ArtSlant - Openings & events http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/show en-us 40 - Chicago Corporate Photography & Video - August 28th 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM <p style="text-align: justify;">Enjoy a great night in the light of fireflies, while earning CES credits! The ticket is available at EventBrite: Photo Diversity - The architecture of Fireflies.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">The Zoological Lighting Institute is soon to release 'Brilliant Darkness: Hotaru in the Night' and 'The Light of the Genji'. We are hosting an educational and immersive event that might change the way architects see light forever! In a fun night of film and discovery under the glow of projection art, black-lights and luminescent snacks and drinks, architects and artists will explore what it is to live at night in the digital age.&nbsp;We will watch advance screenings of the two films, discover strategies to conserve the luminous environment in a lecture by James Karl Fischer PhD, (Executive Director of The Zoological Lighting Institute), and explore together under the brilliance of fireflies and art designed to celebrate the night!</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">The event has an underlying aim of wildlife conservation and animal welfare. In the film Brilliant Darkness: Hotaru in the Night; Dr. James Lloyd equates lapses in firefly conservation to a 'canary in a coal-mine', highlighting the environmental dangers posed by current practices in artificial night lighting. The associated lecture invokes physical concepts of the &lsquo;photic field&rsquo; to advance architectural practice beyond current practices dependent upon abstract and ill-suited ecological assessment criteria. Finally, it teaches architects what they can do to overcome client anxiety and so create collaborative designs amenable to wildlife and the nocturnal habitats that we all depend upon. Photo-Diverstiy: The Architecture of Fireflies teaches architects that they can protect public health, safety and welfare by alleviating problems associated with artificial night lighting in their work and practices.&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Come for the glowing jello and other luminescent foods, see the films and get over the fear of the dark like an artist!</p> Wed, 13 Aug 2014 06:24:59 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/list John Henley - slow - August 30th 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM <p>Enough time in a room full of men and the stories turn blue. It&rsquo;s just a thing.<br />&nbsp;<br />Maintenance chores are all about desire for the good life. Maybe that should be edited down: Maintenance chores are all about desire. Present your space in its best light. Present your body groomed, worked out, and postured with confidence.<br />&nbsp;<br /><a href="http://paul-is-slow.us2.list-manage.com/track/click?u=e341e313cf3e876de381d9d41&amp;id=e7833fcdf3&amp;e=766610da6e" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">John Henley</a>&rsquo;s work is sexy and explicit and populated with hot men in various degrees of undress. Usually men and not boys and enough women to keep it human. Regular, attainable, hard working, ordinary. But something else entirely is going on here. The images are about desire, but desire shifts under your feet so it is difficult to differentiate between hot sex or clean sheets, a room addition to your home or decent cup of coffee. John&rsquo;s lexicon of desire is no euphemism for prurient subject matter. It is really stuff he wants and can reasonably expect to work a little and get on a pretty consistent basis. String small attainments together, and a good life is under construction. Lived in the context of community that works together, loves together, and occasionally has spats and tension. There is spectacle and illusion but never really anything that amounts to drama. Not a simple compilation. Episodic structures that contain ruptures, re-do&rsquo;s and parallaxes. The sex bits are there and not in some mournful way that isolates, hides in shame, or relegates to magical thinking. Bits bumping against bits for the bump of it and then back to work. Matter-of-fact without becoming brazen nor losing heat. Emotions and the daily grind all part of a connection.<br />&nbsp;<br />John&rsquo;s painting is about what you see and can&rsquo;t say. An expanse of deep blue can relax a troubled mind, well up into deep and weighty sadness, or inflame a randy impulse to grope and thrust. &nbsp;It may describe a bucolic lake or a dreamy stare upwards. It may be word play. Blue. Blue as in dirty. Blue as in melancholic. Blue as in blue. Trying to say how all those things work inside images built on subject matter and narrative structures is a fool&rsquo;s errand. John&rsquo;s paintings color like that. Color schemes that pretend to be simplified and maybe simply found. Worked like paint. &nbsp;Strokes and gestures. The every day of it all. Lines that carry awkward bulges. Flattened perspective pushing against illusionistic expanses. The crummy cardstock he paints on so the art is not so very fine.<br />&nbsp;<br />John&rsquo;s accessible narratives unfold without pandering or dumbing down. We know how he did it. Get caught up in his scene. Stay a while and see how it pans out.</p> Tue, 19 Aug 2014 14:41:52 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/list Bryan Zanisnik - Aspect Ratio - September 5th 5:00 PM - 8:00 PM <p><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/34000/1ggx/20140821100320-PR.JPG" alt="" /></p> Thu, 21 Aug 2014 10:05:07 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/list Eugene Von Bruenchenhein - Carl Hammer Gallery - September 5th 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM Wed, 27 Aug 2014 13:25:04 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/list Gregory Scott - Catherine Edelman Gallery - September 5th 5:00 PM - 8:00 PM <p style="text-align: justify;" align="justify">Gregory Scott has always blurred the lines between painting and photography, incorporating paintings he made of himself, or his body, back into his photographs. The resulting images were both humorous and odd, challenging the viewer&rsquo;s perception of photographic truth. Then, at the age of 49, Scott decided to go to graduate school to strengthen his knowledge of art history and study video editing. In 2008, upon graduation, Gregory Scott stunned the art world with his mixed-media video works that combined installation, photography, performance, video and painting. As more and more artists blur the lines between media, Scott has taken the idea to a whole new level, presenting video-based wall pieces that are humorous and poignant, contemplative yet accessible.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;" align="justify">Gregory Scott builds sets in his studio that serve as his subject. In these sets, he records himself performing a variety of scenarios that are then edited into 6-10 minute videos. The sets are then photographed, and the resulting wall piece is a mounted photograph with a cut out for a monitor on which a video plays, and a painted element appears on the photographic surface. In each video, he shows how he constructed the set that he photographed, breaking down the barrier between maker and viewer. All of the hardware is attached to the inside of the frame, making his works self-contained.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;" align="justify">Continuing to use himself as the model, Scott creates narrative pieces that reference specific artists (Mark Rothko, James Turrell, Cy Twombly, Frank Stella) that have had an impact on his life. Using illusion and surprise, he challenges the definitions placed on photography, painting and video, expanding its discourse and creating a dialogue with the viewer. This dialogue can be seen in&nbsp;<em>Warholian,</em>&nbsp;which shows a photograph of a framed &ldquo;painting&rdquo; hanging in a gallery. The painting quickly reveals itself to be a video, showing the artist making his own Warhols, including a silkscreened Marilyn who gets up and walks out of the frame, and a Campbell&rsquo;s soup can that tips over, pouring out blue paint. In his newest piece,&nbsp;<em>Half Dome</em>, Scott built a model of Yosemite in his studio, referencing Ansel Adams and the beautiful landscape he made famous. In&nbsp;<em>Don&rsquo;t Fade Away</em>, he disappears into walls and staircases, referencing the work of Liu Bolin. Gregory Scott is a gifted painter, photographer, narrator and video editor, who creates clever narratives that challenge the viewers&rsquo; perception of art and the many ways it can be presented.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;" align="justify">Gregory Scott was born in Ann Arbor, Michigan in 1957 and received his Bachelor degree from the Institute of Design at IIT in Chicago in 1979 and his Master of Fine Art from Indiana University in 2008. He lives in Cleveland, OH.</p> Mon, 18 Aug 2014 14:13:02 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/list Dominick Di Meo - Corbett vs. Dempsey - September 5th 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM Wed, 27 Aug 2014 13:33:16 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/list My Barbarian - Gallery 400 - September 5th 5:00 PM - 8:00 PM <p><em>Universal Declaration of Infantile Anxiety Situations Reflected in the Creative Impulse&nbsp;</em>is an exhibition by My Barbarian collective who are artists Malik Gaines, Jade Gordon, and Alexandro Segade. Founded in Los Angeles in 2000, My Barbarian combines elements of theater and visual art to create interdisciplinary works in video, music, performance, drawing, and sculpture. Their solo exhibition at Gallery 400 includes a live staging of the group&rsquo;s interpretation of Bertolt Brecht&rsquo;s 1932 play,&nbsp;<em>The Mother</em>, and a video, W<em>orking Mother</em>&nbsp;(2013). Hand-made masks and drawings associated with this performance will activate the gallery space for the show's duration.</p> <p>In their adaptation of&nbsp;<em>The Mother</em>, My Barbarian tells the story of a working-class mother who becomes increasingly radicalized on the eve of the Bolshevik Revolution. While looking at the role of the woman as a mother, worker, and revolutionary in the modern world, the play considers the role of art within capitalist constraints and promotes the critical roles artists can perform.&nbsp;<em>Working Mother</em>&nbsp;(2013), stages playful scenarios that convey both continuity and change in feminist, conceptual artistic, and familial projects as they move through generations. In a series of interconnected "short films," Gaines, Gordon, and Segade perform with their own mothers as well as influential artists Eleanor Antin and Mary Kelly, enacting a personal and political matrilineage.</p> <p>- See more at: http://gallery400.uic.edu/exhibitions/universal-declaration-of-infantile-anxiety-situations-reflected-in-the-creative-impulse#sthash.qiHCWiij.dpuf</p> Wed, 13 Aug 2014 20:08:39 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/list Malik Gaines, Jade Gordon, Alexandro Segade - Gallery 400 - September 5th 5:00 PM - 8:00 PM <p class="p1">August 15, 2014&mdash;Chicago, IL&mdash; Universal Declaration of Infantile Anxiety Situations Reflected</p> <p class="p1">in the Creative Impulse is an exhibition by My Barbarian collective who are artists Malik Gaines,</p> <p class="p1">Jade Gordon, and Alexandro Segade. Founded in Los Angeles in 2000, My Barbarian</p> <p class="p1">combines elements of theater and visual art to create interdisciplinary works in video, music,</p> <p class="p1">performance, drawing, and sculpture. Their solo exhibition at Gallery 400 includes a live</p> <p class="p1">staging of the group&rsquo;s interpretation of Bertolt Brecht&rsquo;s 1932 play, The Mother, and a</p> <p class="p1">video, Universal Declaration of Infantile Anxiety Situations Reflected in the Creative</p> <p class="p1">Impulse (2013). Hand-made masks and drawings associated with this performance will activate</p> <p class="p1">the gallery space for the show's duration.</p> <p class="p1">In their adaptation of The Mother, My Barbarian tells the story of a working-class mother who</p> <p class="p1">becomes increasingly radicalized on the eve of the Bolshevik Revolution. While looking at the</p> <p class="p1">role of the woman as a mother, worker, and revolutionary in the modern world, the play</p> <p class="p1">considers the role of art within capitalist constraints and promotes the critical roles artists can</p> <p class="p1">perform. The video Universal Declaration of Infantile Anxiety Situations Reflected in the Creative</p> <p class="p1">Impulse (2013), stages playful scenarios that convey both continuity and change in feminist,</p> <p class="p1">conceptual artistic, and familial projects as they move through generations. In a series of</p> <p class="p1">interconnected "short films," Gaines, Gordon, and Segade perform with their own mothers as</p> <p class="p1">well as influential artists Eleanor Antin and Mary Kelly, enacting a personal and political</p> <p class="p1">matrilineage.</p> <p class="p2">This multifaceted exhibit explores historical and contemporary interests in feminism, the</p> <p class="p2">symbolism of motherhood and love, as well as My Barbarian&rsquo;s own experiences as children,</p> <p class="p2">parents, and workers. The title of the exhibition borrows from the post- World War II document</p> <p class="p2">the &ldquo;Universal Declaration of Human Rights,&rdquo; (co-authored by Eleanor Roosevelt) which was</p> <p class="p2">the first expression of global human rights and Melanie Klein&rsquo;s 1929 essay &ldquo;Infantile Anxiety</p> <p class="p2">Situations Reflected in a Work of Art and the Creative Impulse,&rdquo; which investigated the way</p> <p class="p2">children relate to their mothers through objects and play. Utilizing camp humor, fantasy, and</p> <p class="p2">jarring aesthetic juxtapositions, My Barbarian brings a playful yet critical eye to their</p> <p class="p2">investigation of serious artistic, social, and political issues.</p> <p class="p2">Related Programs:</p> <p class="p1">Friday September 5, 5:00pm-8:00pm - Universal Declaration of Infantile Anxiety Situations</p> <p class="p1">Reflected in the Creative Impulse opening reception + Performance by Malik Gaines at</p> <p class="p1">6:30pm</p> <p class="p1">Friday September 19, 7:00-9:00pm &ndash; My Barbarian Performance: An adaptation of Berthold</p> <p class="p1">Brecht's The Mother</p> <p class="p1">Saturday September 20, 3:00p-5:00pm &ndash; My Barbarian Performance: An adaptation of</p> <p class="p1">Berthold Brecht's The Mother</p> <p class="p1">Wednesday October 8, 7:00pm-9:00pm &ndash; Chicago Filmmakers Screening: Half Suffocated</p> <p class="p1">Saturday October 11, 4-6pm &ndash; Film Screening and performance: A Feminist Perspective on</p> <p class="p1">Gun Violence in Chicago featuring work by Lonnie Edwards, Michael Paulucci, Cheryl</p> <p class="p1">Pope and young poets</p> <p class="p1">Saturday October 18 2:00pm-4:00pm &ndash; Mothernism Panel featuring Elise Archias, Lise</p> <p class="p1">Haller Baggesen Ross and Hamza Walker</p> <p class="p2">Tours:</p> <p class="p1">Gallery 400 offers guided tours for groups of all ages. Tours are free of charge but require</p> <p class="p1">reservation. Please complete our online form (accessible at gallery400.uic.edu/visit/tours) to</p> <p class="p2">schedule a tour of Universal Declaration of Infantile Anxiety Situations Reflected in the</p> <p class="p1">Creative Impulse. For more information, or to discuss the specific needs and interests of your</p> <p class="p1">group, please contact us at 312 996 6114 or gallery400@uic.edu.</p> <p class="p1">Universal Declaration of Infantile Anxiety Situations Reflected in the Creative Impulse is</p> <p class="p1">supported by the School of Art &amp; Art History, the College of Architecture, Design, and the Arts,</p> <p class="p1">University of Illinois at Chicago and a grant from the Illinois Arts Council, a state agency. The</p> <p class="p1">Daryl Gerber Stokols and Jeff Stokols Voices Series Fund provides general support to Gallery</p> <p class="p1">400. Support for the opening reception provided by Lagunitas Brewing Company and Dark</p> <p class="p1">Horse Wine.</p> <p class="p1">***</p> <p class="p1">Founded in 1983, Gallery 400 is one of the nation's most vibrant university galleries,</p> <p class="p1">showcasing work at the leading edge of contemporary art, architecture, and design. The</p> <p class="p1">Gallery's program of exhibitions, lectures, film and video screenings, and performances</p> <p class="p1">features interdisciplinary and experimental practices. Operating within the School of Art and Art</p> <p class="p1">History in the College of Architecture, Design, and the Arts at the University of Illinois at</p> <p class="p1">Chicago (UIC), Gallery 400 endeavors to make the arts and its practitioners accessible to a</p> <p class="p1">broad spectrum of the public and to cultivate a variety of cultural and intellectual perspectives.</p> <p class="p1">Gallery 400 is recognized for its support of the creation of new work, the diversity of its</p> <p class="p1">programs and participants, and the development of experimental models for multidisciplinary</p> <p class="p1">exhibition.</p> Wed, 27 Aug 2014 16:46:22 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/list Carol Jackson - threewalls - September 5th 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM <p style="text-align: justify;">What is fated and what is free-will? In a country that depends almost equally on a narrative of the self-made, pragmatism and the maverick alongside the relatively dominant influence of Christianity and the concept of serving God, the chronicles that make-up American identity are an amalgamation of symbols cut-up and repurposed into a collaged taxonomy. Heroism is deeply entwined with a belief in manifest destiny, frequently giving way to a kind of hubris that perpetually imagines mankind, not so much as benevolent stewards, but masters. Supervisors and CEOS, pioneers and overseers, cutting one&rsquo;s path, being a leader not a follower: these directives dog the American in their pursuit of happiness, forever running up against the problems inherent to making and living in a community, caring for your fellow-man, and being custodians of the earth.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Carol Jackson&rsquo;s work has long addressed the concept of American hubris and manifest destiny, borrowing from narratives of the American West, real estate speculation, epic poems, jingoism and expansionism through material choices like tooled leather and references like turn-of-the-century sheet music and trophies. For&nbsp;<em>High Plains Drifter</em>, she looks to Milton&rsquo;s epic poem, Paradise Lost, and America&rsquo;s fascination, romance and dependence on the automobile. In a twisted assemblage of papier-mache, Jackson builds a car wreck emerging from the wall. Part crash-site and part marquee, the disaster houses embedded, hieroglyphic messages that only Satan can read.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">In her own words, Jackson cites Derrida&rsquo;s concept of hauntology, an idea that suggests that the present exists only with respect to the past and as time passes, society will come more and more to orient itself towards the rustic or &ldquo;old-timey.&rdquo; This old-timey state exists as a specter, a suspended, unresolved state that is neither being or non-being, but rather, a haunting that contaminates the present.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Carol Jackson received her MFA in 1992 from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, where she now teaches. Her recent exhibitions include the 2014 Whitney Biennial, curated by Anthony Elms (New York); Monique Meloche Gallery (Chicago); Kunsthaus Speckstrasse (Hamburg, Germany); the Chicago Cultural Center; Van Abbe Museum (Eindhoven, Netherlands); and The Smart Museum of Art (Chicago). She has been featured in the New York Times, Interview Magazine, Frieze Magazine, and Newcity. Jackson&rsquo;s work is included in the collections of The Smart Museum of Art, (Chicago) and the Werner Hirsch Drawing Collection, (Los Angeles), among others.</p> Wed, 27 Aug 2014 23:58:30 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/list Jon Geiger - threewalls - September 5th 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM <p style="text-align: justify;">Threewalls &nbsp;is pleased to present an exhibition of new work by Jon Geiger, titled&nbsp;<em>Nothing That Gleams</em>.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Geiger&nbsp;mines American folk history, cowboy films, and European Classicism for the symbols and objects&ndash;from boots to bowling balls&ndash;that are continually curated into American history, muddying and fictionalizing its narrative. His sculptural installations rearrange displaced fragments into tableaux that have a familiarity but no clear story. Resembling props for a spaghetti Western or the miscellany of a roadside museum, Geiger uses these objects as a language or syntax, challenging their origins and place in the imagination while examining their relationship to narratives of achievement, masculine archetypes, and the western spirit. As ambiguous arrangements, they are intentionally open for interpretation, with the premise in place that meaning is never fixed and there is always another side, another reading available.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">For Nothing That Gleams, Geiger sets up a new tableau in the project room, as well as furnishing Jackson&rsquo;s exhibition with point-of-interest seating, so the gallery visitor can enjoy the view of the wreckage.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Jon P. Geiger (b. 1987) received his MFA in ceramics from Cranbrook Academy of Art in 2014. Upon exiting graduate school, Geiger&rsquo;s work was inducted into the permanent collections of the Cranbrook Art Museum. His work has been exhibited nationally and internationally, most recently with his solo show A Durable Canon at Good Weather Gallery in North Little Rock, AR. Jon currently lives and works in Detroit, Michigan.</p> Sun, 27 Jul 2014 14:58:51 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/list Lilli Carré - Western Exhibitions - September 5th 5:00 PM - 8:00 PM <div style="text-align: justify;">The interdisciplinary work in&nbsp;<strong>Lilli Carr&eacute;'s</strong>&nbsp;second solo show at Western Exhibitions takes the maze as a point of inquiry and departure. She will present work in the form of drawings, book, and animation, exploring the human fascination for constructing mazes specifically to spend time getting lost within them, and for the hope or delight of resolution. The show opens on Friday, September 5&nbsp;with a free public reception from&nbsp;5 to 8pm&nbsp;and runs through&nbsp;October 18, 2014.&nbsp;<br /><br /></div> <div style="text-align: justify;"> <div>Mazes offer an unusual kind of headspace, providing ways to experience losing awareness of oneself while being extremely focused on where one is at the same time. For Carr&eacute;, mazes are ways to set up and depict structures of time, play, and choice; structures created to lose, find or study oneself. Carr&eacute;'s graphic investigations draw upon the human obsession with mazes of all forms, across time and different cultures, in both myth and experience.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>In Gallery 1, Carr&eacute; presents a series of complex mazes as overhead diagrams that she draws for herself, and then immediately attempts to solve. She separates the solution from the maze, letting the structure and the solution exist as separate images. The solution line drawing marks the particular path of impulsive decision-making, a path of thinking through a nonstop series of decisions, like any regular day in our lives, or as a trail and shape of a lifetime of choices from beginning to end.&nbsp;<br /><br /></div> <div>Two large-scale drawings and an accordion book approach the maze form as fragmented imagery, dislocated from an original context. The space of the page is divided by a series of corners, edges, and panels, to be read as a diagram more akin to how time is read on a comics page. Figures are obscured as they weave through and interact with the lines and panels around them, which act as physical walls and borders on the page. A monitor in the gallery shows a looped animation of a crowd briskly moving through a blank, congested maze-like space from above. Figures face and swerve around each other, all focused on their own path.<br /><br /></div> <div>Gallery 2 will feature a looped projection of a hand-drawn animation, leading the viewer on a journey through a maze in the first-person perspective, reminiscent of a maze in a video game or of the gallery space itself. As the viewer is lead through the virtual space, the figures and shapes on the periphery flicker, morph, and pass by, evoking the sensation of feeling lost, confused, electric and untethered when in an unfamiliar place.&nbsp;<br /><br /></div> <div><strong>Lilli Carr&eacute;</strong>&nbsp;(American, b. 1983), an interdisciplinary artist currently living in Chicago, is best known for her comics, animated films, and commercial illustration. Her creative practice employs a wide range of media including printmaking, artists' books, drawing, and ceramic sculpture. Her animated films have been shown in festivals throughout the US and abroad, including the Sundance Film Festival, and she is the co-founder of the&nbsp;Eyeworks Festival of Experimental Animation, now in its 5th year. Her most recent collection of comics,&nbsp;<em>Heads or Tails</em>, will see its second printing from Fantagraphics Books in January 2015. Her work has appeared in&nbsp;The Believer Magazine, the New Yorker,&nbsp;The New York Times,&nbsp;Best American Comics&nbsp;and Best American Nonrequired Reading. Her recent&nbsp;BMO Harris Chicago Works&nbsp;solo show at the&nbsp;MCA Chicago&nbsp;was reviewed in the&nbsp;Chicago Tribune&nbsp;and&nbsp;Chicago Reader. She has been included in shows at the&nbsp;Columbus Museum of Art&nbsp;in Ohio, the John Michael Kohler Arts Center in Wisconsin, the Museum of Cartoon Art in San Francisco, and the DePaul University Art Museum in Chicago.</div> <br /><br /></div> <div style="text-align: justify;">In Gallery 1, Carr&eacute; presents a series of complex mazes as overhead diagrams that she draws for herself, and then immediately attempts to solve. She separates the solution from the maze, letting the structure and the solution exist as separate images. The solution line drawing marks the particular path of impulsive decision-making, a path of thinking through a nonstop series of decisions, like any regular day in our lives, or as a trail and shape of a lifetime of choices from beginning to end.&nbsp;<br /><br /></div> <div style="text-align: justify;">Two large-scale drawings and an accordion book approach the maze form as fragmented imagery, dislocated from an original context. The space of the page is divided by a series of corners, edges, and panels, to be read as a diagram more akin to how time is read on a comics page. Figures are obscured as they weave through and interact with the lines and panels around them, which act as physical walls and borders on the page. A monitor in the gallery shows a looped animation of a crowd briskly moving through a blank, congested maze-like space from above. Figures face and swerve around each other, all focused on their own path.<br /><br /></div> <div style="text-align: justify;">Gallery 2 will feature a looped projection of a hand-drawn animation, leading the viewer on a journey through a maze in the first-person perspective, reminiscent of a maze in a video game or of the gallery space itself. As the viewer is lead through the virtual space, the figures and shapes on the periphery flicker, morph, and pass by, evoking the sensation of feeling lost, confused, electric and untethered when in an unfamiliar place.&nbsp;<br /><br /></div> <div style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Lilli Carr&eacute;</strong>&nbsp;(American, b. 1983), an interdisciplinary artist currently living in Chicago, is best known for her comics, animated films, and commercial illustration. Her creative practice employs a wide range of media including printmaking, artists' books, drawing, and ceramic sculpture. Her animated films have been shown in festivals throughout the US and abroad, including the Sundance Film Festival, and she is the co-founder of the&nbsp;Eyeworks Festival of Experimental Animation, now in its 5th year. Her most recent collection of comics,&nbsp;<em>Heads or Tails</em>, will see its second printing from Fantagraphics Books in January 2015. Her work has appeared in&nbsp;The Believer Magazine, the New Yorker,&nbsp;The New York Times,&nbsp;Best American Comics&nbsp;and Best American Nonrequired Reading. Her recent&nbsp;BMO Harris Chicago Works&nbsp;solo show at the&nbsp;MCA Chicago&nbsp;was reviewed in the&nbsp;Chicago Tribune&nbsp;and&nbsp;Chicago Reader. She has been included in shows at the&nbsp;Columbus Museum of Art&nbsp;in Ohio, the John Michael Kohler Arts Center in Wisconsin, the Museum of Cartoon Art in San Francisco, and the DePaul University Art Museum in Chicago.</div> Mon, 18 Aug 2014 13:49:39 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/list MY DOG SIGHS - Vertical Gallery - September 6th 6:00 PM - 10:00 PM <p>Vertical Gallery presents <em>Lost and Found</em>, the debut US solo show from British artist My Dog Sighs. Inspired by the beauty of urban decay, My Dog Sighs upcycles old cans and other objects, and adorns them with beautifully detailed faces. The artist&rsquo;s work forms a narrative based on counterpointed poignancy that resonate with those that have the opportunity to find them. Moments of loss and then being found echo the materials used. My Dog Sighs&rsquo; <em>Lost and Found</em> is September 6 &ndash; 27, 2014 with an opening reception with the artist on Saturday, September 6, 6-10PM.</p> <p>Painting on recycled materials is a signature of My Dog Sighs&rsquo; work, most recognizable are food, drink and spray cans, which are twisted, crushed and hand painted. Each has its own character, be it melancholic clown or aggressive punk. After working quietly but fervently on the streets for the last ten years, honing his craft, My Dog Sighs has this year finally found himself strapped in to a well-deserved meteoric rise. With an incredible international following in Israel, Japan and the UK, a number of sold out shows under his belt, and a strong following of staunchly loyal fans on social media; My Dog Sighs is fast becoming an important figure on the contemporary art scene.</p> Tue, 12 Aug 2014 21:57:35 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/list Franziska Holstein - Devening Projects + Editions - September 7th 4:00 PM - 7:00 PM <p style="text-align: justify;">For her upcoming project at&nbsp;<strong>devening projects + editions,&nbsp;</strong><strong>Franziska Holstein</strong>&nbsp;has produced a series works on paper using metal-plate lithography. Each print refers to a single painting; the entire project incorporates all the paintings she&rsquo;s made since 2010. Extracting a single geometric form from each source image, she then works through the composition via collage. This approach runs counter to her approach to painting where she intensely controls the composition and builds up the images and surfaces via a more involved, long-term process. The collages are directed not by control, but by informality and intuition; arriving at a end point comes quickly and with little conceptual interference. In this series, she doesn&rsquo;t allow herself to direct the arrangement of the single forms on the paper or control where she puts them. Randomness, coming as a result of previously orchestrated strategies, gives the work a fresh and enlivened clarity.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Franziska Holstein lives and works in Leipzig, Germany and is represented by Galerie Christian Ehrentraut, Berlin.</p> Wed, 13 Aug 2014 13:44:56 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/list Natalie Frank - Rhona Hoffman Gallery - September 12th 5:00 PM - 7:30 PM <p style="text-align: justify;">Interiors and Openings,&nbsp;her first solo exhibition at Rhona Hoffman Gallery<em>,&nbsp;</em>Natalie Frank will present new three-dimensional, multi-layered paintings.<strong>&nbsp;</strong>Rooted in a strong foundation in representational and figurative painting, Frank's practice borders on abstraction, and now leaps further into the sculptural realm. Rendered in jewel-like tones, the new paintings are on shaped wooden panels with hinged appendages and will create an immersive environment of grotesquely beautiful Magical Realism.&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Natalie Frank (b. 1980, Austin, TX)&nbsp;received her MFA at Columbia University and BA from Yale University, with additional training at the National Academy of Fine Art in Oslo, Norway on a Fulbright Scholarship. Her first museum exhibition&nbsp;will premiere at The Drawing Center, New York in Spring 2015 and travel to The Blanton Museum of Art, Austin, TX. The exhibition&nbsp;will present a body of work based on the original, dark Grimm's Fairy Tales and be accompanied by the first monograph on the artist, with essays by Linda Nochlin, Claire Gilman, Julie Taymor, and an introduction by Jack Zipes.</p> Mon, 18 Aug 2014 13:36:55 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/list Paula Hayes - Rhona Hoffman Gallery - September 12th 5:00 PM - 7:30 PM <div style="text-align: justify;"><em>This Bird Saved Me,</em>&nbsp;Paula Hayes&rsquo; second solo exhibition with Rhona Hoffman Gallery, will feature new sculpture in the form of&nbsp;birdhouses, birdbaths and basins.&nbsp;Nurturing a studio practice of creating vessels for living plants such as terrariums, amorphous planters and birdhouses, Hayes&nbsp;seeks to connect people to the natural world, while maintaining a high level of design. The works featured in this fall exhibition are organic, custom-made sculpture - both eco-friendly and in harmony with the landscape.</div> <div> <div style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Paula Hayes (b. 1958, Concord, MA)</strong>&nbsp;received her MFA in Sculpture from Parsons School of Design. Since the early 90's Hayes has exhibited with the following New York galleries: Salon 94, David Zwirner Gallery, Hauser &amp; Wirth, and Marianne Boesky Gallery.</div> </div> Mon, 18 Aug 2014 13:40:27 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/list Group Show - Hyde Park Art Center - September 13th 12:00 PM - 9:00 PM <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>The Chicago Effect: Redefining the Middle</em>&nbsp;is an exhibition and public program that engages artists and practitioners in considering conditions of the middle&mdash;both conceptual and concrete. Artwork on view in&nbsp;<em>The Chicago Effect</em>&nbsp;will explore permeable boundaries, liminal spaces, and in-betweens, identifying and asserting the necessity of the middle as a fertile improvisational space that becomes a creative engine, and raising questions about the value of a middle-man, a middle class, a moderate political position, and even the middle ground between formal and material states. Using the Art Center as a model for how an arts institution can occupy the space of the middle to foster intercommunity connectivity and spur creative production, public programming and a printed catalogue will accompany the exhibition to offer analyses of how mid-sized organizations can serve and engage audiences.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Co-curated by Director of Exhibitions &amp; Residency Programs Allison Peters Quinn, Residency &amp; Special Projects Manager Megha Ralapati, and New York-based guest curator Christopher K. Ho, the exhibition encourages movement away from the poles. The curators frame the position of the middle as an essential condition of the creative process, selecting artwork that exemplifies this idea.&nbsp;<em>The Chicago Effect</em>&nbsp;includes work by&nbsp;<strong>Marissa Lee Benedict, Robert Burnier, Devon Dikeou, Essex/Olivares, Assaf Evron, Jamie Hayes, Patrick Meagher, Michael Smith, Jan Tichy, and Lan Tuazon</strong>.&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&ldquo;We&rsquo;ve found our position in &lsquo;the middle&rsquo; to be fertile ground for creativity and connectivity&mdash;both for the Art Center as an institution and for the artists and communities we work with,&rdquo; said Executive Director Kate Lorenz. &ldquo;We&rsquo;re excited to partner with artists and organizations in&nbsp;<em>The Chicago Effect</em>&nbsp;to present alternate viewpoints of the middle and its benefits to the creative process. The middle can be a place of uncertainty, but that&rsquo;s exactly what makes it so exciting. Those moments can be used to turn the middle into an incubator for radical thought.&rdquo;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Celebrating its 75th anniversary in 2014, Hyde Park Art Center is somewhere in the middle of its history. An organization that has developed a lasting legacy over time, its institutional identity has always been oriented to the new. The Art Center embraces occupying this middle ground: the space of tension between past and future, the grey area of openness to what could be, the place of connection between opposing elements. By being comfortable with the middle&mdash;being a mid-sized institution, supporting artists at the emerging and blockbuster levels and everywhere in between, straddling the line between contemporary art gallery and community center&mdash;the Art Center has grown into a space of creative production that connects diverse audiences unlike any other in Chicago.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Using the Art Center model as a laboratory,&nbsp;<em>The Chicago Effect</em>&nbsp;includes a year-long think tank in which teams of academics and practitioners in diverse fields question assumptions about how an art center can and should function. These projects inspired a complementary program of experimental interventions, which will be presented throughout the run of the exhibition. Representatives from DePaul University, IDEO, the Illinois Institute of Technology, Rhode Island School of Design, the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and the University of Chicago&rsquo;s Science of Philanthropy Initiative will physically and conceptually adapt the Art Center&rsquo;s administration, architecture, design, and programming leading up to and during the exhibition. A catalogue documenting these trials will serve as a blueprint for experimental ways the art center of the future might effectively engage with and serve its community.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">The public is invited to celebrate the&nbsp;<em>The Chicago Effect</em>&nbsp;and all the exhibitions on view at the Art Center&rsquo;s&nbsp;<strong>75th Anniversary Block Party BBQ Bash</strong>&nbsp;on Saturday, September 13 from 12 &ndash; 9pm.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>About Christopher K. Ho</strong>:&nbsp;Christopher K. Ho lives and works in New York and is currently the resident curator of the Jackman Goldwasser Residency at Hyde Park Art Center. Recent solo exhibitions of his artwork include Privileged White People at Forever &amp; Today, Inc., New York and Lesbian Mountains in Love at the Des Moines Art Center, Des Moines. He has participated in the Chinese, Busan and Incheon, South Korea Biennials and exhibited at Socrates Sculpture Park, Queens and Queens Museum of Art. His curatorial projects and artwork have been featured in Artforum.com, Art in America, Art Papers, ArtReview, Bomb, Modern Painters, The New York Times, and TimeOut New York.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Sun, 17 Aug 2014 19:34:53 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Events/list