STREET now open! Chicago | Los Angeles | Miami | New York | San Francisco | Santa Fe
Amsterdam | Berlin | Brussels | London | Paris | São Paulo | Toronto | China | India | Worldwide
 
Amsterdam
http://matthewfelixsun.blogspot.com/
Impressionism from National Gallery of Art (DC) in San Francisco

Last weekend, I visited Legion of Honor Museum, San Francisco, to see a special exhibition - Intimate Impressionism from the National Gallery of Art from Washington D.C. (March 29, 2014 – August 3, 2014).  

DSCN1836 _ Impressionism from National Gallery of Art at Legion of Honor Museum, San Francisco

The exhibition included many paintings from the period of the emergence of the Impressionism, most of them were of modest dimensions, with subjects ranging from intimate portraits, still life to familiar outdoor landscapes.

The exhibition was organized and displayed by artists, a choice group including many big names and a few less familiar ones.  Below are the paintings I liked most:

DSCN1805 _ Self-Portrait, 1861, Henri Fantin-Latour, National Gallery of Art at Legion of Honor
Self-Portrait, 1861, Henri Fantin-Latour

DSCN1807 _ Three Peaches on a Plate, 1868, Henri Fantin-Latour, National Gallery of Art at Legion of Honor
Three Peaches on a Plate, 1868, Henri Fantin-Latour

DSCN1806 _ Oysters, 1862, Édouard Manet, National Gallery of Art at Legion of Honor
Oysters, 1862, Édouard Manet

DSCN1808 _ The Artist's Studio, ca. 1868, Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot, National Gallery of Art at Legion of Honor
The Artist's Studio, ca. 1868, Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot

DSCN1815 _ The Towpath, 1864, Johan Barthold Jongkind, National Gallery of Art at Legion of Honor
The Towpath, 1864, Johan Barthold Jongkind

DSCN1816 _ Beach at Trouville, 1864/65, Eugène Boudin, National Gallery of Art at Legion of Honor
Beach at Trouville, 1864/65, Eugène Boudin

DSCN1817 _ Beach at Trouville, 1863, Eugène Boudin, National Gallery of Art at Legion of Honor
Beach at Trouville, 1863, Eugène Boudin

DSCN1822 _ Mound of Butter, 1875/1885, Antoine Vollon, National Gallery of Art at Legion of Honor
Mound of Butter, 1875/1885, Antoine Vollon

DSCN1820 _ Claude Monet, 1872, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, National Gallery of Art at Legion of Honor
Claude Monet, 1872, Pierre-Auguste Renoir

DSCN1831 _ The Fence, 1872, Camille Pissarro, National Gallery of Art at Legion of Honor
The Fence, 1872, Camille Pissarro

DSCN1830 _ Flood at Port-Marly, 1872, Alfred Sisley, National Gallery of Art at Legion of Honor
Flood at Port-Marly, 1872, Alfred Sisley

DSCN1827 _ Boulevard Héloïse, Argenteuil, 1872, Alfred Sisley, National Gallery of Art at Legion of Honor
Boulevard Héloïse, Argenteuil, 1872, Alfred Sisley

DSCN1838 _ Madame Henriot, ca. 1876, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, National Gallery of Art at Legion of Honor
 Madame Henriot, ca. 1876, Pierre-Auguste Renoir

DSCN1841 _ Carmen Caudin, 1885, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, National Gallery of Art at Legion of Honor
Carmen Caudin, 1885, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec

DSCN1842 _ Three Pears, 1878/79, Paul Cézanne, National Gallery of Art at Legion of Honor
Three Pears, 1878/79, Paul Cézanne

DSCN1845 _ Flower Beds in Holland, ca. 1883, Vincent van Gogh, National Gallery of Art at Legion of Honor
Flower Beds in Holland, ca. 1883, Vincent van Gogh

DSCN1852 _ Village by the Sea in Brittany, ca. 1880, Odilon Redon, National Gallery of Art at Legion of Honor
Village by the Sea in Brittany, ca. 1880, Odilon Redon

DSCN1854 _ Breton Village, ca. 1890, Odilon Redon, National Gallery of Art at Legion of Honor
Breton Village, ca. 1890, Odilon Redon

DSCN1853 _ Landscape of the Île-de-France,  Édouard Vuillard, National Gallery of Art at Legion of Honor
 Landscape of the Île-de-France,  Édouard Vuillard

DSCN1856 _ Woman in Black, ca. 1891, Édouard Vuillard, National Gallery of Art at Legion of Honor
Woman in Black, ca. 1891, Édouard Vuillard

DSCN1870 _ The Artist's Studio, 1900, Pierre Bonnard, National Gallery of Art at Legion of Honor
The Artist's Studio, 1900, Pierre Bonnard

DSCN1867 _ Red Plums, 1892, Pierre Bonnard, National Gallery of Art at Legion of Honor
Red Plums, 1892, Pierre Bonnard

DSCN1872 _ Bouquet of Flowers, ca. 1926, Pierre Bonnard, National Gallery of Art at Legion of Honor
Bouquet of Flowers, ca. 1926, Pierre Bonnard

Famous names included in the exhibition included Monet, Gauguin, etc. but I felt their works somewhat less moving and affecting than their the better efforts, nevertheless, their works deserved to be included in this blog:

DSCN1818 _ Horses in a Meadow, 1871, Edgar
 Degas, National Gallery of Art at Legion of Honor
Horses in a Meadow, 1871, Edgar Degas

DSCN1809 _ The Artist's Sister at a Window, 1869, Berthe Morisot, National Gallery of Art at Legion of Honor
The Artist's Sister at a Window, 1869, Berthe Morisot

DSCN1832 _ Argenteuil, ca. 1872, Claude Monet, National Gallery of Art at Legion of Honor
Argenteuil, ca. 1872, Claude Monet

DSCN1844 _ Self-Portrait Dedicated to Carrière, 1888 or 1889, Paul Gauguin, National Gallery of Art at Legion of Honor
Self-Portrait Dedicated to Carrière, 1888 or 1889, Paul Gauguin

It was a marvelous show and the last day of the exhibition is August 3rd.  Do try to catch this beautiful presentation.


Other Related posts on Art · 文化 · Kunst:
- My Favorite Paintings at Museum of Legion of Honor, San Francisco
- Birth of Impressionism at De Young Museum, San Francisco
- Van Gogh, Gauguin, Cézanne and Beyond: Post-Impressionist Masterpieces from the Musée d’Orsay at De Young Museum, San Francisco
- Venetian Masterpieces from Vienna at De Young Museum
- Post-Impressionism Masterpieces from the Musée d’Orsay, De Young Museum, San Francisco 2010-11
- Get Ready for the Treasures from Musée d’Orsay

Posted by Matthew Felix Sun on 7/10 | tags: impressionism San Francisco Legion of Honor washington dc National Gallery of Art painting figurative realism landscape traditional




My e-Portfolio on MagCloud and ISSUU

Finally, I made an electronic portfolio of my selected paintings, drawings and installations and it can be viewed on ISSUU:

 


Unfortunately, ISSUU would not allow my readers to print the copies so, you may send me request, or sign on my eNewsletter on my website: www.matthewfelixsun.com and I will be very happy to send a free PDF to you.

Alternatively, I am also offering a professionally bound copy via MagCloud, at the cost of $8 per copy (Wire-O-Bind), 8.5"x11":

Art Portfolio of Matthew Felix Sun
Electronic portfolio of awarding winning fine artist, Matthew Felix Sun www.matthewfelixsun.com
 


or a square one, 8.5"x8.5", in perfect bound, offered at $8.5 per copy (with 8 extra pages):

New Publication
Electronic portfolio of awarding winning fine artist, Matthew Felix Sun www.matthewfelixsun.com
 




Related posts on Art · 文化 · Kunst
- New Wilde Magazine Publications
- Two Figure Paintings of Mine Published by Wilde Magazine Issue 2
- Pomona Valley Review, Issue 7 Published with My Paintings and Installation
- Four Paintings of Mine Published by Superstition Review, April 2013
- Three Magazines to Publish My Works in April
- Publications

Posted by Matthew Felix Sun on 6/20 | tags: landscape realism Magcloud installation drawing figurative painting ebook ISSUU modern




My e-Portfolio on MagCloud and ISSUU

Finally, I made an electronic portfolio of my selected paintings, drawings and installations and it can be viewed on ISSUU:

 


Unfortunately, ISSUU would not allow my readers to print the copies so, you may send me request, or sign on my eNewsletter on my website: www.matthewfelixsun.com and I will be very happy to send a free PDF to you.

Alternatively, I am also offering a professionally bound copy via MagCloud, at the cost of $8 per copy:

On MagCloud

Art Portfolio of Matthew Felix Sun
Electronic portfolio of awarding winning fine artist, Matthew Felix Sun www.matthewfelixsun.com
 



Related posts on Art · 文化 · Kunst
- New Wilde Magazine Publications
- Two Figure Paintings of Mine Published by Wilde Magazine Issue 2
- Pomona Valley Review, Issue 7 Published with My Paintings and Installation
- Four Paintings of Mine Published by Superstition Review, April 2013
- Three Magazines to Publish My Works in April
- Publications

Posted by Matthew Felix Sun on 6/20




My Favorite Paintings at Österreichische Galerie Belvedere, Vienna

The complex of the Belvedere Palaces in Vienna contained the Österreichische Galerie Belvedere (Austrian Gallery Belvedere), showcasing Austrian artists, such as Gustave Klimt (1862-1918) and Egon Schiele (1890-1918), two giants of the late 19th to early 20th century and their works were indeed my favorites in this museum.

Of many works by these two artists, I'll call Braut (Bride) by Klimt as my first favorite.  It was less iconic than the more renown Kuss (Kiss), but the images of this piece were richer and the messages more layered.  I particularly loved the interplays of the patterns and the juxtaposition of those overtly sensual, to the point of near indecent fleshy figures, permeating a hedonistic and even sinister atmosphere. It was the unabashed abandon carried the day.


Braut, Gustav Klimt, 1918, Oberes Belvedere, Wien

My second favorite painting there was Fensterwand (Hauswand) (Window Wall (House Wall), which contrasted most violently with the Braut by Klimt.


Fensterwand (Hauswand), Egon Schiele, 1914, Oberes Belvedere, Wien

This Schiele piece, somber though not stern, was orderly and becalming, with dashes of colors accenting the overall gray scheme.  It had a purifying effect, yet it was also playful in the details.  This piece, completed just four short years before both his wife and he succumbed to the Spanish flu pandemic, represented the world to be smashed by the Great War (World War I).  A very beautiful and poignant piece.

My Favorite Museum Collection Series
>> My Favorite Museum Collection Series 82: My Favorite Paintings at Leopold Museum, Vienna
<< My Favorite Museum Collection Series 80: My Favorite Paintings at Albertina Museum, Vienna


List of My Favorite Artworks in the Museums I've Visited


Other Related posts on Art · 文化 · Kunst:
- Magnificent Churches in Vienna
- Kaiser Maximilian I und die Kunst der Duerer-Zeit in Albertina Museum, Vienna
- My Favorite Paintings at Akademie der bildenden Künste Wien
- My Favorite Paintings at Kunsthistorisches Museum, Wien (Vienna)
- Gustav Klimt and Egon Schiele in Wien (Vienna)
- Visiting Four Universities in Austria and Italy

Posted by Matthew Felix Sun on 6/15 | tags: Schiele Klimt Vienna surrealism landscape figurative painting Belvedere modern




My Favorite Paintings at Albertina Museum, Vienna

The renown Albertina Museum in Vienna, Austria was mostly valued for its graphic art collections, such as works by the incomparable Albrecht Dürer, whose ultra-realistic drawings and watercolors were so delicate that the museum only put reproductions on display, therefore, I refrain from citing his works as my favorite there.

Albertina Museum also had some really impressive oil paintings, amongst which, I was particularly enthralled by paintings by Max Beckmann and Paul Delvaux.

The Frau mit Katze (Woman with Cat) by German artist Max Beckmann was a stylish, understated yet highly erotically charged woman portrait, typical of his pre-Third-Reich oeuvre, without the unsettling sinister atmosphere permeated in his later works.

I was particularly enchanted by the sitters' self-satisfying langour, the marvelously subtle and bold interplays of orange, yellow, pale purple, green and black shades, and the sitter's slightly monumental bulk, which didn't take away any of her sensuality or her femininity.

DSCN9068 _ Frau mit Katze (Woman and Cat), 1942, Öl auf Leinwand, Max Beckmann, Albertina Museum, Wien, 2 October - 500
Frau mit Katze (Woman and Cat), Max Beckmann, 1942, Öl auf Leinwand (Oil on Canvas)

My second favorite works was Belgian painter Paul Delvaux's Landschaft mit Lanternen (Landscape with Lanterns) - a mysterious cityscape which extended to landscape under cool moonshine, almost symmetrical, with a noble-looking woman stood at the foreground, looking into the goings-on on the receding away from the viewers, including two small figures in white, carrying a stretcher with a person enshrouded in white sheet, against the gently lit hills dotted with unfinished architectures, or strange gate-shaped structures, corresponding to the seemingly unfinished city structures in the foreground.

DSCN9070 _ Landschaft mit Lanternen, 1958, Paul Delvaux (1897-1994), Albertina, - 500
Landschaft mit Lanternen (Landscape with Lanterns), 1958, Paul Delvaux (1897-1994)

The cool atmosphere and the classical symmetry recalled The Ideal City by Piero della Francesca (?) though the mood of Delvaux's painting was much darker and more mysterious, even quite sinister, and the story was much harder to decode, thus even more fatally attractive.

File:Piero della Francesca Ideal City.jpg
The Ideal City, Piero della Francesca, public domain work of art

During my visit, I shot the picture with a viewer looking inside the frames, and her presence added another layer to this haunting piece.

My Favorite Museum Collection Series
>> My Favorite Museum Collection Series 81: My Favorite Paintings at Österreichische Galerie Belvedere, Vienna
<< My Favorite Museum Collection Series 79: My Favorite Sculptures in Cathédrale Notre Dame de Paris


List of My Favorite Artworks in the Museums I've Visited


Other Related posts on Art · 文化 · Kunst:
- Magnificent Churches in Vienna
- Kaiser Maximilian I und die Kunst der Duerer-Zeit in Albertina Museum, Vienna
- My Favorite Paintings at Akademie der bildenden Künste Wien
- My Favorite Paintings at Kunsthistorisches Museum, Wien (Vienna)
- Gustav Klimt and Egon Schiele in Wien (Vienna)
- Visiting Four Universities in Austria and Italy

Posted by Matthew Felix Sun on 6/10 | tags: Albertina Vienna Paul Delvaux Max Beckmann figurative realism surrealism modern




My Favorite Sculptures in Cathédrale Notre Dame de Paris

Whenever Cathédrale Notre Dame de Paris was mentioned, one often thinks of the fantastic gargoyles on the rooftop and the rose windows above the portals, justifiably so.  Yet, despite all those famous objects, and the holy artifacts in the treasury, I would cite the below two sculptures as my favorite from the cathedral.

My first favorite was a bronze equestrian statue of Charlemagne, weather beaten, hollow looking yet undeniably grand, dominating the side plaza.  The green patina interwove with dark sooty patches, adding senses of history to this marvelous sculpture.

IMG_8227 _ Cathédrale Notre Dame de Paris, 2008
Equestrian Statue of Charlemagne

My second favorite was one of the many figures by one of the portals to the cathedral, centering on the patron saint Denis of Paris, who was the third century Bishop of Paris and was martyred shortly after 250 AD. According to legend, after his beheading, he picked up his head and walked ten kilometres (six miles) and preached a sermon during his final voyage.

Saint Denis, along with other figures, including two winged angels, stood on pedestals supported by strange beasts and figures, looked quite serene, with their flowing draperies, in their simplistic lines, like the creations of master draftsman, formed a memorable but not ungainly sight for this ghastly story.

IMG_8242 _ Cathédrale Notre Dame de Paris, 2008
Saint Denis and Angels

My Favorite Museum Collection Series
>> My Favorite Museum Collection Series 80: My Favorite Paintings at Albertina Museum, Vienna
<< My Favorite Museum Collection Series 78: My Favorite Sculptures in Église de Saint-Germain-des-Prés
 
 


List of My Favorite Artworks in the Museums I've Visited  


Other Related posts on Art · 文化 · Kunst:
- My Favorite Sculptures in Basilique Saint-Denis (Paris)
- My Favorite Paintings at Église Saint-Sulpice, Paris
- Magnificent Churches in Vienna
- My Favorite Sculpture and Painting at Church of Our Lady, Bruges
- My Favorite Paintings in Cathedral of Our Lady, Antwerp (Antwerpen), Belgium
- Architectural Wonder - the Cathedral of Christ the Light in Oakland

Posted by Matthew Felix Sun on 6/7 | tags: Notre Dame figurative sculpture realism traditional




New Publications in Pomona Valley Review

Last weekend, Issue 8 (May 2014) of Pomona Valley Review was published online and two of my paintings were included in this new edition, following the publication of my two paintings and an installation in their last year's edition, Issue 7.

The paintings included in the magazine were an oil painting, Surveying (2013), and a gouache painting, Wildflowers (2014).

Surveying / 勘查 / Begutachtung
Surveying, Oil on Canvas, 28" x 22"

Wildflowers / 野花 / Wildblumen
Wildflowers, Gouache on Paper, 7" x 10.25"

These two paintings, different in sizes, media, and particularly colors - one was monochromatic and the other burst with colors - shared my current fascination with intricate and repeating patterns, evident in the whirling wasted fields in Surveying and undulating flowers and green leaves in Wildflowers

Below is the comprehensive survey of my published artworks:

 

www.flickr.com
Matthew Felix Sun's My Publications (displayed on Flickr) photoset Matthew Felix Sun's My Publications (displayed on Flickr) photoset



Related posts on Art · 文化 · Kunst
- New Wilde Magazine Publications
- Two Figure Paintings of Mine Published by Wilde Magazine Issue 2
- Pomona Valley Review, Issue 7 Published with My Paintings and Installation
- Four Paintings of Mine Published by Superstition Review, April 2013
- Three Magazines to Publish My Works in April
- Publications

Posted by Matthew Felix Sun on 5/21 | tags: publication Pomona Valley Review painting figurative landscape surrealism




My Favorite Artworks in Panthéon, Paris

Panthéon in Paris was originally built as a church dedicated to St. Genevieve, but was converted into a secular mausoleum housing the remains of most renown figures, such as Voltaire, Rousseau, Victor Hugo, Zola and Marie Curie.

The architecture was fashioned after the one in Rome in the neoclassical style.  There were many paintings, sculptures and relief to see inside the vast expanse of the building.

My favorite artwork in Panthéon was a sculpture whose name and creator I failed to record and could not find.  This sculpture featured two kneeling giants, hoisting a huge tablet depicting hardworking on earth and the welcoming hosts of angels above, with an inscription at the base: "Aeterni custodibus ignis quorum splendet opus nomen oblivio tenet", which was translated by Google as "Eternal guards fire which shines work has forgotten to name".

IMG__7767 - A Sculpture inside Panthéon, Paris"

My second favorite artwork there was the tomb of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, a deep red wooden tomb, in the shape of an ancient temple, whose "roof" was edged with thirteen mourning face masks, like seen in the Greek dramas.  On the front, delicate carving relief depicted people dressed or being naked in ancient Greek style, laying tributes on the tomb with an inscription of "Rousseau", and looked upon by two figures flanked by columns, of those two figures, I presumed to be Apollo and a muse.  The writing above the central group of figures and the tomb of the philosopher and writer, stated "Ici repose l'homme de la nature et de la vérité" (Here lies the man of nature and truth). 

IMG__7774 - Tomb of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, in the crypt of Panthéon, Paris

My Favorite Museum Collection Series
>> My Favorite Museum Collection Series 78: My Favorite Sculptures in Église de Saint-Germain-des-Prés
<< My Favorite Museum Collection Series 76: My Favorite Drawing and Painting in Musée Cognacq-Jay, Paris
 


List of My Favorite Artworks in the Museums I've Visited  


Other Related posts on Art · 文化 · Kunst:
- My Favorite Sculpture and Painting at Musée d'Art moderne de la Ville de Paris
- My Favorite Sculptures in les Jardins du Ranelag, Paris
- My Favorite Paintings at the National Gallery (Schwarzenberg Palace) in Prague
- Vasari Frescoes and Michelangeo Sculpture - My Favorite Works at Palazzo Vecchio, Firenze
- Angelic and Evil - Bunkerei and Palais Augarten in Augarten, Vienna
- Paintings from Imperial Palace Museum, Shenyang, China

Posted by Matthew Felix Sun on 5/9 | tags: Pantheon Paris figurative sculpture realism traditional




My Favorite Drawing and Painting in Musée Cognacq-Jay, Paris

Wandering in Marais district of Paris, during my 2008 trip, I stumbled upon a small museum, the Musée Cognacq-Jay, located in Hôtel Donon, and saw some wonderful paintings and drawings by the likes of Watteau, Tiepolo, Rembrandt, Rubens, Cézanne and Degas, amongst decorative art displayed in twenty paneled rooms (four floors) in the styles of Louis XV and Louis XVI. "The collection was formed between 1900–1925 by Théodore-Ernest Cognacq (1839–1928) and his wife Marie-Louise Jay (1838–1925), founders of La Samaritaine department store." [source: wikipedia]

IMG_8980 - Musée Cognacq-Jay, Paris, 2008

What interested me most were works by Antoine Watteau, and my favorite was a study, titled Etudes de deux figures de femmes (Study of two female figures).  The line drawing was fluid, with just enough detail to give the figure a three-dimensional modeling, without overwhelming the figure with large hatching, therefore losing the trademark delicacy of the artist.  The figures were either aristocrats or actresses caught in their moonlit performances, a favored setting by this peculiar painter.

IMG_8970 - Etudes de deux figures de femmes Antoine Watteau, Antoine Watteau, Musée Cognacq-Jay, Paris, 2008
Etudes de deux figures de femmes, Antoine Watteau

My second favorite was an oil painting, a portrait of Gaspard Gevartius (an Antwerp city clerk) by Peter Paul Rubens.

IMG_8984 - Gaspard Gevartius, Peter Paul Rubens, Musée Cognacq-Jay, Paris, 2008
Gaspard Gevartius, Peter Paul Rubens

This painting is very similar to another portrait of Gevartius by Rubens, collected in Antwerpen Koninklijk Museum voor Schone Kunsten. Instead of giving him a writing table, a bust on the table represents the Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius, a source of inspiration to Gevartius on whom he also wrote an unpublished book, as seen in the Antwerp painting, this more intimate piece in Paris focused solely on the sitter's bust.  The sharp features were rendered meticulously, and the rather serious, dark or even gloomy portrait was enlivened by the rosy cheeks of the sitter and his white ruff, which though elaborate, didn't compete with the face, rather it became a clever framing device, and draw viewer's eye upwards towards the sitter's intelligent face. Here, intimacy trumps grandeur.

My Favorite Museum Collection Series
>> My Favorite Museum Collection Series 77: My Favorite Artworks in Panthéon, Paris
<< My Favorite Museum Collection Series 75: My Favorite Sculptures in le Jardin des Tuileries
 


List of My Favorite Artworks in the Museums I've Visited  


Other Related posts on Art · 文化 · Kunst:
- My Favorite Sculpture and Painting at Musée d'Art moderne de la Ville de Paris
- My Favorite Sculptures in les Jardins du Ranelag, Paris
- Pieter Paul Rubens (June 28, 1577 – May 30, 1640)
- My Favorite Paintings at Antwerpen Koninklijk Museum voor Schone Kunsten (Antwerp Royal Museum of Fine Arts)
- My Favorite Paintings in Cathedral of Our Lady, Antwerp (Antwerpen), Belgium
- My Favorite Paintings at the Wallace Collection, London
- My Favorite Paintings at Museum of Legion of Honor, San Francisco
- Revisiting Norton Simon Museum in Pasadena

Posted by Matthew Felix Sun on 5/3 | tags: Watteau Rubens Paris painting drawing figurative realism traditional




My Favorite Sculptures in le Jardin des Tuileries

Le Jardin des Tuileries, the former royal garden dated back to Catherine de Medicis in the 16th century, situates between the Louvre and Place de la Concorde, is a wonderful place for Parisians to promenade, meet, and display.

It also hosts a wonderful museum, Musée de l'Orangerie, built to host the amazing series of Claude Monet's Les Nymphéas (Water Lilies).  Besides major works by Monet, it also collected many important late 19th - early 20th century modern works (Paul Guillaume collection).

In 2000, when I visited Paris for the first time, Musée de l'Orangerie was closed for renovation and only during my second trip to Paris in 2008, was I able to see Les Nymphéas and other amazing works inside the oval-shaped museum.

Artworks in Paris were not confined inside museums, therefore we saw many sculptures in the ground of Jardin des Tuileries.

The most amazing one was a gigantic modern work, by American artist Richard Serra, Clara-Clara, which consisted of two giant curved steel plates, forming an opened doorway, echoing the carriage driveway behind it.  The sculpture sat in the center of the elongated Jardin and from the opening of the "arms", seen from the side of the reflection pond, one could see the distant obelisk in the Place de la Concorde.  Seen across the pond, one could see a tall jet of water fountain competing with the obelisk.

IMG__7907 - Clara Clara, Richard Serra, Jardin des Tuileries, Paris 2008

IMG_7900 - Clara Clara, Richard Serra, Jardin des Tuileries, Paris 2008

IMG_7897 - Clara Clara, Richard Serra, Jardin des Tuileries, Paris 2008

The fun part was walking around it, examining the changing shapes from various vantage points, and walking through the opening and to admire the "strategically placed" obelisk in the middle of the opening of the outstretching sensuous arms of Clara-Clara.

Clara Clara - Richard Serra - Jardin des Tuileries
Photo courtesy: Tybo

Clara Clara - Richard Serra - Jardin des Tuileries
Photo courtesy: Tybo

Clara Clara - Richard Serra - Jardin des Tuileries
Photo courtesy: Tybo

The second favorite sculpture of mine in le Jardin des Tuileries was Le Baiser (The Kiss) (1934 cast of the marble original), by omnipresent Auguste Rodin. It was a typical Rodin, monumental, sensual, life-like and larger than life.  Despite the metal material, and the though marvelous but unnatural green patina, the lovers were every inch the flesh and blood beings.

The Kiss by Rodin
Photo courtesy: Sarah Stierch

IMG__7910 - The Kiss, Auguste Rodin, , Jardin des Tuileries, Paris 2008

My Favorite Museum Collection Series
>> My Favorite Museum Collection Series 76: My Favorite Drawing and Painting in Musée Cognacq-Jay, Paris
<< My Favorite Museum Collection Series 74: My Favorite Artwork at Musée de Cluny - Musée national du Moyen Âge, Paris
 


List of My Favorite Artworks in the Museums I've Visited  


Other Related posts on Art · 文化 · Kunst:

- My Favorite Sculptures in Jardin du Luxembourg, Paris
- My Favorite Sculptures in les Jardins du Ranelag, Paris
- Richard Serra in Grand Palais, Paris
- Rodin and Richard Serra in Cantor Arts Center, Stanford University
- Inside Richard Serra's Sculpture "Sequence" at Cantor Arts Center, Stanford University
- Richard Serra Drawing and 2010 SECA Art Award at SFMOMA
- My Favorite Sculptures at Musée Rodin, Paris
- Revisiting Norton Simon Museum in Pasadena
- My Favorite Sculptures at Cimetière du Père-Lachaise, Paris
- Art in the Streets of Shenyang, China
- A Day at Palace of Fine Arts & Crissy Field in San Francisco

Posted by Matthew Felix Sun on 4/27 | tags: Paris serra rodin abstract sculpture installation realism traditional




My Favorite Artwork at Musée de Cluny - Musée national du Moyen Âge, Paris

Not far from Jardin du Luxembourg in Paris, lies Musée de Cluny, officially known as Musée National du Moyen Âge, which boasts many magnificent ancient artifacts.  Even for people who are not usually interested in the Medieval era, if they are open-minded enough, they might be pleasantly surprised by many surprisingly vital things they'll encounter there, and might even re-assess their own notions of stilted Middle-Age.

My favorite collection in this museum was a group of six tapestries, under the name of La Dame à la licorne - The Lady and the Unicorn: My only desire and five senses. In the dark room, the pale pink tapestries glowed with unbridled sensuality and it was the culmination of the chivalry culture of the romantic era.

Musée National du Moyen Âge: Lady_and_the_Unicorn by Atlant
Photo courtesy of Atlant

La Dame à la licorne: A mon seul désir, Musée National du Moyen Âge, Paris, 2008
La Dame à la licorne: A mon seul désir, Musée National du Moyen Âge, Paris, 2008

My second favorite object was harder to pick amongst numerous wonderful things and finally I decided on an ancient tile with a bird dominating the center of the square, painted light on maroon colored background. Evocative pose, rich coloration, fluid lines, economical yet rich in detail, it was startlingly modern and authentically ancient. 

Ancient Tile - Musée national du Moyen Âge, Paris, 2008

My Favorite Museum Collection Series
>> My Favorite Museum Collection Series 75: My Favorite Sculptures in le Jardin des Tuileries
<< My Favorite Museum Collection Series 73: My Favorite Artworks at Musée National Eugène Delacroix, Paris
 


List of My Favorite Artworks in the Museums I've Visited  

Other Related posts on Art · 文化 · Kunst:
- Musée de Cluny - Musée national du Moyen Âge, Paris
- The Cloisters - The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City
- My Favorite Paintings at Musée Marmottan Monet
- My Favorite Sculptures at Musée Rodin, Paris
- Revisiting Norton Simon Museum in Pasadena
- My Favorite Paintings from Musée Picasso, Paris
- My Favorite Sculptures at Cimetière du Père-Lachaise, Paris
- My Favorite Paintings in Cathedral of Our Lady, Antwerp (Antwerpen), Belgium

Posted by Matthew Felix Sun on 4/23 | tags: figurative abstract tapestry tile line drawing Paris




My Favorite Artworks at Musée National Eugène Delacroix, Paris

Musée National Eugène Delacroix (Musée Delacroix) in Paris is a modest museum which though contains works from nearly every phase of Delacroix’s career, covering many of his themes, along with some of his memorabilia.

According to the museum, "Magdalene in the Desert, exhibited at the 1845 Salon and one of the museum’s major paintings, is a most unusual religious composition, as compared to Education of the Virgin, painted in Nohant in 1842. The museum also boasts the artist’s only three attempts at fresco, which were done in Valmont (1834)."

These paintings, sketches and other works were intimate and quite personal, comparing to his more monumental works often encountered in more exalted institutions, such as Musée du Louvre. Incidentally, one of my two favorite artworks in Musée Delacroix was a preparation work for his gigantic La Mort de Sardanapale (Death of Sardanapalus), collected by Louvre. 

IMG_9000 - Study for La Mort de Sardanapale, Eugène Delacroix, Musée Delacroix, Paris, 2008

Though concentrating on a small slice of the huge final composition, this study conveyed the same strange mix of terror and abandon.  With its exceptionally delicate coloration, its figures looking like exotic birds in strange poses, this study was eerily beautiful and even evoked the calm world of Albrecht Dürer's meticulous watercolor still life.  Being a romanticist, Delacroix's work though was naturally more sweeping in execution; being a study, it also carried impressionistic traits.

My second favorite work there was another study for another historical moment - Study for Mirabeau Confronts the Marquis de Dreux-Brézé, during the French Revolution, over the procedure therefore substance of the congress of three estates.

IMG_9004 - Study for Mirabeau Confronts the Marquis de Dreux-Brézé, Eugène Delacroix, Musée Delacroix, Paris, 2008

This study was both energetic and economic.  The eloquence of the painting lay in the restrained bod languages of the grandees, whose multiplying dark frocks and gray wigs foreshadowed the mob scenes soon to come, and the gilded panels and roof of the interior clashed violently with the somber and unsmiling figures of the confronting parties.  Despite being a sketch, it was a masterpiece, similar to many very revealing and satisfying study sketches by Pieter Paul Rubens. 

The final composition of this work is in the Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek in Copenhagen.  One day I'd love to see it there, and to see whether it would be one of my two favorites there or not.

My Favorite Museum Collection Series
>> My Favorite Museum Collection Series 74: My Favorite Artwork at Musée de Cluny - Musée national du Moyen Âge, Paris

<< My Favorite Museum Collection Series 72: My Favorite Artworks at Maison de Victor Hugo, Paris 


List of My Favorite Artworks in the Museums I've Visited  

Other Related posts on Art · 文化 · Kunst:
- My Favorite Paintings at Musée Marmottan Monet
- My Favorite Sculptures at Musée Rodin, Paris
- Revisiting Norton Simon Museum in Pasadena
- My Favorite Paintings from Musée Picasso, Paris
- The Museum of Modern Art, New York City
- My Favorite Sculptures at Cimetière du Père-Lachaise, Paris
- My Favorite Paintings in the Courtauld Gallery at Somerset House, London
- My Favorite Paintings in Cathedral of Our Lady, Antwerp (Antwerpen), Belgium

Posted by Matthew Felix Sun on 4/11 | tags: painting drawing figurative realism traditional




George W. Bush, the Artist and the Apocalypse

Former US president George W. Bush (2001-2009) is immersing himself in the art world and has created some rather surprisingly interesting portraits of world leaders, most of them he encountered during his presidency, arguably the worst one ever in the US history.



http://www.bushcenter.org/sites/default/files/styles/hp_slider/public/aol-wideshot-homeslidercrop.jpg?itok=vS-8mmG9
Image source: George W. Bush Center

During his horrible and incompetent presidency, George W. Bush (GWB) was often criticized as an imbecile ninny occupying a high office due to his fabulous family connection - his father Georg Bush was the president of the US from 1989 to 1993.  To me, that argument was incorrect and way too benevolent.  GWB did many horrible things not due to his stupidity, but his fundamental believe in those horrible things.

To me, this painting of mine below, The Triumph of Saint George, created during the time he was drumming up the invasion of Iraq in 2003, reflects what he was; the painting also jump-started my ongoing Apocalypse Series., to commemorate the miseries of humankind.

 Oil painting, The Triumph of Saint George, by Matthew Felix Sun
Triumph of Saint George, Oil on Canvas, 48" x 30", 2003

GWB was surely not stupid, and to his credit that he started to learn to appreciate art in his retirement.  Too bad, nobody had convinced him before his political ascendency that his spending more time in his own studio and many museums, rather than in Oval Office, would have benefit the humanity more, much, much more.

It was just as tragic and regrettable as the Akademie der bildenden Künste Wien's refusal to admit the artistically frustrated young Adolf Hitler.

C'est la vie.


Other Related posts on Art · 文化 · Kunst:
- The Modern Art Iraq (Online) Archive
- Politics and Profits
- Herakles, not Hamlet
- "The Triumph of Saint George" (2003)
- My "Apocalypse Series" on Synchronized Chaos Webzine
- Tragedies of Our Time
- Thoughts on Originality
- My Featured Work - Portrait Painting "Grandma"

Posted by Matthew Felix Sun on 4/6 | tags: portrait apocalypse politics George W. Bush painting figurative modern




My Favorite Artworks at Maison de Victor Hugo, Paris

After visiting Balzac's former residence, a trip to Maison de Victor Hugo, Paris was in order and there, in the crazily decorated old flat in a fashionable building with a lovely courtyard in Le Marais district, I was amused by some quite idiosyncratic decorations and odd collections. 

Amongst such clutters, several sculptures, paintings and prints stood out and my two favorites there were a bust of Hugo and a painting depicting the battle between classists and romanticists during the performance of his play, Hernani.

The Victor Hugo, buste héroïque was once again by the great French sculptor Auguste Rodin (1840-1917).  This bronze sculpture presented the triangle-shaped bust of a lean and brawny Hugo, without clothes and stripped of his arms, precariously perched on a small marble stand.  Head bent down, he was lost in his own thoughts, not dissimilar to Le Penseur, the most celebrated work by Rodin.

IMG_8803 _ Victor Hugo, buste héroïque, Auguste Rodin, 1902 (2), 1908, Bronze, Maison de Victor Hugo, Paris, 2008
Victor Hugo, buste héroïque, Auguste Rodin (1840-1917), 83 x 56 x 65 cm, 1902 (2), 1908, Bronze (fonte Alexis Rudier)

The painting, Performance of 'Hernani' by Victor Hugo in 1830, aka, The Battle of Hernani, by Paul Albert Besnard was quite virtuosic in depicting an animated crowd scene; if its artistic value was not the most accomplished, it did command viewers' attention and was hard to forget, and that made it a wonderful work. 

Hernani was Hugo's romantic play, during its premiere, in anticipating attacked from the classists, Hugo enlisted the support of fellow romanticists to combat the opposition and indeed the play had caused fights amongst the audience.  It was one of the watershed moment of the course of artistic development.  The painting captured the maniac atmosphere of that significant moment wonderfully. 

IMG_8800 _ Performance of 'Hernani' by Victor Hugo in 1830, Paul Albert Besnard, Maison de Victor Hugo, Paris, 2008
Performance of 'Hernani' by Victor Hugo in 1830, Paul Albert Besnard

My Favorite Museum Collection Series
>> My Favorite Museum Collection Series 73: My Favorite Artworks at Musée National Eugène Delacroix, Paris

<< My Favorite Museum Collection Series 71: My Favorite Artworks in La maison de Balzac, Paris

List of My Favorite Artworks in the Museums I've Visited



Other Related posts on Art · 文化 · Kunst:
- My Favorite Paintings at Musée Marmottan Monet
- My Favorite Sculptures at Musée Rodin, Paris
- Revisiting Norton Simon Museum in Pasadena
- My Favorite Paintings from Musée Picasso, Paris
- The Museum of Modern Art, New York City
- My Favorite Sculptures at Cimetière du Père-Lachaise, Paris
- Fifteen Authors Influenced Me Most and Watching Shakespeare in China
- Swiss Author and Dramatist Friedrich Dürrenmatt
- Molotov's Magic Lantern: A Journey In Russian Histoy by Rachel Polonsky and Some Journeys of My Own
- Review of "As Above, So Below" by Rudy Von B. Rucker

Posted by Matthew Felix Sun on 4/2 | tags: painting figurative sculpture realism traditional




My Favorite Artworks in La maison de Balzac, Paris

Honoré de Balzac was the first French author I encountered via his immortal Le Père Goriot, when I was still in elementary school, therefore I had a great affection for this great novelist and societal historian.

In 2008, when I returned to Paris, I made my way to his former residence, La maison de Balzac, in the western edge of the city, near Musée Marmottan Monet and Jardins du Ranelag in its vicinity. Balzac rented the top floor of that rather modest house, from 1840-1847 under his housekeeper's name (Mr. de Breugnol), evading his creditors from the city.

I loved Balzac's keen and cutting observation of the colorful characters populated the brutal society in Paris and provinces, and was delighted to see a roomful print blocks of main characters from his enormous, though unfortunately unfinished, La Comédie humaine.  Amongst those characters, my favorite had always been Eugène de Rastignac, a charming and innocent lad from province to a roguish and cynic though not without redeeming qualities, featured in several of his novels in this series.

Print blocks of characters from La Comédie humaine by Honoré Balzac, Le maison de Balzac, Paris, 2008
Print blocks of characters from La Comédie humaine by Honoré Balzac

In the block below, Rastignac, after having buried the self-sacrificing Père Goriot, swore to fight with the corrupted city and its high society, before he jumped into the battle headlong, by joining his mistress, the younger daughter of Père Goriot, Delphine, Baroness de Nucingen.  It was the moment of truth and resolution, a moment of leaping from innocence to corruption.  The image was an utterly bleak and most biting assessment of the glittering Paris and its dazzling society.

IMG_8879 _ Eugène Rastignac dans le cimetière du Père-Lachaise dans Le Père Goriot, a main character from La Comédie humaine by Honoré Balzac, Le maison de Balzac, Paris, 2008
Eugène de Rastignac dans le cimetière du Père-Lachaise dans Le Père Goriot

My second favorite artwork there was a definitive study of a head sculpture of the novelist by Auguste Rodin, made around 1897 - Étude définitive pour la tête de Balzac.  Behind exuberant air of the novelist, Rodin captured his sharp gaze and presented him as simultaneously sagely and clownish, embodying the broad spectrum of his oeuvre and his epoch. 

Sculpture of Honoré Balzac, Le maison de Balzac, Paris, 2008
Étude définitive pour la tête de Balzac, vers 1897, Auguste Rondin

My Favorite Museum Collection Series
>> My Favorite Museum Collection Series 72: My Favorite Artworks at Maison de Victor Hugo, Paris

<< My Favorite Museum Collection Series 70: My Favorite Sculptures in Jardins du Ranelag, Paris

List of My Favorite Artworks in the Museums I've Visited



Other Related posts on Art · 文化 · Kunst:
- My Favorite Paintings at Musée Marmottan Monet
- My Favorite Sculptures at Musée Rodin, Paris
- Revisiting Norton Simon Museum in Pasadena
- My Favorite Paintings from Musée Picasso, Paris
- The Museum of Modern Art, New York City
- My Favorite Sculptures at Cimetière du Père-Lachaise, Paris
- Fifteen Authors Influenced Me Most and Watching Shakespeare in China
- Swiss Author and Dramatist Friedrich Dürrenmatt
- Molotov's Magic Lantern: A Journey In Russian Histoy by Rachel Polonsky and Some Journeys of My Own
- Review of "As Above, So Below" by Rudy Von B. Rucker

Posted by Matthew Felix Sun on 3/29 | tags: sculpture figurative rodin realism




My Favorite Sculptures in Jardins du Ranelag, Paris

On my way to Musée Marmottan Monet in the 16th arrondissement of western Paris, I encountered a lovely park, Jardins du Ranelagh, nearby, which obviously provided much pleasure to the residents nearby, and also boasted many amazing sculptures.

Of those, I found these two below most interesting.  The first one was a bronze, Hommage à Jean de La Fontaine (1983) by Charles Corréia (1945-1988).  The sculpture featured one of the most famous fables by Jean de La Fontaine, Le Corbeau et le Renard (The Fox and the Crow), depicting the cunning fox cheating the cheese out of the crow's mouth by flattery, observed by the poet.

IMG_8862 _ Hommage à Jean de La Fontaine (1983) by Charles Corréia (1945-1988), Jardins du Ranelag, Paris

IMG_8863 _ Hommage à Jean de La Fontaine (1983) by Charles Corréia (1945-1988), Jardins du Ranelag, Paris

IMG_8864 _ Hommage à Jean de La Fontaine (1983) by Charles Corréia (1945-1988), Jardins du Ranelag, Paris

The second of my favorite sculpture there was a marble, Pêcheur ramenant la tête d’Orphée dans ses filets (Fisherman bringing the head of Orpheus in his nets), the sad ending of the immortal Orpheus myth. The sculpture was dynamic, lively, powerful, elegant and melancholic.  Unforgettable.

IMG 8901 _ Pêcheur ramenant la tête d’Orphée dans ses filets (1883), Louis-Eugène Longepied (1849-1883), Marbre, Jardins du Ranelag, Paris

IMG 8902 _ Pêcheur ramenant la tête d’Orphée dans ses filets(1883), Louis-Eugène Longepied (1849-1883), Marbre, Jardins du Ranelag, Paris

IMG 8903 _ Pêcheur ramenant la tête d’Orphée dans ses filets (1883), Louis-Eugène Longepied (1849-1883), Marbre, Jardins du Ranelag, Paris IMG 8904 _ Pêcheur ramenant la tête d’Orphée dans ses filets (1883), Louis-Eugène Longepied (1849-1883), Marbre, Jardins du Ranelag, Paris

My Favorite Museum Collection Series
>> My Favorite Museum Collection Series 71: My Favorite Artworks in La maison de Balzac, Paris

<< My Favorite Museum Collection Series 69: My Favorite Sculptures in Cimetière de Montmartre, Paris

List of My Favorite Artworks in the Museums I've Visited



Other Related posts on Art · 文化 · Kunst:
- My Favorite Sculptures at Cimetière du Père-Lachaise, Paris
- Grand Palais in Paris
- My Favorite Sculptures in Jardin du Luxembourg, Paris
- My Favorite Paintings at Musée Marmottan Monet
- Musée de Cluny - Musée national du Moyen Âge, Paris
- A Day at Palace of Fine Arts & Crissy Field in San Francisco
- The Song of Orpheus

Posted by Matthew Felix Sun on 3/23 | tags: myth La Fonte literature fable Orpheus figurative sculpture realism traditional





Copyright © 2006-2013 by ArtSlant, Inc. All images and content remain the © of their rightful owners.