ArtSlant - Feng jin's tao of art http://www.artslant.com/chi/Articles/show en-us 40 Chinese Culture Center's Art-In-Storefront <p><strong> <div style="text-align: left;"> <div style="margin: 0px;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; text-align: center;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; text-align: left;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; text-align: center;"> <div style="display: inline ! important;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; text-align: left;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; text-align: left;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; margin: 0px;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; text-align: center;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; text-align: left;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; text-align: center;"> <div style="display: inline ! important;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; text-align: left;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; text-align: left;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; margin: 0px;"> <div style="display: inline ! 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important; text-align: left;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; margin: 0px;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; text-align: center;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; text-align: left;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; text-align: center;"> <div style="display: inline ! important;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; text-align: left;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; text-align: left;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; margin: 0px;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; text-align: center;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; text-align: left;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; text-align: center;"> <div style="display: inline ! important;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; text-align: left;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; text-align: left;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; margin: 0px;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; text-align: center;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; text-align: left;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; text-align: center;"> <div style="display: inline ! important;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; text-align: left;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; text-align: left;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; margin: 0px;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; text-align: center;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; text-align: left;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; text-align: center;"> <div style="display: inline ! important;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; text-align: left;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; text-align: left;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; margin: 0px;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; margin: 0px;"> <div style="display: inline ! important;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; margin: 0px;"> <div style="margin: 0px;">Original post: <a href="http://www.blackbookartmag.com/2011/04/chinese-culture-centers-art-in.html" rel="nofollow">Blackbookart Magazine</a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <p><strong><span style="font-size: small;">Tuesday, April 26, 2011</span></strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>On 704 and 708 Kearny Street, you might see installation in progress in the vacant storefronts on this busy San Francisco street.<br /><br />The Chinese Culture Center of San Francisco extends its Daily Lives show with the YBCA, by bringing Bay Area artists out of the gallery and studio and to the public with their Art-In-Storefront exhibition.<br /><br />Featuring work by Stella Zhang and Feng Jin, this exhibit is set to open next week. Here are some pictures of the storefronts before and in progress during installation.<br /><br />Many a perplexed passerby gazed inside while I was there, getting a first hand look at the installations. This show revitalizes the discarded spaces within our city, while helping to create a new face for Chinatown, reconstructed with contemporary art.</p> <div style="text-align: left;"> <div style="margin: 0px;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; text-align: center;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; text-align: left;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; text-align: center;"> <div style="display: inline ! important;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; text-align: left;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; text-align: left;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; margin: 0px;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; text-align: center;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; text-align: left;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; text-align: center;"> <div style="display: inline ! important;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; text-align: left;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; text-align: left;"> <div style="display: inline ! 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important;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; text-align: left;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; text-align: left;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; margin: 0px;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; margin: 0px;"> <div style="display: inline ! important;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; margin: 0px;"> <div style="margin: 0px;"></div> <div style="margin: 0px;"></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: inline ! important; text-align: center;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; text-align: center;"> <div style="display: inline ! important; text-align: left;"> <div style="margin: 0px;"> <div style="margin: 0px;"> <div style="margin: 0px;"></div> <div style="margin: 0px;"></div> <div style="margin: 0px;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/5943/967/20110501173415-1.jpg" /></div> <div style="margin: 0px;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/5943/967/20110501173429-2.jpg" /></div> <div style="margin: 0px;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/5943/967/20110501173454-3.jpg" /></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <p>&nbsp;</p> Sun, 01 May 2011 17:38:25 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Articles/list Op-Ed: Touristy, yes but San Francisco's North Beach still has the beat Special <h1 class="in-article"><a href="http://www.digitaljournal.com/article/305994" rel="nofollow">Op-Ed: Touristy, yes but San Francisco's North Beach still has the beat Special</a></h1> <div class="invis"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium;"><strong>By Jonathan Farrell</strong></span></div> <div class="invis"><strong><a href="digitaljournal.com" rel="nofollow"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium;">Digital Journal</span></a><br /></strong></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/5943/967/20110426173248-Feng_Jin_at_North_Beach_art_show_2011.jpg" /></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000; font-family: times new roman,times;">The North Beach section of San Francisco for the most part caters to tourists; complete with tour buses, souvenirs and inflated prices. </span></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000; font-family: times new roman,times;"><br /></span></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"> <div style="overflow: hidden; color: #000000; background-color: transparent; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; border: medium none;"></div> </div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000; font-family: times new roman,times;">Yet despite the dusty narrow streets, heavy with traffic and often litter-strewn, North Beach still has a beat, if it can be said that way.</span></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000; font-family: times new roman,times;"><br /></span></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"></div> <div style="overflow: hidden; color: #000000; background-color: transparent; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; border: medium none;"></div> <div style="overflow: hidden; color: #000000; background-color: transparent; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; border: medium none;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000; font-family: times new roman,times;">"Beat" referring to its "Beatnik" past. At least for this reporter, North Beach still has a kind of rhythm that still makes it a special spot to gather.</span></div> <div style="overflow: hidden; color: #000000; background-color: transparent; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; border: medium none;"></div> <div style="overflow: hidden; color: #000000; background-color: transparent; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; border: medium none;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000; font-family: times new roman,times;"><br /></span></div> <div style="overflow: hidden; color: #000000; background-color: transparent; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; border: medium none;"></div> <div style="overflow: hidden; color: #000000; background-color: transparent; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; border: medium none;"></div> <div style="overflow: hidden; color: #000000; background-color: transparent; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; border: medium none;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000; font-family: times new roman,times;">Sit outside one of the many cafes and restaurants and watch scores of people transit by. From all walks of life from every part of the nation, the world, people flock to North Beach. Since the 1950's it has been a place for artist's - San Francisco's "Left Bank;" as it were, like the Montparnasse area of Paris. </span></div> <div style="overflow: hidden; color: #000000; background-color: transparent; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; border: medium none;"></div> <div style="overflow: hidden; color: #000000; background-color: transparent; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; border: medium none;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000; font-family: times new roman,times;"><br /></span></div> <div style="overflow: hidden; color: #000000; background-color: transparent; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; border: medium none;"></div> <div style="overflow: hidden; color: #000000; background-color: transparent; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; border: medium none;"> <div style="overflow: hidden; color: #000000; background-color: transparent; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; border: medium none;"></div> </div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000; font-family: times new roman,times;">This past Saturday the day before Easter, there was an art show in Washington Square. Dozens of works lined the walkway facing Union Street with the steps and steeples of Saints Peter and Paul Church in the background.</span></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000; font-family: times new roman,times;"><br /></span></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000; font-family: times new roman,times;">Among them was art by Feng Jin. What looked like outlined silhouette paintings on canvas - to this reporter, actually turned out to be delicate sculpture made of strips of metal. Up close strips of metal at various lengths entangled with one another, but stand back and a complete eye-catching feminine form emerges, an exquisite lady.</span></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000; font-family: times new roman,times;"><br /></span></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000; font-family: times new roman,times;">A graduate of the Central Academy of Fine Art in Beijing, Jin is a metal arts sculptor. "Most of my work is in stainless steel," said Jin. "But I also work in steel, brass and copper," he said.</span></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000; font-family: times new roman,times;"><br /></span></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000; font-family: times new roman,times;">"My metal sculpture includes both non-representational and representational sculptures: figures, curved lines &amp; shapes, and abstract forms are common themes." Jin said. He is inspired by the work of American metal sculptor David Smith.</span></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000; font-family: times new roman,times;"><br /></span></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000; font-family: times new roman,times;">"I am influenced by David Smith, even at a very early age, when I was still an art student in China," said Jin. "While not many Western metal sculptors were introduced to China during the early 1980's, Smith's strong compositions from steel and "found" scrap material have made significant impressions on me," Jin said.</span></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000; font-family: times new roman,times;"><br /></span></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000; font-family: times new roman,times;">Some art historians classify Smith as an abstract expressionist. Some speculate that Smith was influenced by Picasso. Perhaps this is what appeals to Jin?</span></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000; font-family: times new roman,times;"><br /></span></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000; font-family: times new roman,times;">For over 15 years Jin has lived and worked in San Francisco making Alameda, an island across the bay 40 minutes East from San Francisco his home. Working full-time as a sculptor his works were shown at the Alameda Museum this past March.</span></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000; font-family: times new roman,times;"><br /></span></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000; font-family: times new roman,times;">Often inspired by calligraphy, blending East with West he finds the lines and cursive shapes of such in the Chinese &amp; Japanese characters aesthetically pleasing. Next month Jin will be exhibiting his works at the <a href="http://web.mac.com/jin8feng/Site/Home.html" rel="nofollow">Atrium Gallery in San Francisco. </a></span></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000; font-family: times new roman,times;"><br /></span></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000; font-family: times new roman,times;">Even though it is spring time, the weather in San Francisco is chilly and yes fog appears at any time of year, regardless of the season. As clouds began to sprinkle some misty rain, Jin and the others started to put things away, and wrap up for the day.</span></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000; font-family: times new roman,times;"><br /></span></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"></div> <div class="body" style="color: #333333;"></div> <div></div> <div style="overflow: hidden; color: #000000; background-color: transparent; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; border: medium none;"><br /><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000; font-family: times new roman,times;">Read more: <a href="http://www.digitaljournal.com/article/305994#ixzz1Kg7nM4c4" rel="nofollow" style="color: #003399;">http://www.digitaljournal.com/article/305994</a></span></div> Tue, 26 Apr 2011 17:40:28 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Articles/list The Art of Passages: A Group Exhibition Featuring Visual Expression of Life Experiences <p><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/5943/967/20110430111947-Picture_2.jpg" /></p> <p><b>APRIL 25, 2011 </b>There is a new exhibit in town that promises to be refreshing and exciting with an intriguing grouping of medium to delight the eye.  Opening at the 901 Market Street Atrium (2<sup>nd</sup> floor), San Francisco on May 9<sup>th</sup> is <b><i>The Art of Passages; </i></b>featuring Seamus Berkeley, Mi’Chelle Fredrick, N. Teddy Goldsworthy-hanner, Christine Hanlon, Feng Jin and Michelle Nye working in the mediums of painting – oil, acrylic, watercolor and encaustic – sculpture and photography.</p> <p><b><i>The Art of Passages</i></b> represents life experiences as defined through each artist’s visual expression.  Seamus Berkeley, whose paintings are in oil or acrylic, uses his paintings as a means of practicing discovery, of seeing and connecting to an incredible, alternative view of the world.  Mi’Chelle Fredrick’s photographs in the show represent her fascination with the natural world, she states that “For as long as I can remember, I have looked at the world as if sizing up a scene for a photo or painting,” as is evident in the abstractions she creates.</p> <p>Encaustic Painting – a mixture of beeswax, dammar resin and oil paint combined with heat – is another medium with unique physical properties in the paintings of N. Teddy Goldsworthy-hanner. This method of painting has allowed fragmented memories and depth of color to surface in layer after layer of each piece making each of her paintings a collage of emotions.</p> <p>Christine Hanlon’s focus in her watercolor landscapes is a reflection of her environmental concerns as well as her feeling for the transcendent beauty of nature and the healing power of the experience of painting in nature.  Feng Jin’s metal sculpture is an intimate dialogue between man and the boundless strength of metal, “an expression of all the thoughts, emotions, dreams, passions, destinies and desires that constantly bounce out of my mind.”</p> <p>Michelle Nye’s ethereal large-scale photographic landscapes represent her journey: “I went hunting for an America promised in a dream and found the march of suburbia…I found intersections of nature and man which spoke like urgent metaphors.”</p> <p>This exhibit is a culmination of each artist’s journey into the art of passages.</p> <p align="right" style="text-align: left;">The Opening Reception is Thursday, May 12<sup>th</sup> from 5:00 pm to 7:00 pm.  The show ends on October 7<sup>th</sup>, 2011.  901 Market St., San Francisco is open Monday through Friday from 8:00 am to 6:00 pm.</p> <p align="right" style="text-align: left;">&nbsp;</p> <p align="right" style="text-align: left;">Contact:  Colene Leong<br />CAC Real  Estate Management Co., Inc.<br />e-mail:  cleong@cacremco.com<br />Phone:  510-496-7206</p> Sun, 01 May 2011 13:59:17 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Articles/list Art in Storefronts <div class="post-4126 post type-post status-publish format-standard hentry category-exhibitions category-featured clearfix single-post" id="post-4126"> <h1 class="entry-title"><span style="font-size: medium;">By<a href="http://www.c-c-c.org/archives/author/ccc/" class="url fn n" title="ccc" rel="nofollow"> ccc</a>– <abbr class="published" title="2011-04-22T15:54:00+00:00">April 22, 2011</abbr><strong>Posted in: </strong><a href="http://www.c-c-c.org/category/exhibitions/" rel="nofollow">Exhibitions</a>, <a href="http://www.c-c-c.org/category/featured/" rel="nofollow">Featured</a></span></h1> <div class="entry-content clearfix"> <p><img class="alignleft size-full wp-image-4127" title="sz1" src="http://www.c-c-c.org/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/sz1.jpg" height="364" alt="stella zhang SPACE" width="486" /></p> <p>Art-in-Storefront, a project taking art to the public domain to reclaim and revitalize San Francisco’s forgotten city spaces, is back!</p> <p>Stretching from 704 to 710 Kearny Street, the 2011 storefronts include original work from acclaimed Bay Area artists Stella Zhang and Feng Jin. Unique to this installment is the artists’ use of the spaces as an extension of the concurrent <em>Daily Lives</em> exhibition at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, which opened on February 29 as a partnership between the CCC and YBCA.</p> <p>In the words of curator Kwai Mei Manor, this exhibition takes “art out of the gallery and into the streets, [making it] public and on view for everyone.” The project brings visibility to economic implications of stores without merchants, and to the innovative work of artists from the community to revitalize these empty spaces.</p> <p>Re-imagining the public and private, Stella Zhang creates a fluid display of shape and form, only to discover the secrets that lay behind closed doors. Feng Jin creates a false storefront filled with Chinese character-like forms, as an examination of art transmitted through language. This exhibition challenges the viewer to interact with art and concept on their daily comings and goings on the street. Art-In-Storefront looks at the empty storefront, or vacant city space, as a venue for dialogue and esthetic appreciation.</p> <p>-------------------------</p> <p><strong>Artists Statements</strong></p> <blockquote> <p><strong>Stella Zhang</strong><br /> <em>Space</em></p> <p>I’m always interested in exploring an object’s soul and expressing its essence. I also relate to what is happening in daily life. Displaying objects from daily life could be insipid, but I attempt to create multiple layers of impressions by paying special attention to details, multiplicity, and space. The space created realms between counterfeit and reality; public and private. Consequently, the discovery of this space by those who pass the store front will be as individual as the beholder’s imagination and private associations with the objects.</p> <p><img class="alignleft size-full wp-image-4139" title="sz3 - small" src="http://www.c-c-c.org/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/sz3-small.jpg" height="160" width="215" /></p> <p>空间  张爽</p> <p>我所关注的是日常生活。我对事物的本质认识与挖掘总怀有浓厚的兴趣。对于物件的视觉表现可以采用平凡的素材,但我希望能创造多种层次的解读可能性,这种解读取决于对于整体空间,以及细节的特别关注角度与感觉。<br /> 我试图创造一个介于假想与真实;公共与私密之间的空间。对于这个空间的定义在于经过这个作品的人用什麽样的方式去观察和联想它。</p> <p>--------------------------</p> <p><strong>Feng Jin</strong><br /> <a href="http://web.mac.com/jin8feng/Site/Exhibition_Albums/Pages/Art-in-Storefronts_Project.html#27" rel="nofollow">click here to see Feng Jin’s creative process</a></p> <p>As a sculptor, I would like to use my art form to describe a different type of art form that has a strong attachment with language and writing. People are familiar with an idea that most philosophical thoughts are delivered through out words and language. Maybe one day a certain art form can alternate the language and do the same job as a major communication tool.</p> <p>I want my audiences to purely enjoy these “character-like sculpture” aesthetically, not to be limited to figuring out what do these pieces look like whatsoever or the actual meaning behind. I also intend to give native Chinese audiences to re-think the stereotypical meanings of our language, the language that we use everyday even if we come to a foreign country. Can art deliver messages to people from all around the world without translation (or a statement)? Can people see art without ideology behind?</p> <p>I am still seeking the Tao of art. I know it should be something for you to sense, something that is just unspeakable.</p> <p>創作自述                           ◎金鋒</p> <p>作為一個雕塑家,我想用我的藝術形式來描述一種不同類型的藝術形式、一種對文字和語言相關的探討。人們都熟悉一個想法,即大部分的哲學思想都是透過 文字和語言來溝通的。而做為藝術家最想看到的事情應該是:也許有一天,某些特定的藝術形式也可以替代語言,作為主要的溝通工具。</p> <p><img class="alignleft size-full wp-image-4138" title="small" src="http://www.c-c-c.org/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/small.jpg" height="249" width="351" /></p> <p>我希望我的觀眾,純粹享受這些“字狀雕塑”的美感,而不是受限於想弄清楚這些作品代表著什麼樣的文字形體或任何實質上的意義。我也希望、能透過作品 讓懂得中文的觀眾重新思考我們母語,一個即使我們到了外國、也在日常中使用的語言,它在中西方人眼中有著什麼樣的刻板形象?藝術是否能在不提供語言文字 “翻譯”(或陳述,就像您現在在看的這一篇文章這樣)情況下仍能與來自世界各地的人溝通?人們是否能夠用沒有意識形態的眼睛去看藝術?</p> <p><br /> 我仍然在尋求我的藝術之道。我知道,這應該是一種只能意會、而有時候“不可說”的東西。<img class="size-full wp-image-4137 alignright" title="DSC_4532" src="http://www.c-c-c.org/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/DSC_4532.jpg" height="285" width="409" /></p> </blockquote> </div> </div> Tue, 26 Apr 2011 20:39:12 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Articles/list Chinese Culture Center's Art-In-Storefront <ul class="navigation byline"> </ul> <p style="text-align: left;">Original Post: <a href="http://www.cccgallery.org/profiles/blogs/chinese-culture-centers" rel="nofollow">Chinese Culture Foundation Artists Network</a> <strong> </strong></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><strong>Posted by Kwai Mei Manor on April 17, 2011 at 12:14pm</strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>On Kearny Street, at 704, 708, and 710, you might see installation in progress in the vacant storefronts on this busy San Francisco street. <br /><br />The Chinese Culture Center of San Francisco extends its Daily Lives show with the YBCA, by bringing Bay Area artists out of the gallery and studio and to the public with their Art-In-Storefront exhibition.<br /><br />Curated by Kwai Manor, and featuring work by Stella Zhang, Cynthia Tom, and Feng Jin, this exhibit is set to open next week. Here are some pictures of the storefronts before, and in progress during installation.<br /><br />Many a perplexed passerby gazed inside while I was there, getting a first hand look at the installations. This show revitalizes the discarded spaces within our city, while helping to create a new face for Chinatown, reconstructed with contemporary art.</p> <p><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/5943/967/20110430125829-1.jpg" /><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/5943/967/20110430125844-2.jpg" /><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/5943/967/20110430125858-3.jpg" /></p> <div></div> <div></div> <div></div> Sat, 30 Apr 2011 12:59:09 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Articles/list Island Arts: Feng Jin at the Alameda Museum <p>Submitted by <a href="http://www.theislandofalameda.com/author/michael-singman-aste/" title="Posts by Michael Singman-Aste" rel="nofollow">Michael Singman-Aste</a> on 1, March 17, 2011</p> <dl class="wp-caption alignleft" id="attachment_16796"><dt class="wp-caption-dt"><a href="http://www.theislandofalameda.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/FJ_Artist1.jpg" rel="nofollow"><img title="FJ_Artist" class="size-full wp-image-16796" src="http://www.theislandofalameda.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/FJ_Artist1.jpg" height="385" width="582" /></a></dt><address class="wp-caption-dd"><em><strong>Feng Jin with Romancing the Metal, 2011. Copper and wood boards.</strong></em>*</address><address class="wp-caption-dd"><br /></address></dl> <p><strong>By Michael Singman-Aste</strong></p> <p>Having studied Japanese for two years at the University at California, Berkeley, there was a time when I knew several hundred Chinese characters. I know I’m rusty, but I can’t make heads or tails of Feng Jin’s characters. That’s just fine.</p> <p>Although inspired by Chinese calligraphy, his work is not in fact a reproduction of Chinese verse in metal. Jin says that there are so many new words, in part because of the Internet.</p> <p>“Let’s say this one called ‘peace,” he said, gesturing to one “character” at random. “You and me, we say ‘peace. My son, my family, all say that’s ‘peace.’ And today I don’t know how many people all say that’s ‘peace.’ Next time we saw this word we call ‘peace.’ So it’s a new mark … I want people to look at this one and not just say ‘Chinese word.’ You can see maybe Chinese guy made it. But nothing about Chinese.”</p> <p>The solo show of Jin’s sculptures, “The Tao of Metal,” opened at the Alameda Museum on March 5. A reception was held March 12.</p> <p>The fact that his “characters” are meant to be enjoyed purely aesthetically makes his work more accessible to a Western audience and gives them much broader appeal. Jin likens this appeal to the appreciation of Tang dynasty calligrapher Huai Su, whose “wild cursive” calligraphy is difficult even for Chinese speakers to decipher.</p> <p>“He’s writing a lot of things that are just words. Nobody knows what’s that word,” Jin said. “A lot of professionals maybe know but a lot of people still don’t know. But we like it. We enjoy it because the lines, the stripes, the power, the space, whatever, they have a lot of professional beauty right there … Just like installation art, or modern art. Just art! That’s it.”</p> <p>With the exception of a few freestanding sculptures studding the exhibit, all the work on display was created in the past year and a half, for which he fashioned 1,500 unique copper “characters.” Although not intended to retain their original meaning, a few of these pieces are in fact derived from actual Chinese characters.</p> <p>“Sometimes I design using special pen, just writing Chinese word and cutting apart, but not too many,” Jin said. “And later bending the words to make new thing. You’d never know this was Chinese character. I just bending everything. But some pieces when I cutting the thing outside the line I still feeling the Chinese calligrapher.”</p> <p>Many of Jin’s pieces are “signed” with a plate which bears his name in English crafted in a highly stylized script which resembles Chinese writing. Jin compares this to the work of another Chinese artist, Xu Bing, who both creates work in which English looks like Chinese writing, and also created his own series of faux-Chinese characters which he then used to print scrolls.</p> <div class="mceTemp"><dl class="wp-caption alignleft" id="attachment_16778" style="width: 251px;"><dt class="wp-caption-dt"><a href="http://www.theislandofalameda.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/FJ_Root.jpg" rel="nofollow"><img title="FJ_Root" class="size-full wp-image-16778 " src="http://www.theislandofalameda.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/FJ_Root.jpg" height="430" width="241" /></a></dt><address class="wp-caption-dd"><em><strong>Feng Jin. Foreground: Root, 2008. Patina on stainless steel and painted steel base. Background, from left: Ci, 2011. Copper and wood door; Round &amp; Completed, 2011. Copper and wood doors.</strong></em></address></dl></div> <p>About half the pieces in the show are built upon doors. According to Jin’s statement, the door is “a background and an entry to introduce new form of Chinese calligraphy. Door not only represents ‘in vs. out,’ ‘open vs. close,’ ‘acceptive vs. rejective,’ but is also an entry in leading people to a new way, a way where either moving people forward or backward.”</p> <p>Some of these doors were purchased secondhand. Others were traded by friends in exchange for brand new doors. He said to them “your door is beautiful,” to which they often replied, “I think it’s ugly.”</p> <p>These door pieces range stylistically from the minimalist “Front Tooth” — a cracked white door with a black border bearing a single central copper odontoid piece — to his “Round &amp; Completed,” two doors painted bright reddish orange with 15 copper pieces arranged in a circle. Jin said he intentionally steered clear of using 12 characters to avoid stereotyping the work and causing confusion with the Chinese zodiac.</p> <div class="mceTemp"><dl class="wp-caption alignright" id="attachment_16779" style="width: 251px;"><dt class="wp-caption-dt"><a href="http://www.theislandofalameda.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/FJ_Neo.jpg" rel="nofollow"><img title="FJ_Neo" class="size-full wp-image-16779" src="http://www.theislandofalameda.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/FJ_Neo.jpg" height="430" width="241" /></a></dt><address class="wp-caption-dd"><em><strong>Feng Jin, Neo-Bronze Age, 2011. Copper and stainless steel.</strong></em></address></dl></div> <p>His “Neo-Bronze Age” stands out in gleaming contrast to the distressed doors.</p> <p>“This stainless steel looks like bamboo,” Jin said. “First, before Chinese make the paper they use bamboo or wood. And they use some kind of rope, just tie, like a book. From there I got some form. It looks like a bamboo book. And you look at this one (copper piece that) looks pretty old, maybe a thousand years ago somebody makes some work, and this (stainless steel) material is modern work. And it just makes modern/old contact.”</p> <p>Jin’s beautiful sculptures with their faux-Chinese characters provide form without meaning, a framework upon which the viewer can attach significance. “The Tao of Metal” runs through March 30. Come see it for yourself. What do they mean to you?</p> <p>The Alameda Museum is located at 2324 Alameda Avenue. Their hours are 1:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday through Friday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and 1:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday. The museum is closed Monday and Tuesday.</p> Tue, 26 Apr 2011 20:30:53 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Articles/list Embrace the Tao of Metal <p>&nbsp;</p> <table class="contentpaneopen contentpaneopenTable2"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <div class="articleInfo"><span style="font-size: small;"><strong>Written by Dennis Evanosky    Published: Thursday, 10 March 2011</strong></span></div> <div class="articleInfo"><strong><span style="font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.alamedasun.com/" rel="nofollow">Alameda Sun</a></span><br /></strong></div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" colspan="2"> <div class="introContent"> <div style="float: right;"></div> <p><span style="font-size: small;">Sculptor Feng Jin shows his sons Felix, 10, and Irwin, 6, his signature on a piece of his sculpture while his wife, Lauren Huang looks on. Jin's work will be on display at the Alameda Museum, 2324 Alameda Ave.</span></p> </div> <div class="mainContent"> <div class="ins" style="width: 216px; float: right;"><span style="font-size: small;"><img title="Image" src="http://www.alamedasun.com/images/stories/vol10/20110311/ESSENCE%20embrace%20the%20tao.jpg" border="0" height="364" hspace="6" alt="Image" width="289" /></span></div> <p><span style="font-size: small;">Sculptor Feng Jin shows his sons Felix, 10, and Irwin, 6, his signature on a piece of his sculpture while his wife, Lauren Huang looks on. Jin's work will be on display at the Alameda Museum, 2324 Alameda Ave. through Wednesday, March 30. Meet Jin at an artist's reception from noon to 4 p.m. this Saturday, March 12. The exhibition features Jin's metal sculpture, which uses doors not only as backgrounds but as entryways to introduce a new form of Chinese calligraphy. "A door not only represents in versus out, or open versus closed, but also an entry to a new way," Jin said. Of Korean descent, Jin graduated from the Central Academy of Fine Art in Beijing. He came to the United States in 1995.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: small;">He lives in Alameda, where he works as a full-time sculptor.</span></p> </div> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Tue, 26 Apr 2011 20:45:07 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Articles/list Alameda Museum Presents 'The Tao of Metal' by Metal Sculptor Feng Jin <h1 class="title"><span style="font-size: medium;">Alameda Patch</span></h1> <h1 class="title"><span style="font-size: medium;">Posted by <a href="http://alameda.patch.com/users/lauren-huang" class="fn" rel="nofollow">Lauren Huang</a> | February 25, 2011 |</span></h1> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/5943/967/20110426214036-Picture_6.png" /><br /></span></p> <p>Alameda Museum is presenting <em>The Tao of Metal</em>, a solo exhibition of sculpture by Bay Area artist Feng Jin. From March 5 to 30, 2011, the exhibition will feature Jin's new work, including pedestal and large-scale sculpture as well as a site specific installation.<br /><br />Jin's work offers connections between forms, symbols and architecture through a vocabulary that is emblazed with light and informed by Asian art and history.</p> <p>Jin uses an actual door as a background and an entry to introduce new form of Chinese calligraphy. The door not only represents in vs. out, open vs. close, acceptive vs. rejective, but is also an entry in leading people to a new way, moving people either forward or backward.</p> <p>Three-D, freehand-cut banded bronze characters placed on top of used door create a writing in space. And shadow is also considered a part of the creative element that is never included in traditional calligraphy.<br /><br />This exhibition will also feature Jin's calligraphic series <em>Sculpt-Script Series</em>. This series of work transforming from 2-D calligraphy writings into a 3-D object. Each piece somehow in certain angles look like a real Chinese character, in a sculpture form. Jin has liberated his imagery entirely from the atmosphere of Chinese calligraphy by combining linear invention and lyric finesse.<br /><br />Feng Jin is an artist strongly influenced by David Smith in his early creative age technically, but he has also came out with his own sculpting style by picking up some very fundamental ideology from his origin.</p> <p>A signature characteristic of Jin's work is the investigation of Chinese traditional through the influences of sources like Chinese calligraphy in various dynasties, traditional symbols and contemporary ideology.</p> <p>At a glance his work resemble urban elements and classic symbols that he has seen and familiar in daily life with a vaguely reflection of contemporary insinuation.<br /><br />Born in Harbin, China of Korean descent, Jin graduated from Central Academy of Fine Art of China, Beijing. He came to the U.S. in 1995 and currently resides in Alameda, and works as a full-time sculptor. Jin has exhibited his work widely, major exhibition include: Alameda Museum, San Leandro Historical Museum and Art Gallery, Los Gatos Museum of Art and Stanford Art Space at Stanford University. <br /><br /><em>"The Tao of Metal -- Feng Jin Sculpture Solo Exhibition" artist reception: Saturday, March 12, 12 - 4 p.m. at Alameda Museum, 2324 Alameda Avenue, Alameda, CA  94501. Admission free. For info: (510) 521-1233. Alameda Museum website: <a href="http://www.alamedamuseum.org/" rel="nofollow">www.alamedamuseum.org</a>. Feng Jin's official website: <a href="http://www.dreamcatchersarts.com/" rel="nofollow">www.dreamcatchersarts.com</a>.</em></p> <p><em> </em></p> Tue, 26 Apr 2011 21:40:48 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Articles/list Island arts: “Cross Currents” <div class="clearfloat" id="stats"><strong>This article originally appeared on July 10, 2010 in The Island. Michele Ellson, editor.</strong></div> <div class="clearfloat">Submitted by <a href="http://www.theislandofalameda.com/author/michael-singman-aste/" title="Posts by Michael Singman-Aste" rel="nofollow">Michael Singman-Aste</a> on 1, July 8, 2010 – 4:50 am<a href="http://www.theislandofalameda.com/2010/07/island-arts-cross-currents/#respond" rel="nofollow"><br /></a></div> <div class="entry clearfloat"> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>By Michael Singman-Aste</strong></p> <p>Sponsored by the <a href="http://www.islandallianceofthearts.org/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Island Alliance of the Arts</a> non-profit, the fourth annual “Cross Currents” exhibit at the Alameda Museum is billed as an exhibit of California artists, with one coming from as far away as Bristol in Southern California. But with 22 out of 38 artists from Alameda and the exhibit capably installed by local wood artist Peter Sanderson, it may as well be “The Alameda Show.”</p> <div class="wp-caption alignleft" id="attachment_10192" style="width: 136px;"><a href="http://www.theislandofalameda.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/CC2010_23a_David_PatinaFinishedStainlessSteel_-132x213.jpg" rel="nofollow"><img title="CC2010_23a_David_PatinaFinishedStainlessSteel_-132x213" class="size-full wp-image-10192" src="http://www.theislandofalameda.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/CC2010_23a_David_PatinaFinishedStainlessSteel_-132x213.jpg" height="213" width="126" /></a><strong>"David" by Feng Jin</strong></div> <p>Some of the best work was also contributed by Alamedans, including <strong>Feng Jin</strong>. “My sculpture is an intimacy [sic] dialogue between a human and the boundless strength of metal,” Feng writes in his statement, and nowhere is this more apparent than in his patina-finished stainless steel sculpture “David.”</p> <p><strong>N. Teddy Goldsworthy-hanner</strong>, a professor at the Academy of Art University in San Francisco, shows two encaustic pieces. The rustic panel adorned with images of wild horses, “Like Wind &amp; Sunsets,” is also inscribed with a quote from environmentalist Aldo Leopold’s “Sand County Almanac”:</p> <p>Like wind and sunsets, wild things were taken for granted until progress began to do away with them. Now we face the question whether a (still) higher standard of living is worth the cost in things (natural) wild and free.</p> <div class="wp-caption alignright" id="attachment_10193" style="width: 156px;"><a href="http://www.theislandofalameda.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/CC2010_24c_NudeWithBonsai_Acrylic_40x30-146x198.jpg" rel="nofollow"><img title="CC2010_24c_NudeWithBonsai_Acrylic_40x30-146x198" class="size-full wp-image-10193" src="http://www.theislandofalameda.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/CC2010_24c_NudeWithBonsai_Acrylic_40x30-146x198.jpg" height="198" width="146" /></a>"Nude with Bonsai" by Gary Comoglio</div> <p>Painter and printmaker <strong>Gary Comoglio</strong> works in the style of a number of movements, from Impressionism to Surrealism. His “soft cubist” acrylic “Nude with Bonsai” is gorgeous and inviting, and despite his use of “cool” colors the feeling is warm and lush.</p> <p>Work by other Bay Area artists deserving mention includes “Neiman Marcus – Mannequin,” a photograph by <strong>William Van Meter</strong> of Oakland. Van Meter has been photographing storefronts for a decade, recording the changes in displays and capturing what he calls “the haughty to the naughty.”</p> <p><strong>Justin Yanke</strong> of Emeryville, whose credits include The Columbus Museum of Contemporary Art in Ohio, contributes a remarkable photo-realistic graphite drawing, “Closed Hand.” The detail is amazing, down to the thumb’s slightly ragged cuticle.</p> <div class="wp-caption alignleft" id="attachment_10194" style="width: 226px;"><a href="http://www.theislandofalameda.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/StarGazing.jpg" rel="nofollow"><img title="StarGazing" class="size-medium wp-image-10194 " src="http://www.theislandofalameda.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/StarGazing-300x300.jpg" height="216" width="216" /></a>"Star Gazing" by Maria Foley</div> <p>Many attempt to imbue mediocre photos with beauty or meaning by applying “artistic” filters in Photoshop. <strong>Maria Foley</strong> of Palo Alto states on her website that “(p)hotographs are collaged and heavily manipulated in Photoshop,” which is usually enough to send me running. But Foley’s photo collages are exquisite. An artist in residence at Berkeley’s Kala Art Institute, her work is further enhanced by the printing process, photopolymer etching with a chine-collé layer. Along with Feng Jin’s “David,” Foley’s “Star Gazing” is my pick for Best of Show.</p> <p>“Cross Currents” opens today and continues through July 30 at the Alameda Museum, 2324 Alameda Avenue, with a reception from 1p.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, July 10 and talks by the artists from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. on July 24. Their phone number is 521-1233.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Read original article: <a href="http://www.postdiluvianphoto.com/blog/tag/feng-jin/page/2/" rel="nofollow">http://www.postdiluvianphoto.com/blog/tag/feng-jin/page/2/</a></p> </div> Sat, 30 Apr 2011 17:17:04 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Articles/list Feng Jin’s shadow sculptures <h2><span style="font-size: medium;">Blog Post from <a href="http://dianaperazzo.wordpress.com/2010/05/30/feng-jins-shadow-sculptures/" rel="nofollow">Matryoshka</a></span></h2> <div class="info">May 30, 2010 <a href="http://dianaperazzo.wordpress.com/author/dianaperazzo/" title="Posts by dianaperazzo" rel="nofollow">dianaperazzo</a><a href="http://dianaperazzo.wordpress.com/2010/05/30/feng-jins-shadow-sculptures/#comments" rel="nofollow"><br /></a></div> <p>In the beginning of May while visiting San Francisco, me and my boyfriend noticed an art exhibit at the Union Square. There must have been at least 10 artists present. To our disbelief each art exhibition’s artist was there, too. After walking through the isles of sculptures and pictures, I found myself right in front of a very interesting sculpture. It had only an outline. Placed right in front of a white board, it put its shade on it, which was a naked woman with her arms up.</p> <p>I fell in love with it right away. I kept walking through and looking at more sculptures in the same style, when I was approached by a guy who introduced himself to be … the sculptor who made them – Feng Jin! He was regularly dressed and very soft-spoken. He explained that we were looking at the shadow sculptures. Normally, a person would put it behind the light and the big wall shadows would occupy the room.</p> <p>If you ever have a chance, try to see his exhibition, it is really amazing. Feng Jin’s website is <a href="http://www.dreamctchersart.com/" rel="nofollow">www.dreamcatchersart.com</a>, but it does not have his shadow sculptures. I, on the other hand, have it right here!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/5943/967/20110430170413-1.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" /></p> Sat, 30 Apr 2011 17:04:27 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Articles/list Feng Jin's metal sculptures dance 'With Shadows' in Belmont Gallery <div class="style_SkipStroke_2 flowDefining" style="visibility: visible; margin-left: 49px; margin-top: 437px; position: relative; width: 607px; z-index: 1;"> <div class="text-content style_External_607_528" style="padding: 0px;"> <div class="style"> <p class="paragraph_style_2" style="padding-top: 0pt;">By Bonny Zanardi</p> <p class="paragraph_style_2">San Mateo Times Correspondent</p> <p class="paragraph_style_2">&nbsp;</p> <p class="paragraph_style_2">&nbsp;</p> <p class="paragraph_style_3">THE 1870 Art Center Gallery is hosting "Dances With Shadows," an exhibition of metal sculptures by Feng Jin, through Sept. 20.</p> <p class="paragraph_style_3">Born in Harbin, China, Jin graduated from the Central Academy of Fine Arts in Beijing with a Bachelor of Arts in sculpture. He lives in the Bay Area and works in a variety of metals, creating both figural and abstract works at his Dream Catchers Arts studio in Alameda.</p> <p class="paragraph_style_3">A full-time sculptor, Jin often creates pieces using a technique he calls "open-minded sculpting," meaning with no preconceived design. He works sheet metal by hand cutting, rolling, bending, hammering, grinding and welding. The finish might be highly polished, textural or natural.</p> <p class="paragraph_style_3">The sculptures on view at gallery are made of steel rods or wire, which he bends into curves and welds together, then adds a black finish. He starts with drawings from a live model and sculpts the form in different clays before beginning work with the metal rods.</p> <p class="paragraph_style_3">Jin says his original inspiration for these shadow sculptures came from Chinese painting. The idea to use an interplay of light with the sculptures is based on the traditional Chinese shadow-play art form.</p> <p class="paragraph_style_3">In his artist's statement, he writes that "good sculpture must have its own soul" and he sees his work as an intimate dialogue "between a human and the boundless strength of metal."</p> <p class="paragraph_style_3" style="padding-bottom: 0pt;">You can meet the artist at a reception from 1 to 4 p.m. Aug. 29 at the gallery, at 1870 Ralston Ave., Belmont. Hours are 1 to 5 p.m. Thursdays through Sundays. Call 750-595-9679 or visit <a href="http://www.1870artcenter.org/" title="http://www.1870artcenter.org/" rel="nofollow">www.1870artcenter.org</a>.</p> </div> <div class="tinyText" style="height: 80px; line-height: 80px;"></div> </div> </div> <div class="style_SkipStroke_3" id="id3" style="visibility: visible; height: 24px; left: 49px; position: absolute; top: 414px; width: 410px; z-index: 1;"> <div class="text-content style_External_410_24" style="padding: 0px;"> <div class="style"> <p class="Date" style="padding-bottom: 0pt; padding-top: 0pt;">Friday, August 7, 2009</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="tinyText" style="height: 441px; left: 302px; position: absolute; top: 27px; width: 310px; z-index: 1;"> <div style="position: relative; width: 310px;"><img src="http://web.mac.com/jin8feng/Site/Blog/Entries/2009/8/7_Feng_Jins_metal_sculptures_dance_With_Shadows_in_Belmont_gallery_1_files/shapeimage_2.jpg" id="generic-picture-attributes" style="height: 442px; left: 0px; margin-top: -1px; position: absolute; top: 0px; width: 310px; visibility: visible;" /></div> </div> Tue, 26 Apr 2011 21:52:07 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Articles/list Los Gatos Art Museum offers Three Visions art show <p><strong>By Erica Goss </strong></p> <p><a href="http://www.examiner.com/contemporary-art-in-san-jose/erica-goss" rel="nofollow">San Jose Contemporary Art Examiner</a></p> <ul class="meta clearfix"> </ul> <p>June 29th, 2009 4:45 pm PT</p> <p><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/5943/967/20110426220033-2342-Feng-Jin.jpg" />Mert Carpenter Photo</p> <p>The art of <a href="http://www.donnaorme.com/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Donna Orme</a>, <a href="http://www.dreamcatchersarts.com/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Feng Jin</a> and <a href="http://www.dreamcatchersarts.com/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Glen Rogers</a> is featured through August 7 at the <a href="http://www.museumsoflosgatos.org/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Los Gatos Art Museum</a>.  These three artists’ work appear in a group show that includes both floors of the museum.  On the first floor, sculptor Feng Jin’s female torsos, this series in mirror-polished steel, as well as his ribbon-like abstracts, juxtapose Donna Orme’s colorful monoprints and monotypes.</p> <p>In her artist statement, Donna Orme says, “I allow obscure thoughts and feelings to emerge into forms and colors which are then expressed in art pieces.  The works incorporate an interplay of space, color, circles and lines.  The composition of my work is contemporary in feeling.  Producing nonobjective art requires that one be articulate about the simplicity or complexity of line.”  In “Orange Loops,” (cast acrylic monotype, poured acrylic) vivid red-orange explodes at the borders, framing the abstract black, white and gray shapes that wind into the center.  The gray shapes are cloud-soft, floating between the harder reds and blacks.  Feng Jin’s glittering torsos echo the metal plates used to create these monotypes and mono prints, giving them a hard edge.</p> <p>On the museum’s lower level, Glen Rogers’ large canvasses blend with Jin’s softer sculptures, Rogers’ strong feminine shapes complementing Jin’s torsos and full-length female nudes.  Rogers’ paintings and monotypes, which feature highly textured backgrounds and curved shapes outlined in black, red and mahogany, balance the slightly irregular, idealized look of Jin’s sculptures.  “My work is accessed not ?through the intellect, but rather the heart or subconscious mind.  As I work the surface of the plate or canvas and access this ancient iconography, I feel an affinity ?with those who have come before me,” she writes.  The earth tones she uses complement the textual finishes of Jin’s torsos, evoking ebony, oak, marble and granite surfaces, most notably in “Secrets of the Field.”</p> <p>In an interview with Stacey Louiso of <a href="http://www.attributemagazine.com/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Attribute Magazine</a>, Jin stated, “I love stainless steel.  It has a tendency to ‘fight back’ before yielding to form.”  He uses an “open-minded” sculpting technique, starting with sheet metal, often without any drafts or sketches, and free-hand cuts, rolls, bends, hammers, heats, grinds, and welds.  The final finish ranges from natural to various patinas.  The shapes of water drops, moon and heart can be found on most of Jin’s pieces, and, as his brochure states, “All the figures are one-of-kind, just like women in this world.”</p> <p>Los Gatos Museum, located at 4 Tait Avenue, Los Gatos, CA 95031, is a small gallery that offers an intimate art experience.  “Three Visions” imbues the small space with energy, inviting the viewer a close and personal encounter with each piece.</p> <ul class="meta clearfix"> </ul> Tue, 26 Apr 2011 22:02:53 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Articles/list Shape, curve, and three-dimensionality <p><a href="http://www.tricityvoice.com/displayArchiveMenu.php?issue=2009-05-13" rel="nofollow">May 13, 2009</a><a href="http://www.tricityvoice.com/articlefiledisplay.php?issue=2009-05-13&amp;file=Shape.txt" rel="nofollow"><strong> Tri-City Voice</strong></a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <center> <span style="font-size: medium;"><strong>Shape, curve, and three-dimensionality </strong></span> <p>&nbsp;</p> </center> <center><strong>By Dustin Findley</strong><br /></center> <p>This week is your last chance for a truly 3-dimensional experience at the Phantom Art Gallery in Milpitas. Feng Jin has metal sculptures on display until Friday, May 15.<br /><br />Feng Jin trained the number one school in China for classical art training. Feng Jin's parents worked in a machine shop. He went there and enjoyed "playing with the metal."<br /> <br />The work on display features older and newer work. Feng Jin chose to exhibit pieces that demonstrate his new style of turning Chinese calligraphy into sculpture.<br /> <br />So that everybody could enjoy the shape, curve, and three-dimensionality of the characters, they are not complete representations of Chinese calligraphy.<br /> <br />Feng Jin works with patina-finished stainless steel. "The material has life" he said. <br /><br />Feng Jin plans to continue producing calligraphy inspired pieces, and probably try smaller versions. <br />He is working on how to create a poem in sculpture to hang on the wall. <br /><br />The artist implores that visitors to use eyes and heart to enjoy the art. Please do not touch. Touching might damage the piece and creates safety concerns.<br /> <br />Feng's official website, where you can learn more about him and his sculpture, is www.dreamcatchersarts.com<br /><br />Metal sculptures exhibit<br />until May 15<br />Phantom Art Gallery<br />457 E. Calaveras Blvd. Milpitas<br />(408) 586-3286</p> Sat, 30 Apr 2011 18:15:21 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Articles/list Feng Jin: Artist on Fire <p><a href="http://www.attributemagazine.com/index/index.php?option=com_content&amp;task=view&amp;id=65&amp;Itemid=128" class="blacktitle" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">AttributeMagazine.com</a></p> <p class="MsoBodyText" style="text-align: left;">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoBodyText" style="text-align: left;"><span><strong><span style="font-size: x-large;">Feng Jin: Artist on Fire</span></strong></span></p> <p class="MsoBodyText" style="text-align: left;"><span><strong>Written by: Stacey Louiso /  Photos provided by: Lauren Huang</strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><img title="feng jin photo 2.jpg" src="http://www.attributemagazine.com/index/images/stories/articles/issue2/fengjin/feng jin photo 2.jpg" onmouseover="this.src='http://www.attributemagazine.com/index/Metal Sculpture Feng Jin peeks from behind one of his pieces';" height="147" onmouseout="this.src='http://www.attributemagazine.com/index/images/stories/articles/issue2/fengjin/feng jin photo 2.jpg';" alt="Metal Sculpture Feng Jin peeks from behind one of his pieces" /></p> <p class="MsoBodyText" style="text-align: left;"><span><strong> One never knows what to expect when meeting an artist in person. Some are shy introverts, others outrageous extroverts. Their work is often a reflection of their soul: frantic, serene, intense, playful or tragic. Feng Jin is no exception. He is warm, funny and energetic: Infectious. </strong></span></p> <p class="MsoBodyText" style="text-align: left;">Jin’s personality is a combination of serenity, intensity and that of a fun-loving, family oriented man. He is as unique and interesting as the twists and curves of the lively metal sculptures he creates.</p> <div class="Section1"> <p class="MsoBodyText" style="text-align: left;">Jin’s home and art are one. He shares his life with wife Lauren Huang, who is also exemplary. She dedicates herself to their life together as wife and mother of their two young sons while taking on the job of Jin’s manager, PR rep and even curator of showings and openings. The couple is the epitome of yin and yang.</p> <p class="MsoBodyText">Entering their home completely demonstrates the mutual dedication to Jin’s art and their livelihood. Sculpture often fills the main rooms of their home which becomes his gallery, giving new meaning to the term “open house” as they welcome friends, collectors and those new to Jin’s following, to open studios &amp; receptions at their home in Alameda, CA.</p> <img title="infinity of love, 2008.jpg" src="http://www.attributemagazine.com/index/images/stories/articles/issue2/fengjin/infinity%20of%20love,%202008.jpg" onmouseover="this.src='http://www.attributemagazine.com/index/Feng Jin';" height="134" onmouseout="this.src='http://www.attributemagazine.com/index/images/stories/articles/issue2/fengjin/infinity of love, 2008.jpg';" alt="Feng Jin's " /> <p class="MsoBodyText">It is an impressive display of aesthetically pleasing work from over the years. Shadows of his sculptures dance across the walls, some done purposefully—his series of sculptures titled “Shadow Dancing” are meant to cast shadows when placed before a plain, light colored wall. These are just a glimpse into the mind of Feng Jin: His creativity and passion nakedly evident.</p> <img title="shadow dancing " src="http://www.attributemagazine.com/index/images/stories/articles/issue2/fengjin/shadow%20dancing%2012.jpg" onmouseover="this.src='http://www.attributemagazine.com/index/Feng Jin';" height="300" onmouseout="this.src='http://www.attributemagazine.com/index/images/stories/articles/issue2/fengjin/shadow dancing 12.jpg';" alt="Feng Jin's " /> <p class="MsoBodyText">Jin came to the US from China 13 years ago. Born in Harbin, China in 1966, the son of a machinist of Korean decent, his creativity blossomed early. He didn’t choose his medium (metal) he was born into it. As a child he fell in love with the tools his father used at work. He quickly learned to use them and even adjust them for his own purpose. He experimented with the different types of metal available to him. This led him to art school.</p> <p class="MsoBodyText">Jin studied at the Central Academy of Fine Arts, Beijing (BA, Sculpture), China’s number one art institute (with an acceptance rate of only 1:10,000); here he was encouraged by professors to pursue his love of metal arts when no program existed to teach him. During the protests of Tienanmen Square, he was responsible for the designs of the “Goddess of Democracy” sculpture erected during the uprising. After graduating, Jin went on to teach sculpture, sketch and anatomy at Beijing Xuan Wu Hong Qi Vocational University, then moving on to work as a Supervisor of Design &amp; Production at the Beijing Urban Environment Art Institute.</p> <p class="MsoBodyText">In 1997, after arriving in the U.S. and settling in San Francisco, CA, Jin worked full-time for a family owned machine shop. He was happy- the job at least related to his art. The owner of the shop (an Italian immigrant) was supportive of Jin’s dreams and allowed him to use the equipment and left over materials to create sculpture in his spare time.</p> <p class="MsoBodyText">Shortly after, he met Lauren Huang through friends. She, a writer and graphic artist who was beginning her freelance career writing columns for Chinese newspapers, providing translation and also creating graphic design. They found commonalities and joined forces to market Jin’s work.</p> <p class="MsoBodyText">In the year 2000, Jin marked the new millennium by officially becoming a full time artist. Upon doing so he made a conscious choice that his art would never again be used to make political statements. Rather for pure aesthetics, he confides, “my sculpture is an intimate dialogue between a human and the boundless strength of metal, an expression of all the thoughts, emotions, dreams, passions, destinies and desires that are constantly bouncing out of my mind<span>.” Jin </span>also made another big decision; he and Huang were married that same year.</p> <img title="the one 2001-1.jpg" src="http://www.attributemagazine.com/index/images/stories/articles/issue2/fengjin/the%20one%202001-1.jpg" onmouseover="this.src='http://www.attributemagazine.com/index/A piece from Feng Jin';" height="200" onmouseout="this.src='http://www.attributemagazine.com/index/images/stories/articles/issue2/fengjin/the one 2001-1.jpg';" alt="A piece from Feng Jin's 2001 " /> <p class="MsoBodyText">Creating a sculpture, for Jin, is creating life. Every nook and curve is pounded and smoothed by hand in a process he has perfected. The end product is the result of a lot of effort, thought and foresight on Jin’spart. His work is exquisite and elegant. Even if you aren’t a connoisseur of sculpture, you will be drawn in by the pure artistry of his designs. Jin rarely brings a sole piece to fruition; instead an entire series is birthed around a theme of his own imagining.</p> <p class="MsoBodyText">Jin works with steel, bronze, brass and copper. “My metal sculptures include both non-representational and representational sculptures: figures, curved lines, shapes and abstract forms are common themes. My influences include David Smith, whose work I was introduced to, while an art student in China. While not many Western metal sculptors were introduced in China during the early 80's, Smith's strong compositions from steel and 'found' scrap material made significant impressions on me.”</p> <p class="MsoBodyText">He elaborates, “I love stainless steel, it has tendency to 'fight back' before yielding to form. Material with such special characters enables a sculptor like me not to come out of a specific design when making a sculpture. Sometimes I allow the metal itself to tell me what to do and I'll come out with something that shows what it [the metal] wants to be. Using my so-called 'open-minded sculpting' technique, I often start with sheet metal, mostly without any drafts or sketches, and begin free-handcutting, rolling, bending, hammering, heating, grinding, and welding. The final finish may be natural, textural, high-polished, or a patina.”</p> <img title="dubai-ball" src="http://www.attributemagazine.com/index/images/stories/articles/issue2/fengjin/dubai-balljpg.jpg" onmouseover="this.src='http://www.attributemagazine.com/index/Feng Jin';" height="134" onmouseout="this.src='http://www.attributemagazine.com/index/images/stories/articles/issue2/fengjin/dubai-balljpg.jpg';" alt="Feng Jin's " /> <p class="MsoBodyText"><span>On the occasion he does create a solo piece, it is usually larger than life such as a commission he received from the Scientific Art Studio in Richmond, CA, titled “The Dubai Project”. This project started out as a giant hollow ball of stainless steel that was then cut open and welded down to the final “capsule” which sits nestled on a base of white quartz crystals. The design was eminently different than Jin’s other works, and he has created large-scale pieces, such as his “Rising” series. Some of his larger pieces<span> are on display at Wildwood Farm Sculpture Garden, in Kenwood, CA </span><a href="http://web.mac.com/jin8feng/Site/Sculpture/Pages/New_Born.html" rel="nofollow"><span>("New Born" arrives at Wildwood Farm)</span></a><span>. But Jin dreams of someday having all of his large works displayed in a sculpture garden so they can “live freely”. </span></span></p> <p class="MsoBodyText"><span>Jin and Huang are constantly pursuing opportunities for his work to be seen by the public. Past shows have included showings at numerous museums and galleries around the San Francisco Bay Area, Las Vegas, NV and various venues in Arizona. He also does the occasional installation as well as duo shows with other Asian artist’s working in the Bay Area. Thus far 2008 has proven to be busy for them. The year started at a group exhibitiontitled “All Fired Up” in Santa Clara, CA, by spring many more exhibits were on the agenda going into autumn. Next-up, from Sept-October a solo exhibit entitled, “The Heart Sutra” at the San Leandro Historical Museum and Art Gallery which will showcase one of Jin’s more abstract statuesque series. Jin is also on the schedule for winter 2008 into 2009 (Oct. 08-Jan 09), at Stanford Art Space, Stanford University, in a four artist, Group Exhibition. </span></p> <img title="new born" src="http://www.attributemagazine.com/index/images/stories/articles/issue2/fengjin/new born 1.jpg" onmouseover="this.src='http://www.attributemagazine.com/index/Feng Jin';" height="134" onmouseout="this.src='http://www.attributemagazine.com/index/images/stories/articles/issue2/fengjin/new born 1.jpg';" alt="Feng Jin's new series " /> <p class="MsoBodyText"><span>Success in the US, he hopes, may also carry over and bring recognition in his homeland, for in 2008 Jin’s art arrived in Asia, appropriately, to Beijing. “A collector recommended my work to Guardian Auction House, which is China’s equivalent to Christie’s or Sotheby’s, and they accepted my work. It is very prestigious to be introduced through an auction house in China—it means the artist is now in the international artists ‘bluebook’.” But, Jin explains, “As an artist, success for me is to be able to create sculpture full-time and to have the ability to support myself and my family (plus my ill parents and some relatives in China) by selling what I've created; in addition to having a certain amount of collectors. I've lived in the U.S. for 13 years. During the past 11 years I've persevered at creating sculptures and making a living as a professional artist. As an immigrant artist I think the success means he/she doesn't give up his/her profession and dream.” </span></p> <img title="feng jin photo" src="http://www.attributemagazine.com/index/images/stories/articles/issue2/fengjin/feng%20jin%20photo%201.jpg" height="201" alt="Artist Feng Jin" /> <p class="MsoBodyText"><span>For more information or to view more photos of Feng Jin’s work please visit: Feng Jin in the photo gallery. </span></p> <p class="MsoBodyText">&nbsp;</p> </div> <p style="text-align: left;"><span> <hr /> </span></p> <p style="text-align: left;">Special thanks to Lauren Huang for assisting with translation and providing information for this article.</p> <p style="text-align: left;">&nbsp;</p> Tue, 26 Apr 2011 20:32:26 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Articles/list Sculptures at SL Museum — A Study of the Female Form <div class="style_SkipStroke_1" id="id2" style="visibility: visible; height: 28px; left: 78px; position: absolute; top: 341px; width: 466px; z-index: 1;"> <div class="text-content Normal_External_466_28" style="padding: 0px;"> <div class="Normal"> <p class="paragraph_style_1" style="padding-bottom: 0pt; padding-top: 0pt;">&nbsp;</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="tinyText" style="height: 1px; line-height: 1px;"></div> <div class="style_1"> <p class="paragraph_style_2" style="padding-top: 0pt;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/5943/967/20110426220915-HeartsOnFire_.jpg" height="559" width="285" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" /></p> <p class="paragraph_style_2" style="padding-top: 0pt;"><span style="font-size: medium;"><strong>By : Staff Reports : 8/29/08     San Leandro Times</strong></span></p> <p class="paragraph_style_2">&nbsp;</p> <p class="paragraph_style_2">The San Leandro History Museum and Art Gallery presents a sculpture solo exhibition “The Heart Sutra” featuring Bay Area sculptor Feng Jin’s recent new series “Hearts On Fire.”</p> <p class="paragraph_style_2">The exhibition runs from Sept. 4 to Oct. 26 at the gallery at 320 West Estudillo Avenue with a reception for the artist on Saturday, Sept. 6 from 1 to 3 p.m.</p> <p class="paragraph_style_2">In this series of abstract figurative sculptures, Feng Jin creates ancient goddess figures using modern material and sculpting technique. In “The Heart Sutra,” the twisted metal torsos salute the natural beauty of human bodies.</p> <p class="paragraph_style_2">The works are inspired by women, with various definitions from ancient sayings, poetry and religious stories, in addition to the belief that a man cultivates pure vision by seeing the woman as a deity,</p> <p class="paragraph_style_2">“Hearts On Fire” series is an extension of Feng Jin’s “The H Series,” an evolution from realistic to abstract figures. Sculptures are mostly in human size, with mirror-like high-polished finishing or patina-finished.</p> <p class="paragraph_style_2">Jin uses a difficult technique to create these figurative series — by hand-fabricating a cool, flat stainless steel sheet into the figure. He cuts and hand-hammers several flat stainless steel sheets into different curvy body parts, then wields the parts together and polishes the entire surfaces with patina color. A simple hammer does most of the work — punching and more punching.</p> <p class="paragraph_style_2">Jin insists on using the hand fabricated technique because it provides the best result of showing curves and shapes of a female body, instead of casting bronze or stainless steel.</p> <p class="paragraph_style_2">All of the figures are one of a kind, just like women in this world. Shapes of water drops, the moon, and the heart can be found on most of the pieces. The marble-texture patina finishing provides flowing curves and forms.</p> <p class="paragraph_style_2">Some pieces are designed to incorporate both male and female figures to show the Yin and Yang harmony.</p> <p class="paragraph_style_2">Jin is a professional metal sculptor based in Alameda whose work can be seen throughout the San Francisco Bay Area. Jin is of Korean descent and was born in Harbin, China.</p> <p class="paragraph_style_2">Jin grew up as the son of a machinist. His creativity came from early childhood when the he often played in his father’s work place and fell in love with hand tools, old gears and bent metals.</p> <p class="paragraph_style_2">In 1992, he received his BA in Sculpture from the Central Institute of Fine Art, Beijing.</p> <p class="paragraph_style_2">He began working with stainless steel and various metals with abstract curves in his art school days. In 1989, Jin helped design and coproducing the statue, “Goddess of Democracy” for the student movement at Tiananmen Square.</p> <p class="paragraph_style_2" style="padding-bottom: 0pt;">In 1995, Jin came to the Bay Area pursuing his artistic career. In thirteen years since moving to the Bay Area, Jin has exhibited his work wide.</p> </div> Tue, 26 Apr 2011 22:12:47 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Articles/list Picto-Calligraphy & Sculpt-Script: Symphony of Chinese Calligraphy & Sculpture <p><strong>EAST BAY EXPERSS -- CRITIC'S CHOICE</strong></p> <p><br />Drawing, according to the French neoclassicist J.A.D. Ingres, is "the hard, wiry line of rectitude" underlying all great art. In Chinese painting, calligraphy links both the poetry that artist-sages admired, and their deeply felt aesthetic/kinesthetic responses. In this two-man show at the AlamedaMuseum, two China-born Californians update tradition with modernist ideas of free expression. In his Picto-Calligraphy series, Mei Chu Chang, a retired teacher and a renowned calligraphy expert, treats the ideograms as personages -- Shang Dynasty oracle bones meet Paul Klee -- rather than symbols. He also adds marbleized ink textures instead of perfectly executed trees and mountains and plays elegantly with other conventions. <strong>Feng Jin,</strong> who helped create the famous Tiananmen Square Goddess of Democracy, studies calligraphy with Chang, and creates three-dimensional abstract works in dialogue with the material -- polished or patinated stainless steel, in the Sculpt-Script series; they're 3D brushstrokes à la de Kooning made palpable. Through July 30 at AlamedaMuseum (2324 Alameda Ave., Alameda).510-522-1076.<br /><br /><strong>-- By DeWitt Cheng</strong></p> <p><br />Time &amp; Date: July 3-30, 2008<br />Alameda Museum<br />2324 Alameda Ave.<br />Alameda CA 94501<br />Alameda<br />510-521-1233</p> Tue, 26 Apr 2011 21:14:18 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/chi/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/chi/Articles/list