ArtSlant - Recently added http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/show en-us 40 - Smart Museum of Art, University of Chicago - September 27th - December 31st <p style="text-align: justify;">What makes an object a sculpture? The immersive exhibition&nbsp;<em>Carved, Cast, Crumpled</em>investigates the essential qualities of three-dimensional art across historical and cultural contexts, questioning what it means to be in the presence of an object.&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">The exhibition is the first in a series of special projects celebrating the Smart Museum of Art's 40th anniversary. Comprised entirely of three-dimensional works and a handful of drawings by sculptors, it showcases a foundational component of the Museum&rsquo;s collection, one that can be traced back to the Joel Starrels, Jr. Memorial Collection of modern sculpture that was featured in the Smart&rsquo;s inaugural exhibition in the fall of 1974.&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">The exhibition takes over the entirety of the Museum, transforming both spaces normally dedicated to temporary exhibitions as well as those that are home to longer-standing installations of the Smart&rsquo;s collection. Highlights include small-scale sculptures by modern masters like Auguste Rodin, Jacques Lipchitz, and Henry Moore; ancient Chinese&nbsp;<em>mingqi</em>tomb figures and Buddhist devotional statues; European bronzes of princes,&nbsp;<em>putti</em>, and classical heroes; and boundary-breaking work by contemporary artists including Magdalena Abakanowicz, John Chamberlain, Robert Irwin, and H. C. Westermann. Through roughly chronological presentations as well as unexpected juxtapositions of objects,&nbsp;<em>Carved, Cast, Crumpled</em>&nbsp;explores the notion of sculpture in all its forms.&nbsp;</p> Thu, 21 Aug 2014 10:52:17 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/list Group Show - Shane Campbell Gallery - August 23rd - October 4th Thu, 21 Aug 2014 10:31:19 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/list Bryan Zanisnik - Aspect Ratio - September 5th - October 18th <p><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/34000/1ggx/20140821100320-PR.JPG" alt="" /></p> Thu, 21 Aug 2014 10:05:06 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/list John Henley - slow - August 30th - September 27th <p>Enough time in a room full of men and the stories turn blue. It&rsquo;s just a thing.<br />&nbsp;<br />Maintenance chores are all about desire for the good life. Maybe that should be edited down: Maintenance chores are all about desire. Present your space in its best light. Present your body groomed, worked out, and postured with confidence.<br />&nbsp;<br /><a href="http://paul-is-slow.us2.list-manage.com/track/click?u=e341e313cf3e876de381d9d41&amp;id=e7833fcdf3&amp;e=766610da6e" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">John Henley</a>&rsquo;s work is sexy and explicit and populated with hot men in various degrees of undress. Usually men and not boys and enough women to keep it human. Regular, attainable, hard working, ordinary. But something else entirely is going on here. The images are about desire, but desire shifts under your feet so it is difficult to differentiate between hot sex or clean sheets, a room addition to your home or decent cup of coffee. John&rsquo;s lexicon of desire is no euphemism for prurient subject matter. It is really stuff he wants and can reasonably expect to work a little and get on a pretty consistent basis. String small attainments together, and a good life is under construction. Lived in the context of community that works together, loves together, and occasionally has spats and tension. There is spectacle and illusion but never really anything that amounts to drama. Not a simple compilation. Episodic structures that contain ruptures, re-do&rsquo;s and parallaxes. The sex bits are there and not in some mournful way that isolates, hides in shame, or relegates to magical thinking. Bits bumping against bits for the bump of it and then back to work. Matter-of-fact without becoming brazen nor losing heat. Emotions and the daily grind all part of a connection.<br />&nbsp;<br />John&rsquo;s painting is about what you see and can&rsquo;t say. An expanse of deep blue can relax a troubled mind, well up into deep and weighty sadness, or inflame a randy impulse to grope and thrust. &nbsp;It may describe a bucolic lake or a dreamy stare upwards. It may be word play. Blue. Blue as in dirty. Blue as in melancholic. Blue as in blue. Trying to say how all those things work inside images built on subject matter and narrative structures is a fool&rsquo;s errand. John&rsquo;s paintings color like that. Color schemes that pretend to be simplified and maybe simply found. Worked like paint. &nbsp;Strokes and gestures. The every day of it all. Lines that carry awkward bulges. Flattened perspective pushing against illusionistic expanses. The crummy cardstock he paints on so the art is not so very fine.<br />&nbsp;<br />John&rsquo;s accessible narratives unfold without pandering or dumbing down. We know how he did it. Get caught up in his scene. Stay a while and see how it pans out.</p> Tue, 19 Aug 2014 14:41:49 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/list various contributors - The Art Institute of Chicago - August 7th 5:00 PM - 8:00 PM <p>Temporary installation of selected surreal everyday objects. Installation and collection done in conjunction with the museum's special Magritte exhibit, running through October, 2014</p> Tue, 19 Aug 2014 04:27:52 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/list various contributors - The Art Institute of Chicago - August 7th 5:00 PM - 8:00 PM <p>Temporary installation of selected surreal objects.&nbsp;</p> Tue, 19 Aug 2014 04:20:17 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/list Gregory Scott - Catherine Edelman Gallery - September 5th - November 1st <p style="text-align: justify;" align="justify">Gregory Scott has always blurred the lines between painting and photography, incorporating paintings he made of himself, or his body, back into his photographs. The resulting images were both humorous and odd, challenging the viewer&rsquo;s perception of photographic truth. Then, at the age of 49, Scott decided to go to graduate school to strengthen his knowledge of art history and study video editing. In 2008, upon graduation, Gregory Scott stunned the art world with his mixed-media video works that combined installation, photography, performance, video and painting. As more and more artists blur the lines between media, Scott has taken the idea to a whole new level, presenting video-based wall pieces that are humorous and poignant, contemplative yet accessible.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;" align="justify">Gregory Scott builds sets in his studio that serve as his subject. In these sets, he records himself performing a variety of scenarios that are then edited into 6-10 minute videos. The sets are then photographed, and the resulting wall piece is a mounted photograph with a cut out for a monitor on which a video plays, and a painted element appears on the photographic surface. In each video, he shows how he constructed the set that he photographed, breaking down the barrier between maker and viewer. All of the hardware is attached to the inside of the frame, making his works self-contained.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;" align="justify">Continuing to use himself as the model, Scott creates narrative pieces that reference specific artists (Mark Rothko, James Turrell, Cy Twombly, Frank Stella) that have had an impact on his life. Using illusion and surprise, he challenges the definitions placed on photography, painting and video, expanding its discourse and creating a dialogue with the viewer. This dialogue can be seen in&nbsp;<em>Warholian,</em>&nbsp;which shows a photograph of a framed &ldquo;painting&rdquo; hanging in a gallery. The painting quickly reveals itself to be a video, showing the artist making his own Warhols, including a silkscreened Marilyn who gets up and walks out of the frame, and a Campbell&rsquo;s soup can that tips over, pouring out blue paint. In his newest piece,&nbsp;<em>Half Dome</em>, Scott built a model of Yosemite in his studio, referencing Ansel Adams and the beautiful landscape he made famous. In&nbsp;<em>Don&rsquo;t Fade Away</em>, he disappears into walls and staircases, referencing the work of Liu Bolin. Gregory Scott is a gifted painter, photographer, narrator and video editor, who creates clever narratives that challenge the viewers&rsquo; perception of art and the many ways it can be presented.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;" align="justify">Gregory Scott was born in Ann Arbor, Michigan in 1957 and received his Bachelor degree from the Institute of Design at IIT in Chicago in 1979 and his Master of Fine Art from Indiana University in 2008. He lives in Cleveland, OH.</p> Mon, 18 Aug 2014 14:12:54 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/list Lilli Carré - Western Exhibitions - September 5th - October 18th <div style="text-align: justify;">The interdisciplinary work in&nbsp;<strong>Lilli Carr&eacute;'s</strong>&nbsp;second solo show at Western Exhibitions takes the maze as a point of inquiry and departure. She will present work in the form of drawings, book, and animation, exploring the human fascination for constructing mazes specifically to spend time getting lost within them, and for the hope or delight of resolution. The show opens on Friday, September 5&nbsp;with a free public reception from&nbsp;5 to 8pm&nbsp;and runs through&nbsp;October 18, 2014.&nbsp;<br /><br /></div> <div style="text-align: justify;"> <div>Mazes offer an unusual kind of headspace, providing ways to experience losing awareness of oneself while being extremely focused on where one is at the same time. For Carr&eacute;, mazes are ways to set up and depict structures of time, play, and choice; structures created to lose, find or study oneself. Carr&eacute;'s graphic investigations draw upon the human obsession with mazes of all forms, across time and different cultures, in both myth and experience.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>In Gallery 1, Carr&eacute; presents a series of complex mazes as overhead diagrams that she draws for herself, and then immediately attempts to solve. She separates the solution from the maze, letting the structure and the solution exist as separate images. The solution line drawing marks the particular path of impulsive decision-making, a path of thinking through a nonstop series of decisions, like any regular day in our lives, or as a trail and shape of a lifetime of choices from beginning to end.&nbsp;<br /><br /></div> <div>Two large-scale drawings and an accordion book approach the maze form as fragmented imagery, dislocated from an original context. The space of the page is divided by a series of corners, edges, and panels, to be read as a diagram more akin to how time is read on a comics page. Figures are obscured as they weave through and interact with the lines and panels around them, which act as physical walls and borders on the page. A monitor in the gallery shows a looped animation of a crowd briskly moving through a blank, congested maze-like space from above. Figures face and swerve around each other, all focused on their own path.<br /><br /></div> <div>Gallery 2 will feature a looped projection of a hand-drawn animation, leading the viewer on a journey through a maze in the first-person perspective, reminiscent of a maze in a video game or of the gallery space itself. As the viewer is lead through the virtual space, the figures and shapes on the periphery flicker, morph, and pass by, evoking the sensation of feeling lost, confused, electric and untethered when in an unfamiliar place.&nbsp;<br /><br /></div> <div><strong>Lilli Carr&eacute;</strong>&nbsp;(American, b. 1983), an interdisciplinary artist currently living in Chicago, is best known for her comics, animated films, and commercial illustration. Her creative practice employs a wide range of media including printmaking, artists' books, drawing, and ceramic sculpture. Her animated films have been shown in festivals throughout the US and abroad, including the Sundance Film Festival, and she is the co-founder of the&nbsp;Eyeworks Festival of Experimental Animation, now in its 5th year. Her most recent collection of comics,&nbsp;<em>Heads or Tails</em>, will see its second printing from Fantagraphics Books in January 2015. Her work has appeared in&nbsp;The Believer Magazine, the New Yorker,&nbsp;The New York Times,&nbsp;Best American Comics&nbsp;and Best American Nonrequired Reading. Her recent&nbsp;BMO Harris Chicago Works&nbsp;solo show at the&nbsp;MCA Chicago&nbsp;was reviewed in the&nbsp;Chicago Tribune&nbsp;and&nbsp;Chicago Reader. She has been included in shows at the&nbsp;Columbus Museum of Art&nbsp;in Ohio, the John Michael Kohler Arts Center in Wisconsin, the Museum of Cartoon Art in San Francisco, and the DePaul University Art Museum in Chicago.</div> <br /><br /></div> <div style="text-align: justify;">In Gallery 1, Carr&eacute; presents a series of complex mazes as overhead diagrams that she draws for herself, and then immediately attempts to solve. She separates the solution from the maze, letting the structure and the solution exist as separate images. The solution line drawing marks the particular path of impulsive decision-making, a path of thinking through a nonstop series of decisions, like any regular day in our lives, or as a trail and shape of a lifetime of choices from beginning to end.&nbsp;<br /><br /></div> <div style="text-align: justify;">Two large-scale drawings and an accordion book approach the maze form as fragmented imagery, dislocated from an original context. The space of the page is divided by a series of corners, edges, and panels, to be read as a diagram more akin to how time is read on a comics page. Figures are obscured as they weave through and interact with the lines and panels around them, which act as physical walls and borders on the page. A monitor in the gallery shows a looped animation of a crowd briskly moving through a blank, congested maze-like space from above. Figures face and swerve around each other, all focused on their own path.<br /><br /></div> <div style="text-align: justify;">Gallery 2 will feature a looped projection of a hand-drawn animation, leading the viewer on a journey through a maze in the first-person perspective, reminiscent of a maze in a video game or of the gallery space itself. As the viewer is lead through the virtual space, the figures and shapes on the periphery flicker, morph, and pass by, evoking the sensation of feeling lost, confused, electric and untethered when in an unfamiliar place.&nbsp;<br /><br /></div> <div style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Lilli Carr&eacute;</strong>&nbsp;(American, b. 1983), an interdisciplinary artist currently living in Chicago, is best known for her comics, animated films, and commercial illustration. Her creative practice employs a wide range of media including printmaking, artists' books, drawing, and ceramic sculpture. Her animated films have been shown in festivals throughout the US and abroad, including the Sundance Film Festival, and she is the co-founder of the&nbsp;Eyeworks Festival of Experimental Animation, now in its 5th year. Her most recent collection of comics,&nbsp;<em>Heads or Tails</em>, will see its second printing from Fantagraphics Books in January 2015. Her work has appeared in&nbsp;The Believer Magazine, the New Yorker,&nbsp;The New York Times,&nbsp;Best American Comics&nbsp;and Best American Nonrequired Reading. Her recent&nbsp;BMO Harris Chicago Works&nbsp;solo show at the&nbsp;MCA Chicago&nbsp;was reviewed in the&nbsp;Chicago Tribune&nbsp;and&nbsp;Chicago Reader. She has been included in shows at the&nbsp;Columbus Museum of Art&nbsp;in Ohio, the John Michael Kohler Arts Center in Wisconsin, the Museum of Cartoon Art in San Francisco, and the DePaul University Art Museum in Chicago.</div> Mon, 18 Aug 2014 13:49:35 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/list Paula Hayes - Rhona Hoffman Gallery - September 12th - October 25th <div style="text-align: justify;"><em>This Bird Saved Me,</em>&nbsp;Paula Hayes&rsquo; second solo exhibition with Rhona Hoffman Gallery, will feature new sculpture in the form of&nbsp;birdhouses, birdbaths and basins.&nbsp;Nurturing a studio practice of creating vessels for living plants such as terrariums, amorphous planters and birdhouses, Hayes&nbsp;seeks to connect people to the natural world, while maintaining a high level of design. The works featured in this fall exhibition are organic, custom-made sculpture - both eco-friendly and in harmony with the landscape.</div> <div> <div style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Paula Hayes (b. 1958, Concord, MA)</strong>&nbsp;received her MFA in Sculpture from Parsons School of Design. Since the early 90's Hayes has exhibited with the following New York galleries: Salon 94, David Zwirner Gallery, Hauser &amp; Wirth, and Marianne Boesky Gallery.</div> </div> Mon, 18 Aug 2014 13:40:24 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/list Natalie Frank - Rhona Hoffman Gallery - September 12th - October 25th <p style="text-align: justify;">Interiors and Openings,&nbsp;her first solo exhibition at Rhona Hoffman Gallery<em>,&nbsp;</em>Natalie Frank will present new three-dimensional, multi-layered paintings.<strong>&nbsp;</strong>Rooted in a strong foundation in representational and figurative painting, Frank's practice borders on abstraction, and now leaps further into the sculptural realm. Rendered in jewel-like tones, the new paintings are on shaped wooden panels with hinged appendages and will create an immersive environment of grotesquely beautiful Magical Realism.&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Natalie Frank (b. 1980, Austin, TX)&nbsp;received her MFA at Columbia University and BA from Yale University, with additional training at the National Academy of Fine Art in Oslo, Norway on a Fulbright Scholarship. Her first museum exhibition&nbsp;will premiere at The Drawing Center, New York in Spring 2015 and travel to The Blanton Museum of Art, Austin, TX. The exhibition&nbsp;will present a body of work based on the original, dark Grimm's Fairy Tales and be accompanied by the first monograph on the artist, with essays by Linda Nochlin, Claire Gilman, Julie Taymor, and an introduction by Jack Zipes.</p> Mon, 18 Aug 2014 13:36:50 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/list