Chicago | Los Angeles | Miami | New York | San Francisco | Santa Fe
Amsterdam | Berlin | Brussels | London | Paris | São Paulo | Toronto | China | India | Worldwide
 
Berlin

Cruise & Callas

Exhibition Detail
Stefan Rinck befragt die Nachbarschaft: Will Gott noch was mit uns zu tun haben?
Alexandrinenstr. 1
Kreuzberg
10969 Berlin
Germany


September 23rd, 2011 - November 5th, 2011
 
Grobianism kills Lookism (süchtig nach Sex), Stefan RinckStefan Rinck,
Grobianism kills Lookism (süchtig nach Sex),
2011, Installation of 25 sandstone and marble sculptures, dimensions variable
© Cruise & Callas
Stefan Rinck befragt die Nachbarschaft: Will Gott noch was mit uns zu tun haben?, Stefan RinckStefan Rinck,
Stefan Rinck befragt die Nachbarschaft: Will Gott noch was mit uns zu tun haben?,
2011, Exhibition view
© Cruise & Callas
Stefan Rinck befragt die Nachbarschaft: Will Gott noch was mit uns zu tun habe?, Stefan RinckStefan Rinck,
Stefan Rinck befragt die Nachbarschaft: Will Gott noch was mit uns zu tun habe?,
2011, Exhibition view
© Cruise & Callas
Stefan Rinck befragt die Nachbarschaft: Will Gott noch was mit uns zu tun habe?, Stefan RinckStefan Rinck,
Stefan Rinck befragt die Nachbarschaft: Will Gott noch was mit uns zu tun habe?,
2011, Exhibition view
© Cruise & Callas
Stefan Rinck befragt die Nachbarschaft: Will Gott noch was mit uns zu tun haben?, Stefan RinckStefan Rinck,
Stefan Rinck befragt die Nachbarschaft: Will Gott noch was mit uns zu tun haben?,
2011, Exhibition view
© Cruise && Callas
Mirror of Death, Stefan RinckStefan Rinck, Mirror of Death,
2010, sandstone, 38 x 19 x 7 cm
© Cruise & Callas
Monster with Totem of Love, Stefan RinckStefan Rinck, Monster with Totem of Love,
2010, sandstone, 50 x 30 x 20 cm
© Cruise & Callas
Der Dachs steigt, Stefan RinckStefan Rinck, Der Dachs steigt,
2011, sandstone, 46,5 x 38 x 28 cm
© Cruise & Callas
Hommage à Gislebertus, Stefan RinckStefan Rinck, Hommage à Gislebertus,
2011, acrylic and metal leaf on sandstone , 55 x 16 x 10,5 cm
© Cruise & Callas
Fratzenbuch (Facebook), Stefan RinckStefan Rinck, Fratzenbuch (Facebook),
2011, shellac on sandstone, 52 x 38 x 7,5 cm
© Cruise & Callas
San Marco und der Schweinetechno der aus den Büschen kommt, Stefan RinckStefan Rinck,
San Marco und der Schweinetechno der aus den Büschen kommt,
2002, acrylic, oil and metal leaf on canvas, 160 x 150 cm
© Cruise & Callas
The Girl from Fukushima, Stefan RinckStefan Rinck, The Girl from Fukushima,
2011, acrylic and oil on cotton , 98 x 70 cm
© Cruise & Callas
< || >
> QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://www.cruisecallas.com
NEIGHBORHOOD:  
friedrichshain-kreuzberg
EMAIL:  
office@cruisecallas.com
PHONE:  
+ 49 30 7492 7880
OPEN HOURS:  
Opening hours 12-6pm Wed-Sat
TAGS:  
installation, realism, figurative, sculpture
> DESCRIPTION

Richard Neal on Stefan Rincks work

Most often, the figures just stand there, freshly and directly hewn from the block. Four-square, shoulders and head just slightly slumped, sometimes as if they have just been poked back, and are slow to reassert themselves. They wait, immobile. They want something, and still live in their desire, or have occasionally just been thwarted, and now can do nothing but reel, frustrated. Once in a blue moon, the guitar picked up, satisfaction briefly reigns.

The motives are usually base: money, lust for fl esh fi rst and then power, with the odd starry eyed lovesick giant. Sometimes they know what they want, and scheme. Others may be less self-aware, but what they feel is nonetheless apparent, so much so that their own horizons are clearly circumscribed within the bounds of our gaze, giving the viewer at least the position of a parental overlord, if not a divine power. This relation is reinforced through the sheer, brutal cuteness, the childlike expectant mouths and gazes, the innocence that is clearly withering in front of our eyes.

The dividing line is not always clear but in general the sculpture consists of the tempted, and the temptation itself is more often to be seen in the paintings. Girls are posed closely, frontally, mute, aloof. They may look at you, and you at them, but no more. And they float, fi xed in your view but not in their surroundings.

The technique of both painting and sculpture has a shared quality. It does just enough. It is rough and coarse, but not for the sake of it, more for a negative logic that more is not required. It does declare and flaunt this coarseness but delicately so. Baseness equates with basics, establishing a unity of motif and manner. The titles and backstories also necessarily operate on the same level, and tend to the comical. The only element in the whole art relationship given the possibility of a (deluded) grandeur is us, the viewer.


Back to the figures, their very boxed-in comic posture leaves them isolated. The seductive wonder which is either right in, or about to enter, the process of disillusionment, radiates a vulnerability whereby we become sensitive to our place and what is around and, indeed, above us.


Copyright © 2006-2013 by ArtSlant, Inc. All images and content remain the © of their rightful owners.