ArtSlant - Openings & events http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/show en-us 40 Lea Porsager - Künstlerhaus Bethanien - March 5th 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM <p style="text-align: justify;">Porsager develops her works from occult theories and spiritual practices, which she applies to question standardised ways of thinking and the limits of human knowledge. Transformative rituals and meditative techniques play a part in her works, and &ldquo;spiritual cogitation&rdquo; (Porsager) defines her working method in a decisive way.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><br /> Vernissage and Open Studios: Thursday, 5 March , 7 - 10 pm</p> Mon, 02 Mar 2015 16:47:17 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list Olaf Kühnemann - Künstlerhaus Bethanien - March 5th 7:00 PM - 10:00 PM <p style="text-align: justify;">K&uuml;hnemann's artistic starting point is his love of painting, which drives him to experiment creatively with the portrayal of objects. Working on large-format paintings on wood, specific forms, colours and objects, which run like a thread through several works (e.g. the sun, a circle, the colours yellow, red and orange). K&uuml;hnemann uses these repeated threads to play with possibilities, creating the unexpected, and breaking through routines.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><br /> Vernissage and Open Studios: Thursday, 5 March , 7 - 10 pm</p> Mon, 02 Mar 2015 16:47:33 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list Choy Ka Fai - Künstlerhaus Bethanien - March 5th 7:00 PM - 10:00 PM <p style="text-align: justify;">Fascinated by the human body and the technology of movement, Choy Ka Fai investigates patterns of movement in dance and performance. For 'The Choreography of Things' Ka Fai will measure and represent dancer&rsquo;s brainwaves, raising questions of to what extent is the field of relaxation, attention or memory activated? Through this neurological and perspective, Ka Fai creates a new dialogue on the portrayal and observation of dance.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><br /> Vernissage and Open Studios: Thursday, 5 March , 7 - 10 pm</p> Mon, 02 Mar 2015 16:47:54 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list Elizabeth Willing - Künstlerhaus Bethanien - March 5th 7:00 PM - 10:00 PM <p style="text-align: justify;">Willing's creative work is founded on her fascination with foods, their transformation through preparation, and eating as a performative experience. Working primarily with industrially produced, manipulated foodstuffs, Willing provides a multi-sensory experience that attempts to take back control over what we eat, processing it as we personally wish, and thus designing the rules of food consumption ourselves.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><br /> Vernissage and Open Studios: Thursday, 5 March , 7 - 10 pm</p> Mon, 02 Mar 2015 16:49:02 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list Stary Mwaba - Künstlerhaus Bethanien - March 5th 7:00 PM - 10:00 PM <p style="text-align: justify;">Mwaba focuses on the current socio-economic situation and historical events in his country of origin, Zambia. Specifically, the beginning of the 1960s, when the former British colony became independent and the state of Zambia was founded. At this time, teacher and visionary Makuka Nkoloso set up a space flight programme. A small group of young Zambians were prepared to fly into space as &ldquo;Afronauts&rdquo;, to ensure the first African country's participation in the international space race.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><br /> Vernissage and Open Studios: Thursday, 5 March , 7 - 10 pm</p> Mon, 02 Mar 2015 16:49:06 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list Lucas Jardin, JEAN SÉBASTIEN GRÉGOIRE - DUVE Berlin - March 6th 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM <div class="page" title="Page 1"> <div class="section"> <div class="layoutArea"> <div class="column"> <p>DUVE Berlin is proud to present LARSEN+, an exhibition bringing together paintings by Lucas Jardin and sculptures by Jean-Sébastien Grégoire. The exhibition&rsquo;s title refers to the Larsen Effect, a technical interference commonly known as audio feedback, which occurs when a sound loop exists between an audio input and an audio output. Applying the same concept to the realm of images, Jardin and Grégoire create works which oscillate between construction and destruction, erasure and renewal. LARSEN+ marks both Jardin and Grégoire&rsquo;s first exhibition in Germany.&nbsp;</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Fri, 27 Feb 2015 16:44:18 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list Ann Veronica Janssens - Esther Schipper - March 6th 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM Tue, 17 Feb 2015 10:55:10 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list Philipp Modersohn - Galerie Guido W. Baudach - March 6th 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM Tue, 17 Feb 2015 10:56:10 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list Chris Dreier, Reinhard Wilhelmi - Laura Mars Gallery - March 7th 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM Thu, 26 Feb 2015 22:54:46 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list - Martin-Gropius-Bau - March 7th 10:00 AM - 7:00 PM <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Organizer</strong> Berliner Festspiele.<br />An exhibition of the Tel Aviv Museum of Art and the Martin-Gropius-Bau</p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Veranstalter</strong> Berliner Festspiele<br />Eine Ausstellung des Tel Aviv Museum of Art und des Martin-Gropius-Bau</p> Tue, 30 Dec 2014 14:15:48 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list Mathieu Mercier - Mehdi Chouakri - March 7th 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM Tue, 17 Feb 2015 11:07:59 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list - Martin-Gropius-Bau - March 8th 10:00 AM - 7:00 PM <div class="accordiontext_module"> <div class="intro"> <p style="text-align: justify;">For the first time artworks from Oceania are the subjects of an exhibition at the Martin-Gropius-Bau. They come from an area on the middle and lower reaches of the river Sepik in Papua-New Guinea. About 220 artworks from twelve lenders &ndash; some of Europe&rsquo;s most prominent museums are involved &ndash; will be on view. As early as the beginning of the 20th century the aesthetics of the art of the Sepik region were fascinating European scholars and artists, Berlin and Basel being centres of Sepik scholarship.</p> </div> <div class="cont" style="display: block; text-align: justify;"> <p>Although ethnological explorers were quick to speak of a &ldquo;Sepik art&rdquo;, the art world was more reserved, preferring to formulate theories of &ldquo;Primitivism&rdquo; &ndash; until well into the 1980s. The major exhibition on &ldquo;&lsquo;Primitivism&rsquo; in 20th Century Art &ndash; Affinity of the Tribal and the Modern&rdquo; (1984) put on by the Museum of Modern Art in New York is a reminder of this lengthy discussion. Today it is perfectly normal to view such artworks &ndash; previously held, like those of the Sepik region, to be &ldquo;primitivistic&rdquo;&ndash; for their aesthetic qualities. An opportunity to do so is provided by the present exhibition.</p> <p>The Sepik plain is a large area of water and marshland. The banks of the Sepik, which extends for almost 1,200 kilometres, are inhabited by small tribal groups who speak over a hundred different languages. On the middle and lower reaches of the Sepik alone over ninety different languages are spoken, so one cannot think of the region as a relatively homogeneous settlement area. No sooner had the Sepik been discovered and named (in 1886) Kaiserin Augusta River by the German colonialists (who also drew on the same nomenclature for the Bismarck Sea into which it flowed), than the highly elaborate material culture aroused the attention of collectors and museologists all over the world.</p> <p>The deeds of the ancestors created the human world. The changes they wrought are manifested in the environment and cultural relics. The ancestors, it is supposed, created the broad river basin of the Sepik, on whose embankments stand the dwellings and the houses of the men. Of key significance are the dance floors in front of the men&rsquo;s houses; that is where the ancestor figures perform, recalling the great deeds of yore. The dancers embody these ancestors with their rich jewellery and brightly coloured masks and become one with them.</p> <p>In walking through a village one finds that the rooms are arranged to reflect the social order: there is a clear division between the world of women and that of men, between the public sphere, where everyone is allowed to move about freely, and the sphere which is reserved for male initiates. Within the village the women are mainly assigned to the dwelling houses. The objects are visible. The men, on the other hand, chiefly congregate in the big men&rsquo;s houses and on the dance floors. The objects are hidden and secret and are only on display when rites are performed.</p> <p>In the forefront of the selection of ethnological art shown here, is the motif of the human figure, which is common to all cultures: the male or female founder-ancestors of settlements, human communities, and their natural environment. In Sepik societies this ancestor figure is not shown directly. It always unravels itself gradually in complex patterns. The course of the exhibition will enable visitors to understand the various forms in which these ancestor figures manifest themselves, beginning with the more public ones which become progressively more secret.</p> <p>The works are fascinating for their extremely rich decoration on small and large objects and the blending of creative genres which in Europe are kept strictly separate (painting, sculpture): A combination of sculptures in human form and surface decoration; of ornaments on palm leaf stalks and ceremonial buildings; of ceramics in the shape of model figures, used for storing or preparing food.</p> <p>On display will be a large outrigger boat and a dug-out canoe, richly decorated door posts for men&rsquo;s houses, huge slit drums, mighty ancestor figures, and splendidly ornamented masked figures. The river basin is a mosaic of linguistic groups. The ninety-odd languages partially explain the variety of created objects. Together with the elaborate rites there is a remarkable abundance of objects, whose formal design is frequently astonishing, fascinating and exotic.</p> <p>For a long time the Sepik was overlooked by European, American and Australian explorers and travellers. It was only towards the end of the 19th century that its mouth was discovered and the river navigated by a German ship (the Ottilie). Years were to pass, however, before scientific expeditions were organized. Leading German institutions launched voyages of exploration, from Hamburg in 1909 and from Berlin in 1912-13. The then K&ouml;nigliches Museum f&uuml;r V&ouml;lkerkunde (Royal Museum of Ethnology) in Berlin mounted a full-blown interdisciplinary expedition, some of whose results can only now be published. One of the protagonists of these expeditions had just discovered the sources of the Sepik River, when the First World War broke out in 1914 and soon spread to the South Seas. Australia conquered and took over control of the colony of &ldquo;German New Guinea&rdquo; in 1899-1914.</p> <p>The present exhibition, put on a hundred years after the last Berlin expedition, will go a long way towards bringing this great Berlin enterprise to public attention, for it was only with this expedition that the Sepik area became one of the most significant regions for ethnographical and scientific research in the South Seas.</p> <p>As early as 1911 a Berlin Museum employee recognized the extraordinary aesthetic value of the carvings from the Sepik. As a result numerous collectors from all over the world have exchanged and acquired these works in the course of adventurous journeys up the river and its numerous tributaries. Soon these masks, figures and paintings came to be found in those art galleries which in the 1920s in Europe and later also in America offered the art of the &ldquo;Primitives&rdquo; side by side with the art of the Modernists. The carvings from the Sepik thus became part of the visual repertoire available to the artists of Modernism at the beginning of the 20th century. They were also, however, the occasion of much other research which was to be carried out in the course of that century with the aim of obtaining more information about the significance and iconography of the objects. The exhibition shows a synthesis of this field of art, which also details the scientific expeditions of the last fifty years.</p> <div class="contract">&nbsp;</div> </div> </div> <div class="event_details"> <div class="event_organizer"> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Organizers</strong> Berliner Festspiele. An exhibition of the Mus&eacute;e du Quai Branly in association with Martin-Gropius-Bau and Museum Rietberg, Z&uuml;rich.<br /><strong>Curators</strong> Philippe Peltier (Mus&eacute;e du Quai Branly), Markus Schindlbeck, (Ethnologisches Museum, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin &ndash; Stiftung Preu&szlig;ischer Kulturbesitz)</p> <hr /> <div class="accordiontext_module" style="text-align: justify;"> <div class="intro"> <p>Erstmals stehen Kunstwerke aus Ozeanien im Zentrum einer Ausstellung des Martin-Gropius-Bau. Sie kommen aus einem Gebiet am Mittel- und Unterlauf des Flusses Sepik in Papua-Neuguinea. Etwa 220&nbsp;Kunstwerke von zw&ouml;lf Leihgebern &ndash; die bedeutendsten Museen Europas sind beteiligt &ndash; werden zu sehen sein. Die &Auml;sthetik der Kunst der Sepikregion hat schon zu Beginn des 20.&nbsp;Jahrhunderts europ&auml;ische Wissenschaftler und K&uuml;nstler fasziniert. Berlin war mit Basel ein Zentrum der Sepik-Forschung.</p> </div> <div class="cont" style="display: block;"> <p>Zwar sprachen ethnologische Entdecker fr&uuml;h von &bdquo;Kunst des Sepik&ldquo;, doch die Kunstwelt war zur&uuml;ckhaltend, formulierte eher Theorien des &bdquo;&sbquo;Primitivismus&lsquo; &ndash; noch bis weit in die 1980er Jahre. Die gro&szlig;e Ausstellung &bdquo;&sbquo;Primitivism&lsquo; in 20th&nbsp;Century Art &ndash; Affinity of the Tribal and the Modern&ldquo;(1984) des Museum of Modern Art in New York erinnerte an diese lange Diskussion. Heute ist es selbstverst&auml;ndlich, jene als &sbquo;primitivistisch&lsquo; deklarierten Kunstwerke, so auch die der Sepikregion, aus ihrer eigenen &auml;sthetischen Qualit&auml;t heraus zu betrachten und zu beurteilen. Dazu bietet diese Ausstellung Gelegenheit.</p> <p>Die Sepikebene ist ein gro&szlig;es Wasser- und Sumpf-Gebiet. Entlang des Sepik, der sich &uuml;ber fast 1.200&nbsp;Kilometer erstreckt, leben Gruppen von Menschen, die &uuml;ber hundert verschiedene Sprachen sprechen. Allein am Mittel- und Unterlauf des Sepik werden &uuml;ber neunzig verschiedene Sprachen gesprochen. Man darf sich also die Region des Sepik nicht als ein relativ homogenes Siedlungsgebiet vorstellen. Kaum war der Sepik entdeckt, der dann 1886 von den deutschen Kolonisatoren &bdquo;Kaiserin Augusta-Fluss&ldquo; genannt wurde und nach damaliger Nomenklatur in die Bismarck-See m&uuml;ndete, erregte die h&ouml;chst elaboriert gestaltete materielle Kultur die Aufmerksamkeit von Sammlern und Museumsleuten aus aller Welt.</p> <p>Die Taten der Ahnen haben die Welt der Menschen geschaffen. Ihre Verwandlungen manifestieren sich in der Umwelt und in den kulturellen Zeugnissen. Die Ahnen, so denkt man, haben das breite Flussbecken des Sepik geschaffen, auf dessen Uferd&auml;mmen die Wohnh&auml;user und die M&auml;nnerh&auml;user stehen. Von zentraler Bedeutung sind die Tanzpl&auml;tze vor den M&auml;nnerh&auml;usern; auf ihnen treten die Ahnenfiguren auf und erinnern an die Taten der mythischen Zeit. Die T&auml;nzer verk&ouml;rpern mit ihrem reichen Schmuck und ihren farbenpr&auml;chtigen Maskenfiguren diese Ahnen und werden eins mit ihnen.</p> <p>Beim Durchschreiten verschiedener &sbquo;R&auml;ume&lsquo; eines Dorfes spiegelt deren Ordnung die soziale Organisation wider: eine deutliche Trennung zwischen der Welt der Frauen und derjenigen der M&auml;nner, zwischen einer &ouml;ffentlichen Sph&auml;re, wo jeder frei ist, sich zu bewegen, und einer Sph&auml;re, die den initiierten M&auml;nnern vorbehalten ist. Die Frauen sind innerhalb des Dorfes vor allem den Wohnh&auml;usern zugeordnet, die Gegenst&auml;nde sind sichtbar. Die M&auml;nner hingegen sind auf die gro&szlig;en M&auml;nnerh&auml;user und die Tanzpl&auml;tze ausgerichtet. Die Gegenst&auml;nde sind verborgen und geheim und werden nur bei den Riten sichtbar.</p> <p>Im Vordergrund der hier gezeigten Auswahl an ethnologischer Kunst steht auch deshalb das Motiv der menschlichen Figur, die allen Kulturen gemeinsam ist: der oder die Gr&uuml;nder-Ahnen von Siedlungen, menschlichen Gemeinschaften und ihrer nat&uuml;rlichen Umwelt. In den Gesellschaften des Sepik zeigt sich diese Ahnenfigur nicht unmittelbar. Sie entschl&uuml;sselt sich immer nur st&uuml;ckweise in ihrer ganzen Komplexit&auml;t. Der Verlauf der Ausstellung wird den Besuchern erlauben, die unterschiedlichen Formen und Variationen zu verstehen, unter denen sich diese Ahnenfiguren manifestieren, beginnend mit ihren mehr &ouml;ffentlichen Formen bis hin zu jenen eher geheimen.</p> <p>Die Werke faszinieren wegen ihrer &uuml;beraus reichen Verzierung auf kleinen und gro&szlig;en Gegenst&auml;nden und durch die Vermischung der in Europa strikt getrennten Gattungen (Malerei, Skulptur) des Gestaltens: Eine Kombinationen von Skulpturen in Menschenform und Oberfl&auml;chenverzierung, von Ornamenten auf Palmblattstielen und Zeremonialh&auml;usern, von modellierter, fig&uuml;rlich ausgestalteter Keramik, genutzt zur Aufbewahrung oder Zubereitung von Nahrungsmitteln.</p> <p>Zu sehen ist ein gro&szlig;es Auslegerboot und ein Einbaum, reich verzierte Pfosten von M&auml;nnerh&auml;usern, gewaltige Schlitztrommeln, kr&auml;ftige Ahnenfiguren und pr&auml;chtig geschm&uuml;ckte Maskengestalten. Die Flussebene ist ein Mosaik von linguistischen Gruppen. Die etwa neunzig Sprachen erkl&auml;ren zu einem Teil auch die Verschiedenheit der hergestellten Objekte. Neben den Reichtum an Riten tritt eine bemerkenswerte F&uuml;lle von Objekten, deren formale Gestaltung h&auml;ufig &uuml;berraschend, faszinierend und exotisch wirkt.</p> <p>Der Sepik war lange Zeit von den europ&auml;ischen, amerikanischen und australischen Entdeckern und Reisenden &uuml;bersehen worden. Erst gegen Ende des 19.&nbsp;Jahrhunderts wurde seine M&uuml;ndung entdeckt und der Fluss von einem deutschen Schiff (&bdquo;Ottilie&ldquo;) befahren. Es sollte jedoch noch Jahre dauern, bis wissenschaftliche Expeditionen organisiert wurden. Vor allem gro&szlig;e deutsche Institutionen bereiteten Forschungsreisen vor, so von Hamburg aus 1909 und von Berlin aus 1912-13. Das damalige K&ouml;nigliche Museum f&uuml;r V&ouml;lkerkunde in Berlin richtete eine umfassende interdisziplin&auml;re Expedition aus, deren Ergebnisse teilweise erst heute ver&ouml;ffentlicht werden k&ouml;nnen. Einer der Protagonisten dieser Forschungen entdeckte die Quellen des Sepik-Flusses, als schon der Erste Weltkrieg 1914 auch in der S&uuml;dsee ausgebrochen war. Australien eroberte und &uuml;bernahm 1914 die deutsche Kolonie &bdquo;Deutsch-Neuguinea&ldquo; (1899-1914).</p> <p>Diese Ausstellung, hundert Jahre nach jener Berliner Expedition veranstaltet, leistet einen wichtigen Beitrag, auch dieses gro&szlig;e Berliner Unternehmen ins Licht der &Ouml;ffentlichkeit zu r&uuml;cken, denn erst seit dieser mehrj&auml;hrigen Expedition ist das Sepikgebiet eine der bedeutendsten Regionen der ethnographischen und wissenschaftlichen Forschungen in der S&uuml;dsee geworden.</p> <p>Schon 1911 erkannte ein Berliner Museumsmitarbeiter den au&szlig;erordentlich hohen &auml;sthetischen Wert der Schnitzwerke vom Sepik. In der Folge haben zahlreiche Sammler aus der ganzen Welt diese Werke auf den immer abenteuerlichen Reisen auf dem Fluss und seinen zahlreichen Nebenarmen eingetauscht und erworben. Bald wurden die Masken, Figuren und Malereien Teil der Kunstgalerien, die in den zwanziger Jahren in Europa und sp&auml;ter auch in Amerika die Kunst der &bdquo;Primitiven&ldquo; neben der Kunst der Moderne anboten. Die Schnitzwerke vom Sepik waren so Teil des Bildinventars, das den K&uuml;nstlern der Moderne zu Beginn des 20. Jahrhunderts zur Verf&uuml;gung stand. Sie waren aber auch Anlass f&uuml;r zahlreiche weitere Forschungen, die im Verlauf dieses Jahrhunderts noch stattfinden sollten, um n&auml;here Ausk&uuml;nfte &uuml;ber die Bedeutung und Ikonographie von Objekten zu erhalten. Die Ausstellung zeigt eine Synthese dieses Kunstgebietes, die auch die Forschungsreisen der letzten f&uuml;nfzig Jahre auswertet.</p> <div class="contract">&nbsp;</div> </div> </div> <div class="event_details"> <div class="event_organizer"> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Veranstalter</strong> Berliner Festspiele.<br />Eine Ausstellung des Mus&eacute;e du quai Branly, Paris. In Zusammenarbeit mit dem Museum Rietberg, Z&uuml;rich.<br /><strong>Kuratiert von</strong> Philippe Peltier, Mus&eacute;e du quai Branly, und Markus Schindlbeck, Ethnologisches Museum &ndash; Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Stiftung Preu&szlig;ischer Kulturbesitz</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Tue, 30 Dec 2014 14:21:35 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list Robert Heinecken - Capitain Petzel - March 12th 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM Fri, 13 Feb 2015 11:15:52 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list Group Show - Galerie Max Hetzler (Bleibtreustraße) - March 12th 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM <p style="text-align: justify;">Inspired by economic theorist Jeremy Rifkin&rsquo;s book, <em>The Zero Marginal Cost Society: the Internet of Things, the Collaborative Commons, and the Eclipse of Capitalism</em>, this exhibition considers artwork made since 1990 to the present which reflect economic transition. <br /><br /><em>&ldquo;The capitalist era is passing...not quickly, but inevitably. A new economic paradigm &ndash; the Collaborative Commons &ndash; is rising in its wake that will transform our way of life. We are already witnessing the emergence of a hybrid economy, part capitalist market and part Collaborative Commons. The two economic systems often work in tandem and sometimes compete. They are finding synergies along each other&rsquo;s perimeters, where they can add value to one another, while benefiting themselves. At other times, they are deeply adversarial, each attempting to absorb or replace the other.&rdquo;<br /></em>Jeremy Rifkin, excerpt from The Zero Marginal Cost Society: the Internet of Things, the Collaborative Commons, and the Eclipse of Capitalism, 2014 <br /><br />Whether we subscribe to Rifkin&rsquo;s conceit, we can acknowledge the existence of tensions and shifts in our economic framework. When major advancements in energy and communications collide, an Industrial Revolution arises. The exhaustion of fossil fuels and the advent of renewable energy in tandem with the application of the Internet, and now the Internet of Things, has propagated since the late 80s a <em>Third Industrial Revolution</em>. In turn, this development has brought on massive changes in every sector of society that are accelerating at unprecedented speed. How have artists been working in both form and content to reflect these vicissitudes in the world around us?<br /><br />The exhibition <em>Open Source</em> looks at a selection of artists, most of them working since 1990, who have utilized new technologies, embraced a reimagined future, confronted ecological issues, sifted through cyborgs and post humanism, commented on the economy, and mined the overall psychological impact and flux of our cultural moment.<br /><br />For example, the removal of the artist&rsquo;s hand, underway for almost a century is taken to a new technological level in the works of many painters in the early 90s who were tinkering with the computer. <strong>Albert Oehlen</strong>&rsquo;s early computer based paintings from the 90s, made with a Texas Instrument laptop, inadvertently highlight pending issues of authorship, labor, robotics, and potential technological unemployment.<br /><br />Critiquing the immanent entropic bill of capitalist society, <strong>Bernadette Corporation</strong>&rsquo;s <em>The Earth&rsquo;s Tarry Dreams of Insurrection Against the Sun</em> illustrates this clearly on a double-screen video by featuring footage of the 2010 BP oil spill. !<br /><br /><strong>Rirkrit Tiravanija</strong>&rsquo;s use of Annlee &ndash; the manga character, whose rights have been bought by artists Pierre Huyghe and Philippe Parreno &ndash; in his video <em>Ghost Reader</em>, captures the complex issues of copyright, identity, subject-hood, and emotion in our changing society. A salvaged Manga character, Annlee reads the entire Philip K. Dick novel <em>Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?</em> that inspired the movie <em>Blade Runner</em>.<br /><br /><strong>Pamela Rosenkranz</strong> brings attention to the contradictions inherent in capitalism by commenting on the fraudulence of the once hope-filled industries of plastics, pharmaceuticals and spring water. Marketed as purifying and holistic, they have led to some of the most devastating damage to our biosphere.<br /><br /><em>Open Source</em>, through the framework of the economy at large, examines the ways in which artists have attended to it critically in opposition to the singular discourse of the art market. It is also through the lens of artists that we can consider discussions regarding the urgency of our future and the world guided by technological and cultural transformations.<br /><br />Participating artists include:<br /><strong>Cory Arcangel, Allora &amp; Calzadilla, Ian Cheng, Bernadette Corporation, Simon Denny, Jeff Elrod, Jana Euler, John Gerrard, Calla Henkel and Max Pitegoff, Pierre Huyghe, Alex Israel, Daniel Keller, John Kelsey, Josh Kline, Agnieszka Kurant, Ajay Kurian, Louise Lawler, Mark Leckey, Megan Marrin/Tyler Dobson, Michel Majerus, Katja Novitskova, Albert Oehlen, Laura Owens, Seth Price, Richard Prince, Sebastian Lloyd Rees, Tabor Robak, Pamela Rosenkranz, Hugh Scott-Douglas, Steven Shearer, Reena Spaulings, Frank Stella, Rirkrit Tiravanija, Kelley Walker, Christopher Wool.</strong> <br /><br />The exhibition is co-curated by <strong>Lisa Schiff</strong>, founder and Principal of SFA Art Advisory and co-founder of VIA Art, <strong>Leslie Fritz</strong>, senior advisor at SFA Art Advisory, and <strong>Eugenio Re Rebaudengo</strong>, founder and Principal of ARTUNER. <br /><br />Special thanks to Jeremy Rifkin who inspired the show; to Hans Ulrich Obrist for his interview with Mr. Rifkin to appear both online and in a forthcoming book based on the exhibition and published by Karma, New York; to Jean de Loisy, President of the Palais de Tokyo, who will host a lecture and a roundtable; to Lauren Guilford, research assistant at SFA Art Advisory. <br />
<br />With support by Art Production Fund, New York<br /><br /><span style="text-decoration: underline;">SCHEDULE OF EVENTS</span><br />March 9-April 19: <strong>Rirkrit Tiravanija</strong>&rsquo;s billboards on view in Berlin in collaboration with Art Production Fund, New York<br />March 11: <em>Hotel Moon</em> at <strong>New Theater, Berlin</strong>, organized by <strong>Calla Henkel</strong> and <strong>Max Pitegoff</strong><br />March 12: Opening at <strong>Galerie Max Hetzler, Berlin</strong> and on <a href="http://www.artuner.com/" target="_blank"><strong>ARTUNER.COM</strong></a><br />March 13: Opening at <strong>Galerie Max Hetzler, Paris</strong><br />March 14: Lecture by <strong>Jeremy Rifkin</strong>, followed by a roundtable at <strong>Palais de Tokyo, Paris</strong></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: justify;"><br />Inspiriert von den Thesen des US-amerikanischen Wirtschaftstheoretikers Jeremy Rifkin aus seinem Buch <em>Die Nullgrenzkostengesellschaft. Das Internet der Dinge, kollaboratives Gemeingut und der R&uuml;ckzug des Kapitalismus</em> zeigt diese Ausstellung Werke, die in den letzten 25 Jahren entstanden sind und den kontinuierlichen &ouml;konomischen Wandel reflektieren. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <br /><br /><em>&ldquo;Der Kapitalismus geht seinem Ende entgegen. Nicht von heute auf morgen, aber dennoch unaufhaltsam. [...] Ein neues Wirtschaftssystem &ndash; die Kollaborativen Commons &ndash; betritt die &ouml;konomische Weltb&uuml;hne. [&hellip;] Bereits heute werden wir Zeugen der Herausbildung eines Wirtschaftshybriden aus kapitalistischem Markt und kollaborativen Commons. In der Regel arbeiten die beiden Wirtschaftssysteme im Gespann; zuweilen stehen sie miteinander in Konkurrenz. Beide finden sie in ihren Randbereichen Synergien, die es ihnen erm&ouml;glichen, einander zu Mehrwert zu verhelfen und zugleich davon zu profitieren. Ansonsten sind sie erbitterte Gegner, die einander zu ersetzen versuchen &ndash; oder wenigstens zu absorbieren.&rdquo;<br /></em>- Jeremy Rifkin, Auszug aus Die Nullgrenzkostengesellschaft. Das Internet der Dinge, kollaboratives Gemeingut und der R&uuml;ckzug des Kapitalismus, 2014<br /><br />Ob wir die kontroversen Ansichten Jeremy Rifkins teilen oder nicht, die aktuellen Ver&auml;nderungen und Spannungen innerhalb unseres &ouml;konomischen Systems sind schwer zu &uuml;bersehen. Treffen wesentliche Entwicklungen in Bereichen wie der Energiegewinnung und Kommunikation aufeinander, so kann hieraus eine industrielle Revolution entstehen. Die zunehmende Ersch&ouml;pfung fossiler Brennstoffe und der Aufschwung erneuerbarer Energien gemeinsam mit den M&ouml;glichkeiten des Internets &ndash; vor allem des so genannten Internets der Dinge &ndash; haben seit den sp&auml;ten 1980er Jahren zu eben solch einer <em>Dritten Industriellen Revolution</em> gef&uuml;hrt. Diese Entwicklung hat wiederum massiven Einfluss auf jegliche gesellschaftliche Bereiche und schreitet in ungeahnter Schnelligkeit voran. Wie reflektieren K&uuml;nstlerinnen und K&uuml;nstler seither &ndash; sowohl formal als auch inhaltlich &ndash; diesen Wandel in ihrer Praxis?<br /><br />Die Ausstellung <em>Open Source</em> zeigt eine Auswahl k&uuml;nstlerischer Positionen, die seit den 1990er Jahren mit neuen Technologien experimentieren, eine andere Zukunft denken und dabei sowohl &ouml;kologische Fragen thematisieren, als auch die Potenziale von Cyborgs und Posthumanismus erkennen. Positionen, die die heutige &Ouml;konomie kritisch befragen und ihre allgemeinen psychologischen Auswirkungen auf unsere gegenw&auml;rtige Kultur untersuchen.<br /><br />So wurde beispielsweise der Verzicht auf die Hand des K&uuml;nstlers, bereits seit fast einem Jahrhundert&nbsp; im Gange, auf eine neue technologische Ebene gehoben, indem sich viele Maler der fr&uuml;hen 90er Jahre am Computer ausprobierten. <strong>Albert Oehlen</strong>s fr&uuml;he computerbasierte Gem&auml;lde, hergestellt mit einem Texas Instrument Laptop, nehmen eher unbeabsichtigt wichtige Fragen nach Autorschaft, Robotern und ver&auml;nderten, technologisch bedingten Arbeitsstrukturen vorweg. <br /><br />Die Kritik an den komplexen und undurchsichtigen Verflechtungen innerhalb der kapitalistischen Gesellschaft wird anhand <strong>Bernadette Corporation</strong>s Videoinstallation <em>The Earth&rsquo;s Tarry Dreams of Insurrection Against the Sun </em>verdeutlicht, welche Bildmaterial der BP &Ouml;lkatastrophe von 2010 zeigt.<br /><br />In seinem Video <em>Ghost Reader</em> l&auml;sst <strong>Rirkrit Tiravanija</strong> einen Manga-Charakter mit dem Namen Annlee &ndash; dessen Verwendungsrechte von den K&uuml;nstlern Pierre Huyghe und Philippe Parreno gekauft wurden &ndash; den gesamten Roman <em>Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?</em> von Philip K. Dick lesen, welcher die literarische Vorlage f&uuml;r den Science-Fiction-Film <em>Blade Runner</em> darstellt. Der entfremdete Manga-Charakter Annlee verk&ouml;rpert dabei die vielschichtigen Fragen nach Urheberrecht, Identit&auml;t, <br />Subjektstatus und Gef&uuml;hlen innerhalb unserer sich st&auml;ndig ver&auml;ndernden Gesellschaft.<br /><br /><strong>Pamela Rosenkranz</strong> richtet den Blick auf die Widerspr&uuml;che innerhalb des kapitalistischen Systems indem sie die Machenschaften ehemals hoffnungsvoller Branchen wie der Pharmazie sowie Plastik- und Quellwasserindustrie darlegt. Als reinigend und ganzheitlich vermarktet, sind sie Ursache einiger der verheerendsten Sch&auml;den an unserer Biosph&auml;re. <br /><br /><em>Open Source </em>untersucht wie K&uuml;nstlerinnen und K&uuml;nstler sich kritisch mit gesamtwirtschaftlichen Umbr&uuml;chen auseinandersetzen und sich so gegen den oftmals einseitig gef&uuml;hrten Diskurs im Kunstmarkt stellen. Denn gerade die k&uuml;nstlerische Perspektive bietet das Potential, gegenw&auml;rtige Diskussionen &uuml;ber aktuelle als auch zuk&uuml;nftige technologische und kulturelle Transformationen neu zu f&uuml;hren und weiterzudenken.<br /><br />Teilnehmende K&uuml;nstlerinnen und K&uuml;nstler: <br /><strong>Cory Arcangel, Allora &amp; Calzadilla, Ian Cheng, Bernadette Corporation, Simon Denny, Jeff Elrod, Jana Euler, John Gerrard, Calla Henkel und Max Pitegoff, Pierre Huyghe, Alex Israel, Daniel Keller, John Kelsey, Josh Kline, Agnieszka Kurant, Ajay Kurian, Louise Lawler, Mark Leckey, Megan Marrin/Tyler Dobson, Michel Majerus, Katja Novitskova, Albert Oehlen, Laura Owens, Seth Price, Richard Prince, Sebastian Lloyd Rees, Tabor Robak, Pamela Rosenkranz, Hugh Scott-Douglas, Steven Shearer, Reena Spaulings, Frank Stella, Rirkrit Tiravanija, Kelley Walker, Christopher Wool. </strong><br /><br />Die Ausstellung wurde kuratiert von <strong>Lisa Schiff</strong>, Gr&uuml;nderin und Leiterin von SFA Art Advisory sowie Mitbegr&uuml;nderin von VIA Art, <strong>Leslie Fritz</strong>, Senior-Beraterin bei SFA Art Advisory, und <strong>Eugenio Re Rebaudengo</strong>, Gr&uuml;nder und Direktor von ARTUNER. <br /><br />Besonderer Dank gilt Jeremy Rifkin, dessen Thesen als Anregung f&uuml;r diese Ausstellung dienten; Hans Ulrich Obrist f&uuml;r sein Interview mit Jeremy Rifkin, welches online und in einem ausstellungsbegleitenden Katalog (Karma, New York) erscheinen wird; Jean de Loisy, President des Palais de Tokyo, der den Vortrag und das Roundtable-Gespr&auml;ch moderieren wird, sowie Lauren Guilford, wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin bei SFA Art Advisory. <br /><br />Mit freundlicher Unterst&uuml;tzung von Art Production Fund, New York. <br /><br /><br /><span style="text-decoration: underline;">VERANSTALTUNGSPROGRAMM</span><br />9. M&auml;rz &ndash; 19. April: <strong>Rirkrit Tiravanija</strong>s Plakate im Berliner Stadtraum in Zusammenarbeit mit Art Production Fund, New York<br />11. M&auml;rz: <em>Hotel Moon</em> im <strong>New Theater, Berlin</strong>, organisiert von Calla Henkel und <strong>Max Pitegoff </strong><br />12. M&auml;rz: Er&ouml;ffnung bei <strong>Galerie Max Hetzler, Berlin</strong> und <a href="http://www.artuner.com/" target="_blank"><strong>ARTUNER.COM</strong></a><br />13. M&auml;rz: Er&ouml;ffnung bei <strong>Galerie Max Hetzler, Paris</strong><br />14. M&auml;rz: Vortrag von <strong>Jeremy Rifkin</strong>, anschlie&szlig;endes Roundtable-Gespr&auml;ch, <strong>Palais de Tokyo, Paris</strong></p> Tue, 17 Feb 2015 11:00:14 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list Group Show - Galerie Max Hetzler (Goethestraße) - March 12th 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM <div class="ap-whitebox-body description"> <p style="text-align: justify;">Inspired by economic theorist Jeremy Rifkin&rsquo;s book, <em>The Zero Marginal Cost Society: the Internet of Things, the Collaborative Commons, and the Eclipse of Capitalism</em>, this exhibition considers artwork made since 1990 to the present which reflect economic transition. <br /><br /><em>&ldquo;The capitalist era is passing...not quickly, but inevitably. A new economic paradigm &ndash; the Collaborative Commons &ndash; is rising in its wake that will transform our way of life. We are already witnessing the emergence of a hybrid economy, part capitalist market and part Collaborative Commons. The two economic systems often work in tandem and sometimes compete. They are finding synergies along each other&rsquo;s perimeters, where they can add value to one another, while benefiting themselves. At other times, they are deeply adversarial, each attempting to absorb or replace the other.&rdquo;<br /></em>Jeremy Rifkin, excerpt from The Zero Marginal Cost Society: the Internet of Things, the Collaborative Commons, and the Eclipse of Capitalism, 2014 <br /><br />Whether we subscribe to Rifkin&rsquo;s conceit, we can acknowledge the existence of tensions and shifts in our economic framework. When major advancements in energy and communications collide, an Industrial Revolution arises. The exhaustion of fossil fuels and the advent of renewable energy in tandem with the application of the Internet, and now the Internet of Things, has propagated since the late 80s a <em>Third Industrial Revolution</em>. In turn, this development has brought on massive changes in every sector of society that are accelerating at unprecedented speed. How have artists been working in both form and content to reflect these vicissitudes in the world around us?<br /><br />The exhibition <em>Open Source</em> looks at a selection of artists, most of them working since 1990, who have utilized new technologies, embraced a reimagined future, confronted ecological issues, sifted through cyborgs and post humanism, commented on the economy, and mined the overall psychological impact and flux of our cultural moment.<br /><br />For example, the removal of the artist&rsquo;s hand, underway for almost a century is taken to a new technological level in the works of many painters in the early 90s who were tinkering with the computer. <strong>Albert Oehlen</strong>&rsquo;s early computer based paintings from the 90s, made with a Texas Instrument laptop, inadvertently highlight pending issues of authorship, labor, robotics, and potential technological unemployment.<br /><br />Critiquing the immanent entropic bill of capitalist society, <strong>Bernadette Corporation</strong>&rsquo;s <em>The Earth&rsquo;s Tarry Dreams of Insurrection Against the Sun</em> illustrates this clearly on a double-screen video by featuring footage of the 2010 BP oil spill. !<br /><br /><strong>Rirkrit Tiravanija</strong>&rsquo;s use of Annlee &ndash; the manga character, whose rights have been bought by artists Pierre Huyghe and Philippe Parreno &ndash; in his video <em>Ghost Reader</em>, captures the complex issues of copyright, identity, subject-hood, and emotion in our changing society. A salvaged Manga character, Annlee reads the entire Philip K. Dick novel <em>Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?</em> that inspired the movie <em>Blade Runner</em>.<br /><br /><strong>Pamela Rosenkranz</strong> brings attention to the contradictions inherent in capitalism by commenting on the fraudulence of the once hope-filled industries of plastics, pharmaceuticals and spring water. Marketed as purifying and holistic, they have led to some of the most devastating damage to our biosphere.<br /><br /><em>Open Source</em>, through the framework of the economy at large, examines the ways in which artists have attended to it critically in opposition to the singular discourse of the art market. It is also through the lens of artists that we can consider discussions regarding the urgency of our future and the world guided by technological and cultural transformations.<br /><br />Participating artists include:<br /><strong>Cory Arcangel, Allora &amp; Calzadilla, Ian Cheng, Bernadette Corporation, Simon Denny, Jeff Elrod, Jana Euler, John Gerrard, Calla Henkel and Max Pitegoff, Pierre Huyghe, Alex Israel, Daniel Keller, John Kelsey, Josh Kline, Agnieszka Kurant, Ajay Kurian, Louise Lawler, Mark Leckey, Megan Marrin/Tyler Dobson, Michel Majerus, Katja Novitskova, Albert Oehlen, Laura Owens, Seth Price, Richard Prince, Sebastian Lloyd Rees, Tabor Robak, Pamela Rosenkranz, Hugh Scott-Douglas, Steven Shearer, Reena Spaulings, Frank Stella, Rirkrit Tiravanija, Kelley Walker, Christopher Wool.</strong> <br /><br />The exhibition is co-curated by <strong>Lisa Schiff</strong>, founder and Principal of SFA Art Advisory and co-founder of VIA Art, <strong>Leslie Fritz</strong>, senior advisor at SFA Art Advisory, and <strong>Eugenio Re Rebaudengo</strong>, founder and Principal of ARTUNER. <br /><br />Special thanks to Jeremy Rifkin who inspired the show; to Hans Ulrich Obrist for his interview with Mr. Rifkin to appear both online and in a forthcoming book based on the exhibition and published by Karma, New York; to Jean de Loisy, President of the Palais de Tokyo, who will host a lecture and a roundtable; to Lauren Guilford, research assistant at SFA Art Advisory. <br />
<br />With support by Art Production Fund, New York<br /><br />SCHEDULE OF EVENTS<br />March 9-April 19: <strong>Rirkrit Tiravanija</strong>&rsquo;s billboards on view in Berlin in collaboration with Art Production Fund, New York<br />March 11: <em>Hotel Moon</em> at <strong>New Theater, Berlin</strong>, organized by <strong>Calla Henkel</strong> and <strong>Max Pitegoff</strong><br />March 12: Opening at <strong>Galerie Max Hetzler, Berlin</strong> and on <a href="http://www.artuner.com/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><strong>ARTUNER.COM</strong></a><br />March 13: Opening at <strong>Galerie Max Hetzler, Paris</strong><br />March 14: Lecture by <strong>Jeremy Rifkin</strong>, followed by a roundtable at <strong>Palais de Tokyo, Paris</strong></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: justify;"><br />Inspiriert von den Thesen des US-amerikanischen Wirtschaftstheoretikers Jeremy Rifkin aus seinem Buch <em>Die Nullgrenzkostengesellschaft. Das Internet der Dinge, kollaboratives Gemeingut und der R&uuml;ckzug des Kapitalismus</em> zeigt diese Ausstellung Werke, die in den letzten 25 Jahren entstanden sind und den kontinuierlichen &ouml;konomischen Wandel reflektieren. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <br /><br /><em>&ldquo;Der Kapitalismus geht seinem Ende entgegen. Nicht von heute auf morgen, aber dennoch unaufhaltsam. [...] Ein neues Wirtschaftssystem &ndash; die Kollaborativen Commons &ndash; betritt die &ouml;konomische Weltb&uuml;hne. [&hellip;] Bereits heute werden wir Zeugen der Herausbildung eines Wirtschaftshybriden aus kapitalistischem Markt und kollaborativen Commons. In der Regel arbeiten die beiden Wirtschaftssysteme im Gespann; zuweilen stehen sie miteinander in Konkurrenz. Beide finden sie in ihren Randbereichen Synergien, die es ihnen erm&ouml;glichen, einander zu Mehrwert zu verhelfen und zugleich davon zu profitieren. Ansonsten sind sie erbitterte Gegner, die einander zu ersetzen versuchen &ndash; oder wenigstens zu absorbieren.&rdquo;<br /></em>- Jeremy Rifkin, Auszug aus Die Nullgrenzkostengesellschaft. Das Internet der Dinge, kollaboratives Gemeingut und der R&uuml;ckzug des Kapitalismus, 2014<br /><br />Ob wir die kontroversen Ansichten Jeremy Rifkins teilen oder nicht, die aktuellen Ver&auml;nderungen und Spannungen innerhalb unseres &ouml;konomischen Systems sind schwer zu &uuml;bersehen. Treffen wesentliche Entwicklungen in Bereichen wie der Energiegewinnung und Kommunikation aufeinander, so kann hieraus eine industrielle Revolution entstehen. Die zunehmende Ersch&ouml;pfung fossiler Brennstoffe und der Aufschwung erneuerbarer Energien gemeinsam mit den M&ouml;glichkeiten des Internets &ndash; vor allem des so genannten Internets der Dinge &ndash; haben seit den sp&auml;ten 1980er Jahren zu eben solch einer <em>Dritten Industriellen Revolution</em> gef&uuml;hrt. Diese Entwicklung hat wiederum massiven Einfluss auf jegliche gesellschaftliche Bereiche und schreitet in ungeahnter Schnelligkeit voran. Wie reflektieren K&uuml;nstlerinnen und K&uuml;nstler seither &ndash; sowohl formal als auch inhaltlich &ndash; diesen Wandel in ihrer Praxis?<br /><br />Die Ausstellung <em>Open Source</em> zeigt eine Auswahl k&uuml;nstlerischer Positionen, die seit den 1990er Jahren mit neuen Technologien experimentieren, eine andere Zukunft denken und dabei sowohl &ouml;kologische Fragen thematisieren, als auch die Potenziale von Cyborgs und Posthumanismus erkennen. Positionen, die die heutige &Ouml;konomie kritisch befragen und ihre allgemeinen psychologischen Auswirkungen auf unsere gegenw&auml;rtige Kultur untersuchen.<br /><br />So wurde beispielsweise der Verzicht auf die Hand des K&uuml;nstlers, bereits seit fast einem Jahrhundert&nbsp; im Gange, auf eine neue technologische Ebene gehoben, indem sich viele Maler der fr&uuml;hen 90er Jahre am Computer ausprobierten. <strong>Albert Oehlen</strong>s fr&uuml;he computerbasierte Gem&auml;lde, hergestellt mit einem Texas Instrument Laptop, nehmen eher unbeabsichtigt wichtige Fragen nach Autorschaft, Robotern und ver&auml;nderten, technologisch bedingten Arbeitsstrukturen vorweg. <br /><br />Die Kritik an den komplexen und undurchsichtigen Verflechtungen innerhalb der kapitalistischen Gesellschaft wird anhand <strong>Bernadette Corporation</strong>s Videoinstallation <em>The Earth&rsquo;s Tarry Dreams of Insurrection Against the Sun </em>verdeutlicht, welche Bildmaterial der BP &Ouml;lkatastrophe von 2010 zeigt.<br /><br />In seinem Video <em>Ghost Reader</em> l&auml;sst <strong>Rirkrit Tiravanija</strong> einen Manga-Charakter mit dem Namen Annlee &ndash; dessen Verwendungsrechte von den K&uuml;nstlern Pierre Huyghe und Philippe Parreno gekauft wurden &ndash; den gesamten Roman <em>Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?</em> von Philip K. Dick lesen, welcher die literarische Vorlage f&uuml;r den Science-Fiction-Film <em>Blade Runner</em> darstellt. Der entfremdete Manga-Charakter Annlee verk&ouml;rpert dabei die vielschichtigen Fragen nach Urheberrecht, Identit&auml;t, <br />Subjektstatus und Gef&uuml;hlen innerhalb unserer sich st&auml;ndig ver&auml;ndernden Gesellschaft.<br /><br /><strong>Pamela Rosenkranz</strong> richtet den Blick auf die Widerspr&uuml;che innerhalb des kapitalistischen Systems indem sie die Machenschaften ehemals hoffnungsvoller Branchen wie der Pharmazie sowie Plastik- und Quellwasserindustrie darlegt. Als reinigend und ganzheitlich vermarktet, sind sie Ursache einiger der verheerendsten Sch&auml;den an unserer Biosph&auml;re. <br /><br /><em>Open Source </em>untersucht wie K&uuml;nstlerinnen und K&uuml;nstler sich kritisch mit gesamtwirtschaftlichen Umbr&uuml;chen auseinandersetzen und sich so gegen den oftmals einseitig gef&uuml;hrten Diskurs im Kunstmarkt stellen. Denn gerade die k&uuml;nstlerische Perspektive bietet das Potential, gegenw&auml;rtige Diskussionen &uuml;ber aktuelle als auch zuk&uuml;nftige technologische und kulturelle Transformationen neu zu f&uuml;hren und weiterzudenken.<br /><br />Teilnehmende K&uuml;nstlerinnen und K&uuml;nstler: <br /><strong>Cory Arcangel, Allora &amp; Calzadilla, Ian Cheng, Bernadette Corporation, Simon Denny, Jeff Elrod, Jana Euler, John Gerrard, Calla Henkel und Max Pitegoff, Pierre Huyghe, Alex Israel, Daniel Keller, John Kelsey, Josh Kline, Agnieszka Kurant, Ajay Kurian, Louise Lawler, Mark Leckey, Megan Marrin/Tyler Dobson, Michel Majerus, Katja Novitskova, Albert Oehlen, Laura Owens, Seth Price, Richard Prince, Sebastian Lloyd Rees, Tabor Robak, Pamela Rosenkranz, Hugh Scott-Douglas, Steven Shearer, Reena Spaulings, Frank Stella, Rirkrit Tiravanija, Kelley Walker, Christopher Wool. </strong><br /><br />Die Ausstellung wurde kuratiert von <strong>Lisa Schiff</strong>, Gr&uuml;nderin und Leiterin von SFA Art Advisory sowie Mitbegr&uuml;nderin von VIA Art, <strong>Leslie Fritz</strong>, Senior-Beraterin bei SFA Art Advisory, und <strong>Eugenio Re Rebaudengo</strong>, Gr&uuml;nder und Direktor von ARTUNER. <br /><br />Besonderer Dank gilt Jeremy Rifkin, dessen Thesen als Anregung f&uuml;r diese Ausstellung dienten; Hans Ulrich Obrist f&uuml;r sein Interview mit Jeremy Rifkin, welches online und in einem ausstellungsbegleitenden Katalog (Karma, New York) erscheinen wird; Jean de Loisy, President des Palais de Tokyo, der den Vortrag und das Roundtable-Gespr&auml;ch moderieren wird, sowie Lauren Guilford, wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin bei SFA Art Advisory. <br /><br />Mit freundlicher Unterst&uuml;tzung von Art Production Fund, New York. <br /><br /><br />VERANSTALTUNGSPROGRAMM<br />9. M&auml;rz &ndash; 19. April: <strong>Rirkrit Tiravanija</strong>s Plakate im Berliner Stadtraum in Zusammenarbeit mit Art Production Fund, New York<br />11. M&auml;rz: <em>Hotel Moon</em> im <strong>New Theater, Berlin</strong>, organisiert von Calla Henkel und <strong>Max Pitegoff </strong><br />12. M&auml;rz: Er&ouml;ffnung bei <strong>Galerie Max Hetzler, Berlin</strong> und <a href="http://www.artuner.com/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><strong>ARTUNER.COM</strong></a><br />13. M&auml;rz: Er&ouml;ffnung bei <strong>Galerie Max Hetzler, Paris</strong><br />14. M&auml;rz: Vortrag von <strong>Jeremy Rifkin</strong>, anschlie&szlig;endes Roundtable-Gespr&auml;ch, <strong>Palais de Tokyo, Paris</strong></p> </div> Tue, 17 Feb 2015 11:04:18 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list Daniel Harms, Ulrich Riedel, Yaşam Şaşmazer, Eda Soylu, Claudia Vitari, Meike Zopf - BERLINARTPROJECTS - March 13th 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM <div class="page" title="Page 2"> <div class="layoutArea"> <div class="column"> <p>BERLINARTPROJECTS is presenting a group exhibition with the six gallery artists Daniel Harms, Ulrich Riedel, Yaşam Şaşmazer, Eda Soylu, Claudia Vitari and Meike Zopf. The exhibition will continuously re- constitute itself as individual works are being swapped and therefore context and effect change simultaneously. The works of the artists give an insight into different views of the world, filtered and shaped by their own thoughts, experiences and world views. Whether the art involves reflections, critical perceptions or alternative concepts, each new setting creates its own reality. The works mutually enrich each other, again and again emphasizing new aspects. The</p> </div> </div> <div class="layoutArea"> <div class="column"> <p>replacement of one work therefore also affects the entire exhibition - as new concepts and relations are gained, others disappear its reality becomes &lsquo;recharged&rsquo;.</p> <p>One remarkable position in the show are the &lsquo;dying flowers in concrete&rsquo;, that will be shown to a later time during the exhibition. The young Turkish artist Eda Soylu embeds flowers in concrete. At the beginning they are still able to draw water from the slowly drying material while then gradually they dry out and die.</p> <p>The pieces shown range from drawings and paintings to photography and sculpture. The cultural backgrounds are equally diverse; as the artists originate from countries such as Turkey, Italy as well as Germany.</p> </div> </div> </div> Mon, 02 Mar 2015 12:33:05 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ber/Events/list