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20130805151800-24hourpsycho 20120903030748-0914_kollwitz_gordon_prettymuch_04_q Gordon 20130805152046-burnedbabygrand 20130805152231-minnie 20130805083546-_mg_3809 20130805084332-_mg_3940 20130805085412-_mg_3845 6fbbe335
'rak'rüm (noun);
the back room of an art gallery
where artists and art lovers hang
20130805073244-_mg_3836
24 Hour Psycho (installation view), Douglas GordonDouglas Gordon,
24 Hour Psycho (installation view),
1993, black-and-white video
© 2007, Douglas Gordon; Courtesy the artist and Gagosian Gallery, New York; Photograph Bert Ross; footage from Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho (1960), Universal Studios Licensing LLLP
Pretty Much Every Film and Video Work From About 1992 Until Now, Douglas GordonDouglas Gordon,
Pretty Much Every Film and Video Work From About 1992 Until Now,
2011, Installation View
© Courtesy of the artist & Static Gallery, Liverpool
Pretty much every film and video work...(installation view), Douglas GordonDouglas Gordon,
Pretty much every film and video work...(installation view),
1992-present, Courtesy: the artist and Gagosian Gallery NY, Photo: Antonia Reeve
© 2007 Douglas Gordon
Burned Baby Grand, Douglas GordonDouglas Gordon, Burned Baby Grand,
2012, burned baby grand piano, dimensions variable
© courtesy of the artist
Play Dead; Real Time, Douglas GordonDouglas Gordon, Play Dead; Real Time, 2003
© courtesy the National Gallery of Canada
, Douglas GordonDouglas Gordon
© photo by Jennifer Osborne
, Douglas GordonDouglas Gordon
© photo by Jennifer Osborne
, Douglas GordonDouglas Gordon
© photo by Jennifer Osborne
Self-Portrait of You + Me (Elvis), Douglas GordonDouglas Gordon,
Self-Portrait of You + Me (Elvis),
2007, Smoke and Mirror, 54-3/4 x 39 X 3 in
© Douglas Gordon
Stilettos Pierre Hardy, Stiletto n°20, automne-hiver 2008-2009 , Douglas GordonDouglas Gordon,
Stilettos Pierre Hardy, Stiletto n°20, automne-hiver 2008-2009

© Douglas Gordon pour Stiletto
BLOW-UP (temporary portrait of a father, channeled through a son, using means to hand), Douglas GordonDouglas Gordon,
BLOW-UP (temporary portrait of a father, channeled through a son, using means to hand),
2008, C-Print, 140 x 112 cm
© In collaboration with Gagosian Gallery
, Douglas GordonDouglas Gordon
© Galerie Eva Presenhuber
Hand and Foot, Douglas GordonDouglas Gordon, Hand and Foot,
1995, video still
© collectie Stedelijk Museum
, Douglas GordonDouglas Gordon
© Tate Photography/Mark Heathcote
Bootleg (Empire), Douglas GordonDouglas Gordon, Bootleg (Empire),
1998, Video installation, dimensions variable
© Courtesy of the artist & Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York
K.364 Poster, Douglas GordonDouglas Gordon, K.364 Poster,
Produced in 2011, in conjunction with "Douglas Gordon: k.364" at Gagosian Gallery, Britannia Street , 30 x 24 inches (76.2 x 61 cm)
© Courtesy of the Artist and Gagosian Gallery - Britannia Street
, Douglas GordonDouglas Gordon
© Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Yvon Lambert
Play Dead; Real Time, Douglas GordonDouglas Gordon, Play Dead; Real Time, 2003
© Courtesy of the artist & Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden
, Douglas GordonDouglas Gordon
© Courtesy of the artist & MMK Museum für Moderne Kunst
Bootleg (Empire), Douglas GordonDouglas Gordon, Bootleg (Empire), 1998
© Courtesy of the artist & Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden
Zidane, a 21st Century Portrait, Douglas Gordon, Philippe ParrenoDouglas Gordon, Philippe Parreno,
Zidane, a 21st Century Portrait,
2006, 2 channel digital video installation, 90:00 minutes, installation dimensions variable
© Courtesy of the artists & National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa
Installation view, Douglas Gordon, Phantom, Galeri Manâ, 2011,
Installation view, Douglas Gordon, Phantom, Galeri Manâ, 2011

Installation view, Douglas Gordon, Phantom, Galeri Manâ, 2011,
Installation view, Douglas Gordon, Phantom, Galeri Manâ, 2011

© Douglas Gordon
Installation view, Douglas Gordon, Phantom, Galeri Manâ, 2011,
Installation view, Douglas Gordon, Phantom, Galeri Manâ, 2011

The End of Civilisation, Douglas GordonDouglas Gordon, The End of Civilisation,
2012 , Film still
© Courtesy of the artist & Studio lost but found / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2012 / Great North Run Culture and Locus+, Newcastle upon Tyne
Sharpening Fantasy, Douglas GordonDouglas Gordon, Sharpening Fantasy,
2012, film still
© Courtesy of the artist & Blain|Southern Berlin
Sharpening Fantasy, 2012 Installation shot , Douglas GordonDouglas Gordon,
Sharpening Fantasy, 2012 Installation shot
© Courtesy of the artist & Blain|Southern Berlin / Photo: Christian Glaeser
Sharpening Fantasy, 2012 Installation shot, Douglas GordonDouglas Gordon,
Sharpening Fantasy, 2012 Installation shot
© Courtesy of the artist & Blain|Southern Berlin / Photo: Christian Glaeser
, Douglas GordonDouglas Gordon
© Courtesy of the artist & The Galerie Eva Presenhuber
, Douglas GordonDouglas Gordon
© Courtesy of the artist and the Musée d'Art moderne de la Ville de Paris / ARC
Phantom (still), Douglas GordonDouglas Gordon, Phantom (still),
2011, stage, screen, piano, monitor
© Studio lost but found, Rufus Wainwright and VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn / Courtesy Studio lost but found, artist and Galerie Yvon Lambert
Douglas Gordon is a Scottish artist. He won the Turner Prize in 1996 and the following year he represented Britain at the Venice Biennale. In 2005 he put together an exhibition at the Deutsche Guggenheim Berlin called 'The Vanity of Allegory'. In 2006 there was an exhibition of his at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York, called "Timeline".In 2008, he won the Roswitha Haftmann prize. CV ...[more]


RackRoom
Berlin's Demons and Devils: Interview with Douglas Gordon

Berlin, Aug. 2013: Douglas Gordon invited a circus elephant named Minnie inside the Gagosian Gallery late at night (when you can get away with transporting an elephant around) in New York City and circled her with a camera. The ethereal video work shows Minnie lying down to play dead and rising again to walk around the room; a scarce documentation of the discomfort felt in a wild mammal amidst a vulnerable state of rest. 

In Glasgow, Gordon was born and educated in the fine arts. Hereturned there after moving to London to graduate from the Slade School of Art. His most lauded artwork 24 Hour Psycho – a less-appropriated, more-manipulated take on the Alfred Hitchcock classic by reducing the film to two frames per second, rather than the usual twenty-four; a rebirth of the motion picture with a clinging of every detail to the eye  was first exhibited in the spaces of Tramway of Glasgow. He has exhibited in Washington DC, Tel Aviv, Portugal, Los Angeles and Paris. He lived in France and he represented Britain at the 1997 Venice Biennale. In New York in 2006, he had a retrospective at the MoMa, Timeline. He fell in love with his current Israeli girlfriend on the stage of Manchester's opera house during an event that he also contributed to. He followed her back to Berlin, where they both now reside and raise their daughter.

If a soul junction between Young Werther and Lemuel Gulliver existed to create an archetype of a restless artist, Gordon has fulfilled it in previous years. However, in rather another expected breaking of ground in the contemporary art world, Gordon is now building walls in a city that he now declares as his home. In the following interview with Jennifer Osborne, he talks about his interest in demons, the formation of a new Yiddish and the struggles of Berlin.
Douglas Gordon in his studio; photo by Jennifer Osborne.


Jennifer Osborne: How did you come to live in Berlin?

Douglas Gordon: I was born in Glasgow in 1966 and the first time I visited Berlin was in 1989, just after the wall came down. And the whole theatre of the city made an impression on me. So I kept coming back. And when I won the Turner Prize (in 1996) from London, I thought the best thing to do was to get out of Dodge City. I then won another prize and went to live in Hanover. And then after another prize, I moved to Berlin in something like ’97 or ’98.

JO: Is there something special here, other than life circumstances, that brought you here?

DG: I come from a very basic place so Berlin compared to Glasgow is kind of spectacular in a way. I like it, and I love the fact that there are ghosts around every corner. And I love the fact that there are demons under every sidewalk. I like this city because of all of these ghosts and these demons and these devils. I suppose we hope there are going to be angels somewhere. When I was a student in Glasgow, of course I saw Wings of Desire, which is all about this. But Wim Wenders’ film is based on angels and I’m much more interested in devils and demons. I like Berlin because it’s a struggling city. It’s a city with discomfort embedded in its DNA. People always came to Berlin because of its liberalism. There is a tolerance here, which you don’t find in other places. I really love the people in Berlin.

photo by Jennifer Osborne

 

JO: Are there any venues or landmarks in Berlin that you find remarkable?

DG: When I fell in love with my girlfriend Ruth, she was part of an assemble at Volksbühne. I come from a background that has music, but I’m not classical in any way. And I don’t know much about theatre and certainly don’t know much about opera. But Volksbühne theatre is architecturally beautiful and incredibly interesting. In the film The Lives of Others all of the intrigue and bizarre sexual propositions that are going on are in the Volksbühne. As I said before, I like Berlin because it is full of ghosts and the Volksbühne has this kind of Post-Former-East idea of theatre and performance, as it features the work of playwrights such as the Marxist Bertolt Brecht.

JO: But there is a darkness here too, correct?

DG: At one time, in Berlin, people had been taken out of apartments and disappeared. I don’t like the idea to live in an apartment building where people were disappeared. We know that the world moves on but the discomfort of that is part of the make-up and part of the character of the city and I like a little discomfort.

Douglas Gordon in his studio; photo by Jennifer Osborne.

 

JO: Do you find inspiration in Berlin?

DG: I am not inspired by what you would call a city. Inspiration is a word I despise. I come from a religious background, so I detest that “stuff”. I think your work comes from your conversation. And I can’t speak German, so where does that put me? Berlin is full of stuff that I don’t get in to. I am 50% alien. My girlfriend and my daughter have a primary language which isn’t mine and that is Hebrew. My daughter also speaks English (because of me) and German with her friends at school. I like the idea that my daughter has other Jewish friends, and they’re speaking German and English. I think there is the possibility of the reinvention of language – as in a sort of new Yiddish.

JO: Would you ever move back to Scotland?

DG: I didn’t really leave.

 

—Photos and interview by Jennifer Osborne, introduction by Stephanie Berzon

 

 

ArtSlant would like to thank Douglas Gordon for his assitance in making this interview possible.

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