STREET now open! Chicago | Los Angeles | Miami | New York | San Francisco | Santa Fe
Amsterdam | Berlin | Brussels | London | Paris | São Paulo | Toronto | China | India | Worldwide
 
Amsterdam

Stedelijk Museum Schiedam

Exhibition Detail
de Volkskrant Beeldende Kunst Prijs 2012
Hoogstraat 112-114
3111 HL Schiedam
Netherlands


March 10th, 2012 - June 17th, 2012
 
, Charlotte DumasCharlotte Dumas
© Courtesy of the Artist and Stedelijk Museum Schiedam
> ARTISTS
> QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://www.stedelijkmuseumschiedam.nl/nl...
NEIGHBORHOOD:  
Rotterdam
EMAIL:  
info@stedelijkmuseumschiedam.nl
PHONE:  
+31 (10) 246 3666
OPEN HOURS:  
Tue-Sun 10-5
TAGS:  
photography
> DESCRIPTION

De Volkskrant Beeldende Kunst Prijs (De Volkskrant Art Award) 2012

The Nominees: Charlotte Dumas, David Jablonowski, Tala Madani, Rory Pilgrim, Sarah van Sonsbeeck

Five talented artists, not older than 35 and working in the Netherlands, have been nominated by specialists from the world of art for de Volkskrant Beeldende Kunst Prijs (The Volkskrant Art Award) 2012: Charlotte Dumas, David Jablonowski, Tala Madani, Rory Pilgrim and Sarah van Sonsbeeck. This is the sixth edition of this Art Award, which is jointly organized by the Volkskrant (national daily newspaper), the Mondriaan Foundation and the NTR (public service television).

The 2012 scouts are: Erik van Lieshout (artist), Domeniek Ruyters (editor-in-chief of the Metropolis M art magazine), Ella van Zanten (head of the Rabo Art Collection), Chris Driessen (director of the Fundament Foundation, Lustwarande Tilburg) and Macha Roesink (director of The Paviljoens Almere).

This year, the chairman of the jury is Jan Mulder, writer, art-lover and commentator in De Wereld Draait Door (television programme). In conjunction with jury members Lex ter Braak (director of the Jan van Eijk Academy in Maastricht), Sacha Bronwasser (art critic of de Volkskrant) and Maria Roosen (artist), a winner will be selected. In a special edition of Kunststof TV (NTR), the winner and the public’s choice will be announced. The prize, worth 10,000 euros, is funded by the Mondriaan Foundation.

The Stedelijk Museum Schiedam will display the work of the five nominees in an exhibition that is just as versatile, infectious, profound and dynamic as the world all around.

Charlotte Dumas

Police dogs and police horses were her first models, then came portraits of other animals, both wild and domesticated. Charlotte Dumas (Vlaardingen, 1977) gained international fame with her photographs: the most recent ones being of the rescue dogs that sought survivors and victims under the rubble of the Twin Towers in New York. Dumas tracked down the retired dogs here and there in the US and presented them in attentive portraits, in a modest heroic series entitled Retrieved. This work coincided with the tenth anniversary of the terrorist attack on New York and was seized upon by the press worldwide. The dog portraits offer a new way of remembering the attack: as a reflection of human dismay and of our emotional and functional dependence.

In her portraits, Dumas centres the animals in classical compositions. By means of contrasts of light and dark, she highlights the sheen, softness and texture of skin and hair. Her work is equally sensuous and expressive, partly due to the monumentality and physical proximity of the animals. Ella van Zanten, head of the RABO Art Collection, who as a scout nominated Charlotte Dumas for the VKBK Award 2012, says: ‘The profound relationship between her and the animal and the psychological portrait that she manages to establish transcends the photography of loved (domestic) animals and gives the topic a strong conceptual dimension.’

Whether it involves racehorses from Palermo and Paris, fighting dogs from an animal shelter in New York or tigers from nature reserves and from a touring circus in the US: the animals are invariably aware of Dumas’ presence. They pose and look back at us. With this, Dumas shows many ways of ‘looking’. She connects her own power of observation to that of the animals. They are just as alert as we are and, just like we subject them to our gaze, they stare at, spy upon, evaluate and watch us.

David Jablonowski

David Jablonowski (Bochum, Germany, 1982) creates sculptures with strongly contrasting materials. He exploits the antithesis between cultural history and technological development. For instance, formal memories of temples or burial monuments are visible in stacks of polystyrene resembling stone. And these creations converge with printers, scanners, copy machines or components of an offset press – equipment for the reproduction of information – reflecting primarily their own construction in this case. When Jablonowski uses a monitor, it is never the intention that the broadcast image should dominate the device, in contrast to what normally occurs. The front and back both play a role: in his work, the back of a flat screen can function as the cover of a book that falls open.

Jablonowski’s work has a retiring dramatic allure. It is as if a frenzied reproduction company has been built on the remains of sacred architecture, once built for eternity. Nevertheless, Jablonowski is not engaged in expressing social criticism. His sculptures and installations are too enigmatic for that. The devices acquire their own aesthetic power of attraction. They evoke the magic that lurks in the paradoxical phenomenon of the recurring snapshot: the multiplication of the unique manuscript.

Unicity versus reproduction, knowledge versus information, the profound versus the superficial: Jablonowski’s work scans the similarities and differences between historic and modern forms of value determination, communication and traditional forms of information transfer. Exhibition specialist Chris Driessen, director of the Fundament Foundation, who scouted Jablonowski for the VKBK Award 2012, refers to his work as ‘formally fascinating’, but also praises ‘the great philosophical and artistic themes’ in Jablonowski’s work, focusing on the question: how is meaning created and disseminated?

Tala Madani

It is primarily men that you see in the virtuoso paintings and animation films of Tala Madani (1981, Teheran). To feature in her artistic work is no sinecure. The men are invariably in conflict with one another or their bald heads are plagued by horseflies. Madani’s work is expressively painted and easily gets under your skin, even if it is amusing at first sight. The humour soon shows itself as grim and violent. A man can even be mocked by his own shadow. Toward the end of 2011 Madani made a group of works about Jinns: beings that can take possession of people.

Such – generally evil – spirits are also exerting their influence worldwide in the 21st century. Madani plays with this erratic phenomenon. She captures the illusions that we ourselves conjure up, which can suddenly appear anywhere: in the shape of a headscarf or veil for example, in the light of the current political turbulence around this topic in the Netherlands.

Tala Madani has been living in the West since she was thirteen years old. In the US, she completed Yale University School of Art, then she continued at the Rijksakademie in Amsterdam. Her paintings and animation films have been included in the Saatchi Collection in London and were on display in the Greater New York exhibition in MoMA, PS1 (2010) and at the Biennial in Venice, in the group exhibition entitled Speech Matters in the Danish pavilion (2011). Her first Dutch retrospective opened in the Stedelijk Museum Bureau Amsterdam at the end of 2011.

Madani was nominated for the Volkskrant Art Award 2012 by Domeniek Ruijters, editor-in-chief of the Metropolis M specialist journal. He refers to her work as being ‘unbelievably rich and versatile, while looking so simple’. Madani’s most important themes are cultural and sexual diversity. This material is presented in a light and straightforward way, which is deceptive as her expositions are critical, like cartoons or caricatures in the newspaper. As her scout remarks: ‘they are hard as nails and razor sharp’.

Rory Pilgrim

Rory Pilgrim (Bristol, England, 1988) gives a voice to art: the voice of the activist and also the voice of a chorister. All good things come in threes, they say, and that applies to him with the convergence of artistic, musical and political themes. He creates performances that draw art into everyday life, and put life into art. Or, as artist Erik van Lieshout, who scouted him, remarks: ‘Rory wants to change the world by developing a new, harmonious style of beauty. With him, there is a rainbow over everything.’

Van Lieshout appreciates the fact that Pilgrim’s work ‘is political and social, in an entirely individual way’. For example, Pilgrim exploits a museum room as a meeting place, conference room and meditation point, all in one. He articulates questions on individual liberties and cultural and political responsibilities. Sometimes he invites school pupils, or senior citizens or church communities to exercise their voices in a round-table discussion or in choir songs especially written for the occasion by Pilgrim himself.

Occasionally Pilgrim will cover the windows of an art institution with a personal variant of ideal advertising, in which his fine sense of colour and form becomes evident. For example, in 2011 he enlivened the façade of De Hallen in Haarlem with the sunny, yellow/orange/red artwork called Wholeheartedly: made-to-measure posters, in which the words ‘protect’ and ‘survive’ were embedded. In the year that Dutch politics imposed severe cutbacks on art and culture, this was a subtle plea for an appreciation of the arts. A choir of school pupils sang the complete text, including the fragments ‘an absent voice, a beating heart’. Under Pilgrim’s directions, their song sounded like ‘a heartbeat full of hope’.

Rory Pilgrim (Bristol, England, 1988) gives a voice to art: the voice of the activist and also the voice of a musician. All good things come in threes, they say, and that applies to him with the convergence of artistic, musical and political themes. He creates performances that draw art into everyday life, and put life into art. Or, as artist Erik van Lieshout, who scouted him, remarks: ‘Rory wants to change the world by developing a new, harmonious style of beauty. With him, there is a rainbow over everything.’

Van Lieshout appreciates the fact that Pilgrim’s work ‘is political and social, in an entirely individual way’. For example, Pilgrim exploits a museum room as a meeting place, conference room and meditation point, all in one. He articulates questions on individual liberties and cultural and political responsibilities. Sometimes he invites school pupils, or senior citizens or church communities to exercise their voices in a round-table discussion or in choir songs especially written for the occasion by Pilgrim himself.

Occasionally Pilgrim will cover the windows of an art institution with a personal variant of ideal advertising, in which his fine sense of colour and form becomes evident. For example, in 2011 he enlivened the façade of De Hallen in Haarlem with made to measure posters, collaborating with a hand crafted poster maker. Entitled 'Wholeheartedly', the bright colours of the posters turned the museum into a beacon of hope. Bearing the words 'Protect' and 'Survive', the posters made subtle reference to the severe cutbacks in the arts in The Netherlands, but more universally the economic and social difficulties across the world. Considering specifically the drastic of effects on younger generations, Pilgrim worked with school pupils from Haarlem to bring the text of the posters to life with musical chant. Including the words, 'an absent voice, a beating heart' the pupils voiced their concerns and dreams, their song becoming 'heartbeat of hope and survival’.

Wilma Sütö


De Volkskrant Beeldende Kunst Prijs 2012

De genomineerden: Charlotte Dumas, David Jablonowski, Tala Madani, Rory Pilgrim, Sarah van Sonsbeeck

Vijf getalenteerde kunstenaars, niet ouder dan 35 jaar en werkzaam in Nederland, zijn door specialisten uit de kunstwereld genomineerd voor de Volkskrant Beeldende Kunst Prijs 2012: Charlotte Dumas, David Jablonowksi, Tala Madani, Rory Pilgrim en Sarah van Sonsbeeck. De kunstprijs beleeft haar zesde editie en wordt georganiseerd in samenwerking met de Volkskrant, het Mondriaan Fonds en de NTR.

De scouts 2012 zijn: Erik van Lieshout (kunstenaar), Domeniek Ruyters (hoofdredacteur kunsttijdschrift Metropolis M), Ella van Zanten (hoofd kunstzaken Rabobank), Chris Driessen (directeur Stichting Fundament, Lustwarande Tilburg) en Macha Roesink (directeur De Paviljoens Almere).

Voorzitter van de jury is dit jaar Jan Mulder, schrijver, oud-profvoetballer, kunstliefhebber en commentator in De Wereld Draait Door. Samen met de juryleden Lex ter Braak (directeur Jan van Eijk Academie Maastricht, ex-directeur Fonds BKVB), Sacha Bronwasser (kunstcriticus de Volkskrant) en Maria Roosen (kunstenaar) wordt een winnaar gekozen. In een speciale uitzending van Kunststof TV (NTR) op zondag 8 april wordt de winnaar bekendgemaakt. De prijs van 10.000 euro is gefinancierd door het Mondriaan Fonds. De Publieksfavoriet wordt bekengemaakt tijdens een speciale dag in het Stedelijk Museum Schiedam op 17 juni.

Het Stedelijk Museum Schiedam toont het werk van de vijf genomineerden op een tentoonstelling die even veelzijdig, aanstekelijk, diepzinnig en dynamisch is als de wereld rondom.

Charlotte Dumas

Politiehonden en politiepaarden waren haar eerste modellen, daarna volgden portretten van andere dieren, wild en getemd. Charlotte Dumas (Vlaardingen, 1977) kreeg internationale faam met haar foto’s: het meest recent van reddingshonden die in New York naar slachtoffers zochten onder het puin van de Twin Towers. Dumas heeft de gepensioneerde speurhonden her en der in de Verenigde Staten opgezocht en laat ze zien in aandachtige portretten, een bescheiden heldenreeks onder de titel Retrieved. Dit werk viel samen met het tienjarig jubileum van de aanslag in New York en is wereldwijd opgepikt door de pers. De hondenportretten bieden een nieuwe manier om de aanslag te herdenken: als spiegel van de menselijke ontreddering en van onze emotionele en functionele afhankelijkheid.

Dumas centreert de door haar gefotografeerde dieren in klassieke composities. Met contrasten van licht en donker haalt ze de glans, de zachtheid en de textuur naar voren van huid en haar. Haar werk is even sensueel als expressief, mede door de monumentaliteit en lichamelijke nabijheid van de dieren. Ella van Zanten, hoofd Kunstzaken van de RABO-collectie, die als scout Charlotte Dumas heeft voorgedragen voor de VKBK Prijs 2012 zegt: ‘De diepgaande relatie tussen haar en het dier en het psychologisch portret dat zij ervan weet vast te leggen, ontstijgt de fotografie van geliefde (huis)dieren en geeft het onderwerp een sterke, conceptuele dimensie.’

Of het nu gaat om renpaarden uit Palermo en Parijs, om vechthonden uit een asiel in New York of om tijgers uit reservaten en uit een rondreizend circus in Amerika: de dieren zijn zich steeds van Dumas’ aanwezigheid bewust. Ze poseren en kijken naar ons terug. Daarbij toont Dumas vele manieren van ‘kijken’. Zij koppelt haar eigen observatievermogen aan dat van de dieren. Die zijn even alert als wij en beloeren, begluren, taxeren en bezien ons, net zoals wij hen aan onze blikken onderwerpen.

David Jablonowski

David Jablonowksi (Bochum, Duitsland, 1982) maakt sculpturen met sterke contrasten in materialen. Hij bespeelt de tegenstelling tussen cultuurgeschiedenis en technologische ontwikkeling. Formele herinneringen aan tempels of grafmonumenten tekenen zich bijvoorbeeld af in stapelingen van blokken piepschuim, ogend als steen. En deze bouwwerken komen weer samen met printers, scanners, kopieermachines of onderdelen van een offsetpers: apparaten voor het vermenigvuldigen van informatie, die hier echter vooral hun eigen constructie weerspiegelen. Als Jablonowski een monitor gebruikt is het, anders dan gewoonlijk, niet de bedoeling dat het uitgezonden beeld het apparaat domineert. Voor- en achterkant zijn beide bepalend: de rug van een flat screen kan bij hem fungeren als het omslag van een boek dat openklapt.

Jablonowski’s werk heeft een ingetogen theatrale uitstraling. Het is alsof op de restanten van sacrale, ooit voor de eeuwigheid bestemde architectuur een doorgedraaide reproductiemaatschappij is gebouwd. Toch bedrijft Jablonowski geen maatschappijkritiek. Zijn beelden en installaties zijn daarvoor te raadselachtig. De apparaten krijgen een eigen esthetische aantrekkingskracht. Ze roepen de magie terug die schuilt in het paradoxale fenomeen van de herhaalde momentopname; de vermenigvuldiging van het unieke manuscript.

Unicum naast reproductie, kennis versus informatie, het diepzinnige tegenover het oppervlakkige: het werk van Jablonowski scant als het ware de verwantschappen en verschillen tussen historische en hedendaagse vormen van waardebepaling, communicatie en overlevering. Tentoonstellingsmaker Chris Driessen, directeur van de Stichting Fundament, die Jablonowski voor de VKBK Prijs 2012 heeft gescout, noemt zijn werk ‘formeel fascinerend’, maar roemt ook ‘de grote, filosofische en artistieke thema’s’ in Jablonowski’s werk, cirkelend rond de vraag: hoe wordt betekenis gemaakt en verspreid?

Tala Madani

In de virtuoze schilderijen en animatiefilms van Tala Madani treden voornamelijk mannen op. Gemakkelijk hebben die het niet. Ze staan elkaar naar het leven of hun kale hoofd wordt door steekvliegen belaagd tot het barst. Het werk van Madani is plastisch geschilderd en kruipt gemakkelijk onder je huid, ook al komt het geestig over. De humor ontvouwt zich al snel als grimmig en gewelddadig. Een man kan zelfs door zijn eigen schaduw worden bespot.

Onlangs maakte Madani een groep werken over djinns: wezens die bezit kunnen nemen van mensen. Zulke - meestal kwade - geesten doen ook in de 21ste eeuw wereldwijd hun invloed gelden. Madani speelt met dit grillige fenomeen. Zij vangt de spookbeelden die wij zelf in het leven roepen, en die overal en nergens kunnen opdoemen: bijvoorbeeld ook in de gedaante van een hoofddoek of sluier, getuige de actuele politieke onrust hierover in Nederland.

Tala Madani (1981, Teheran) woont sinds haar dertiende in het Westen. In Amerika voltooide ze Yale University School of Art, daarna bezocht ze de Rijksakademie in Amsterdam. Haar schilderijen en animatiefilms zijn opgenomen in de Saatchi Collectie in Londen en waren te zien op de expositie Greater New York, MoMA, PS1 (2010) en de Biennale van Venetië, in de groepstentoonstelling Speech Matters in het Deense paviljoen (2011). Eind 2011 opende haar eerste Nederlandse overzicht, in het Stedelijk Museum Bureau Amsterdam.

Madani werd genomineerd voor de Volkskrant Beeldende Kunst Prijs 2012 door Domeniek Ruijters, hoofdredacteur van vaktijdschrift Metropolis M. Hij noemt haar werk ‘ongelooflijk rijk en veelzijdig, terwijl het er zo eenvoudig uitziet.’ Madani’s belangrijkste onderwerpen zijn culturele en seksuele diversiteit. Deze materie wordt licht en helder in beeld gebracht, wat verraderlijk is, want haar voorstellingen zijn kritisch als cartoons of karikaturen in de krant. Daarbij zijn ze, zoals haar scout zegt: ‘keihard en messcherp’.

Rory Pilgrim

Rory Pilgrim (Bristol, Engeland, 1988) geeft een stem aan de kunst: de stem van de activist, maar ook die van de koorzanger. Waar al het goede in drieën komt, geldt dat bij hem voor het samengaan van beeldende, muzikale en politieke aspecten. Hij maakt performances die de kunst in het leven brengen en het leven in de kunst. Of, zoals kunstenaar Erik van Lieshout het zegt, die hem heeft gescout voor de VKBK Prijs 2012: ‘Rory wil de wereld veranderen door een nieuwe, harmonieuze manier van schoonheid te ontwikkelen. Bij hem hangt er altijd een regenboog over alles.’

Van Lieshout waardeert in het werk van Pilgrim dat het ‘politiek en sociaal is, op een heel eigen manier.’ Pilgrim richt een museumzaal bijvoorbeeld in als ontmoetingsplek, vergaderruimte en bezinningsoord ineen. Hij brengt vragen over individuele vrijheden en culturele en politieke verantwoordelijkheden naar voren. Soms nodigt hij scholieren uit, dan weer senioren of kerkgemeenschappen om hun stem te doen klinken, in een kringgesprek of speciaal voor de gelegenheid geschreven koorliederen, die gecomponeerd zijn door Pilgrim zelf.

Soms bekleedt Pilgrim de ramen van een kunstinstelling met een persoonlijke variant op ideële reclame, waarin een fijn gevoel voor kleur en vorm zichtbaar wordt. Zo verlevendigde hij in 2011 de gevel van De Hallen in Haarlem met het zonnig geel/oranje/rode werk Wholeheartedly: posters op maat, waarin de woorden ‘protect’ en ‘survive’ waren verwerkt. In het jaar dat de Nederlandse politiek in historische mate op de kunst bezuinigde, schemerde hier juist een pleidooi voor het koesteren van de kunsten in door. Een koor van scholieren zong de volledige tekst, inclusief de zinsneden ‘an absent voice, a beating heart’. Op Pilgrims aanwijzingen klonk hun lied als ‘een hartslag vol hoop’.

Sarah van Sonsbeeck

‘De vraag wat stilte is en hoe stilte te vinden, te bewaren en door te geven is, is belangrijk voor Sarah van Sonsbeeck’, zegt Macha Roesink, directeur van De Paviljoens in Almere, en zij voegt eraan toe: ‘Ik nomineer haar voor de VKBK Prijs 2012 omdat zij van de ogenschijnlijk dagelijkse realiteit met eenvoudige middelen een sublieme ervaring van ruimte kan creëren.’

Een voorbeeld van zulke bijzondere ruimtelijke ervaringen in Van Sonsbeecks werk is de sculptuur One Cubic Meter of Broken Silence uit 2009, een kubus van glas, die aanvankelijk perfect gesloten was: een roerloos en geruisloos toonbeeld van harmonie. Het stond in Almere in de open lucht, een geometrisch reservoir vervuld van niets dan leegte en stilte, als tegenwicht op de dynamiek en wanorde rondom. Totdat het werd gemolesteerd. Alle zijden en de bovenkant werden met grof geweld kapot geramd. One Cubic Meter of Silence veranderde in One Cubic Meter of Broken Silence. Het glas is gebroken en deels versplinterd, maar de vorm van de kubus bleef intact. Met de macht van de paradox markeren de sporen van geweld zo alsnog de (gebruuskeerde) stilte.

Sarah van Sonsbeeck (Utrecht, 1976) is als architect opgeleid aan de TU in Delft. Daarna voltooide ze de Rietveld Academie in Amsterdam en verbleef ze op de Rijksakademie. In 2010 publiceerde ze het kunstenaarsboek Mental Space, How my neighbours became buildings, waarin ze met tekeningen, foto’s, teksten en plattegronden de zichtlijnen en geluidsstromen inventariseert waarmee de buren haar huis in beslag (kunnen) nemen. De onafwendbare invloed van buitenaf wordt in haar latere werk Acoustic painting zo concreet mogelijk gesmoord, zij het ook in overdrachtelijke zin: de schilderijen annex wandreliëfs bestaan uit anti-tochtstrips en geluidswerende materialen, zoals was en watten, die voor alles de broosheid van het persoonlijke territorium weerkaatsen.

Wilma Sütö


Copyright © 2006-2013 by ArtSlant, Inc. All images and content remain the © of their rightful owners.