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Chicago

Glass Curtain Gallery

Exhibition Detail
RE: figure, a contemporary look at figurative representation in art
Curated by: Cole Robertson
1104 S. Wabash Ave, First Floor
Chicago, IL 60605


September 8th, 2009 - October 30th, 2009
Opening: 
September 10th, 2009 5:00 PM - 8:00 PM
 
Event-slideshow-placeholder-7598836db0df8fd38455e9b6cb02802f
> ARTISTS
> QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://colum.edu/deps
NEIGHBORHOOD:  
Michigan Ave/Downtown
EMAIL:  
mporter@colum.edu
PHONE:  
312-369-6643
OPEN HOURS:  
Mon,Tues, Wed and Fri 9am-5pm, Thurs 9am-7pm
ARTS ORGANIZATION:  
D.E.P.S. (The Department of Exhibition and Performance Spaces)
SCHOOL ASSOCIATION:  
Columbia College Chicago
TAGS:  
sculpture, photography, mixed-media
COST:  
FREE
> DESCRIPTION

For eons, artists have depicted the human body. Such works serve as talismans, warnings, fetishes, memorials, and paeans to the human form. New technologies and innovative use of traditional media have changed the ways in which we view the body—from the Sims to Facebook to Youtube, our lives are inundated with new interpretations of and uses for figurative representation. RE: figure will explore the common ground between new and old media representations of the human form, as well as the different uses of figurative representation.

Re: figure will feature artists working in a diverse range of media, such as video game screen captures, photography, sculpture, collage, drawing, etc. Included works will show a range of body types, as well as explore different relationships between the artist and his or her subject. Don Doe’s mixed-media drawings, modern-day interpretations of the Madonna, give a much darker view of motherhood. Amber Hawk Swanson’s photographic series ‘To Have, To Hold, and To Violate’ of her doppelgänger Realdoll™, a lifelike sex doll she had created in her own image, provide a disturbing look into the ways in which likenesses can be abused. Stacia Yeapanis’ ‘Glitches Are Signs’ gives a more lighthearted view of the same subject, through screen captures of her own Sims™-likeness apparent physical disintegration.


 

 

 


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