with enough opportunities to show work publicly that artists keep their studios open and practice going.  Many of these artists have MFA’s and would consider themselves professional artists, even if they are not generating any income of their art. <br/><br/><b>Winkleman:</b> What components of the current realistic narrative today are missing from those three earlier ones?<br/><br/><b>Powhida: </b>The two contemporary narratives of artistic success today that you outlined are both just highly unlikely for most artists within the kind of MFA sphere of art that we are discussing.   Most artists won’t ever experience much of a splash, the proliferation of art news outlets notwithstanding.  Of the relatively small number that do receive some recognition, even fewer will ever have anything remotely approximating the increasing levels of career spanning success.  Missing from the two most likely narratives is an acknowledgement of the majority of artists working in relative anonymity.  This isn’t a narrative that many artists aspire to, but one arrived at after years of working without making a splash or hitting any of the benchmarks you’ve described. <br/><br/>A friend recently admitted his aspiration had become to paint for his friends and family.  I found it to be a bit depressing at first, but in some ways, his is a very realistic level of expectation at this point in his artistic career.  In my friend’s comment, I think I can see what is missing in between the ‘splash’ (that may never come) and “living comfortably off your art” (which is lottery odds) is a vast, subtle landscape of adequacy and different measures of success other than art world MFA career ladder. I think this includes many components of that ladder, but not always in a forward trajectory to the International Art Event Circuit or blue-chip galleries. Success may be a well-received group show, an opportune residency, a long-sought after grant, the personal fulfillment of a practice, participation in an active, vital community, or long-deserved review. <br/><br/>This isn’t a narrative that makes a sexy magazine profile or will continuously produce the kind of validation collectors need to plunk down on five- and six-figure objects and artistic brands, but it is the one that most artists will experience; an infrequent and episodic series of successes that don’t create a coherent narrative that we identify with the seventy-five artists the art world can support at any one moment. It’s a vertical hierarchy if only because of the economics of the art market; very few artists earn enough to ever ‘live comfortably’.  Increasingly, even that narrative seems to be that even fewer artists will ‘live lavishly’ with large studios filled with assistants.  I know a woman who provides private yoga sessions for an artist and his assistants.  I imagine it’s a pleasant work environment.<br/><br/>Finally, there is an emerging narrative that I don’t think most art dealers will like, except perhaps Vito Schnabel.  BHQF represents something of the authorless, artist collective narrative, which has had its moments previously (Forcefield anyone?) but is now part of the broader critique of Capitalism.  There is a real sense that the emphasis and celebration of individual artists may give way to greater artist or even creative collectives, re-affirming that maybe Barthes was right about the “Death of the Author” after all.  I mention this after nearly two years of Occupy Wall Street activity that has not faded away, but has faded into the fabric of the art world.  It’s why I joked on Twitter about Elizabeth [Dee] saying “horizontal hierarchy” that precipitated this discussion.  I also mention it after hearing that Parsons is shifting their art program away from the individual model towards group dynamics.  It’s an interesting narrative to consider in so much as it doesn’t automatically mean it negates the market, BHQF can achieve five-figures at auction, remain relatively anonymous as subjects, run a free school, and critique the apparatus in which they operate. <br/><br/><b>Winkleman:</b> Some would say younger and mid-level galleries are in crisis because they can't sort out how to help artists who are not yet powerful. They can't sort out what their narratives should be. This would suggest perhaps the artists themselves are unable to articulate what they want/need from those galleries, perhaps being solely focused on what they want/need from bigger galleries. Are artists in crisis over their narratives?<br/><br/><b>Powhida:</b> I think my last response speaks to some of the crises artists face, which is operating within a system that is increasingly bifurcated between a very small group of stars and everyone else.  I think it’s the same condition that you and Elizabeth were discussing, prompting you both to speculate about new models of distribution and production. I think for many of the artists who would be defined as <a href='http://www.gregorysholette.com/books/darkmatter_books.html'>‘dark matter’ by Gregory Sholette,</a> it’s redefining for themselves what is meaningful.  It’s hard to create a narrative of success when you’re the dark matter against which the stars shine, but I find that it’s important for artists to be able to articulate what is valuable about art beyond prices and the market.  I think this is becoming increasingly clear because of our growing awareness of income inequality and how it expresses itself not only in the art market, but the broader Capitalist economy, climate change, and ‘democratic’ society. I think it’s even harder to desire the kind of the success defined in your second narrative if one has any class consciousness at all.<br/><br/><b>Winkleman:</b> What roles, if any, do you see commercial art galleries playing in the emerging narratives? A central one, a marginal one, a fleeting one?<br/><br/><b>Powhida:</b> I think we are seeing the roles commercial galleries will play in the emerging narratives happening now.  It’s clear to me in what Alain Servais, <a href='http://www.edwardwinkleman.com/2012/08/whats-art-got-to-do-with-it-open-thread.html'>whose writings</a> you brought to my attention, calls the ‘go or grow’ model.  There is a diminishing role for the middle where long, slowly developing art careers happen that don’t always result in blue chip status or retrospectives, but regular exhibitions and stable, if modest sales.  I’m getting accustomed to hearing about galleries closing and gallerists becoming directors at bigger galleries.  Obviously, very few galleries are growing into mega galleries with ‘museum-quality’ shows, which one art historian friend recently described as ways for galleries to present “A” level museum works along side “B” and “C” level available secondary market works. Conversely, at the bottom you have an expanding pool of always emerging galleries to produce the ‘splash’ moments for a number of artists who will be pulled up into the larger galleries very quickly if the splash is sufficiently large.  I’ve heard gossip of mega-galleries developing relationships with these smaller spaces to make the transition from the emerging market to the mega-gallery smoothly and without that middle tier.  So, I see the role of commercial galleries perpetuating this kind of ‘go or grow’ crisis narrative, where there is a lot of activity with little remuneration beyond exposure at the bottom, and far less activity at the top where most of the money concentrates in brand names.  “Dude, you got a Colen!” <br/><br/>I know you and Elizabeth discussed new models of collaboration to help support, produce, and distribute artists’ work, but in a model where the middle market is diminishing, I’m not entirely sure that there is a gallery model that can effectively compete.  I imagine that as an alternative to this economic reality, we will see more models like Regina Rex and Essex Flowers where artists will collectively run spaces to socialize the cost of running a space and distributing the rewards of the speculative risk model, anticipated sales after production, differently.  I also imagine that the representation model that BHQF shares with Vito Schnabel, functioning more as an agent to help fund and produce their events and exhibitions will see an increase as more collectives emerge, in part because of altruistic and ideological motives, but also because of the the commercial and critical success of BHQF. <br/><br/> But to the previous point, if we were able to reconsider our notions of the vanity gallery, often derided as ‘pay to play’ we might see a model where artists and dealers collaborate and socialize the speculative model where everyone subsidizes the overhead (shifting that capital requirement from the dealer along to everyone involved) and shares in the rewards in a progressive manner.  This might also help artists and dealers co-produce art works, projects, and events that might not otherwise be affordable by individual artists.  I had a very interesting conversation with <a href='http://mollycrabapple.com/'>Molly Crabapple</a> where she simply wondered in amazement that artists, like myself, would work for months and years on art without getting paid in advance but in hopes of selling it. Her background as a commercial illustrator left her marveling at our collective stupidity in a way.  I really didn’t have much of a counter-argument other than our notions of selectivity, that a dealer must pick the artist to individuate them from their peers to bring their work to attention to the collectors, creates the illusion that art making is pure and autonomous. This perpetuates the illusion that money and exchange just being a kind of necessary evil that happens behind closed doors in hushed tones. This idea is rooted in our 19th century model of the artist as the Bohemian, operating outside social constraints, making poverty synonymous with authenticity and integrity.   That’s not really a problem the mega-galleries have to deal with with, considering they have started dividing their own staff into sales and development to keep production and distribution at a discreet distance and not shatter the illusion that artists and even their dealers are autonomous and the art is made without concern for money. <br/><br/><b>Winkleman:</b> Some have suggested curators can fill in for dealers with regards to providing a sounding board or fostering a studio practice dialog, and artists can sell their work via channels that don't necessarily give them that service that gallerists previously provided. Do you see any advantages/disadvantages to that?<br/><br/><b>Powhida:</b> I’m a terrible person to talk to about this.  I don’t have many curators in my studio and I don’t think we get along very well.  I often find curators to be increasingly specialized creatures that are sensitive to critique of the institutions that they have to negotiate with.  I do know a number of excellent curators, but I assume most of them still don’t want to deal with my work because of art world politics.  My last visit with curators included a group of well-intentioned twenty somethings who were filling in for their boss.  They didn’t seem to know anything about my work after reaching out to me, so I didn’t try to convince them of anything. I obviously was not included in that particular show about the economy.  So, I’m not sure that curators are going to fill in for dealers as being sounding boards, and what would motivate a curator to establish a long-term relationship with a particular artist? I think for me, the big disadvantage of relying on curators to provide feedback and support is that they are at once a small group negotiating their own interests in the work with that of the institutions they represent.<br/><br/>I’m reminded of<a href='http://www.brooklynmuseum.org/exhibitions/go/'> Brooklyn GO</a> when thinking about the relationship between curators or dealers and artists. There are very few curators and dealers relative to artists, and the prize of Brooklyn GO was at base, an opportunity to have work reach a curator’s eyes.  I think this entire question is really only applicable to represented artists or artists who have achieved a certain level of recognition.  In reality, most artists are other artists sounding boards and the ones who foster a studio practice dialog.  I am very lucky to have worked with you, Lisa Schroeder, Sara Jo Romero, Stephen Lyons, Charlie James, and now Magda and Tamas at Postmasters, who have all been involved in my development, but then again, I’m part of a small and diminishing group of artists with representation in the middle market. <br/><br/><b>Winkleman:</b> A famous New York art critic once told me he thought solo exhibitions in the gallery make no commercial sense anymore and are produced solely to keep artists happy. That they are about the artist's egos. He indicted his own profession in that, mind you, feeling that nothing he wrote about solo shows made any difference. Response?<br/><br/><b>Powhida</b>: I have to agree with <a href='http://www.spearswms.com/spears-world/salon/josh-spero/47902/david-zwirner-the-art-world-must-save-smaller-galleries.thtml'>David Zwirner</a> here that the alternative is a little bit dismal, producing and debuting new works in an episodic manner at four day art fair spectacles where even attention becomes a commodity.  I just took down a show I worked on for a year at Charlie’s gallery in LA and based on four sales, the show made economic sense for both of us.  While I certainly could have done versions of the work or shown a few of the works at an art fair, I don’t think the show would have had nearly the same impact.  The show depended thematically on the relationship between each text/object pairing.  Producing the show for a year did not make me happy, it was nerve-wracking and difficult, and I probably would’ve been relieved if Charlie had said “this is a terrible idea, go make some drawings about Koons,” which would have been infinitely easier.  If anything, even <a href='http://www.marlboroughgallery.com/exhibitions/powhida'>my staged performance piece at Marlborough Gallery</a> was a critique of shows that seem like are entirely an extension of an artistic ego as brand.  I find the idea that solo shows are only about making artists’ happy off base and that I hope the aforementioned critic sees an excellent, thoughtful solo exhibition of inter-related works that convey something greater than their individual parts soon. <br/><br/>I also agree with Zwirner that four to six week shows provide an opportunity for a broader, if still limited audience interested in art, to really see the work.  This includes the public, who aren’t going to be traveling to every art fair in the world.  It would be wonderful if art galleries open to the public received a some tax breaks or rent subsidies for providing what <a href='http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/03/arts/design/chelsea-art-galleries-struggle-to-restore-and-reopen.html?pagewanted=all'>Zwirner called “the craziest freebie in the world.” </a> If the market can’t support it, perhaps it’s time to advocate for the kind of value that Chelsea and other art galleries provide freely to anyone interested enough to look. <br/><br/><b>Winkleman:</b> Artist-run models keep emerging, which would on the surface of it seem to be a good response to dealers' crises. Would you consider opening an exhibition space and running it? What might the advantages be over a dealer-run space? How would you imagine dealing with the disadvantages (e.g., less time in the studio, managerial headaches, etc).<br/><br/><b>Powhida:</b> Years ago, <a href='http://www.tomsanford.com/'>Tom Sanford</a> asked me if I was interested in opening a gallery with other artists.  Tom often took pride in finding any way he could to cut his former dealer Leo Koening out of any sales.  He may have been joking about this, but I think Tom was ahead of the game on this, seeing the writing on the wall for his own relationship with Leo, the water had settled after the splash and Tom was beginning to think about the long term.  At that point, I politely considered the idea, but dismissed it because I had just spent years trying to develop relationships with commercial galleries and crack the barrier of selectivity and find an audience. I didn’t want to build that from scratch and saw immediate disadvantages in how collectors or critics might view a group of artists representing themselves and collectively running a gallery.  I allowed my own understanding of how the system worked, its’ deep roots of selectivity and privilege, to short-circuit my own thinking about what Tom was suggesting at the time.  Now as artists have begun to form collectively run galleries that aren’t always about exhibiting and selling their own work, including Jen Dalton and Jennifer McCoy’s low-price gallery model [<a href='http://www.auxiliaryprojects.com/'>Auxiliary Projects</a>], out of necessity, the perception isn’t “look at those desperate artists trying to show their own work.  They must be terrible if they can’t get a gallery...”  The narrative is now received with greater understanding and terms like ‘horizontal hierarchy’ are being used to counter the established narratives of selectivity and the vertical hierarchies that support fix and six-figure branded art objects.  Even the often gratingly conservative <a href='http://galleristny.com/2013/06/new-artist-run-gallery-essex-flowers-will-open-on-the-les-june-28/'><i>GalleristNY</i> found a way to talk nice</a> about Essex Flowers, in part, because it made a "splash."<br/><br/>I think I would be interested in running a gallery collectively for some of the reasons I mentioned earlier about subsidizing the speculative model, if I didn’t have three strong relationships with commercial galleries.  I’d be interested in following a model like <a href='http://suncityprojectspace.com/'>Heliopolis in Greenpoint </a>(which is awesome, but lacked the elusive ‘context’ Elizabeth refers to and hasn’t received the attention it deserves) where the artists are partner/directors of the space and do very interesting shows.  They share the responsibilities which mitigates some of the downsides you mention, but it doesn’t solve the problem of a hundred years of collectors working primarily with dealers as arbitrators of taste.  I think the biggest challenge for a collectively run artist gallery model would be establishing relationships with elites, who may want access to artists, but also desire the validation of an informed opinion and expertise of a dealer in agreement with their own feelings.  Most galleries after all are only as strong as their relationships with collectors, curators, critics, and sometimes, the artists.  I think what happened at Max Protetch Gallery is an example of this.  It barely lasted a season after it was sold to different owner and became Mullensteen Gallery.  Most of the represented artists left immediately, and the new program never really had a chance. <br/><br/>So, at the moment I’ve still got a lot invested with the relationships I’ve established with my dealers, both professionally and personally, and I’m focusing my efforts at working collectively in the area of trying to establish long term artist-owned studio spaces and open a dialogue with the community to address multiple interests. I certainly believe there is room for collaboration with different groups to establish creative, arts-driven community centers, artist-run spaces, and possibly new models of artist-dealer relationships to name a few possibilities.  </span> Fri, 05 Jul 2013 07:29:46 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list Hello world! <p>Welcome to WordPress. This is your first post. Edit or delete it, then start blogging!</p> <div class='feedflare'> <a href='http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/apleasantview?a=HocpXEBIF-E%3ACnfC9FhoZBw%3AyIl2AUoC8zA'><img src='http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/apleasantview?d=yIl2AUoC8zA' border='0'/></a> <a href='http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/apleasantview?a=HocpXEBIF-E%3ACnfC9FhoZBw%3Aqj6IDK7rITs'><img src='http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/apleasantview?d=qj6IDK7rITs' border='0'/></a> </div><img src='http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/apleasantview/~4/HocpXEBIF-E' height='1' width='1'/> Wed, 03 Jul 2013 07:09:43 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list Movie Trailer: Grey City <p> &lt;object height="360" width="640"&gt;&lt;param name="movie" value="//www.youtube-nocookie.com/v/7NpppZaGfJo?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US"/&gt;&lt;param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"/&gt;&lt;param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"/&gt;&lt;embed allowfullscreen="true" allowscriptaccess="always" height="360" src="//www.youtube-nocookie.com/v/7NpppZaGfJo?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="640"&gt;&lt;/embed&gt;&lt;/object&gt;</p> <p> Grey City is tentatively set to be released in October in Brazilian theaters and  festivals around the world.  The film was shot over 6 years in the city of Sao Paulo, showing the tension between the amazing street art scene and a law called "Clean City". </p> Fri, 05 Jul 2013 07:26:19 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list Book Review: Arthur Danto, What Art Is <a href='http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-e4WPoLzi8A0/Uc26tsqxn1I/AAAAAAAAAlo/GD_Dgklz4V0/s360/Danto.jpg' style='clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;'><img src='http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-e4WPoLzi8A0/Uc26tsqxn1I/AAAAAAAAAlo/GD_Dgklz4V0/s320/Danto.jpg' border='0' height='272' width='320'/></a><br/><br/>This month, I review Danto's <i>What Art Is</i> for Andrew Berardini and Sarah Williams' great new project and online journal The Los Angeles Art Book Review.<br/><br/>Here is the link:<br/><br/><a href='http://theartbookreview.org/2013/06/25/what-art-is/'>http://theartbookreview.org/2013/06/25/what-art-is/</a><br/><br/><br/><a href='https://www.amazon.com/dp/030017487X/ref%3Das_li_ss_til?tag=i014-20&camp=0&creative=0&linkCode=as4&creativeASIN=030017487X&adid=1J860RMQRJ71FKM9K0DE&'>If you like the book (as I do), you can find it here for purchase:</a><br/><br/><br/><br/> Sat, 29 Jun 2013 06:59:31 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list Questions for Art Museums in the Information Age <p dir='ltr' id='docs-internal-guid-3aaece00-3f62-c04c-1b70-cfa78535fba5'><a href='http://blogs.walkerart.org/centerpoints/files/2013/06/Aspen.jpg'><img class='alignnone size-full wp-image-5382' src='http://blogs.walkerart.org/centerpoints/files/2013/06/Aspen.jpg' height='318' alt='Aspen' width='440'/></a></p> <p dir='ltr'>“With the massive social, demographic, technological, and economic shifts that have been radically transforming global society in recent decades, art museums around the world have been managing in environments of significant change,” writes Walker executive director Olga Viso in the introduction to a new white paper. “Struggling with issues of audience relevance, leadership and financial sustainability, museum directors around the world are boldly questioning the future of the art museum.”</p> <p>That paper — <a href='http://blogs.walkerart.org/centerpoints/files/2013/06/The-Art-Museum-Today-in-Discussion_0.pdf'>“The Art Museum Today, in Discussion” (pdf)</a>, <a href='https://aamd.org/our-members/from-the-field/propositions-for-the-future-of-the-art-museum'>authored</a> by LACMA director Michael Govan — is the result of a March 2013 convening in Aspen, organized by Viso, that brought together 17 museum directors from around the globe, as well as six “outside provocateurs,” to wrestle with the issues museums face today and into the future. The seminar follows work done in 2012 by the Association of Art Museum Directors (AAMD) Futures Task Force, also chaired by Viso, which identified four key issues facing museums:</p> <p>• changing nature of audiences (demographics and expectations);<br/> • relevance and content of mission statements;<br/> • sustainability of institutional financial models and finding alternative funding/revenue streams;<br/> • sharing authority (tensions between curatorial voice and public voice).</p> <p>Summarizing the convening’s findings, the paper “reflects a strong embrace of the diversity of museums, the challenges they face, and propositions for their respective futures,” as Viso writes.</p> <p><a href='http://blogs.walkerart.org/centerpoints/files/2013/06/The-Art-Museum-Today-in-Discussion_0.pdf'>Read the paper</a> or <a href='http://blogs.walkerart.org/centerpoints/files/2013/06/ASPEN-INSTITUTE-CONVENING-EXECUTIVE-SUMMARY-trb1.pdf'>read the executive summary of the March convening</a>.</p> <p> </p> Fri, 05 Jul 2013 07:29:18 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list Surfing with Satoshi <p>&lt;iframe width="440" height="248" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/ssqM5EgjhQM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;<br/> Watch inspector Clouseau looking for Satoshi Nakomoto in the new Alterazioni Video caper at Greene Naftali's "Freak Out" summer show. Filmed in Puerto Rico in February 2013, with Eric Banks, Detective Snyder, Andrea Sassi, Camila Yari and Wolfgang Staehle.</p> <br class='clear'/><p><a href='http://post.thing.net/node/8703'>read more</a></p> Fri, 05 Jul 2013 07:25:57 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list Merck Announces FDA Acceptance of New Drug Application for Januvia <p style='text-align: justify;'>Januvia has been accepted for standard review by the Food and Drug Administration, Merck &amp; Co announced in a press statement referring to the February 16, 2006 approval on the new formulation. The company’s investigational medicine for type 2 diabetes was made the first in a new class of oral medications in the United States and planned to be the first one across the world according to www.drugs.com. An oral inhibitor for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, Januvia represents a new and different approach — right now subject of questions raised by some <a href='http://www.januvialawyers.net/' title='Januvia Lawyers' target='_blank'>Januvia lawyers</a> because of its side effects reported in clinical studies.</p> <p style='text-align: justify;'>Type 2 diabetes is a condition that shows an increase of blood sugar or glucose. With this condition, the body may not produce enough insulin that helps the body break down glucose. Thus, an inhibitor like Januvia may prevent all these adverse side effects because it enhances the body’s own ability to control blood sugar levels by increasing levels of the incretin hormones that helps in decreasing blood sugar levels in patients with type 2 diabetes.</p> <p style='text-align: justify;'>Finally, with millions of people of type 2 diabetes patients worldwide, Januvia may just be the hope and relief that can stop the epidemic of this atrocious disease.</p> <p style='text-align: justify;'>Source:</p> <p style='text-align: justify;'><span style='font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;'>fda.gov</span></p> <p>The post <a href='http://nyfablog.com/health/merck-announces-fda-acceptance-of-new-drug-application-for-januvia/'>Merck Announces FDA Acceptance of New Drug Application for Januvia</a> appeared first on <a href='http://nyfablog.com/'>New York Arts</a>.</p> Fri, 21 Jun 2013 06:55:58 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list Merck Announces FDA Acceptance of New Drug Application for Januvia <p style='text-align: justify;'>Januvia has been accepted for standard review by the Food and Drug Administration, Merck &amp; Co announced in a press statement referring to the February 16, 2006 approval on the new formulation. The company’s investigational medicine for type 2 diabetes was made the first in a new class of oral medications in the United States and planned to be the first one across the world according to www.drugs.com. An oral inhibitor for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, Januvia represents a new and different approach — right now subject of questions raised by some <a href='http://www.januvialawyers.net/' title='Januvia Lawyers' target='_blank'>Januvia lawyers</a> because of its side effects reported in clinical studies.</p> <p style='text-align: justify;'>Type 2 diabetes is a condition that shows an increase of blood sugar or glucose. With this condition, the body may not produce enough insulin that helps the body break down glucose. Thus, an inhibitor like Januvia may prevent all these adverse side effects because it enhances the body’s own ability to control blood sugar levels by increasing levels of the incretin hormones that helps in decreasing blood sugar levels in patients with type 2 diabetes.</p> <p style='text-align: justify;'>Finally, with millions of people of type 2 diabetes patients worldwide, Januvia may just be the hope and relief that can stop the epidemic of this atrocious disease.</p> <p style='text-align: justify;'>Source:</p> <p style='text-align: justify;'><span style='font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;'>fda.gov</span></p> <p>The post <a href='http://nyfablog.com/health/merck-announces-fda-acceptance-of-new-drug-application-for-januvia/'>Merck Announces FDA Acceptance of New Drug Application for Januvia</a> appeared first on <a href='http://nyfablog.com/'>New York Arts</a>.</p> Fri, 05 Jul 2013 07:30:28 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list New Website. New Blog. I have a <a href='http://www.iwilldestroyyou.com/'>new website.</a> And the blog is integrated into the home-page of the new site. All new <a href='http://iwilldestroyyou.com/main/'>blog posts will be continue over here.</a><br/><br/>thanks!<br/><br/>tomN. Tue, 18 Jun 2013 07:15:32 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list The American Art-Union <p/><p>I’m reading <a href='http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0195140494/ref%3Das_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=0195140494&linkCode=as2&tag=tristanmedial-20'>Gotham: A History of New York City to 1898 (The History of New York City)</a><img src='http://www.assoc-amazon.com/e/ir?t=tristanmedial-20&l=as2&o=1&a=0195140494' border='0' height='1' alt='' width='1' style='border: none !important; margin: 0px !important;'/> at the moment, and there is a bit of American art history that was new to me.</p> <blockquote><p>The Panic of 1837 had disrupted Manhattan’s patronage system. Cole, Sully, and Asher Durand found that merchants laughed wanly at the notion of buying paintings with their businesses facing bankruptcy. Spurred by hard times, artists fashioned new and more collective ways of supporting their work. </p> <p>In 1838 portraitist and engraver James Herring established the Apollo Gallery, where painters could exhibit and share in the proceeds of a twenty-five-cent admission fee. When this foundered, Herring decided to reach out to a far broader audience. In 1839, drawing on a model developed in several European cities, he created the Apollo Association, a noncommercial joint stock company. Subscribers contributed five dollars each to a fund, which then purchased works from artists. These were exhibited to the public free of charge and, at year’s end, distributed by lottery to subscribers. Association members also received engraved reproductions of some of the artworks, as well as the group’s Bulletin, the first magazine devoted exclusively to American art. In 1844 the enterprise, now going strong, was renamed the American Art-Union (AAU). </p> <p>The AAU was run by managers whom Herring drew at first from the pool of gentleman art enthusiasts—among them Philip Hone, rentier James W. Beekman, and editors Henry Raymond and William Cullen Bryant. Some were attracted by old republican ideals of stewardship and civic patronage; others hoped art might exert what the Rev. Henry Bellows called “exalting, purifying, calming influences” on the increasingly agitated masses. Young America rallied to the AAU, seeing in it a democratizing project akin to their own. Duyckinck, Mathews, Putnam, and O’Sullivan, delighted to make art available to the many, also hoped that artists freed from dependence on Eurofixated patrons might create an American art. </p> <p>By the late 1840s the American Art-Union was the nation’s primary market for U.S. paintings other than portraits. Each year roughly nineteen thousand subscribers purchased an average of four hundred artworks, benefiting painters, sculptors, and the engravers and die casters who prepared prints for reproduction. The AAU’s gallery, one paper reported, had “grown to be a kind of municipal Institution, visited by the whole people.” The managers had established a luxurious setting on bustling Broadway, replete with ottomans and gas lights, that stayed open at night when working people could come. The gallery drew from “every section of the social system,” the press noted, “from the millionaire of 5th Avenue, to the B’hoy of 3d.” Half a million people visited in 1848, the organization claimed, a number roughly equal to the city’s entire population. </p></blockquote> <p>Here is a <a href='http://www.philaprintshop.com/aau.html'>page</a> with some of the engravings produced by the AAU.</p> <div class='feedflare'> <a href='http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/bloggy/iKOg?a=Lb2CGZrKB5Y%3ACeJ19Lhx9-g%3AyIl2AUoC8zA'><img src='http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/bloggy/iKOg?d=yIl2AUoC8zA' border='0'/></a> <a href='http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/bloggy/iKOg?a=Lb2CGZrKB5Y%3ACeJ19Lhx9-g%3AbcOpcFrp8Mo'><img src='http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/bloggy/iKOg?d=bcOpcFrp8Mo' border='0'/></a> <a href='http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/bloggy/iKOg?a=Lb2CGZrKB5Y%3ACeJ19Lhx9-g%3AD-G1sG01UhQ'><img src='http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/bloggy/iKOg?d=D-G1sG01UhQ' border='0'/></a> <a href='http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/bloggy/iKOg?a=Lb2CGZrKB5Y%3ACeJ19Lhx9-g%3Aqj6IDK7rITs'><img src='http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/bloggy/iKOg?d=qj6IDK7rITs' border='0'/></a> </div><img src='http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/bloggy/iKOg/~4/Lb2CGZrKB5Y' height='1' width='1'/> Fri, 05 Jul 2013 07:24:47 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list Post Frieze Antidote: The Frick Collection <div dir='ltr' style='text-align: left;'> After the contemporary art overload at the fairs, galleries and auction houses the last couple weeks, it was a bit of fresh air to enjoy the <a href='http://www.frick.org/' target='_blank'>Frick Collection's</a> small but important Piero della Francesca exhibition.<br/> <br/> <div class='mod' style='background-color: white; color: #222222; font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 16px;'> <div class='kno-mrg kno-swp kno-mrg-hnm' id='media_result_group' style=''> <ul class='kno-mi' style='border: 0px; display: inline; margin: 0px; padding: 0px;'> <li class='bili img-kc-m bilik kno-fb-ctx iukp10 uh_r' style='border: 0px; display: inline-block; height: 186px; line-height: 1.2; margin: 0px 1px 1px 0px; overflow: hidden; padding: 0px; vertical-align: top; width: 140px;'><a href='http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http%3A//www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/piero/malatesta.jpg&imgrefurl=http%3A//www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/piero/&h=259&w=195&sz=1&tbnid=ymzt2L6DMgiqPM%3A&tbnh=186&tbnw=140&zoom=1&usg=__hi8B3WN4atNywCvSnv0FrC2NwPs=&docid=zk9EjkLPZ4SuiM&itg=1&sa=X&ei=n-6YUc3BFpa44AOrlIG4CQ&ved=0CI4BEPwdMAo' class='bia uh_rl' id='ymzt2L6DMgiqPM:' style='color: #1122cc; cursor: pointer; display: block; height: 186px; margin-left: 0px; margin-top: 0px; text-decoration: none; width: 140px;'><img class='th ' title='http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/piero/' src='https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn%3AANd9GcTmvTD-8HM9hOYgs6gti9tcmDrlFmX9iPqYk-kFECZp96Kd0wHkAFkcID8-' border='0' align='middle' height='186' alt='' style='border: 0px; margin: 0px;' width='140'/></a></li> </ul> <div class='kno-ibrg' style='display: inline-block;'> <div class='img-brk-ls rhsg4 img-brk' style='display: inline-block;'> <div class='birrg' style='font-size: 13px; height: 95px; overflow: hidden;'> <ul class='rg_ul' style='border: 0px; margin: 0px; padding: 0px;'> <li class='bili bilik kno-fb-ctx iukp11 uh_r' style='border: 0px; display: inline-block; height: 94px; line-height: 1.2; margin: 0px 1px 1px 0px; overflow: hidden; padding: 0px; vertical-align: top; width: 112px;'><a href='http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http%3A//www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/piero/flagellation.jpg&imgrefurl=http%3A//www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/piero/&h=775&w=1106&sz=183&tbnid=J4xjyuVFCJOokM%3A&tbnh=94&tbnw=134&zoom=1&usg=__qYIsvI3S0ya5moQr3t2hsazNuH0=&docid=zk9EjkLPZ4SuiM&sa=X&ei=n-6YUc3BFpa44AOrlIG4CQ&ved=0CJIBEP4dMAs' class='bia uh_rl' id='J4xjyuVFCJOokM:' style=''><img class='th ' title='http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/piero/' src='https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn%3AANd9GcQHk3MXL29eXrU5Up8LvpBuvBcfjeEX8qxlfqTr1XY1gJuEYsEwg28XmkMf' border='0' align='middle' height='94' alt='' style='border: 0px; margin: 0px;' width='134'/></a></li> <li class='bili bilik kno-fb-ctx iukp12 uh_r' style='border: 0px; display: inline-block; height: 94px; line-height: 1.2; margin: 0px 1px 1px 0px; overflow: hidden; padding: 0px; vertical-align: top; width: 58px;'><a href='http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http%3A//www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/piero/montefeltro.jpg&imgrefurl=http%3A//www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/piero/&h=1116&w=760&sz=209&tbnid=Tbv2kbIBur-ylM%3A&tbnh=94&tbnw=64&zoom=1&usg=__qbq_LjUNk1vbt_6fx4zwM9xtU10=&docid=zk9EjkLPZ4SuiM&sa=X&ei=n-6YUc3BFpa44AOrlIG4CQ&ved=0CJQBEP4dMAw' class='bia uh_rl' id='Tbv2kbIBur-ylM:' style=''><img class='th ' title='http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/piero/' src='https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn%3AANd9GcRoUnLvh4Q1SaTW5DLxKDFji-1mk6E7nymx5zyMUblGJ22USjWjg4P3Cg' border='0' align='middle' height='94' alt='' style='border: 0px; margin: 0px;' width='64'/></a></li> <li class='bili bilik kno-fb-ctx iukp13 uh_r' style='border: 0px; display: inline-block; height: 94px; line-height: 1.2; margin: 0px 1px 1px 0px; overflow: hidden; padding: 0px; vertical-align: top; width: 59px;'><a href='http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http%3A//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/62/Piero_della_Francesca_045.jpg&imgrefurl=http%3A//commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3APiero_della_Francesca_045.jpg&h=2256&w=1576&sz=415&tbnid=kIDGATBbnTb67M%3A&tbnh=94&tbnw=66&zoom=1&usg=__EcxQISxEzK-PRtAo1As8EaPx33o=&docid=vbRrdA5XRuafcM&sa=X&ei=n-6YUc3BFpa44AOrlIG4CQ&ved=0CJYBEP4dMA0' class='bia uh_rl' id='kIDGATBbnTb67M:' style=''><img class='th ' title='http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Piero_della_Francesca_045.jpg' src='https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn%3AANd9GcSxKBIArkLItqt3uVQ_q2ikTBdpNvDP9ATR0uTaiEpQtW70JD46cZd0wBo' border='0' align='middle' height='94' alt='' style='border: 0px; margin: 0px;' width='66'/></a></li> <li class='bili bilik kno-fb-ctx iukp14 bilirk uh_r' style='border: 0px; display: inline-block; height: 94px; line-height: 1.2; margin: 0px 0px 1px; overflow: hidden; padding: 0px; vertical-align: top; width: 81px;'><a href='http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http%3A//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/10/Madonna_del_parto_piero_della_Francesca.jpg&imgrefurl=http%3A//commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3AMadonna_del_parto_piero_della_Francesca.jpg&h=840&w=800&sz=132&tbnid=KKQdmc6fqLBSEM%3A&tbnh=94&tbnw=90&zoom=1&usg=__IiZ17vkf0o0-Z0m3X58BlSfRt0o=&docid=Leq3PsQHRkAZkM&sa=X&ei=n-6YUc3BFpa44AOrlIG4CQ&ved=0CJgBEP4dMA4' class='bia uh_rl' id='KKQdmc6fqLBSEM:' style=''><img class='th ' title='http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Madonna_del_parto_piero_della_Francesca.jpg' src='https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn%3AANd9GcTPTYWa6a3d_Gr27ecPk8T4ZkPP4zE7JLUt8VCsOtPC6gnptr1F00nOzw' border='0' align='middle' height='94' alt='' style='border: 0px; margin: 0px;' width='90'/></a></li> </ul> </div> <div class='birrg' style='font-size: 13px; height: 92px; overflow: hidden;'> <ul class='rg_ul' style='border: 0px; margin: 0px; padding: 0px;'> <li class='bili bilik kno-fb-ctx iukp15 uh_r' style='border: 0px; display: inline-block; height: 91px; line-height: 1.2; margin: 0px 1px 1px 0px; overflow: hidden; padding: 0px; vertical-align: top; width: 54px;'><a href='http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http%3A//cleansingfiredor.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/15111-madonna-of-senigallia-piero-della-francesca.jpg&imgrefurl=http%3A//cleansingfiredor.com/2010/12/madonna-of-mercy-madonna-of-senigallia/&h=948&w=818&sz=183&tbnid=yrx5Puw3gf_fSM%3A&tbnh=91&tbnw=79&zoom=1&usg=__nNpL4vfgseaUJF-nkWg84ZHZZRI=&docid=ZL8H9AOU_GaduM&sa=X&ei=n-6YUc3BFpa44AOrlIG4CQ&ved=0CJsBEP4dMA8' class='bia uh_rl' id='yrx5Puw3gf_fSM:' style=''><img class='th ' title='http://cleansingfiredor.com/2010/12/madonna-of-mercy-madonna-of-senigallia/' src='https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn%3AANd9GcQzjJtKkh8hbOPKOyHjRZ0RZDf97yvjdAVVtFdnkoClp39GIkPRiYMz4cs' border='0' align='middle' height='91' alt='' style='border: 0px; margin: 0px;' width='79'/></a></li> <li class='bili bilik kno-fb-ctx iukp16 uh_r' style='border: 0px; display: inline-block; height: 91px; line-height: 1.2; margin: 0px 1px 1px 0px; overflow: hidden; padding: 0px; vertical-align: top; width: 86px;'><a href='http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http%3A//2.bp.blogspot.com/_FXmTwKZmSts/TRUw_it1BCI/AAAAAAAADSw/qNG6qZU_CCg/s1600/Piero+della+Francesca%25252C+Nativity%25252C+National+Gallery%25252C+London%25252C+1470.jpg&imgrefurl=http%3A//acravan.blogspot.com/2010/12/nativity-piero-della-francesca_25.html&h=990&w=1000&sz=192&tbnid=y36yHk3RaSpcmM%3A&tbnh=91&tbnw=92&zoom=1&usg=__ziH2n1drj21Uo_qMnH7kl0kEsLg=&docid=m0bb3TcLBOpyeM&sa=X&ei=n-6YUc3BFpa44AOrlIG4CQ&ved=0CJ0BEP4dMBA' class='bia uh_rl' id='y36yHk3RaSpcmM:' style=''><img class='th ' title='http://acravan.blogspot.com/2010/12/nativity-piero-della-francesca_25.html' src='https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn%3AANd9GcRs03BXYlfZ1x4llaSqkgHulV7ABjIC9cR0x23BqnvFjDtCQblC-duemTI' border='0' align='middle' height='91' alt='' style='border: 0px; margin: 0px;' width='92'/></a></li> <li class='bili bilik kno-fb-ctx iukp17 uh_r' style='border: 0px; display: inline-block; height: 91px; line-height: 1.2; margin: 0px 1px 1px 0px; overflow: hidden; padding: 0px; vertical-align: top; width: 57px;'><a href='http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http%3A//cleansingfiredor.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/15042-polyptych-of-the-misericordia-piero-della-francesca.jpg&imgrefurl=http%3A//cleansingfiredor.com/2010/12/madonna-of-mercy-madonna-of-senigallia/&h=1341&w=900&sz=170&tbnid=k7q2EjsZiDSXhM%3A&tbnh=91&tbnw=61&zoom=1&usg=__QEzuIDmxrucSDPiPzHUMx_pWV-Q=&docid=ZL8H9AOU_GaduM&sa=X&ei=n-6YUc3BFpa44AOrlIG4CQ&ved=0CJ8BEP4dMBE' class='bia uh_rl' id='k7q2EjsZiDSXhM:' style='color: #1122cc; cursor: pointer; display: block; height: 91px; margin-left: 0px; margin-top: 0px; text-decoration: none; width: 61px;'><img class='th ' title='http://cleansingfiredor.com/2010/12/madonna-of-mercy-madonna-of-senigallia/' src='https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn%3AANd9GcQ86EzZ8lJ4bUTqoVSn35IJ340WnRIiIv-0OJBDE7LZ3fsi2LvCZk8-8ZM' border='0' align='middle' height='91' alt='' style='border: 0px; margin: 0px;' width='61'/></a></li> <li class='bili bilik kno-fb-ctx iukp18 bilirk uh_r' style='border: 0px; display: inline-block; height: 91px; line-height: 1.2; margin: 0px 0px 1px; overflow: hidden; padding: 0px; vertical-align: top; width: 113px;'><a href='http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http%3A//www.findnewsonline.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/Piero-della-Francesca-in-America.jpg&imgrefurl=http%3A//www.findnewsonline.com/piero-della-francesca-in-america-at-the-frick-new-york-times.html&h=346&w=464&sz=23&tbnid=PVT159woN4MiGM%3A&tbnh=91&tbnw=122&zoom=1&usg=__2sQPlcxHNbzPkuTJmcK1Ntx47gs=&docid=k9Dn6zWNtaD1FM&sa=X&ei=n-6YUc3BFpa44AOrlIG4CQ&ved=0CKEBEP4dMBI' class='bia uh_rl' id='PVT159woN4MiGM:' style=''><img class='th ' title='http://www.findnewsonline.com/piero-della-francesca-in-america-at-the-frick-new-york-times.html' src='https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn%3AANd9GcRvPfxZBjsOk6LU-GhHDoIczynV0q7HBkcsZt5i59cZ4KBSdXG77sHmSA' border='0' align='middle' height='91' alt='' style='border: 0px; margin: 0px;' width='122'/></a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class='kno-ibrg-mit' style=''> <a href='https://www.google.com/search?q=piero+della+francesca&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=n-6YUc3BFpa44AOrlIG4CQ&ved=0CKMBEIke' class='fl' style='color: #0f08af; cursor: pointer; display: inline-block; font-size: 16px; padding: 5px 8px 7px; text-decoration: none;'>More images</a></div> </div> </div> <div class='mod' style='background-color: white; color: #222222; font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 16px;'> <div class='kno-ecr-t-w-st kno-fb-ctx kno-ecr-t' style='margin: 0px 0px 12px; padding: 9px 0px 0px;'> <div class='kno-ecr-ts'> <div class='kno-ecr-pt' style='color: black; font-size: 30px;'> Piero della Francesca</div> <div style='margin-top: 2px;'> <div class='kno-ecr-st' style='color: #999999; margin-top: 2px; overflow: hidden;'> Artist</div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class='mod' style='background-color: white; color: #222222; font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 16px;'> <div class='kno-fb-ctx kno-desc' style='overflow: hidden; padding: 0px 0px 13px;'> Piero della Francesca was a painter of the Early Renaissance. As testified by Giorgio Vasari in his Lives of the Artists, to contemporaries he was also known as a mathematician and geometer. <a href='http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piero_della_Francesca' class='fl q' style='color: #999999; cursor: pointer; font-size: 11px; text-decoration: none;'><span class='kno-desca' style='white-space: nowrap;'>Wikipedia</span></a></div> <div class='kno-ft kno-xs'> <table class='kno-fs ts' style='border-collapse: collapse; width: 424px;'><tbody> <tr><td style='padding: 0px; vertical-align: top; width: 424px;'><div> <div class='kno-f kno-fb-ctx' style='padding: 7px 0px 0px;'> <span class='kno-fh' style='color: #222222;'><a href='https://www.google.com/search?q=piero+della+francesca+born&sa=X&ei=n-6YUc3BFpa44AOrlIG4CQ&ved=0CLQBEOgTKAEwFA' class='fl' style='color: #222222; cursor: pointer; text-decoration: none;'>Born</a>: </span><span class='kno-fv'><span class='kno-fv-vq fl'>1415, <a href='https://www.google.com/search?q=umbria+region+of+italy&stick=H4sIAAAAAAAAAGOovnz8BQMDAw8HsxKHfq6-QUpOuYF0jM6yo-5ar3wUkuQWNJ38EGH43QwAGD2TMSkAAAA&sa=X&ei=n-6YUc3BFpa44AOrlIG4CQ&ved=0CLUBEJsTKAIwFA' class='fl' style='color: #0f08af; cursor: pointer; text-decoration: none;'>Umbria</a></span></span></div> </div> <div> <div class='kno-f kno-fb-ctx' style='padding: 7px 0px 0px;'> <span class='kno-fh' style='color: #222222;'><a href='https://www.google.com/search?q=piero+della+francesca+died&sa=X&ei=n-6YUc3BFpa44AOrlIG4CQ&ved=0CLgBEOgTKAEwFA' class='fl' style='color: #222222; cursor: pointer; text-decoration: none;'>Died</a>: </span><span class='kno-fv'><span class='kno-fv-vq fl'>October 12, 1492, <a href='https://www.google.com/search?q=sansepolcro+tuscany&stick=H4sIAAAAAAAAAGOovnz8BQMDAy8HsxKnfq6-QZJZlWFuy_ddnoHidQa99x9tUq450nOIue8hAE7B2GsqAAAA&sa=X&ei=n-6YUc3BFpa44AOrlIG4CQ&ved=0CLkBEJsTKAIwFA' class='fl' style='color: #0f08af; cursor: pointer; text-decoration: none;'>Sansepolcro</a></span></span></div> </div> <div> <div class='kno-f kno-fb-ctx' style='padding: 7px 0px 0px;'> <span class='kno-fh' style='color: #222222;'><a href='https://www.google.com/search?q=piero+della+francesca+period&sa=X&ei=n-6YUc3BFpa44AOrlIG4CQ&ved=0CLwBEOgTKAEwFA' class='fl' style='color: #222222; cursor: pointer; text-decoration: none;'>Period</a>: </span><span class='kno-fv'>Italian Renaissance</span></div> </div> </td></tr> </tbody></table> </div> </div> <div style='background-color: white; clear: both; color: #222222; font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 16px;'> <div class='kno-xs'> <div class='mod'> <div class='kno-sb' style='clear: both; margin-top: 24px;'> </div> <span class='kno-sh ellip' style='font-size: 18px; overflow: hidden; padding-right: 5px; white-space: nowrap;'>Artwork</span><br/> <div class='vrtr' style=''> <div class='vrt kno-fb-ctx' style='display: inline-block; line-height: 1.1; margin-left: 16px; vertical-align: top; width: 72px;'> <span class='kno-fv-vq fl'/><br/> <div class='thumb' style='height: 72px; overflow: hidden; width: 72px;'> <span class='kno-fv-vq fl'><a href='https://www.google.com/search?q=flagellation+of+christ+piero+della+francesca&stick=H4sIAAAAAAAAAGOovnz8BQMDgyYHsxCnfq6-gWFaipmpEphpZpaUZabF71hUkllcEpIPpMvzi7Iv9h_-qnGURbqgQm--3MUE58qJ844BADUIkolGAAAA&sa=X&ei=n-6YUc3BFpa44AOrlIG4CQ&ved=0CMIBELEOMBU' style='color: #1122cc; cursor: pointer; display: block; height: 72px; text-decoration: none;'><img title='Flagellation of Christ (1460)' border='0' id='vrthumb22s0' height='72' alt='Flagellation of Christ (1460)' width='72'/></a></span></div> <span class='kno-fv-vq fl'> </span><span class='kno-fv-vq fl'><a href='https://www.google.com/search?q=flagellation+of+christ+piero+della+francesca&stick=H4sIAAAAAAAAAGOovnz8BQMDgyYHsxCnfq6-gWFaipmpEphpZpaUZabF71hUkllcEpIPpMvzi7Iv9h_-qnGURbqgQm--3MUE58qJ844BADUIkolGAAAA&sa=X&ei=n-6YUc3BFpa44AOrlIG4CQ&ved=0CMMBEMQNMBU' class='fl ellip' title='Flagellation of Christ (1460)' style=''>Flagellation of Christ</a></span><br/> <div class='vrt_m ellip' title='Flagellation of Christ (1460)' style='color: #666666; font-size: x-small; overflow: hidden; padding-top: 2px;'> 1460</div> </div> <div class='vrt kno-fb-ctx' style='display: inline-block; line-height: 1.1; margin-left: 16px; vertical-align: top; width: 72px;'> <span class='kno-fv-vq fl'/><br/> <div class='thumb' style='height: 72px; overflow: hidden; width: 72px;'> <span class='kno-fv-vq fl'><a href='https://www.google.com/search?q=legend+of+the+true+cross&stick=H4sIAAAAAAAAAGOovnz8BQMDgyYHsxCnfq6-gWFaipmpEphpZmFinKvF71hUkllcEpIPpMvzi7Itvs7oFPcK3fQ20-Ko_eWOnP-5Hx4BAExtmrFGAAAA&sa=X&ei=n-6YUc3BFpa44AOrlIG4CQ&ved=0CMYBELEOMBU' style='color: #1122cc; cursor: pointer; display: block; height: 72px; text-decoration: none;'><img title='The History of the True Cross (1466)' border='0' id='vrthumb22s1' height='72' alt='The History of the True Cross (1466)' width='72'/></a></span></div> <span class='kno-fv-vq fl'> </span><span class='kno-fv-vq fl'><a href='https://www.google.com/search?q=legend+of+the+true+cross&stick=H4sIAAAAAAAAAGOovnz8BQMDgyYHsxCnfq6-gWFaipmpEphpZmFinKvF71hUkllcEpIPpMvzi7Itvs7oFPcK3fQ20-Ko_eWOnP-5Hx4BAExtmrFGAAAA&sa=X&ei=n-6YUc3BFpa44AOrlIG4CQ&ved=0CMcBEMQNMBU' class='fl ellip' title='The History of the True Cross (1466)' style=''>The History of the True Cross</a></span><br/> <div class='vrt_m ellip' title='The History of the True Cross (1466)' style='color: #666666; font-size: x-small; overflow: hidden; padding-top: 2px;'> 1466</div> </div> <div class='vrt kno-fb-ctx' style='display: inline-block; line-height: 1.1; margin-left: 16px; vertical-align: top; width: 72px;'> <span class='kno-fv-vq fl'/><br/> <div class='thumb' style='height: 72px; overflow: hidden; width: 72px;'> <span class='kno-fv-vq fl'><a href='https://www.google.com/search?q=the+resurrection+piero+della+francesca&stick=H4sIAAAAAAAAAGOovnz8BQMDgxYHsxCnfq6-gWFaipmpEheIaVSWY5yUocXvWFSSWVwSkg-ky_OLsqt7S9l_ec1jVLDYtqdGw_LB0f6nLgCm6NoTRwAAAA&sa=X&ei=n-6YUc3BFpa44AOrlIG4CQ&ved=0CMoBELEOMBU' style='color: #1122cc; cursor: pointer; display: block; height: 72px; text-decoration: none;'><img title='The Resurrection (1465)' border='0' id='vrthumb22s2' height='72' alt='The Resurrection (1465)' width='72'/></a></span></div> <span class='kno-fv-vq fl'> </span><span class='kno-fv-vq fl'><a href='https://www.google.com/search?q=the+resurrection+piero+della+francesca&stick=H4sIAAAAAAAAAGOovnz8BQMDgxYHsxCnfq6-gWFaipmpEheIaVSWY5yUocXvWFSSWVwSkg-ky_OLsqt7S9l_ec1jVLDYtqdGw_LB0f6nLgCm6NoTRwAAAA&sa=X&ei=n-6YUc3BFpa44AOrlIG4CQ&ved=0CMsBEMQNMBU' class='fl ellip' title='The Resurrection (1465)' style=''>The Resurrection</a></span><br/> <div class='vrt_m ellip' title='The Resurrection (1465)' style='color: #666666; font-size: x-small; overflow: hidden; padding-top: 2px;'> 1465</div> </div> <div class='vrt kno-fb-ctx rhsg3' style='display: inline-block; line-height: 1.1; margin-left: 16px; vertical-align: top; width: 72px;'> <span class='kno-fv-vq fl'/><br/> <div class='thumb' style='height: 72px; overflow: hidden; width: 72px;'> <span class='kno-fv-vq fl'><a href='https://www.google.com/search?q=piero+della+francesca+the+baptism+of+christ&stick=H4sIAAAAAAAAAGOovnz8BQMDgxYHsxCnfq6-gWFaipmpEheIaVSWY2hprMXvWFSSWVwSkg-ky_OLsldlaUaWl5sdeSakI9769MPUNBmpPQA5DjoPRwAAAA&sa=X&ei=n-6YUc3BFpa44AOrlIG4CQ&ved=0CM4BELEOMBU' style='color: #1122cc; cursor: pointer; display: block; height: 72px; text-decoration: none;'><img title='The Baptism of Christ (1450)' border='0' id='vrthumb22s3' height='72' alt='The Baptism of Christ (1450)' width='72'/></a></span></div> <span class='kno-fv-vq fl'> </span><span class='kno-fv-vq fl'><a href='https://www.google.com/search?q=piero+della+francesca+the+baptism+of+christ&stick=H4sIAAAAAAAAAGOovnz8BQMDgxYHsxCnfq6-gWFaipmpEheIaVSWY2hprMXvWFSSWVwSkg-ky_OLsldlaUaWl5sdeSakI9769MPUNBmpPQA5DjoPRwAAAA&sa=X&ei=n-6YUc3BFpa44AOrlIG4CQ&ved=0CM8BEMQNMBU' class='fl ellip' title='The Baptism of Christ (1450)' style=''>The Baptism of Christ</a></span><br/> <div class='vrt_m ellip' title='The Baptism of Christ (1450)' style='color: #666666; font-size: x-small; overflow: hidden; padding-top: 2px;'> 1450</div> </div> <div class='vrt kno-fb-ctx rhsg4' style='display: inline-block; line-height: 1.1; margin-left: 16px; vertical-align: top; width: 72px;'> <span class='kno-fv-vq fl'/><br/> <div class='thumb' style='height: 72px; overflow: hidden; width: 72px;'> <span class='kno-fv-vq fl'><a href='https://www.google.com/search?q=madonna+del+parto&stick=H4sIAAAAAAAAAGOovnz8BQMDgxYHsxCnfq6-gWFaipmpEheIaVSWXWFYpcXvWFSSWVwSkg-ky_OLsk-teOVncl1pttYDs8tTs_mKdyk4fQIAPYI72EcAAAA&sa=X&ei=n-6YUc3BFpa44AOrlIG4CQ&ved=0CNIBELEOMBU' style='color: #1122cc; cursor: pointer; display: block; height: 72px; text-decoration: none;'><img title='Madonna del Parto (1457)' border='0' id='vrthumb22s4' height='72' alt='Madonna del Parto (1457)' width='72'/></a></span></div> <span class='kno-fv-vq fl'> </span><span class='kno-fv-vq fl'><a href='https://www.google.com/search?q=madonna+del+parto&stick=H4sIAAAAAAAAAGOovnz8BQMDgxYHsxCnfq6-gWFaipmpEheIaVSWXWFYpcXvWFSSWVwSkg-ky_OLsk-teOVncl1pttYDs8tTs_mKdyk4fQIAPYI72EcAAAA&sa=X&ei=n-6YUc3BFpa44AOrlIG4CQ&ved=0CNMBEMQNMBU' class='fl ellip' title='Madonna del Parto (1457)' style=''>Madonna del Parto <span style='color: #666666; font-size: xx-small; line-height: 1.1;'>1457</span></a></span></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <br/> The Frick Collection in it's own right, filled with gems by Veronese, Boucher, Vermeer, Lucas Cranach the Elder, El Greco and many other Old Masters, is valuable. As a balance, or measuring stick for the contemporary art world, it is priceless.<br/> <br/> The cute room filled with Boucher's paintings of flirtatious, happy, voluptuous, sensual characters in an abundant outdoor and indoor landscape may have been frowned upon in his time, but now give us a warm feeling when we look at them. The provenance alone tells us how important a work of art this is, originating as it did from the Marquise de Pompadour in the 18th Century.<br/> <table class='tr-caption-container' cellspacing='0' align='center' cellpadding='0' style='margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;'><tbody> <tr><td style='text-align: center;'><a href='http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-xsURAIrb5hM/UZjxCiiCqyI/AAAAAAAAHQI/4pctxX2YSKI/s1600/19161014.jpeg' style='margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;'><img src='http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-xsURAIrb5hM/UZjxCiiCqyI/AAAAAAAAHQI/4pctxX2YSKI/s1600/19161014.jpeg' border='0'/></a></td></tr> <tr><td class='tr-caption' style='text-align: center;'><div class='singledata' style='background-color: white; color: #555555; float: left; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 12px; text-align: left; width: 370px;'> <a href='http://collections.frick.org/view/people/asitem/items@null:52/0?t%3Astate%3Aflow=c1a38dcf-c90e-44bd-a5a4-6b8614c93bcd' style='border: 0px; color: #996633; font-family: inherit; font-style: inherit; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;'><span class='artistName' style='font-weight: bold;'>François Boucher</span></a>  (1703 - 1770)<br/> <em style='border: 0px; font-family: inherit; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;'>The Four Seasons: Autumn</em>, 1755<br/> oil on canvas<br/> 22 1/4 x 28 3/4 in. (56.5 x 73 cm)<br/> Henry Clay Frick Bequest<br/> Accession number: 1916.1.14<br/> <div id='onview' style='margin: 10px 0px;'> <span class='label' style='font-weight: bold;'>Currently on View</span><br/> West Vestibule (144)<br/> <a href='http://www.frick.org/collection/collections/paintings' target='_blank'>Link to floorplan and Virtual Tour</a></div> </div> <div class='textblock' style='background-color: white; clear: both; color: #555555; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 12px; text-align: left;'> <div class='paragraph' style='float: left; line-height: 1.5em; margin-bottom: 12px;'> <span class='label' style='font-weight: bold;'>Collections: </span>Marquise de Pompadour. Inherited by her brother, the Marquis de Marigny et de Ménars, in 1764. His sale, February, 1782, Paris, Lot 11, sold for 1,402 livres to Vernier. Nicolas Beaujon, Paris. His sale, April 25, 1787, Paris, Lot 202, sold for 884 livres to Ridgway. Madame Ridgway sale, December 3, 1904, Galerie Georges Petit, Paris, Lots 4, 5, 6, 7, sold for 360,000 francs to Eugène Fischhof. E.R. Bacon, New York. Mrs. Virginia Bacon. Duveen. Frick, 1916.<br/> <br/> Source: <i>Paintings in The Frick Collection: French, Italian and Spanish</i>. Volume II. New York: The Frick Collection, 1968.</div> </div> </td></tr> </tbody></table> Vermeer's "Girl Interrupted at Her Music" and "Officer and Laughing Girl"are two masterworks the likes of which any museum or collector worth its salt would like to get their hands on.<br/> <br/> <table class='tr-caption-container' cellspacing='0' align='center' cellpadding='0' style='margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;'><tbody> <tr><td style='text-align: center;'><a href='http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-eiwLTgtE3Ug/UZjyCTI6ScI/AAAAAAAAHQY/U63HOK9i7dk/s1600/19111127.jpeg' style='margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;'><img src='http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-eiwLTgtE3Ug/UZjyCTI6ScI/AAAAAAAAHQY/U63HOK9i7dk/s1600/19111127.jpeg' border='0'/></a></td></tr> <tr><td class='tr-caption' style='text-align: center;'><a href='http://collections.frick.org/view/people/asitem/items@null:174/0?t%3Astate%3Aflow=fd8add66-6ad6-42ac-8ac4-199f04af95b2' style='background-color: white; border: 0px; color: #996633; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 12px; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;'><span class='artistName' style='font-weight: bold;'>Johannes Vermeer</span></a><span style='background-color: white; color: #555555; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 12px; text-align: left;'>  (1632 - 1675) </span><br/> <em style='background-color: white; border: 0px; color: #555555; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 12px; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; text-align: left; vertical-align: baseline;'>Officer and Laughing Girl</em><span style='background-color: white; color: #555555; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 12px; text-align: left;'>, c. 1657</span><br/> <span style='background-color: white; color: #555555; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 12px; text-align: left;'>oil on canvas (lined)</span><br/> <span style='background-color: white; color: #555555; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 12px; text-align: left;'>19 7/8 x 18 1/8 in. (50.5 x 46 cm) </span><br/> <span style='background-color: white; color: #555555; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 12px; text-align: left;'>Henry Clay Frick Bequest</span><br/> <span style='background-color: white; color: #555555; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 12px; text-align: left;'>Accession number: 1911.1.127 </span><br/> <div id='onview' style='background-color: white; color: #555555; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 12px; margin: 10px 0px; text-align: left;'> <span class='label' style='font-weight: bold;'>Currently on View</span><br/> South Hall (141)</div> </td></tr> </tbody></table> Veronese's towering monumental paintings, "Hercules Choice/The Choice Between Virtue and Vice" and "Wisdom and Strength", again remind us of the great trends throughout Western art history that have shaped our sensibilities and what we currently value. The Greco/Roman columns, the theatrical setting, the drapery, the twisting winding figures and the view behind them into the far distance, even the title of the work, gives us an idea of the perspective and some of the concerns with which artists at that time were dealing.<br/> <br/> <table class='tr-caption-container' cellspacing='0' align='center' cellpadding='0' style='margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;'><tbody> <tr><td style='text-align: center;'><a href='http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-2iWWoAlqxQI/UZjy_OtNmRI/AAAAAAAAHQk/GdUhuS0fnBQ/s1600/19121128.jpeg' style='margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;'><img src='http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-2iWWoAlqxQI/UZjy_OtNmRI/AAAAAAAAHQk/GdUhuS0fnBQ/s1600/19121128.jpeg' border='0'/></a></td></tr> <tr><td class='tr-caption' style='text-align: center;'><a href='http://collections.frick.org/view/people/asitem/items@null:175/0?t%3Astate%3Aflow=6804cd7f-4572-4b8c-9e42-2bb1e2774c99' style='background-color: white; border: 0px; color: #996633; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 12px; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;'><span class='artistName' style='font-weight: bold;'>Paolo Veronese</span></a><span style='background-color: white; color: #555555; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 12px; text-align: left;'>  (c. 1528 - 1588) </span><br/> <em style='background-color: white; border: 0px; color: #555555; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 12px; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; text-align: left; vertical-align: baseline;'>Wisdom and Strength</em><span style='background-color: white; color: #555555; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 12px; text-align: left;'>, c.1580</span><br/> <span style='background-color: white; color: #555555; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 12px; text-align: left;'>oil on canvas</span><br/> <span style='background-color: white; color: #555555; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 12px; text-align: left;'>84 1/2 x 65 3/4 in. (214.6 x 167 cm) </span><br/> <span style='background-color: white; color: #555555; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 12px; text-align: left;'>Henry Clay Frick Bequest</span><br/> <span style='background-color: white; color: #555555; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 12px; text-align: left;'>Accession number: 1912.1.128 </span><br/> <div id='onview' style='background-color: white; color: #555555; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 12px; margin: 10px 0px; text-align: left;'> <span class='label' style='font-weight: bold;'>Currently on View</span><br/> West Gallery (131)</div> </td></tr> </tbody></table> <br/> It would be great if our contemporary artists could look to art history to inform their work instead of looking to other contemporary work to do so.  A new art friend said this about a certain art review in the <a href='http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/17/arts/design/jeff-koons-at-david-zwirner-and-gagosian-and-paul-mccarthy-at-hauser-wirth.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0' target='_blank'>NY Times </a>that gave a smidgen of credit to the current Koons exhibition at Zwirner: "...Anyone who really thinks any of these sculptures are actually important or remotely approaching great art is too steeped in the contemporary world to distinguish between ubiquitous work and good work."<br/> <br/> <br/></div> <img src='http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/BeezAndHoney/~4/qng3DpWzGWc' height='1' width='1'/> Mon, 01 Jul 2013 06:57:27 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list Workshop: 3D Printing for Fashion <fieldset class='fieldgroup group-eventdetails'> <div class='field field-type-date field-field-startdate'> <div class='field-items'> <div class='field-item odd'> <div class='field-label-inline-first'> Start Date: </div> <a href='http://eyebeam.org/calendar'><span class='date-display-single'>5/21 <span class='date-display-start'>6:06pm</span><span class='date-display-separator'> - </span><span class='date-display-end'>9:09pm</span></span></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class='field field-type-text field-field-hours'> <div class='field-items'> <div class='field-item odd'> <div class='field-label-inline-first'> Hours: </div> 6:00PM-9:00PM </div> </div> </div> <div class='field field-type-text field-field-event-cost'> <div class='field-items'> <div class='field-item odd'> <div class='field-label-inline-first'> Cost: </div> $25.00 </div> </div> </div> <div class='field field-type-text field-field-event-venue'> <div class='field-items'> <div class='field-item odd'> <div class='field-label-inline-first'> Venue: </div> Eyebeam </div> </div> </div> <div class='field field-type-text field-field-event-programming'> <div class='field-items'> <div class='field-item odd'> <div class='field-label-inline-first'> Eyebeam Programming?: </div> Eyebeam </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class='field field-type-filefield field-field-thumbnail'> <div class='field-items'> <div class='field-item odd'> <img class='imagefield imagefield-field_thumbnail' title='Thumbnail' src='http://eyebeam.org/sites/default/files/projects/images/3D-Printed_gown_detail2_700.jpg?1368219248' height='449' alt='Thumbnail' width='674'/> </div> </div> </div> <div class='field field-type-text field-field-photo-credit'> <div class='field-items'> <div class='field-item odd'> "Dita's Gown" (detail) – Michael Schmidt Studios, Francis Bitonti Studio and Shapeways. Photo: Albert Sanchez Photography </div> </div> </div> <div class='field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-programs'> <div class='field-items'> <div class='field-item odd'> <a href='http://eyebeam.org/programs/adult-workshops'>Adult Workshops</a> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href='http://3dprintfashion.brownpapertickets.com/' title='Purchase tickets: 3D Printing for Fashion workshop' target='_blank'><strong>PURCHASE TICKETS ONLINE</strong></a></p> <p><a href='http://eyebeam.org/events/workshop-3d-printing-for-fashion' target='_blank'>read more</a></p> Fri, 05 Jul 2013 07:29:31 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list Arabic Graffiti Icon : A1one Got Kidnapped <div dir='ltr' style='text-align: left;'>One year ago, in March of 2012, A1one was kidnapped on the streets of Tehran, Iran by the civilian police from the “Intelligent Service of Islamic republic”. For nearly two weeks, he was kept in a hidden prison, blindfolded and lonely. Accusing him to receive money from Israel to promote graffiti and resistance against the Islamic Government of Ahmadinejad. They also accused him to have received training in a military camp in Jordan, aiming to go back to Iran and promote graffiti and hip hop through his Underground Art media Studio.<br/><br/><table class='tr-caption-container' cellspacing='0' align='center' cellpadding='0' style='margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;'><tbody><tr><td style='text-align: center;'><a href='http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-6VfF05gL-8E/UYa-MRexFHI/AAAAAAAABt0/qVy4SahTTtc/s1600/arabic-graffiti-1.jpg' style='margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;'><img title='Arabic Graffiti Icon - A1one' src='http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-6VfF05gL-8E/UYa-MRexFHI/AAAAAAAABt0/qVy4SahTTtc/s400/arabic-graffiti-1.jpg' border='0' height='233' alt='Arabic Graffiti Icon - A1one' width='400'/></a></td></tr><tr><td class='tr-caption' style='text-align: center;'>Arabic Graffiti Icon - A1one in Germany</td></tr></tbody></table><br/><div class='separator' style='clear: both; text-align: center;'><a href='http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-GbN9w-bCpog/UYa-MIHh1UI/AAAAAAAABtw/pNJSZpai6Bk/s1600/arabic-graffiti2.jpg' style='margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;'><br/><img title='Arabic Graffiti Icon - A1one' src='http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-GbN9w-bCpog/UYa-MIHh1UI/AAAAAAAABtw/pNJSZpai6Bk/s400/arabic-graffiti2.jpg' border='0' height='255' alt='Arabic Graffiti Icon - A1one' width='400'/></a></div><div class='separator' style='clear: both; text-align: center;'/><div class='separator' style='clear: both; text-align: center;'><a href='http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-l0BNFNC6JUM/UYa-NK3ffII/AAAAAAAABuE/6w8rbUfIUHU/s1600/arabicgraffiti-1.jpg' style='margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;'><br/></a></div>“None of this is true, I have never been in Jordan and never received money from Israel. Graffiti Was just my lifestyle and communication as a young artist ” -A1one<br/><br/><br/><div class='separator' style='clear: both; text-align: center;'><img src='http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-l0BNFNC6JUM/UYa-NK3ffII/AAAAAAAABuE/6w8rbUfIUHU/s400/arabicgraffiti-1.jpg' border='0' height='166' width='400'/><a href='http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-jzXkrRLAgug/UYa-L8EPdXI/AAAAAAAABto/cF07TZkX0YU/s1600/arabic-graffiti3.jpg' style='margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;'><img title='' src='http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-jzXkrRLAgug/UYa-L8EPdXI/AAAAAAAABto/cF07TZkX0YU/s400/arabic-graffiti3.jpg' border='0' height='266' alt='Iranian Graffiti' width='400'/></a></div><br/><div class='separator' style='clear: both; text-align: center;'><a href='http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-TnZFEWZkijc/UYa-M18tb4I/AAAAAAAABuA/b1dKkylGGgI/s1600/arabic-graffiti4.jpg' style='margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;'><br/><img title='Arabic Graffiti Pioneer A1one' src='http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-TnZFEWZkijc/UYa-M18tb4I/AAAAAAAABuA/b1dKkylGGgI/s400/arabic-graffiti4.jpg' border='0' height='197' alt='Arabic Graffiti Pioneer A1one' width='400'/></a></div><br/><br/><br/><div class='separator' style='clear: both; text-align: center;'> </div>Now, in March of 2013, the Iranian painter is free and painting in Germany. He is trying to forget this period of prison and mental torture which led him down yet another path of problems… A1one is mostly known for his innovative way of Arabic – Persian Calligraphy which is rooten in Middle Eastern calligraphy traditions while influenced by the western “Wild Style” graffiti and tagging style.<br/>You can check more of <a href='http://www.kolahstudio.com/?p=612'>Arabic Graffiti </a>by A1one  or check more of His <a href='http://www.kolahstudio.com/?p=620'>Modern Persian Calligraphy</a><br/><div class='separator' style='clear: both; text-align: center;'><a href='http://www.kolahstudio.com/underground/wp-content/uploads/2009/08/A1oneinESSEN.jpg' style='margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;'><br/><img title='Arabic Graffiti Art by A1one in Germany' src='http://www.kolahstudio.com/underground/wp-content/uploads/2009/08/A1oneinESSEN.jpg' border='0' height='245' alt='Arabic Graffiti Art by A1one in Germany' width='400'/></a></div><br/></div><div class='blogger-post-footer'>All materials belong to Kolahstudio.com Iranian underground Art mainstream.</div> Mon, 06 May 2013 06:46:22 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list Spring Cleaning <div class='separator' style='clear: both; text-align: center;'><a href='http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-VTRhaReOFo0/UYFsfYJk56I/AAAAAAAALP0/pCK-ImYGRN0/s1600/worlds-greatest.jpg' style='margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;'><img src='http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-VTRhaReOFo0/UYFsfYJk56I/AAAAAAAALP0/pCK-ImYGRN0/s400/worlds-greatest.jpg' border='0' height='111' width='400'/></a></div>The Atelier LaRose classes are on hold as I put more time and energy into making some paintings.  I just created an electronic commerce website for selling my pieces.  <a href='http://www.stevenlarosefineart.com/' target='_blank'>Steven LaRose Fine Art</a> is up and running.  Fri, 21 Jun 2013 06:59:48 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list Osvaldo Cibils – 2 Humans, 1 Paper <p><a href='http://dvblog.org/movies/03_2013/2_humans_1_paper.mov' target='_blank'><img src='http://dvblog.org/wp-content/images//2_humans_1_paper.jpg' width='320'/></a><br/> <a href='http://dvblog.org/movies/03_2013/2_humans_1_paper.mov' target='_blank'>2 Humans, 1 Paper (2013, 10MB, 3:38 min)</a></p> <p>I first stumbled across <a href='http://osvaldocibils.com/' target='_blank'>Osvaldo Cibils</a> and his marvellously eclectic and well..simply marvellous work<br/> on <a href='http://www.flickr.com/photos/osvaldocibils/' target='_blank'>Flickr</a> but he seems to have all sorts of things going.<br/> So simple but so, so telling. Kind of Buster Keaton meets Bruce Nauman meets something hard to pin down but lyrical, grotesque and smart all at once.<br/> My kind of artist.<br/> +++<br/> 2 humans 1 paper<br/> video art/soundart.<br/> performance with plotter paper 200 x 107 centimeters.<br/> performers: fiorella alberti architect and osvaldo cibils artist.<br/> place: artist’s studio. Via della Cervara, 55 – 38121 – Trento (TN) Italia<br/> 22 march 2013, 20 hours</p> Mon, 01 Apr 2013 06:44:53 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list Brandl Opening Painting-Installation Zurich <span class='mt-enclosure mt-enclosure-image' style='display: inline;'><a href='http://www.sharkforum.org/assets_c/2013/01/Jedlitschka%20invitation.html'><img class='mt-image-none' src='http://www.sharkforum.org/assets_c/2013/01/Jedlitschka%20invitation-thumb-480x680.jpg' height='680' alt='Jedlitschka invitation.jpg' width='480' style=''/></a></span> <br/><br/> It is finally the time! After some years in the making, the room-filling painting-installation based on my PhD dissertation is opening at Jedlitschka Gallery in Zurich. You are cordially invited to the opening, I'd love to see you there. <br/><br/> -------- <br/><br/> Mark Staff Brandl My Metaphor(m), Painting-Installation 28 Feb. - 18 April, 2013 <br/><br/> Opening Reception: 28 Februar, 5 pm - 9 pm the artist will be present (as well as on Saturday, 2 March) <br/><br/> Laudatio/Opening Speech: 28 February 7 pm Dr Philip Ursprung, Professor Art and Architectur History at the ETH Zürich <br/><br/> Discussion with the Artist: Friday 22 March, 7 pm with Dr Gerhard Mack, Editor and Critic for Art and Architecture at the NZZ am Sonntag <br/><br/> Finissage /Closing Reception: Thursday, 18 April, 5 pm - 9 pm The artist will be present.<br/><br/> Mon, 03 Jun 2013 06:59:22 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list David Bowie's New Berlin Elegy: Where Are We Now? <div class='separator' style='clear: both; text-align: center;'><br/></div><div class='separator' style='clear: both; text-align: center;'><a href='http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-49ZjGQvbppo/UOyS5SpaFgI/AAAAAAAADsc/q0uIis9USFw/s1600/Where+Are+We+Now%3F.png' style='margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;'><img src='http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-49ZjGQvbppo/UOyS5SpaFgI/AAAAAAAADsc/q0uIis9USFw/s400/Where+Are+We+Now%3F.png' border='0' height='173' width='400'/></a></div><span style='color: #333333; font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='line-height: 18px;'><br/></span></span><span style='color: #333333; font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='line-height: 18px;'><br/></span></span><span style='color: #333333; font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='line-height: 18px;'>Early this morning <a href='http://www.davidbowie.com/news' target='_blank'>David Bowie</a> celebrated his 66th Birthday with the release of his first single in a decade. </span></span><span style='color: #333333; font-family: Georgia, &apos;Times New Roman&apos;, serif; line-height: 18px;'>This song <i>Where Are We Now?,</i> taken from Bowie's forthcoming album <i>The Next Day, </i>is accompanied by an artful <a href='http://www.davidbowie.com/vision' target='_blank'>video</a> directed by the contemporary artist <a href='http://tonyoursler.com/work.php?navItem=work&subsection=All%20Exhibitions&year=0&page=1' target='_blank'>Tony Oursler</a>. Set in a black and white Berlin of memory and dream, Oursler's video combines with Bowie's voice and lyrics to </span><span style='color: #333333; font-family: Georgia, &apos;Times New Roman&apos;, serif; line-height: 18px;'>question the themes of human bondage, release, freedom,  doubt, ageing, and death. </span><br/><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='color: #333333; line-height: 18px;'><br/></span><span style='color: #333333; line-height: 18px;'> The video opens with a shot of a crystal skull on a table. Reminiscent of Gerhard Richter's evocative paintings of human skulls, this</span> visual entrance to Bowie's musical <i>memento <span class='GRcorrect' id='GRmark_40227e0f4b9a633aba981cc8d802e58af61026aa_mori:0'>mori</span></i>, <i style='color: #333333; line-height: 18px;'> </i><span style='color: #333333; line-height: 18px;'>reminds us that in Berlin we </span><span style='color: #333333; line-height: 18px;'>wrestle with the dead as we walk through a haunted and enchanted city. After the fall of the wall, </span><span style='color: #333333; line-height: 18px;'>Berlin has come to embody the future while at the same time carrying the scars of the past. </span></span><br/><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='color: #333333;'><span style='line-height: 18px;'><br/></span></span></span><br/><div class='separator' style='clear: both; text-align: center;'><a href='http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-aCd7ZgYIYXc/UOyTkroRwqI/AAAAAAAADsk/k-ML2F-PGyM/s1600/Memento+Mori.png' style='margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;'><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><img src='http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-aCd7ZgYIYXc/UOyTkroRwqI/AAAAAAAADsk/k-ML2F-PGyM/s400/Memento+Mori.png' border='0' height='193' width='400'/></span></a></div><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='color: #333333;'><span style='line-height: 18px;'><br/></span></span><span style='color: #333333;'><span style='line-height: 18px;'>Bowie <span class='GRcorrect' id='GRmark_5e032a1c7cf750d383821af0914a2d5a494f3ad7_sings:0'>sings</span>:</span></span></span><br/><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><em style='color: #222222; line-height: 24px;'><br/></em><em style='color: #222222; line-height: 24px;'>Had to get the train<br/>From Potsdamer Platz<br/>You never knew<br/>That I could do that<br/>Just <span class='GRcorrect' id='GRmark_61b6099b04f29ecd6ce6152610a688dae1570a7f_walking:0'>walking</span> the dead</em></span><br/><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><br/></span><br/><table class='tr-caption-container' cellspacing='0' align='center' cellpadding='0' style='margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;'><tbody><tr><td style='text-align: center;'><a href='http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-N20OtD79rvA/UOyVxl86swI/AAAAAAAADtM/H3qehzLSDZs/s1600/Gerhard+Richter%E2%80%99s+Skull+%28Schadel%29+%281983%29.jpg' style='margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;'><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><img src='http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-N20OtD79rvA/UOyVxl86swI/AAAAAAAADtM/H3qehzLSDZs/s320/Gerhard+Richter%E2%80%99s+Skull+%28Schadel%29+%281983%29.jpg' border='0' height='320' width='282'/></span></a></td></tr><tr><td class='tr-caption' style='text-align: center;'><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif; font-size: small;'><span style=''><span style='color: #333333;'>Gerhard Richter</span><br/> </span><span style=''><a href='http://www.gerhard-richter.com/includes/retrieve.image.php?paintID=6537&size=xl' target='_blank' style=''><em>Skull (Schadel) </em>(1983)</a></span></span><br/><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif; font-size: small;'><br/></span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style='background-color: white; color: #282828; line-height: 20px;'><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><i>Where Are We Now? </i><span class='GRcorrect' id='GRmark_d91c64772b0962481cceb274128735b3ef503927_is:0'>is</span> as much a painting in soft <span class='GRcorrect' id='GRmark_d91c64772b0962481cceb274128735b3ef503927_greys:1'>greys</span> as it is a song. <span style='white-space: nowrap;'>A quiet rhythm of drums and <span class='GRcorrect' id='GRmark_2c2273960d3b8d3b64abfd02aa59d22c518d3532_synth:0'>synth</span> warp and weft with minor key </span></span></span><br/><span style='background-color: white; color: #282828; line-height: 20px;'><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='white-space: nowrap;'><span class='GRcorrect' id='GRmark_2316a9d437e080909ab41799cc5f1c4300a49aa3_piano:0'>piano</span> chords </span></span></span><span style='background-color: white; color: #282828; line-height: 20px;'><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='white-space: nowrap;'>and Bowie's </span></span></span><span style='background-color: white; color: #282828; line-height: 20px;'><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='white-space: nowrap;'><span class='GRcorrect' id='GRmark_a2925bc40a15a6798b9dc51ed45fa45281bd4b1b_plaintive:0'>plaintive</span>, </span></span></span><span style='background-color: white; color: #282828; font-family: Georgia, &apos;Times New Roman&apos;, serif; line-height: 20px; white-space: nowrap;'>elegiac </span><span style='background-color: white; color: #282828; font-family: Georgia, &apos;Times New Roman&apos;, serif; line-height: 20px; white-space: nowrap;'/><span style='background-color: white; color: #282828; font-family: Georgia, &apos;Times New Roman&apos;, serif; line-height: 20px; white-space: nowrap;'/><span style='background-color: white; color: #282828; font-family: Georgia, &apos;Times New Roman&apos;, serif; line-height: 20px; white-space: nowrap;'/><span style='background-color: white; color: #282828; font-family: Georgia, &apos;Times New Roman&apos;, serif; line-height: 20px; white-space: nowrap;'/><span style='background-color: white; color: #282828; font-family: Georgia, &apos;Times New Roman&apos;, serif; line-height: 20px; white-space: nowrap;'/><span style='background-color: white; color: #282828; font-family: Georgia, &apos;Times New Roman&apos;, serif; line-height: 20px; white-space: nowrap;'/><span style='background-color: white; color: #282828; font-family: Georgia, &apos;Times New Roman&apos;, serif; line-height: 20px; white-space: nowrap;'/><span style='background-color: white; color: #282828; font-family: Georgia, &apos;Times New Roman&apos;, serif; line-height: 20px; white-space: nowrap;'/><span style='background-color: white; color: #282828; font-family: Georgia, &apos;Times New Roman&apos;, serif; line-height: 20px; white-space: nowrap;'/><span style='background-color: white; color: #282828; font-family: Georgia, &apos;Times New Roman&apos;, serif; line-height: 20px; white-space: nowrap;'/><span style='background-color: white; color: #282828; font-family: Georgia, &apos;Times New Roman&apos;, serif; line-height: 20px; white-space: nowrap;'/><span style='background-color: white; color: #282828; font-family: Georgia, &apos;Times New Roman&apos;, serif; line-height: 20px; white-space: nowrap;'/><span style='background-color: white; color: #282828; font-family: Georgia, &apos;Times New Roman&apos;, serif; line-height: 20px; white-space: nowrap;'/><span style='background-color: white; color: #282828; font-family: Georgia, &apos;Times New Roman&apos;, serif; line-height: 20px; white-space: nowrap;'/><span style='background-color: white; color: #282828; font-family: Georgia, &apos;Times New Roman&apos;, serif; line-height: 20px; white-space: nowrap;'/><span style='background-color: white; color: #282828; font-family: Georgia, &apos;Times New Roman&apos;, serif; line-height: 20px; white-space: nowrap;'/><span style='background-color: white; color: #282828; font-family: Georgia, &apos;Times New Roman&apos;, serif; line-height: 20px; white-space: nowrap;'/><span style='background-color: white; color: #282828; font-family: Georgia, &apos;Times New Roman&apos;, serif; line-height: 20px; white-space: nowrap;'/><span style='background-color: white; color: #282828; font-family: Georgia, &apos;Times New Roman&apos;, serif; line-height: 20px; white-space: nowrap;'/><span style='background-color: white; color: #282828; font-family: Georgia, &apos;Times New Roman&apos;, serif; line-height: 20px; white-space: nowrap;'/><span style='background-color: white; color: #282828; font-family: Georgia, &apos;Times New Roman&apos;, serif; line-height: 20px; white-space: nowrap;'/><span style='background-color: white; color: #282828; font-family: Georgia, &apos;Times New Roman&apos;, serif; line-height: 20px; white-space: nowrap;'/><span style='background-color: white; color: #282828; font-family: Georgia, &apos;Times New Roman&apos;, serif; line-height: 20px; white-space: nowrap;'/><span style='background-color: white; color: #282828; font-family: Georgia, &apos;Times New Roman&apos;, serif; line-height: 20px; white-space: nowrap;'/><span style='background-color: white; color: #282828; font-family: Georgia, &apos;Times New Roman&apos;, serif; line-height: 20px; white-space: nowrap;'/><span style='background-color: white; color: #282828; font-family: Georgia, &apos;Times New Roman&apos;, serif; line-height: 20px; white-space: nowrap;'/><span style='background-color: white; color: #282828; font-family: Georgia, &apos;Times New Roman&apos;, serif; line-height: 20px; white-space: nowrap;'/><span style='background-color: white; color: #282828; font-family: Georgia, &apos;Times New Roman&apos;, serif; line-height: 20px; white-space: nowrap;'/><span style='background-color: white; color: #282828; font-family: Georgia, &apos;Times New Roman&apos;, serif; line-height: 20px; white-space: nowrap;'/><span style='background-color: white; color: #282828; font-family: Georgia, &apos;Times New Roman&apos;, serif; line-height: 20px; white-space: nowrap;'/><span style='background-color: white; color: #282828; font-family: Georgia, &apos;Times New Roman&apos;, serif; line-height: 20px; white-space: nowrap;'/><span style='background-color: white; color: #282828; font-family: Georgia, &apos;Times New Roman&apos;, serif; line-height: 20px; white-space: nowrap;'/><span style='background-color: white; color: #282828; font-family: Georgia, &apos;Times New Roman&apos;, serif; line-height: 20px;'>voice. </span><br/><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='background-color: white; color: #282828; line-height: 20px;'><br/></span><span style='background-color: white;'/></span><br/><div class='separator' style='clear: both; color: #282828; line-height: 20px; text-align: center;'><span style='background-color: white; font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><a href='http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-t_uyVFgsQR0/UOyScImmubI/AAAAAAAADsU/GoPt-dw2Pok/s1600/The+Moment+You+Know+.png' style='line-height: normal; margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em; text-align: center;'><img src='http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-t_uyVFgsQR0/UOyScImmubI/AAAAAAAADsU/GoPt-dw2Pok/s400/The+Moment+You+Know+.png' border='0' height='168' width='400'/></a></span></div><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><br/></span><br/><div style='color: #282828; line-height: 20px;'><span style='background-color: white; font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><br/></span></div><div style='color: #282828;'/><div style='line-height: normal;'><span style='background-color: white; font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='line-height: 20px;'>Bowie lived in West Berlin between 1976 and 1979 in the Schöneberg district in a house with Iggy Pop while Brian Eno and Tony Visconti were helping record Bowie's </span><span style='background-color: white; line-height: 20px;'>Berlin trilogy of albums <i>Low, Heroes,</i> and <i>Lodger</i> </span><span style='background-color: white; line-height: 20px;'>in</span><span style='background-color: white; line-height: 20px;'> the now legendary Hansa Studios.</span></span></div><span style='background-color: white; font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='background-color: white; line-height: 20px;'>In an interview on a French radio program, Bowie said, “Berlin has the strange ability to make you write only the important things. Anything else you don’t mention.” </span></span><br/><div style='line-height: 20px;'><span style='background-color: white; font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><br/></span></div><div style='line-height: 20px;'><span style='background-color: white; font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'>In <i>Where Are We Now?</i>, <span style='background-color: white;'>Bowie guides us through his former haunts:</span></span></div><br/><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='background-color: white;'><span style='line-height: 20px;'><i>Sitting in the Dschungel</i></span></span></span><br/><span style='background-color: white; font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='line-height: 20px;'><i>On Nürnberger Straße</i></span></span><br/><span style='background-color: white; font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='line-height: 20px;'><i>A man lost in time</i></span></span><br/><span style='background-color: white; font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='line-height: 20px;'><i>Near KaDeWe</i></span></span><br/><span style='background-color: white; font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='line-height: 20px;'><i>Just <span class='GRcorrect' id='GRmark_61b6099b04f29ecd6ce6152610a688dae1570a7f_walking:0'>walking</span> the dead</i></span></span><br/><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='background-color: white;'><span style='line-height: 20px;'><i><br/></i></span></span></span><br/><div style='color: black;'><span style='background-color: white; font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='color: #333333; font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='line-height: 18px;'>The Dschungel</span></span><span style='color: #333333; font-family: Georgia, &apos;Times New Roman&apos;, serif; line-height: 18px;'> was a Schöneberg club frequented by Bowie,</span><span style='color: #333333; font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='line-height: 18px;'> Iggy Pop, Frank Zappa, and  Nina Hagen. <span class='GRcorrect' id='GRmark_24b5a460650b7176898e4ca6c92a83037564bc40_KaDaWe:0'>KaDaWe</span> is a historical Berlin department store that originally opened in 1907. <span style='white-space: nowrap;'>I</span>n a divided city, from its reopening in 1950 until 1989, KaDaWe was a beacon for the East and drew massive crowds after the fall of the Berlin Wall.  </span></span></span></div><div style='color: black;'><span style='background-color: white; font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><br/></span></div><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><br/></span><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='background-color: white;'><span style='line-height: 20px;'><i><br/></i></span></span></span><br/><div class='separator' style='clear: both; text-align: center;'><span style='background-color: white; font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><a href='http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-jLRJUklck3E/UOyqjbdjxKI/AAAAAAAADuc/fpug81Nb8nk/s1600/bowie_next.jpg' style='margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;'><img src='http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-jLRJUklck3E/UOyqjbdjxKI/AAAAAAAADuc/fpug81Nb8nk/s400/bowie_next.jpg' border='0' height='400' width='400'/></a></span></div><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='background-color: white;'><span style='line-height: 20px;'><i><br/></i></span></span></span><br/><div style='color: #282828; line-height: 20px;'><span style='background-color: white; font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><br/></span></div><span style='background-color: white; font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='color: #282828;'><span style='line-height: 20px;'>In an informative piece on the creation of the cover for the upcoming album </span></span><i style='color: #282828; line-height: 20px;'>The Next Day</i><span style='color: #282828;'><span style='line-height: 20px;'>, designer Johnathan Barnbrook writes that "the song </span></span><i style='color: #282828; line-height: 20px;'>Where Are We Now?</i> <span style='color: #282828; line-height: 20px;'><span class='GRcorrect' id='GRmark_e7416034f3e11016acf1579bfc7672e97ae92ed5_is:0'>is</span></span><span style='color: #282828;'><span style='line-height: 20px;'> a comparison between Berlin when the wall fell and Berlin today. Most people know of Bowie’s heritage in Berlin and we want people to think about the time when the original album was produced and now."</span></span></span><br/><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='background-color: white;'><span style='color: #282828;'><span style='line-height: 20px;'><br/></span></span></span><span style='background-color: white;'><span style='color: #222222; font-style: italic; line-height: 24px;'>Twenty thousand people</span><br style='color: #222222; font-style: italic; line-height: 24px;'/><span style='color: #222222; font-style: italic; line-height: 24px;'>Cross Bösebrücke</span><br style='color: #222222; font-style: italic; line-height: 24px;'/><span style='color: #222222; font-style: italic; line-height: 24px;'>Fingers are crossed</span><br style='color: #222222; font-style: italic; line-height: 24px;'/><span style='color: #222222; font-style: italic; line-height: 24px;'>Just in case</span><br style='color: #222222; font-style: italic; line-height: 24px;'/><span style='color: #222222; font-style: italic; line-height: 24px;'><span class='GRcorrect' id='GRmark_3cc5f9d860a23d423cae7b7d7d27b36d712b3db0_Walking:0'>Walking</span></span><span style='color: #222222; font-style: italic; line-height: 24px;'> the dead</span></span></span><br/><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='background-color: white;'><span style='color: #282828;'><span style='line-height: 20px;'><br/></span></span></span><span style='background-color: white;'><span style='color: #282828;'><span style='line-height: 20px;'> T</span></span><span style='background-color: white; color: #333333; line-height: 18px;'>he Bösebrücke was the bridge on which the first border crossing was opened to Eastern Berliners in November 1989 as the Berlin Wall began to fall. </span><span style='background-color: white; line-height: 18px;'><span style='color: #333333;'>In</span></span><span style='background-color: white; line-height: 18px;'><span style='color: #333333;'/></span><span style='background-color: white; line-height: 18px;'><span style='color: #333333;'/></span><span style='background-color: white; line-height: 18px;'><span style='color: #333333;'> Berlin, David Bowie challenged societal bondages in his art and his life. Later, the city itself broke free from the bondage of the wall. Now, years later, Bowie looks back and wonders if all the chains have been broken.</span></span></span></span><br/><div style='color: #282828; line-height: 20px;'><span style='background-color: white; font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><br/></span></div><div style='color: #282828; line-height: 20px;'><span style='background-color: white; font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='color: #222222; line-height: 16px;'><table class='tr-caption-container' cellspacing='0' align='center' cellpadding='0' style='font-style: italic; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;'><tbody><tr><td style='text-align: center;'><a href='http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-3EZYRZLt07Q/UOy2OeZEN3I/AAAAAAAADvE/xJsBpBAosBE/s1600/Berlin+Noir+30%22x22%22+monotype+on+paper+2011.jpg' style='margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;'><img src='http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-3EZYRZLt07Q/UOy2OeZEN3I/AAAAAAAADvE/xJsBpBAosBE/s400/Berlin+Noir+30%22x22%22+monotype+on+paper+2011.jpg' border='0' height='400' width='258'/></a></td></tr><tr><td class='tr-caption' style='text-align: center;'><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif; font-size: small;'>Gregg Chadwick<br/><i>Berlin Noir</i><br/>30"x22" <span class='GRcorrect' id='GRmark_1bdf283d8c16bc15718df62bf95ce4da9725ea08_monotype:0'>monotype</span> on paper 2011</span></td></tr></tbody></table></span></span></div><div style='border: none; line-height: 24px; margin-bottom: 19px; padding: 0px;'><span style='background-color: white; font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='background-color: white; line-height: 16px;'/></span></div><div style='border: none; display: inline !important; line-height: 24px; margin-bottom: 19px; padding: 0px;'><span style='background-color: white; font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='background-color: white; color: #282828; font-family: Georgia, &apos;Times New Roman&apos;, serif;'>There are hints of personal loss in </span><span style='background-color: white; color: #282828; font-family: Georgia, &apos;Times New Roman&apos;, serif;'><i>Where Are We Now?</i> </span><span style='background-color: white; color: #282828; font-family: Georgia, &apos;Times New Roman&apos;, serif;'><span class='GRcorrect' id='GRmark_463f76a2a041acea49779c1b68376c762bf305f2_as:0'>as</span></span><span style='background-color: white; color: #282828; font-family: Georgia, &apos;Times New Roman&apos;, serif;'> well. Does the mysterious woman who appears with David throughout the video refer to Bowie's incredibly brave and influential first wife </span><a href='http://www.angiebowie.net/' target='_blank' style='background-color: white;'>Angela</a><span style='background-color: white; color: #282828; font-family: Georgia, &apos;Times New Roman&apos;, serif;'>? Or is she a reference to the classical muses? Or perhaps an angel briefly freed from the the towering Siegessäule which flickers in the video behind Bowie and his partner.</span><span style='background-color: white; color: #282828; font-family: Georgia, &apos;Times New Roman&apos;, serif;'> </span><span style='background-color: white; color: #282828; font-family: Georgia, &apos;Times New Roman&apos;, serif;'>The political and the personal merge in <i>Where Are We Now?</i>. We are left with existential questions and</span><span style='background-color: white; color: #282828; font-family: Georgia, &apos;Times New Roman&apos;, serif;'> are reminded that bodies age, marriages end, friendships dissolve and memories fade. But Bowie's quietly defiant voice does not give in to any dying of the light:</span></span></div><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><br/></span><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><br/></span><br/><div style='color: #282828;'><span style='background-color: white; font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><em style='color: #222222; line-height: 24px;'>As long as there’s sun<br/>As long as there’s sun<br/>As long as there’s rain<br/>As long as there’s rain<br/>As long as there’s fire<br/>As long as there’s fire<br/>As long as there’s me<br/>As long as there’s you</em></span></div><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><br/></span><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><br/></span><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><br/></span><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><br/></span><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'>&lt;iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/FOyDTy9DtHQ" width="560"&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;<br/></span><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><br/></span><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><br/></span><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='color: #333333;'/><br/></span><span style='color: #333333; font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='line-height: 18px;'> <b><i>Where Are We Now?</i></b></span></span><br/><span style='color: #333333; font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='line-height: 18px;'> <span class='GRcorrect' id='GRmark_f0ca1e49404a107e7cfcf09b17e0720a3b900c08_by:0'>by</span> David Bowie</span></span><br/><span style='color: #333333; font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='line-height: 18px;'> <span class='GRcorrect' id='GRmark_228b536d52b60e3a1d09123d42bff9b9ad2af6c5_produced:0'>produced</span> by Tony Visconti </span></span><br/><br/><div style='background-color: white; border: none; color: #222222; line-height: 24px; margin-bottom: 19px; padding: 0px;'><span style='color: #333333; font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><em>Had to get the train<br/>From Potsdamer Platz<br/>You never knew<br/>That I could do that<br/>Just <span class='GRcorrect' id='GRmark_61b6099b04f29ecd6ce6152610a688dae1570a7f_walking:0'>walking</span> the dead</em></span></div><div style='border: none; line-height: 24px; margin-bottom: 19px; padding: 0px;'><span style='color: #333333; font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><em style='background-color: white; color: #222222; line-height: 16px;'>Sitting in the Dschungel</em></span><br/><span style='color: #333333; font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><em style='background-color: white; color: #222222; line-height: 16px;'>On Nürnberger Straße</em></span><br/><span style='color: #333333; font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><em style='background-color: white; color: #222222; line-height: 16px;'>A man lost in time</em></span><br/><span style='color: #333333; font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><em style='background-color: white; color: #222222; line-height: 16px;'>Near KaDeWe</em></span><br/><span style='color: #333333; font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><em style='background-color: white; color: #222222; line-height: 16px;'>Just <span class='GRcorrect' id='GRmark_61b6099b04f29ecd6ce6152610a688dae1570a7f_walking:0'>walking</span> the dead</em></span></div><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='color: #333333;'><em style='background-color: white; color: #222222; line-height: 16px;'/></span></span><br/><div style='border: none; line-height: 24px; margin-bottom: 19px; padding: 0px;'><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='color: #333333;'><em style='background-color: white; color: #222222; line-height: 16px;'>Where are we now?</em></span></span><br/><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='color: #333333;'><em style='background-color: white; color: #222222; line-height: 16px;'>Where are we now?</em></span></span><br/><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='color: #333333;'><em style='background-color: white; color: #222222; line-height: 16px;'>The moment you know</em></span></span><br/><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='color: #333333;'><em style='background-color: white; color: #222222; line-height: 16px;'>You know you know</em></span></span></div><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='color: #333333;'><em style='background-color: white; color: #222222; line-height: 16px;'/></span></span><br/><div style='border: none; line-height: 24px; margin-bottom: 19px; padding: 0px;'><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='color: #333333;'><em style='background-color: white; color: #222222; line-height: 16px;'>Twenty thousand people</em></span></span><br/><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='color: #333333;'><em style='background-color: white; color: #222222; line-height: 16px;'>Cross Bösebrücke</em></span></span><br/><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='color: #333333;'><em style='background-color: white; color: #222222; line-height: 16px;'>Fingers are crossed</em></span></span><br/><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='color: #333333;'><em style='background-color: white; color: #222222; line-height: 16px;'>Just in case</em></span></span><br/><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='color: #333333;'><em style='background-color: white; color: #222222; line-height: 16px;'><span class='GRcorrect' id='GRmark_3cc5f9d860a23d423cae7b7d7d27b36d712b3db0_Walking:0'>Walking</span> the dead</em></span></span></div><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='color: #333333;'><em style='background-color: white; color: #222222; line-height: 16px;'/></span></span><br/><div style='border: none; line-height: 24px; margin-bottom: 19px; padding: 0px;'><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='color: #333333;'><em style='background-color: white; color: #222222; line-height: 16px;'>Where are we now?</em></span></span><br/><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='color: #333333;'><em style='background-color: white; color: #222222; line-height: 16px;'>Where are we now?</em></span></span><br/><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='color: #333333;'><em style='background-color: white; color: #222222; line-height: 16px;'>The moment you know</em></span></span><br/><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='color: #333333;'><em style='background-color: white; color: #222222; line-height: 16px;'>You know you know</em></span></span></div><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='color: #333333;'><em style='background-color: white; color: #222222; line-height: 16px;'/></span></span><div style='background-color: white; border: none; color: #222222; line-height: 24px; margin-bottom: 19px; padding: 0px;'><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='color: #333333;'><em>As long as there’s sun<br/>As long as there’s sun<br/>As long as there’s rain<br/>As long as there’s rain<br/>As long as there’s fire<br/>As long as there’s fire<br/>As long as there’s me<br/>As long as there’s you</em></span></span></div><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='color: #333333;'><br/><br/><div style='line-height: 18px;'/><div style='color: black; line-height: normal;'/><br/><span style='color: #333333;'><br/></span><div class='separator' style='clear: both; text-align: center;'><a href='http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-9-yNw1X55sU/UOybvCCSnXI/AAAAAAAADt0/UXjwXRSmzNs/s1600/David+Bowie.png' style='margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;'><img src='http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-9-yNw1X55sU/UOybvCCSnXI/AAAAAAAADt0/UXjwXRSmzNs/s400/David+Bowie.png' border='0' height='233' width='400'/></a></div><span style='color: #333333;'><br/></span><span style='color: #333333;'><br/></span><span style='color: #333333;'>In March, David Bowie will release <i>The Next Day</i>, an album of his first new music in a decade and a reunion with longtime producer Tony Visconti. <i>Where Are We Now?</i> <span class='GRcorrect' id='GRmark_d75974c4b7f5ab02037981e49d36c30e9c3b8677_was:0'>was</span> released today on Bowie's 66th birthday. A note from his label Columbia explained this was "a timely moment for such a treasure to appear as if out of nowhere." </span><br/><br/><br/></span><span style='color: #333333;'><span style='line-height: 18px;'><a href='https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/the-next-day-deluxe/id590844404?ls=1' target='_blank'>Available from iTunes</a></span></span></span><br/><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><br/></span><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><br/></span><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'>More at:</span><br/><a href='http://blog.zeit.de/tontraeger/2013/01/08/david-bowie-where-are-we-now_14811' target='_blank'><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'>Die Zeit: Nächste Abfahrt Potsdamer Platz</span></a><br/><div style=''><span style='color: #0000ee; font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='line-height: 26px;'><u>David Bowie: The Next Day. That album cover design</u></span></span></div><div style=''><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><u style='color: #0000ee; line-height: 26px;'/></span></div><div style='display: inline !important;'><u style='color: #0000ee; line-height: 26px;'><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'> <b><a href='http://www.virusfonts.com/' target='_blank'>What is the font you used for the main title?</a>:</b></span></u></div><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><br/></span><br/><div style=''><span style='color: #0000ee; font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='line-height: 26px;'><u/></span></span></div><span style='color: #0000ee; font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><u><a href='http://www.virusfonts.com/' target='_blank'>It is a new font that we are working on called Doctrine – this is the first major use of it. Doctrine will be released in the coming weeks at <span class='GRcorrect' id='GRmark_7954bf458fc5091adfab621d10c71ba7e0e23434_VirusFonts:0'>VirusFonts</span>.</a></u></span><br/><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='color: #0000ee;'><u><br/></u></span><span style='color: #0000ee;'><u><br/></u></span></span><br/><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><br/></span><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><span style='color: #333333;'><span style='line-height: 18px;'><br/></span></span></span><br/><span style='font-family: Georgia, Times New Roman, serif;'><br style='background-color: #ebebeb; color: #333333; line-height: 18px;'/></span><img src='http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/SpeedOfLife/~4/VoBAjYs2ljA' height='1' width='1'/> Tue, 29 Jan 2013 06:32:43 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list Sugarloaf, a ski painting <p><a href='http://markdixon.ca/artwork/sugarloaf-a-ski-painting-2.php/sugarloaf-timberline-finished' rel='attachment wp-att-793'><img title='Sugarloaf, Timberline, 2012' class='alignnone size-medium wp-image-793' rel='lightbox792' src='http://markdixon.ca/artwork/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/sugarloaf-timberline-finished-600x428.jpg' height='428' alt='Sugarloaf, Timberline, 2012' width='600'/></a><br/> Sugarloaf, Timberline Chair, 2012, oil on canvas, 42 x 32 inches, private collection.</p> <p>It has been a while since I have posted any news or a new painting here recently. I am happy to send this painting off to a new home in Calgary to live on the walls of a skiing family.</p> <p>Last March I posted an image of the <a href='http://markdixon.ca/artwork/sugarloaf-a-ski-painting.php'>study</a> for this painting. The painting took quite a few turns along the way and I finally finished it a few weeks ago.</p> Tue, 16 Apr 2013 07:31:41 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list Sugarloaf, a ski painting <p><a href='http://markdixon.ca/artwork/sugarloaf-a-ski-painting-2.php/sugarloaf-timberline-finished' rel='attachment wp-att-793'><img title='Sugarloaf, Timberline, 2012' class='alignnone size-medium wp-image-793' rel='lightbox792' src='http://markdixon.ca/artwork/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/sugarloaf-timberline-finished-600x428.jpg' height='428' alt='Sugarloaf, Timberline, 2012' width='600'/></a><br/> Sugarloaf, Timberline Chair, 2012, oil on canvas, 42 x 32 inches, private collection.</p> <p>It has been a while since I have posted any news or a new painting here recently. I am happy to send this painting off to a new home in Calgary to live on the walls of a skiing family.</p> <p>Last March I posted an image of the <a href='http://markdixon.ca/artwork/sugarloaf-a-ski-painting.php'>study</a> for this painting. The painting took quite a few turns along the way and I finally finished it a few weeks ago.</p> Fri, 05 Jul 2013 07:30:13 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list Quote for this Campaign Season <span class='Apple-style-span' style='font-family: &apos;Trebuchet MS&apos;, sans-serif;'>"Thus it is manifest that the best political community is formed by citizens of the middle class, and that those states are likely to be well-administered in which the middle class is large, and stronger if possible than both the other classes, or at any rate than either singly; for the addition of the middle class turns the scale, and prevents either of the extremes from being dominant. Great then is the good fortune of a state in which the citizens have a moderate and sufficient property; for where some possess much, and the others nothing, there may arise an extreme democracy, or a pure oligarchy; or a tyranny may grow out of either extreme- either out of the most rampant democracy, or out of an oligarchy; but it is not so likely to arise out of the middle constitutions and those akin to them. "  --Aristotle, from "<a href='http://classics.mit.edu/Aristotle/politics.4.four.html'>Politics</a>" </span><div class='blogger-post-footer'><img src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/12363995-7812471141747580655?l=www.edwardwinkleman.com' height='1' alt='' width='1'/></div> Thu, 02 Aug 2012 08:20:27 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list Artoon <p style='text-align: center;'><a href='http://www.artworldsalon.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/the-scream.jpg' title='the-scream' rel='lightbox[pics-1336156964]'><img class='attachment wp-att-894 centered' src='http://www.artworldsalon.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/the-scream.jpg' height='538' alt='the-scream' width='500'/></a></p> Sat, 05 May 2012 08:46:23 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list A Painting In situ <p><a href='http://www.markdixon.ca/artwork/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/painting-in-situ.jpg' title='Painting in situ - Montreal' rel='lightbox726'><img class='alignnone size-full wp-image-727' title='painting-in-situ' src='http://www.markdixon.ca/artwork/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/painting-in-situ.jpg' alt='Painting in situ - Montreal' width='600'/></a></p> <p>The painting <a href='http://www.markdixon.ca/artwork/portfolio-recent-paintings'>Green Forest</a> hung.</p> Tue, 08 May 2012 08:24:16 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list People I knew without the gelatin <p>“The deceased, as you know, have the inconvenient habit of cooling off too slowly; they’re burning hot. So they are turned into aspics by pouring memories over them–the best form of gelatin.<br/> And since deceased greats are also too large, they are cut down. The nose, say, is served separately, or the tongue. You need less gelatin that way. And that’s how you get yesterday’s classic as freshly cooked tongue in aspic. With a side dish of hoofs, from the horse he used to ride.<br/> I’m trying to remember the people I knew without the gelatin. I don’t pour aspic over them, I’m not trying to turn them into a tasty dish. I know that a tasty dish is easier to swallow and easier to digest. You know where it ends up.”<br/> <em>Testimony: The memoirs of Dmitri Shotakovich</em></p> Thu, 19 Apr 2012 08:20:40 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list People I knew without the gelatin <p>“The deceased, as you know, have the inconvenient habit of cooling off too slowly; they’re burning hot. So they are turned into aspics by pouring memories over them–the best form of gelatin.<br/> And since deceased greats are also too large, they are cut down. The nose, say, is served separately, or the tongue. You need less gelatin that way. And that’s how you get yesterday’s classic as freshly cooked tongue in aspic. With a side dish of hoofs, from the horse he used to ride.<br/> I’m trying to remember the people I knew without the gelatin. I don’t pour aspic over them, I’m not trying to turn them into a tasty dish. I know that a tasty dish is easier to swallow and easier to digest. You know where it ends up.”<br/> <em>Testimony: The memoirs of Dmitri Shotakovich</em></p> Thu, 29 Mar 2012 10:11:38 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list Under a flyover <p><img class='size-full wp-image-147388 ' title='folly_green' src='http://londonist.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/folly_green.jpg?9d7bd4' height='427' alt='' width='640'/><br/><a href='http://londonist.com/2011/06/in-pictures-folly-for-a-flyover.php'>Folly For A Flyover | Londonist</a><br/> </p><blockquote>On Friday, a temporary structure nestled beneath a concrete flyover in Hackney Wick opened its doors to the public.<p/> <p>Part of the Create11 Festival, Folly For a Flyover is the work of Assemble, the gang of amibitious young architects and designers who built the Cineroleum in Clerkenwell last year. Those who filled up at the Cineroleum will feel right at home here: each weekend evening until late July the Folly will hold a series of musical performances and film screenings. If you’ve ever dreamt about watching 2001: A Space Odyssey or The Wizard of Oz on a scrub of disused land beneath a flyover (and who hasn’t?), now’s your chance.</p> <p>During the day and evening there’s a simple cafe on-site, and there’s also the opportunity to rent out small rowing boats for a quick paddle up and down the algae-infested Lee Navigation Canal. Come dusk, with the thrum of vehicles overhead, it’s the perfect place to watch a film, even if you can never quite shake the feeling that you’re living in a slightly more pleasant version of JG Ballard’s Concrete Island.</p></blockquote> Tue, 23 Aug 2011 07:19:52 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list Call for Art EXTENDED: Northern Manhattan Artists <p>June 26, 2013</p> <p><strong>Due to artists June Uptown Arts Stroll schedule, we have been asked to open and extend the call for the Poster Contest.</strong></p> <p><strong>New Deadline: Thursday, July 18, 2013 Midnight</strong></p> <p><strong>MTA –Artists Unite Subway Elevator Poster Project<br/> </strong></p> <p>Northern Manhattan Artists</p> <p>Administrative Fee: $10</p> <p><strong>We are looking for six (6) original artworks by artists residing in CB 12* to be produced as posters and placed in the subway elevators at the A-Line 184th. St. (181st. Subway Stop) and the 190th. St. Subway Stations. One poster in each of the 6 elevators, 3 elevators per station. Work will be seen by thousands of residents and tourists en route to the Cloisters Museum.</strong> See Instructions below.</p> <p>* CB 12 covers Manhattan north of 155th street, river to river.</p> <p><strong>Guidelines:</strong> Material must be sensitive to and respectful of the diversity of the community and be appropriate for viewing by persons of all ages and varying backgrounds.</p> <ul> <li>Material can not include messages that might reasonably be interpreted as an endorsement or advocacy of any political, religious, social or ethnic organization, cause, or belief nor contain logos or other symbols of same.</li> <li>Materials can not include depictions of commercial establishments or photographs of individuals, pets, or private residences.</li> <li>Materials can not include written or printed text.</li> <li>Material can not include content or references which might be reasonably construed as being of a sexual or violent nature.</li> <li>Proposed art must lend itself to reproduction as a two-dimensional poster, no more than 29.5 inches wide by 45 inches long, (vertical/portrait orientation).</li> <li>Of the 6 posters frames, 5 are portrait, and 1 landscape. Please indicate the direction of your image. And, CONSIDER that your chances of being selected are greater submitting work in the portrait direction.</li> </ul> <p><strong>Deadline for submissions: Thursday, July 18, 2013, 12:00 Midnight.</strong> <strong>Previous Winners Not Eligible.</strong></p> <p>Posters will be exhibited for a minimum of six months.</p> <p><strong>Instructions:</strong></p> <p>Please submit no more than 4 images in JPG format for viewing. JPG files should be no more than 1440 pixels in any direction (e.g., 800 by 1440, or 1440 x 800 pixels). Include artist’s last name in the filename for each image (e.g., Rodriguez-landscape1.jpg).</p> <p>Original work may be in any medium: painting, collage, sculpture, photography.</p> <p>Selected artists will be contacted regarding image specifications for reproduction.</p> <p>Send Images by e-mail to: rosa@artistsunite-ny.org along with your address in CB12 (Manhattan north of 155th street, river to river). In the subject line enter <strong>Poster Contest 2013</strong>.</p> <p><strong>Mail the Administrative Fee:</strong> To be considered by the judges, we must receive the Administrative Fee by Tuesday, July 16, 2013. Please send a check for $10.00 payable to <strong>Artists Unite</strong> and mail to: Artists Unite, 720 Fort Washington Ave. #2K, New York, NY 10040</p> <p><strong>For More Information:</strong></p> <p>Contact rosa@artistsunite-ny.org or call: 212.740-9378</p> <p><strong>Judging:</strong></p> <p>Artists Unite will convene a 3-7-person panel to select artwork. Final approval is by the MTA in accordance with listed guidelines.</p> <p>We look forward to your entries.</p> <p>Thank you,</p> <p>Rosa Naparstek,<br/> Co-Director, Artists Unite</p> Mon, 01 Jul 2013 06:52:55 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list dia/projects one year <p><span class='mt-enclosure mt-enclosure-image' style='display: inline;'><img class='mt-image-none' src='http://www.diacritic.org/blog/archives/images/dia_table.jpg' border='1' height='317' alt='dia_table.jpg' width='450' style=''/></span></p> <p>It's been over a year, and I suppose the good thing is that the activity in the space hasn't left me time to concentrate on the blog. And Facebook apparently still remains the main mode of mass communication despite the patchy issues with FB in Vietnam. Anyhow, I've prepared a little pdf to provide a glimpse of some of the activities over the past year, which you can download below.</p> <p>+ Scribd. <a href='http://www.scribd.com/doc/55754598'>Dia/Projects.pdf</a><br/> + Facebook. <a href='http://www.facebook.com/home.php?sk=group_208836995816652'>Dia/Projects</a> (new open group format)</p> Fri, 05 Jul 2013 07:24:58 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list We Moved! <p style='text-align: center;'><a href='http://theocartblog.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8341c058b53ef014e88524ab9970d-popup' style='display: inline;'><img class='asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8341c058b53ef014e88524ab9970d' title='Ocartblogscreenprint' src='http://theocartblog.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8341c058b53ef014e88524ab9970d-500wi' alt='Ocartblogscreenprint'/></a></p> <p style='text-align: center;'> </p> <p style='text-align: center;'>Have you heard? We moved!</p> <p style='text-align: center;'>Come visit us!</p> <p style='text-align: center;'><span style='font-size: 18pt;'><a href='http://www.ocartblog.com/' target='_self'>www.ocartblog.com</a></span></p> Sun, 19 May 2013 06:50:06 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list No Parking Yet another way that regulation chokes Washington: The height restriction on buildings prevents investors (including the city) from realizing the immense market value of public parks. In Manhattan, where growth is profound, density is high, and regulation is light, the... Tue, 31 Jan 2012 08:39:07 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list Thanks for the Memories Tue, 07 Sep 2010 00:08:58 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list Call for Artists : International MFA Program in Creative Practice (2010-05-03 - 2010-06-01) Transart Institute offers an international MFA program for working artists to develop a sustainable creative praxis with three summer residencies in Berlin; two winter residencies in New York City and individual advisement during two school years - wherever students work and live. The low-residency program leads to a Master of Fine Arts (MFA) in Creative Practice. Students are free to pursue work in any art-related genre and to create their own course of study, working independently and with the support of faculty and self-chosen studio advisors. Short periods of intensive residency permit students to continue with their professional work and keep a balanced personal life while participating in the program. Fri, 07 May 2010 00:09:54 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list ClipODay: Bruno 9LI A short documentary on this great Brazilian artist whose work is currently showing at the San Jose based Anno Domini. Thu, 28 Aug 2008 07:58:52 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list Call: work needed for a Library on Themes of Openness <p><img src='http://transition.turbulence.org/blog/images/2008/05/resize-cropphp.jpeg' alt='resize-cropphp.jpeg'/>I am writing to you as I am researching content for the constitution of a film and reading library which will be permanently installed in the reading area (which is presently being set up) at Gasworks, London, and will be available as far as possible, as an online linked bibliography or resource.</p> <p>This initiative stems from Disclosures, “<a href='http://gasworks.org.uk/exhibitions/detail.php?id=344'>http://gasworks.org.uk/exhibitions/detail.php?id=344</a>“, a project exploring the extent to which Open Source methodologies find applications in fields of cultural production outside of the Internet. We have started constituting a library during Disclosures and are currently working on its expansion. We are looking for films, videos, digital works, documentaries, files and printed material of any kind which contribute (or have contributed) to themes of openness - as organizational strategy and/or ethos; diffuse authorship and open content licences; the limits of openness, the conditions of its existence and its economic reality; the building and maintaining of networks, etc. The library is there to gather material from different interconnected fields encompassing urban sociology, critical media and visual art practice, and social history studies.</p> <p>We would like to ask you if you and/or your organisation had material which you thought was relevant to the subjects outlined above and which you could send us for addition.</p> <p>We’re hoping to create an interesting archive of initiatives that are not necessarily seen together and to open them up to various publics, i.e. students, researchers, practitioners, curators, to help them in their research or simply introduce them to a range of projects and activities. We will place a catalogue online which will link to all online material.</p> <p>We look forward to hearing from you or receiving your material. You can send it to: moira@gasworks.org.uk</p> Mon, 19 May 2008 00:08:10 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list Paul Huet (1804-1869) <a href='http://www.linternaute.com/sortir/fontainebleau-un-atelier-grandeur-nature/image/11625.jpg'><img src='http://www.linternaute.com/sortir/fontainebleau-un-atelier-grandeur-nature/image/11625.jpg' border='0' alt='' style='display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: pointer; cursor: hand; width: 400px;'/></a><br/><a href='http://www.art-prints-on-demand.com/kunst/paul_huet/paul_huet_stuermisches_meer_1015644.jpg'><img src='http://www.art-prints-on-demand.com/kunst/paul_huet/paul_huet_stuermisches_meer_1015644.jpg' border='0' alt='' style='display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: pointer; cursor: hand; width: 400px;'/></a> Sun, 30 Jun 2013 06:47:05 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list <a href='http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_R4Dod5bRa-Y/RtC9Ib3kDxI/AAAAAAAAAbc/3K9fryPI4DA/s1600-h/sky.jpg'><img src='http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_R4Dod5bRa-Y/RtC9Ib3kDxI/AAAAAAAAAbc/3K9fryPI4DA/s400/sky.jpg' id='BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5102786330428182290' border='0' alt='' style='margin: 0pt 0pt 10px 10px; float: right; cursor: pointer;'/></a><span style=''><span style='font-weight: bold;'><span style='color: rgb(204, 51, 204);'>P</span><span style='color: rgb(204, 0, 0);'/></span></span><span style=''><span style='font-weight: bold;'><span style='color: rgb(204, 0, 0);'>E</span></span></span><span style=''><span style='font-weight: bold;'><span style='color: rgb(51, 204, 0);'/></span></span><span style=''><span style='font-weight: bold;'><span style='color: rgb(51, 204, 0);'>A</span></span></span><span style=''><span style='font-weight: bold;'><span style='color: rgb(51, 51, 255);'>C</span><span style='color: rgb(255, 102, 102);'>E</span> <span style='color: rgb(255, 102, 0);'>O<span style='color: rgb(153, 153, 0);'>U</span></span><span style='color: rgb(51, 51, 153);'>T</span></span></span> <br/> <span style=''><span style='color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-weight: bold;'> I've grown a pair of handsom wings and it's time to jet on outta here. The truth is I'm having miserable separation anxiety about ending ABCN. It was fun gamboling about the ether to find Team Shredder and the Norf*ckneasters, and here's a final salute to Boadweeblog. It's been swell having a daily writing practice, lame though it may be. I'll try to keep that up through my free verse poetry, quatrains and of course poison ink letters to various evil concerns. Right now I am a broken crown of sorrow remembering happier times. </span> <br/><br/> <span style='color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-weight: bold;'>Check out the archives from 2005-2006, ABCN's golden years and here are two good sources of articles and essays to browse through, </span><a href='http://http//www.tate.org.uk/research/tateresearch/tatepapers/' style='color: rgb(153, 0, 0); font-weight: bold;'>The Tate Papers</a><span style='color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-weight: bold;'> and The </span><a href='http://www.doaj.org/doaj?func=findjournals' style='color: rgb(153, 0, 0); font-weight: bold;'>Directory of Open access Journals.</a> <br/><br/> <span style='color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-weight: bold;'> <span style='font-size: 78%;'>Perhaps I'll post occasionally in the future </span></span></span><span style='color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-weight: bold; font-family: verdana; font-size: 78%;'>(but dont bother checking back here regularly).</span> Fri, 05 Jul 2013 07:23:23 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list Take Deep Breaths and Waste Sweet Seconds The weekend's photos are really starting to backup up in here. I've only just now had the chance to upload my pics from Thursday night's Bridge Art Fair preview (selections posted below). Not yet posted: more photos from Art Chicago,... Sat, 20 Sep 2008 22:06:09 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list Updating RSS Feeds <a href='http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_Lbqfd3xHLc4/Rh1-Xaj6gxI/AAAAAAAAAAU/n7JE7-ghLVI/s1600-h/Untitled-2.jpg'><img src='http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_Lbqfd3xHLc4/Rh1-Xaj6gxI/AAAAAAAAAAU/n7JE7-ghLVI/s400/Untitled-2.jpg' border='0' id='BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5052333297711612690' alt='' style='display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: pointer; cursor: hand;'/></a><br/><span style='font-weight: bold;'>Olav Westphalen</span>, <span style='font-style: italic;'>Extremely site-unspecific sculpture</span>, 2000<br/><span style='font-style: italic;'>Image via: Public Art Fund</span><br/><br/>If you're reading this message, chances are you haven't updated my new RSS feed to your newsreader. To do so just follow <a href='http://feeds.feedburner.com/ArtFagCity'>this link</a>, and in about two seconds you'll be set up! Those who have missed a few of the latests posts will be sore indeed: From the loins of youtube, <a href='http://www.artfagcity.com/2007/04/09/is-dry-humping-work-safe/'>Making Vindaloo</a>, a soft core bollywood music video, and <a href='http://www.artfagcity.com/2007/04/11/reviewing-the-reviews-selling-himself-and-prints-too-at-the-nytimes/'>my the latest <span style='font-style: italic;'>Reviewing the Reviews</span>, whidh discusses the New York Times piece <span style='font-style: italic;'>Selling Himself and Prints Too</span></a>. It's a lot to do at once, but I'll hazard a guess and say I think my readers can handle dry humping and the NYTimes at once. <br/><br/>Also note that I'll be closing this blog down shortly so all links here will simply redirect to <a href='http://www.artfagcity.com/'>Art Fag City.</a><div class='blogger-post-footer'><img src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/16235132-6106106372932185705?l=artfagcity.blogspot.com' height='1' alt='' width='1'/></div> Sat, 12 May 2012 07:04:49 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Feeds/list