Chicago | Los Angeles | Miami | New York | San Francisco | Santa Fe
Amsterdam | Berlin | Brussels | London | Paris | São Paulo | Toronto | China | India | Worldwide
 
Amsterdam

Huis Marseille Museum voor Fotografie

Exhibition Detail
Second Nature
Keizersgracht 401
1016 EK Amsterdam
Netherlands


March 2nd, 2012 - June 3rd, 2012
Opening: 
March 2nd, 2012 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM
 
Hanaiapa  , Guy TillimGuy Tillim, Hanaiapa ,
Hiva Oa, 2011, Pigment ink on cotton paper
© Courtesy Stevenson gallery, South Africa
> QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://www.huismarseille.nl
NEIGHBORHOOD:  
Canal Girdle
EMAIL:  
info@huismarseille.nl
PHONE:  
31 20 5318989
OPEN HOURS:  
Tuesday - Sunday, 11.00 - 18.00 h (closed on Mondays)
TAGS:  
photography
> DESCRIPTION
[“My journeys have been idiosyncratic, often purposeless, not so much to commit journalism as to travel for its own sake.”]


The images of the South African photographer Guy Tillim (1962, Johannesburg) display an analytical precision that never fails to stir up the emotions. His photographic career began in the latter years of apartheid, and this period continues to affect his work. In the ten short years that he has worked as a freelance photographer for local and foreign media, including Reuters and Agence France Presse, he has moved away from photojournalism and towards a much more humane and subtle approach to his themes. After the successful publication of Congo Democratic in 2006 Guy Tillim decided to pursue a non-political subject, and in 2010 he bought a catamaran and sailed from New Zealand to the Polynesian islands. In the wake of the British explorer Captain James Cook (1728–1779), and more than a century after the painter Paul Gauguin (and numerous other artists), he sought to portray the modern landscapes of these ‘paradise islands’. His intensely light, vividly colourful, windblown landscapes occasionally call to mind the paintings of the Douanier Rousseau, but Guy Tillim’s photographs also reveal these landscapes as being new, up to date, and full of life. These are images that live long in the mind. They also advance the art of photography, for Guy Tillim’s work seems to have liberated the genre of landscape photography from every cliché that had ever crept in over the years. In collaboration with the Stevenson Gallery in Cape Town. A book with the same name will be published in 2012 by Prestel Verlag.

 [ “In reading the accounts of the artists who accompanied Captain James Cook, Guy Tillim was interested to note that their debates on-board ship around the subject of the representation of landscape are very similar to those we have today: how much do you ‘give’ a scene and how much do you let it speak for itself?”]

 

In brief: Guy Tillim was born in Johannesburg in 1962, and went on to study economics at the University of Cape Town. He started taking photographs in the 1980s, first with the Afropix collective, and later also for important foreign media. He has won many prizes, including the DaimlerChrysler Award for South African photography in 2004 and the Leica Oscar Barnack Award in 2005. Guy Tillim’s eminently collectable books include Jo’burg, 2005; Petros Village, 2006; Avenue Patrice Lumumba, 2008; and Roma, Città di mezzo, 2009.


[“My journeys have been idiosyncratic, often purposeless, not so much to commit journalism as to travel for its own sake.”]

De foto’s van de Zuid-Afrikaanse fotograaf Guy Tillim (1962, Johannesburg) hebben een analytische precisie die feilloos de emotie weet te treffen. Zijn carrière als fotograaf begon in de nadagen van de apartheid. Dat kenmerkt hem. In de kleine tien jaar dat hij als freelance fotograaf voor lokale en buitenlandse media werkte, o.a. Reuters en Agence France Presse, heeft hij de fotojournalistiek ingewisseld voor een veel humanere en genuanceerdere benadering van zijn thema’s. Na zijn succesvolle publicatie Congo Democratic in 2006, heeft hij voor een niet politiek onderwerp gekozen. In 2010 kocht Guy Tillim een catamaran en zeilde vanuit Nieuw Zeeland naar de Polynesische eilanden. In het spoor van de Britse ontdekkingsreiziger Captain James Cook (1728–1779), en ruim een eeuw later van de schilder Paul Gauguin, en vele andere kunstenaars, wilde hij het huidige landschap op deze paradijselijke eilanden opnieuw in beeld brengen. Zijn verbluffend lichte, intens kleurige en winderige landschappen doen op sommige momenten denken aan de schilderijen van Le Douanier Rousseau. In de foto’s van Guy Tillim toont zich dit landschap als nieuw, actueel en vol leven. Dit is werk dat lang op het netvlies blijft hangen. Ook de fotografie wordt ermee vooruit geholpen: met dit werk lijkt Guy Tillim het genre landschapsfotografie ontdaan te hebben van alle clichés die er mettertijd zijn ingeslopen. In samenwerking met de Stevenson Gallery in Kaapstad. Het gelijknamige boek verschijnt begin 2012 bij Prestel Verlag.

 [ “In reading the accounts of the artists who accompanied Captain James Cook, Guy Tillim was interested to note that their debates on-board ship around the subject of the epresentation of landscape are very similar to those we have today: how much do you ‘give’ a scene and how much do you let it speak for itself?”]

 

In het kort: Guy Tillim werd in 1962 geboren in Johannesburg. Hij studeerde economie aan de universiteit van Kaapstad. In de jaren tachtig begon hij te fotograferen, eerst bij het collectief Afropix, daarna ook voor grote buitenlandse media. Hij heeft veel prijzen gewonnen: waaronder in 2004 de DaimlerChrysler Award voor Zuid-Afrikaanse fotografie, evenals de Leica Oscar Barnack Award in het jaar daarop. Ook de boeken van Guy Tillim zijn het verzamelen waard, o.a.: Jo’burg, 2005; Petros Village, 2006; Avenue Patrice Lumumba, 2008; Roma, Città di mezzo, 2009.


Copyright © 2006-2013 by ArtSlant, Inc. All images and content remain the © of their rightful owners.