ArtSlant - Openings & events http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/show en-us 40 Andrea Böning, Anja Helbing, Anna Jakopuvic, Friedericke Jokisch, Grace Kim, Matthias Röhrborn, Elisabeth Rosenthal - Meinblau - May 11th, 2013 5:00 PM - 10:00 PM <p><b>Von Innen und Außenlandschaften<br /> Malerei, Video, Fotografie, Text und Performance<br /> </b></p> <p>Was ist innen? Wo ist außen? Was ist Landschaft und wo fängt sie an und wo endet sie? Künstlerische Aussagen zu diesen Fragen stehen im Mittelpunkt der Ausstellung. Sieben KünstlerInnen setzen ihre ganz unterschiedlichen Ansätze dazu in Malerei, Video, Fotografie und Text um.</p> <p>In dieser Ausstellung geht es nicht um das reine Landschaftsbild, die Landschaft wird nach innen erweitert. Sehen wir das, was wir in uns vorgestellt haben?</p> <p>Und haben wir die Landschaft nicht sowieso schon so geformt? Leben wir nicht auch in einer Wohnlandschaft? Und tragen wir öde Landschaften in uns? Den KünstlerInnen geht es nicht um Erklärungen, sondern um eine poetische Wahrnehmung des Blickes nach innen und außen:</p> <p><i>Schwebende Lichter über der Brücke, pfeifende Künstlerin auf dem Dach, ein Blinzeln am Strand, Wasser spritzt – splash, beginnende Eiszeit, traurige Tauben, unwirkliche Wälder, vereinsamte Sofas.</i></p> <p>Ergänzt und erweitert wird die Ausstellung mit einer um Landschaft kreisende Tanzperformance von Minako Seki am 11. Mai, gegen 19:00 Uhr.</p> <p>Außenlandschaften,der erste Teil war 2012 im Dresdner c.rockefeller center for contemporary art zu sehen.</p> <p>Begleitend zur Ausstellung gibt es eine Spezialedition der KünstlerInnen.</p> Wed, 24 Apr 2013 00:40:43 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list Philip Groezinger - Galerie Christian Ehrentraut - May 16th, 2013 5:00 PM - 9:00 PM <p>Life has returned to Grözinger's post-apocalyptic landscape paintings: martial little men and grotesque hybrid creatures with insatiable lust for destruction, zombie-esque figures with bared teeth and pink tentacles that grow out of the barren soil in sulfuric light.
Grözinger cites motives of young adult adventure novels and trashy sci-fi movies and purposefully explores the boundaries of good taste as well as those of pictorial representation. He plays with elements of traditional painting such as light and shadow modulations, classical genres and composition and at the same time playfully flirts with pictorial dilettantism: Abstract colored areas are declared to be fantastic space stations, rough brush strokes to offal. Grözinger's paintings negate academic rules and offer a variety of fields undermining each other.<br /> <br /> On the occasion of the exhibition a catalogue will be published with numerous illustrations and texts by the art historian Dr. Dorothée Brill and the Leipzig author Clemens Meyer, who congenially transfers Grözinger's paintings to the literary Uncanny.</p> Fri, 10 May 2013 20:19:37 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list - me Collectors Room Berlin - May 16th, 2013 12:00 AM - 12:00 AM <p>The exhibition <b><i>PLAY – The Frivolous and the Serious</i></b><b> </b>(16.05. – 25.08.2013) revolves around the universal phenomenon of the act of playing. It is the result of a collaboration between the Olbricht Foundation and two graduate students on the ‘Curating the Contemporary’<i> </i>Master’s degree programme at London Metropolitan University. The programme is run in conjunction with the Whitechapel Gallery, London, under the directorship of Nico de Oliveira. This is the second time that the Foundation has invited young curators to develop their own ideas and perspectives on the Olbricht Collection, and to curate a show for me Collectors Room as part of their final degree module.</p> <p> From early childhood all the way into old age, a myriad of different forms of play have shaped the lives of human beings since time immemorial. Learning experiences among infants, social interactions, and trials of strength in social games, the performing artistes’ acts in the theatre, and the act of making and maintaining a collection (which can itself be seen as a ‘mature’ form of play) are just a handful of examples of games.</p> <p> As an omnipresent subject, be it consciously or subconsciously, the game in all its variants also finds expression in the art and works contained in the Olbricht Collection. Twenty-two works in various media have been singled out and brought into play with one another by the curators Anna-Antonia Stausberg and Philippa O’Driscoll: <br /> The <span style="text-decoration: underline;">painting </span>‘Ich sticht’ (‘Me Trumps’, 2011) by Jonas Burgert, for instance, alludes to the human need to attribute meaning to our existence. The artist creates frozen set pieces, depicting activities that capture the essence of play and play-acting. By extension, he thereby draws attention to his own form of play-acting: art and the act of painting.</p> <p>Gisela Bullacher’s <span style="text-decoration: underline;">photographic work</span> entitled ‘Luftballon ( gelb)’ (‘Balloon (Yellow)’) from 1998 uses an ordinary object to create an ineffable poetic presence. Her works depict the quiet magic inherent in the simplest of everyday things and transport the viewer back to his or her childhood, to a place of spontaneity and innocence.John M Armleder’s <span style="text-decoration: underline;">neon installation</span> ‘O.T. (target)’ from 2001 was created according to the rules of chance. His works emerge according to a defined set of rules or through the absence of rules, whereby the playful character of the process behind the work’s genesis is brought to the fore. PLAY not only features contemporary works, but also <span style="text-decoration: underline;">craftwork</span> and <span style="text-decoration: underline;">historical artworks</span>, such as a chess table with ceramic chess pieces designed by Mogens Lund &amp; P. Jeppesen and etchings of geometric forms by Jost Amman from 1568.</p> <p> <b>List of featured artists</b>: Mark Alexander, Jost Amman, John M Armleder, Gisela Bullacher, Jonas Burgert, André Butzer, Jake &amp; Dinos Chapman, Gama, Philippe Halsmann, Esther-Judith Hinz, Bethan Huws, Mogens Lund &amp; P. Jeppesen , Alex McQuilkin, Jack Pierson and Jorinde Voigt</p> <p> A <b>companion publication</b> to PLAY will be published, priced €14.90.<b> </b>In addition me Collectors Room offers a range of <b>workshops</b> for young people with the two young curators of the exhibition (held in English), as well as a <b>curator’s tour</b> through the exhibition on Saturday, 18.05.2013 at</p> <p>4 p.m. (exhibition and tour €6).</p> <p><b> Parallel</b> to the show, our major exhibition<i> ‘WONDERFUL’</i> is on display and has been extended until 25.08.2013.</p> <p> Both curators are available for interviews and to discuss their show in person.</p> <p></p> <p></p> Wed, 13 Mar 2013 16:39:46 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list Jean-Michel Wicker - Galerie Kamm - May 17th, 2013 4:00 PM - 8:00 PM <p>jmxmage = jean-michel wicker + maximage</p> <p>1234567891011121314151617181920212223242526272829303<br /> 132<br /> 4 offset plates, 1 grid, 32 fields, each field = 1 number, field 1 =<br /> number 1, field 2 = number 2... field 32 = number 32<br /> <br /> Side A: 1 print = 1 poster, Side A + Side B = 1 book<br /> A + B folded = 4 formats -&gt; number of fields by page =<br /> randomized   <br /> <br /> Manual intervention = color braps on pressing roll<br /> Color application, repetition condition = 6, modulation = ∞ <br /> Every print = unique<br /> <br /> 1 artwork = unique<br /> 1 offset reproduction of the artwork [technology] + manual<br /> intervention [emotion] = unique<br /> <br /> Each book, each poster = sequence of the meta worK<br /> 39 books + 11 posters = 50<br /> <br /> (Andreas Koller)<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Jean-Michel Wicker (b. 1970, France) is on vacation in Berlin<br /> since July 2009.<br /> <br /> Maximage Société Suisse, established in 2008, is based in<br /> Lausanne and Berlin.</p> <p>Maximage Société Suisse, established in 2008 and based in<br /> Lausanne and Berlin, is currently dedicated to deconstructing<br /> offset printing by manually intervening in high tech printing<br /> processes</p> Thu, 16 May 2013 23:24:15 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list Mathis Altmann, Kjersti Gjestrud, Christian Jeppsson, Michele Di Menna, Eva Maria Salvador - Autocenter - May 18th, 2013 8:00 PM - 10:00 PM Tue, 14 May 2013 23:00:04 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list George Papacharalambus - exp12 / exposure twelve - May 18th, 2013 7:00 PM - 11:00 PM <p>Berlin 2009 - ...., is a photographic series still in progress that started in Berlin and consists of - mainly but not exclusively - portraits. The focus is usually on the unseen and the rarer side of the persons portraied. They are strangers met by coincidence, intuitively approached at random locations. The specifics of the site as such are irrelevant and stand out only combined with the element of light in order to create a new setting where lights, space and feelings merge, sometimes rendering the person invisible or totally absent, transformed and reduced to his initiating role.</p> <p>George Papacharalambus was born in 1983 in Thessaloniki (Greece). He studied at the Technical University, followed by two years at the Photography Center of Thessaloniki. 2003 he attended a workshop with Anders Petersen. In Berlin he became a masterclass student of Arno Fischer at the Ostkreuzschule. His photography has been shown in several group exhibitions in Greece and abroad. </p> <p></p> Thu, 09 May 2013 13:34:48 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list Junggeun OH - galerie son - May 18th, 2013 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM <p></p> <div><span style="font-family: 'book antiqua', palatino; font-size: small;">Junggeun OH has been living in Berlin since 2005 and working continuously on his topic of The Interspaces.</span></div> <div><span style="font-family: 'book antiqua', palatino; font-size: small;"> </span></div> <div><span style="font-family: 'book antiqua', palatino; font-size: small;">Another exciting chapter of his intense work is presented at galerie son from 18 May to 13 July, 2013.</span></div> <div><span style="font-family: 'book antiqua', palatino; font-size: small;">What Oh shows is consequent: he now brings into shape even the canvasses, cuts out and puts in the interspaces, reduces and abstracts.</span></div> <div><span style="font-family: 'book antiqua', palatino; font-size: small;">Beside several motives from Berlin, this time Böttcherstraße in Bremen and the Basel Art Fair Building also became objects of his aesthetic view.</span></div> <div></div> <div></div> <div></div> <div><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #9e9f9d;">more info about Junggeun OH at <a href="http://www.junggeun-oh.com/art.html" rel="nofollow"><span style="color: #9e9f9d;">www.junggeun-oh.com</span></a></span></div> Tue, 07 May 2013 17:58:04 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list Anish Kapoor - Martin-Gropius-Bau - May 18th, 2013 10:00 AM - 7:00 PM <p>Anish Kapoor is one of the most important of the world’s contemporary artists. Since his first sculptures – simple forms with paint pigments spread out on the floor – Kapoor has developed a multi-faceted oeuvre using various materials, such as stone, steel, glass, wax, PVC skins and high-tech material. In his objects, sculptures and installations the boundaries between painting and sculpture become blurred. For his first major exhibition in Berlin he will use the whole of the ground floor of the Martin-Gropius-Bau, including the magnificent atrium. Some of the works will have been specially designed for this venue. The show, comprising about 70 works, will provide a survey of the abstract poetic work of this winner of the Turner Prize from 1982 to the present.</p> Tue, 21 May 2013 05:14:54 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list Rouzbeh Rashidi - Laura Mars Gallery - May 19th, 2013 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM <p>Berlin Premiere of an experimental feature film by Rouzbeh Rashidi.<br /><br /><strong>Fantôme Verlag introduces:<br /> Rouzbeh Rashidi, Filmmaker</strong></p> <p>at <strong>Sunday, 19th of May 2013 at 9 pm</strong><br /> <br /> screening of<em><strong> HE</strong></em> (122 minutes DSLR Stereo Colour/B&amp;W Ireland 2012) <br /> followed by Q&amp;A and drinks with the filmmaker</p> <p>Rouzbeh Rashidi is present and will talk to Mario Mentrup and the audience at Laura Mars Gallery.</p> <p><br /> <em><strong>HE</strong></em> is an experimental feature film by Rouzbeh Rashidi which exploring the theme of suicide</p> <p>Cast &amp; Crew<br /> Idea &amp; Director: Rouzbeh Rashidi<br /> DoP &amp; Sound: Rouzbeh Rashidi<br /> Soundscape By Mick O’Shea &amp; Emil Nerstrand<br /> Featuring: James Devereaux, Cillian Roche, Maximilian Le Cain, George Hanover &amp; John McCarthy.</p> <p>Synopsis: HE, the latest work in the ongoing collaboration between Rouzbeh Rashidi and actor James Devereaux, is a troubling and mysterious portrait of a suicidal man. Rashidi juxtaposes the lead character’s apparently revealing monologues with scenes and images that layer the film with ambiguity. Its deliberate, hypnotic pace and boldly experimental structure result in an unusual and challenging view of its unsettling subject.</p> <p>Funded by Arts Council of Ireland. Supported by The Guesthouse Cork.<br /> Shot on Canon EOS 5D Mark II with Prime Lenses. Post Production on Final Cut Pro. <br /> Produced By Experimental Film Society © 2012.</p> <p><a href="http://vimeo.co/37311936" rel="nofollow" target="lmg">http://vimeo.co/37311936</a></p> <p><strong><br /> Rouzbeh Rashidi (born in Tehran, 1980) </strong><br /> is an Iranian independent filmmaker. He has been making films since 2000 when he founded the Experimental Film Society in Tehran. Since then, he has worked completely apart from any mainstream conceptions of filmmaking. He strives to escape the stereotypes of conventional storytelling and instead roots his cinematic style in a poetic interaction of image and sound. He generally eschews scriptwriting, seeing the process of making moving images as exploration rather than illustration. His work is also deeply engaged with film history.<br /> His films are inspired by and constructed around images, locations, characters and their immediate situations. The stylistic elements that make up his distinctively personal film language include the use of natural light, professional and non-professional actors, slow paced rhythms, abstract plots, static shots and minimal dialogue. He employs a wide range of different formats and devices to make his films, including video, Super-8mm, webcam and mobile phone cameras. His consistently low-budget work is entirely self-funded and made with complete creative freedom.<br /> Rouzbeh Rashidi has directed and produced forty short films. Since 2008, he has focused on feature projects, making several full length films. <br /> His films has been shown in many film festivals, galleries and showcases throughout the world,</p> <p>He moved to Ireland in 2004 and currently lives and works in Dublin.</p> Thu, 16 May 2013 18:00:42 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list Dario Sanfilippo - Galerie Mario Mazzoli - May 21st, 2013 8:00 PM - 9:00 PM <p>LIES (distance/incidence) is a human-machine interaction improvised performance implementing complex dynamical systems based on analog and digital audio feedback networks. The digital network consists of sound transformation units where feedback coefficients are below the self-oscillating threshold, and where each unit has a different sensitivity to the intensity and spectral profile of input signals. The analog feedback network consists of microphones and loudspeakers, and when enough amplification is provided, self-oscillation occurs; the digital network enters an operating state, and the two interdependent and interacting networks act as a single sound generator. No randomness or automated processes are implemented in the system, yet dynamical and unpredictable behaviours will be exhibited, where sound affects itself and autonomously evolves through time. The performer interacts with the system through the microphones by varying the distance from the loudspeakers and the angle of incidence with which they capture sounds, thus altering the relation the system has to itself, and exploring the anti/resonances of a 3D environment which is constantly mediating the whole process.</p> Wed, 15 May 2013 13:28:41 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list Group Show - HomeBase Berlin - May 21st, 2013 7:00 PM - 11:00 PM <p>Homebase Lab will host a one-night only Performance Art event and party curated by Adrian Brun and Katerina Kokkinos-Kennedy featuring the artists of Residency V and their collaborators. The program will inclu- de performances, installations, live art and an array of audience provoca- tions at a secret and never before seen location. The program of works will play with notions of immersion, the illusory nature of light, sight, sound, absence and presence.</p> Mon, 20 May 2013 16:45:59 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list Wolfgang Berndt, Burchard Vossmann - dr. julius | ap - May 23rd, 2013 7:00 PM - 10:00 PM <p>In der Ausstellung <em>bits and pieces</em> zeigt dr. julius | ap Generative Grafik von Wolfgang Berndt sowie Objekte und Collagen von Burchard Vossmann. Die gezeigten Arbeiten stehen sich dabei in Bezug auf ihre zu Grunde liegenden Entstehungsprozesse in deutlichem Gegensatz gegenüber: Während die mit selbst entwickelter Software erzeugten parametrischen Strukturen und Modulationen Berndts auf digitalem Weg erarbeitet und ausgegeben werden, fertigt Vossmann auf durch und durch analoge Weise serielle Reihungen aus unterschiedlichen, sorgsam ausgewählten Materialien seiner umfangreichen Sammlungen von Dingen des Alltags oder aus vielfältigen, maschinell zerkleinerten Druckerzeugnissen an. <br /> In den beiden künstlerischen Grundhaltungen und Methoden zeigen sich jedoch auch Verwandtschaften und Nähen, insbesondere in der systematisch-strukturellen Arbeitsweise sowie den Bezügen und Fortschreibungen konzeptueller und minimaler Ansätze.<br /><br /></p> <p><strong>Wolfgang Berndt</strong>ist nach mathematisch-technischer Ausbildung über die Stationen Software-Entwicklung, Grafik und Preprint zur Entwicklung eigener Software für algorithmische Bildgenerierung gelangt.<br /> Zu seiner generativ erzeugten Kunst schreibt Hans-Christian von Herrmann, Professor an der TU Berlin mit Forschungsschwerpunkt in der Medien- und Wissenschaftsgeschichte der Künste: „Durch die Ausschaltung des Handwerklichen ist sie, was ihre Entstehung betrifft, ganz angewandte Mathematik. Sie ist daher, wenn sie gegenstandslos bleibt, auch nicht abstrakt, sondern vielmehr konkret – im Sinne reiner Konstruktion – und damit der Simulation näher als der Illusion. Gleichwohl kann sich der Betrachter in sie versenken, nun aber mit einem forschenden Blick, der verfolgt, wie Oberflächen strukturiert und aufgefächert werden oder auch architektonisch in den Raum zu treten scheinen. [...] Wolfgang Berndts Arbeiten sind daher immer auch so etwas wie kunstvolle Präparate. Als materielle Objekte machen sie zugleich etwas sichtbar, denn sie geben Einblick in das Spiel komplexer algorithmischer Prozesse, aus denen sie selbst hervorgegangen sind.“ <span class="Stil4">1</span></p> <p>Wolfgang Berndt stellt seit 2008 regelmäßig bei dr. julius | ap aus und war seither bei den Messeauftritten der Galerie in Berlin, Köln, Amsterdam und Basel vertreten.</p> <p><strong>Burchard Vossmann</strong>s „erstes Mittel für seine künstlerische Arbeit ist der genaue und geschulte Blick auf Dinge aus dem täglichen Umgang: Fahrscheine, Streichholz- und Zigarettenschachteln, Einwegfeuerzeuge, Bonbonpapiere, Verpackungen aller Art, Sammelbilder, Putzlappen etc. betrachtet er unter dem Blickwinkel ihrer gestalterischen Qualitäten. [...] Er sammelt beständig eine große Vielfalt solcher Materialien, die er ordnet, systematisiert und kategorisiert um sie anschließend in verschiedenen Werkgruppen zu verarbeiten. Hierfür nutzt er künstlerische Techniken und Methoden wie Reihen, Collagieren, Akkumulieren und serielles Montieren, um zumeist zweidimensionale und oft quadratische Material-Bilder zu erschaffen. [...] Systematisch geordnet werden dabei scheinbar immer gleiche Einzelelemente an einander gefügt, durch ihr direktes Nebeneinander aber vor allem deren feine Unterschiede herausgestellt. In diesen Arbeiten aus Reihen kleiner Dinge des täglichen Gebrauchs greift er auf etablierte Konzepte der Minimal Art zurück, um diese gleichzeitig in zeitgenössischer Erweiterung fortzuschreiben.“ <span class="Stil2 Stil3">2</span></p> <p>Burchard Vossmann war 2012 mit einem Beitrag an der internationalen Gruppenausstellung <em>FutureShock OneTwo</em> von <br /> dr. julius | ap beteiligt und zeigt im Rahmen von <em>bits and pieces</em> erstmals eine größere Auswahl von Arbeiten in der Galerie.</p> <p><span class="Stil4">1 Hans-Christian von Herrmann: Generative Computergrafik. In: Wolfgang Berndt. Verfahren. Berlin [edition ROTE INSEL], 2012<br /> 2 Matthias Seidel: Serielles Montieren. In: Burchard Vossmann. Arbeiten 2002 – 2012. Berlin [edition ROTE INSEL], 2013. Neuerscheinung zu<em> bits and pieces</em>.</span></p> <p><span class="Stil4"> </span></p> <p><br /><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:WordDocument> <w:View>Normal</w:View> <w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom> <w:TrackMoves/> <w:TrackFormatting/> <w:PunctuationKerning/> <w:ValidateAgainstSchemas/> <w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid> <w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent> <w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText> <w:DoNotPromoteQF/> <w:LidThemeOther>EN-US</w:LidThemeOther> <w:LidThemeAsian>X-NONE</w:LidThemeAsian> <w:LidThemeComplexScript>X-NONE</w:LidThemeComplexScript> <w:Compatibility> <w:BreakWrappedTables/> <w:SnapToGridInCell/> <w:WrapTextWithPunct/> <w:UseAsianBreakRules/> <w:DontGrowAutofit/> <w:SplitPgBreakAndParaMark/> <w:DontVertAlignCellWithSp/> <w:DontBreakConstrainedForcedTables/> <w:DontVertAlignInTxbx/> <w:Word11KerningPairs/> <w:CachedColBalance/> </w:Compatibility> <w:BrowserLevel>MicrosoftInternetExplorer4</w:BrowserLevel> <m:mathPr> <m:mathFont m:val="Cambria Math"/> <m:brkBin m:val="before"/> <m:brkBinSub m:val="--"/> <m:smallFrac m:val="off"/> <m:dispDef/> <m:lMargin m:val="0"/> <m:rMargin m:val="0"/> <m:defJc m:val="centerGroup"/> <m:wrapIndent m:val="1440"/> <m:intLim m:val="subSup"/> <m:naryLim m:val="undOvr"/> </m:mathPr></w:WordDocument> </xml><![endif]--></p> <p><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:LatentStyles DefLockedState="false" DefUnhideWhenUsed="true" DefSemiHidden="true" DefQFormat="false" DefPriority="99" LatentStyleCount="267"> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="0" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Normal"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="heading 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" QFormat="true" Name="heading 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" QFormat="true" Name="heading 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" QFormat="true" Name="heading 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" QFormat="true" Name="heading 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" QFormat="true" Name="heading 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" QFormat="true" Name="heading 7"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" QFormat="true" Name="heading 8"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" QFormat="true" Name="heading 9"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" Name="toc 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" Name="toc 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" Name="toc 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" Name="toc 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" Name="toc 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" Name="toc 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" Name="toc 7"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" Name="toc 8"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" Name="toc 9"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="35" QFormat="true" Name="caption"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="10" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Title"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="1" Name="Default Paragraph Font"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="11" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Subtitle"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="22" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Strong"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="20" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Emphasis"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="59" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Table Grid"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Placeholder Text"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="1" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="No Spacing"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Shading"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light List"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Grid"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Dark List"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Shading"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful List"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Grid"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Shading Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light List Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Grid Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 1 Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 2 Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 1 Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Revision"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="34" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="List Paragraph"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="29" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Quote"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="30" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Intense Quote"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 2 Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 1 Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 2 Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 3 Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Dark List Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Shading Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful List Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Grid Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Shading Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light List Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Grid Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 1 Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 2 Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 1 Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 2 Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 1 Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 2 Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 3 Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Dark List Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Shading Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful List Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Grid Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Shading Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light List Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Grid Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 1 Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 2 Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 1 Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 2 Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 1 Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 2 Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 3 Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Dark List Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Shading Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful List Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Grid Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Shading Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light List Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Grid Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 1 Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 2 Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 1 Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 2 Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 1 Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 2 Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 3 Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Dark List Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Shading Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful List Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Grid Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Shading Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light List Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Grid Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 1 Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 2 Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 1 Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 2 Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 1 Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 2 Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 3 Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Dark List Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Shading Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful List Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Grid Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Shading Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light List Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Grid Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 1 Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 2 Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 1 Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 2 Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 1 Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 2 Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 3 Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Dark List Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Shading Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful List Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Grid Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="19" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Subtle Emphasis"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="21" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Intense Emphasis"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="31" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Subtle Reference"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="32" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Intense Reference"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="33" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Book Title"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="37" Name="Bibliography"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" QFormat="true" Name="TOC Heading"/> </w:LatentStyles> </xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 10]> <style> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} </style> <![endif]--></p> <p class="MsoNormal">The exhibition <i>bits and pieces</i> at dr. julius | ap brings together Wolfgang Berndt’s generative graphics with Burchard Vossmann’s objects and collages. The works shown here stand in stark contrast to each other in terms of creative process: while Berndt’s parametric structures and modulations, produced using software developed by the artist himself, are created digitally, Vossmann’s process is thoroughly analog—his works are serial arrangements of varied, carefully chosen materials from his vast collection of objects from daily life, or mechanically shredded pieces of printed matter. </p> <p class="MsoNormal">There are nonethless relationships and proximities between the two artistic attitudes and methods—particularly in the systematic-structural processes and the ways both artists reference and update conceptual and minimalist approaches.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>Wolfgang Berndt</b> came to develop his own software for algorithmic image generation by way of mathematic and technical training, software development, graphic design, and preprint. Hans-Christian von Herrmann, Professor at TU Berlin with a research focus on history of media and science of the arts, writes on his work: “By removing the actual handicraft aspect from the creative process, the resulting artwork is subsequently pure applied mathematics. Thus an absence of a depiction of an object or objects in such a piece does not make it abstract but rather concrete in the sense that it is a pure construction, and therefore much more closely related to simulation than illusion. The viewer can still become immersed in such works by means of an investigative eye that tracks how surfaces are structured and compartmentalised or how they appear in an architectural sense within the work. When generative art is not depictive, this is not by virtue of the fact that it complies with certain prohibitive principles; but rather because the picture itself has become the object, requiring the viewer to track its compositional principles. [...] As such, Wolfgang Berndt’s works are therefore always artistic fabrications. At the same time, in their role as material objects they reveal something by providing insights into the interplay between the complex algorithmic processes from which they emerged.”<span style="font-size: 7.5pt;"> 1</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal">Wolfgang Berndt has been exhibiting at dr. julius | ap regularly since 2008, and has also been represented at the gallery’s art fair appearances in Berlin, Cologne, Amsterdam, and Basel. </p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>Burchard Vossmann’s</b> “art, on the other hand, begins by taking an exacting and trained look at just those day-to-day objects that we most tend to overlook: bus tickets, matchbooks, packs of cigarettes and disposable lighters, candy wrappers, packaging of all kinds, trading cards, cleaning rags, etc. Vossmann examines these objects for their creative qualities. [...] Vossmann is constantly collecting a variety of banal materials, which he orders, systematizes, and categorizes in order to use them later in various groups of work.  To do so he employs various artistic techniques and methods, including sequencing, collage, accumulation, and serial mounting to create material images which are mostly two-dimensional and often square. [...] Systematically organized, seemingly identical individual elements are placed next to each other, which ultimately illuminates their subtle differences.  These works, which consist of rows of small items from daily life, rely on established concepts of Minimal Art, while also updating and extending these concepts for a contemporary context.” <span style="font-size: 7.5pt;">2</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal">Vossmann has been involved with dr. julius | ap since his participation in the international group show <i>FutureShock OneTwo</i> in 2012. <i>bits and pieces</i> will mark the first time he has shown a larger collection of his work at the gallery.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 7.5pt;">1 Hans-Christian von Herrmann: Generative Computergrafik. In: Wolfgang Berndt. Verfahren. Berlin [edition ROTE INSEL], 2012</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 7.5pt;">2 Matthias Seidel: Serielles Montieren. In: Burchard Vossmann. Arbeiten 2002 – 2012. Berlin [edition ROTE INSEL], 2013. New release on the occassin of <i> bits and pieces</i>.</span></p> Tue, 14 May 2013 22:17:49 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list Rémy Markowitsch - Galerie EIGEN + ART (Berlin) - May 23rd, 2013 5:00 PM - 9:00 PM <p class="Standard1">Rémy Markowitsch visualisiert und realisiert in seiner künstlerischen Arbeit jene starken Bilder, die in unserer Vorstellung aus der Lektüre literarischer Klassiker erwachsen. Dabei bedient sich der Künstler zumeist der Schlüsselszenen und -aspekte der jeweiligen Texte. Nicht nur hält Rémy Markowitsch mit seiner subjektiven Auswahl gleichsam ein Vergrößerungsglas auf ein einzelnes, ganz spezifisches Moment oder Element eines Textes. Er fusioniert dieses darüber hinaus wie in einem surrealistischen <em>cadavre exquis</em> mit einem weiteren Element, das er einer gänzlich anderen Quelle entnimmt und das den Bedeutungsraum des ersteren beträchtlich –besonders in den Bereich des Abgründigen hinein– erweitert. Auch den neuesten Arbeiten liegt ein solches Vorgehen zu Grunde: Im Falle der Objekt-Assemblage „Peterli“ bezieht sich der „Nerf de boeuf“, der Ochsenziemer (der noch im 20. Jahrhundert sowohl in der Tierdressur wie auch als brutale Waffe gegen Menschen eingesetzt wurde), auf eine amüsante, anspielungsreich-erotische Szene in Gustave Flauberts Skandalroman „Madame Bovary“ (1857), der Rémy Markowitsch in den letzten Jahren wiederholt als „Rohstoff“ für bildkünstlerische Werke gedient hat (siehe Ausstellung „Emma’s Gift“, Galerie Eigen+Art, Berlin, 2011). Die zweite belletristische Quelle für „Peterli“ sind die weltberühmten Kinderbücher „Heidis Lehr- und Wanderjahre“ sowie „Heidi kann brauchen, was es gelernt hat“ der Schweizer Autorin Johanna Spyri – bzw. verweist der Titel von Markowitschs Werk wie auch die Ziegenlederhose auf eine der Hauptfiguren der Heidi-Erzählungen, den „Geißenpeter“ (dt. Ziegenpeter), der durch Heidis Vermittlung und pädagogische Strenge endlich lesen lernt, nämlich: zu den Büchern kommt.</p> <p class="Standard1">In der zweiten Arbeit, von deren Titel das mehrdeutige Wort “ALP” abgeleitet ist, spielt das Buch gleichfalls eine wesentliche Rolle. „ALPS“ folgt der Struktur nach den großen Bildserien mit Titeln wie „Nach der Natur“ (1991–1998) oder „On Travel: Tristes Tropiques“ (1998–2004), in denen Rémy Markowitsch das Medium Buch und dessen materielle Qualitäten thematisiert, indem er Bildseiten durchleuchtet, also transparent macht, und dadurch neue hybride, vormals gewissermaßen unbewusste Bilder generiert. Im Falle der Schwarzweiß-Bergbilder entstehen mittels dieses Verfahrens verwirrende, „bestürzende“ Ansichten, in der Oben und Unten, Links und Rechts durcheinander geraten – beinahe so, als würde man das Panorama im Sturz vom Gipfel erblicken statt aus der sicheren Position des Bergtouristen. Eingerahmt sind die Bilder in verschiedenste historische Rahmen, denen die Bilddimensionen digital angepasst und die für den neuen Verwendungszweck in einem einheitlichen Farbton lackiert wurden. In „ALPS“ zeichnet sich nicht bloß eine –politisch häufig missbrauchte– „heile Bergwelt“ ab (die Quelle dieser Bilder sind Jahrbücher des Schweizer Alpen-Clubs von 1925 bis 1946, deren Umschläge im selben Ton gehalten sind wie die hier präsentierten Bilderrahmen, welche aus derselben Zeit stammen), sondern ebenso die düstere, bedrohliche Seite des Gebirges. Diese „unheimliche“ Seite der Bergwelt bezieht sich, über die konkrete, physische Bedrohung für Alpinisten hinaus, auf den Umstand, dass just zur Entstehungszeit dieser Jahrbuch-Aufnahmen das Gebirge und die Bezwingung desselben wiederholt in den Dienst einer faschistischen Ideologie gestellt wurden.</p> <p class="Standard1">Während aus dem beginnenden 19. Jahrhunderts vielfach sentimental aufgeladene Berichte überliefert sind, die nicht zuletzt die Schwäche des Menschen angesichts des Berges reflektieren, sind die Darstellungen des folgenden Jahrhunderts häufig von wissenschaftlichem Impetus, aber insbesondere auch von Wettbewerbsgedanken, Rekordmanie und nationalistischem Gedankengut durchdrungen. In der fünfteiligen Holzfigurengruppe „FALL“ verbindet Rémy Markowitsch zwei spezielle, sehr unterschiedliche historische Ereignisse bzw. Vorlagen: Vier der geschnitzten Gestalten sind in ihrer Körperhaltung den Figuren aus dem monumentalen Bild „Absturz“ des Schweizer Malers Ferdinand Hodler (1853–1918) nachgebildet. Hodler, heute für seine damals revolutionär neuartige Darstellung von Berglandschaften weltberühmt, hat in privatem Auftrag für die Weltausstellung in Antwerpen 1894 zwei hochformatige Dioramen von je 7.25 x 4.35 Meter gestaltet. Die Gemälde zeigten „Aufstieg“ und „Absturz“ –so die Titel– einer Klettermannschaft am Berg, ein drittes geplantes und nie ausgeführtes Gemälde sollte die „Bergung der Leichen“ wiedergeben. Nicht nur war Hodler mit diesem Projekt der erste angesehene Maler, der sich an die Darstellung einer Berg(steiger)tragödie heranwagte, sondern es wird darüber hinaus vermutet, der Künstler habe den dargestellten Alpinisten die Gesichtszüge von zu ihm in Konkurrenz stehenden Malerkollegen verliehen. (Am 6. Juni, 18 Uhr, findet ein Gespräch statt zwischen Rémy Markowitsch und dem Kunsthistoriker Christoph Lichtin, der zu Ferdinand Hodlers Dioramenbildern gearbeitet hat.)</p> <p class="Standard1">Der fünften Figur in Rémy Markowitschs Ensemble liegt eine gänzlich andere, fotografische Quelle zu Grunde: Die Haltung der Gestalt imitiert ein emblematisches Abbild des an der gefährlichen Eiger-Nordwand bei einer versuchten Erstbesteigung im Jahr 1936 tödlich verunglückten deutschen Bergsteigers Toni Kurz. Die Tragödie um Toni Kurz und Kameraden war besonders brisant, wenn man bedenkt, dass zumindest die zwei österreichischen Mitkletterer Kurz’ Mitglieder der paramilitärischen NSDAP-Kampforganisation SA waren und „großdeutsche“ Erfolge am Berg in den folgenden Jahren immer wieder für nationalsozialistische Propaganda instrumentalisiert wurden. Die „Fusion“ der beiden erwähnten historischen Gegebenheiten realisiert Rémy Markowitsch auf der Basis zweier Bildquellen; die Verfremdung der Gestalten, erreicht durch die Darstellung der skulpierten Figuren als Nackte, erweitert das Assoziationsfeld jedoch über diese Quellen hinaus. Ohne Kleidung, welche die Figuren historisch verorten würde, wirken die Gestalten wie zeitlose Schmerzensmänner.</p> <p class="Standard1">Zumal im Deutschen und Österreichischen Alpen-Verein dominierten schon zu Beginn des 20. Jahrhunderts Antisemitismus und Antijudaismus. Vor diesem Hintergrund lässt sich eine weitere Arbeit dieser Ausstellung und deren sprechender Titel erhellen: „… hast Du meine Alpen gesehen?“ ist einem überlieferten Ausspruch des Rabbiners Samson Raphael Hirsch (1808–1888), Begründer der jüdischen Neoorthodoxie, entnommen. Das Objekt nimmt natürlich auf den Namen des Rabbiners und die verschiedensten Bedeutungszusammenhänge des Wortes „Hirsch“ Bezug. Die in der Art eines professionellen Tierpräparats mit traditionellen, speckigen bestickten (Hirsch-)Lederhosen verhüllte Gestalt spielt gleichzeitig auf die „Verkitschung“ der Alpen, die diese begleitende Verharmlosung des (historischen) Alpinismus und die Lederhose als modisch-fetischistisches „Must have“ weit über Bayerns Bierwiesn hinaus an, wie auch auf den mit der Bergsteigerei verbundenen Männlichkeitswahn (der Hirsch wirft bekanntlich sein Geweih jeweils nach der Paarungszeit ab) und die erwähnten Verbindungen zu Nationalismus und Militarismus.</p> <p class="Standard1">Waren es bei „Madame Bovary“ vor allem die diversen Verflechtungen, der soziale „Absturz“ und schließlich der Tod der weiblichen Protagonistin, die das Interesse von Rémy Markowitsch weckten, so sind es in der neuen Gruppe von Werken die Motive des „Absturzes“ am Berg, der Schmerzensmänner (notabene weigerten sich die Mitglieder des Schweizerischen Alpen-Clubs bis in die 1970er-Jahre Frauen aufzunehmen), der Berg-Sucht und -Lust und des exemplarischen, tragischen Scheiterns. Mag Gustave Flaubert auch nüchtern konstatiert haben, die Alpen stünden „in einem Missverhältnis zu unserem Individuum. Zu gross, um nützlich zu sein.“ (Brief an Ivan Turgenew), so lässt sich angesichts der Bildfülle und der komplexen Verflechtungen, für die das „ALP“-Projekt eindrücklicher Beleg ist, doch Folgendes festhalten: Zu gross sind sie bestimmt, die Berge, und zu gross ist die Menge an Bildmaterial, das Zeugnis ablegt von der Faszination und dem Schrecken, welche von den Alpen zu verschiedenen Zeiten ausgegangen sind. Just deshalb aber stellen sie und ihre mediale Vermittlung für kulturhistorische und künstlerische Auseinandersetzungen einen schier unerschöpflichen Quell dar.</p> <p class="Standard1">Isabel Fluri</p> Thu, 16 May 2013 10:59:34 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list Santiago Ydañez - Invaliden1 - May 23rd, 2013 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM <p style="line-height: 150%;">"Nature, childhood, art history… those are the main references in my work... but ethical-political nuances also play into it.</p> <p style="line-height: 150%;">“Schmutziger Schnee” uses irony to take up the fight against intolerance. My imagination is populated by living and dissected animals, landscapes and children, and is currently being enriched with some portraits of my influences from art history and literature. With great reverence and joy, I have painted Grosz, Beckmann, Otto Dix, Thomas Mann and some other people as a love letter to art, but also full of sorrow for the great flaw in the society of that time: non-resistance. Bergman in "The Serpent's Egg" and Haneke's in "The White Ribbon" illustrate very well how close hell is to paradise. Bergman shows how society in Berlin of the 20s began to darken to an eternal winter. Haneke takes us back a further generation and analyzes the society that brought forth the incomprehensible.</p> <p style="line-height: 150%;">This society of "good thinking" in the 19th Century gives me a number sweet motifs full of idyllic images, landscapes, poems about love and hate, an Arcadian orgy.</p> <p style="line-height: 150%;">For inspiration, I have taken books on poetry and love from the 19th century and "polluted" or "enriched" them: a beautiful package for "noble" content. The same happens to the frames, which are the cradle or the loudspeaker of  dirty and blessed painting.</p> <p style="line-height: 150%;">The overstraining of paradise and the metaphor of untouched, fresh-fallen snow – that infinite and antiquated white – lend this exhibition its title."</p> <p style="line-height: 150%;"> </p> <p style="line-height: 150%; text-align: right;">Santiago Ydañez. Berlin 07.05.2013</p> <p style="line-height: 150%;"> </p> <p style="line-height: 150%;">Santiago Ydañez was born in Jaén, 1967. Lives and works in Berlín and Granada (Spain). Graduated in Painting from the School of Arts of Universidad of Granada, Ydañez is one of the most internationally recognized spanish artists of his generation. Santiago Ydañez  was awarded the  Premio de Pintura ABC in 2002, Premio de Pintura Generación 2002 - Caja Madrid, Beca del Colegio de España in París - Ministerio de Cultura in 2001 and the Beca de la Fundación Marcelino Botín in 1998. Ydañez  work is represented in several Institutional Art collections such as:  Fundación Botín (Santander), Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía (Madrid), Museo Sofía Imber (Caracas, Venezuela), amongst others.He/s work is also represented in private colections in Mexico, Canada, Italia, Noruega, Alemania, Portugal y España.</p> Tue, 14 May 2013 22:35:14 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list Group Show - Künstlerhaus Bethanien - May 23rd, 2013 7:00 PM - 10:00 PM <p>BERLIN.STATUS [2] marks the second survey of new tendencies and trends in Berlin’s art scenes, undertaken by the curators <strong>Sven Drühl</strong> and <strong>Christoph Tannert</strong>. It has been a little over a year since BERLIN.STATUS [1], a period in which a lot happens in Berlin.<br /> A boom on the art and creative scenes and gentrification are two aspects of this structural change that are putting the German capital under tremendous pressure; slowly, they are bringing in their wake a reconsideration of strategic land use and housing policy. Berlin is still a dream destination for young artist nomads from all over the world. There is a huge potential of artistic sensitivity in the city, but most of these creative individuals can do no more than keep their heads above water in an extremely precarious situation. At the same time, Berlin is being inundated by tourists. Rents rise and go on rising. The same is true of radicalism.<br /> Many artists are well aware of such aggravations in the inner-city climate but respond in extremely different ways. Relentless overheating in a capitalist system driven by the financial markets is reflected in the anachronism of those artistic urban guerrillas who first pretend outrage, then appear quite sedate and ready for compromise; who either rebel against politics with hidden aggression or make the world that is awry into an aesthetic theme in itself. In all this, simple truths in both politics and art are hard to come by.<br /> BERLIN.STATUS [2] focuses on artists born from 1978–1984. The publication and exhibition of works by more than 50 artists permit a look ahead to the potentials of the youngest generation of artists, although they made quite clear even during preparations for the exhibition that there would be no big bang after which everything would be different. Nonetheless, there is a broad spectrum of interventionist thinking and image-manipulating approaches, with a lot of video art, some painting, non-figurative objects and the tendency towards low-budget materials that is so typical of Berlin.<br /> (Sven Drühl / Christoph Tannert)</p> <p></p> Tue, 14 May 2013 23:30:28 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list Cornelia Schleime - Galerie Michael Schultz - May 24th, 2013 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM Wed, 22 May 2013 00:51:35 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list