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My Featured Pastel Painting: Typhoon

My first successful pastel painting, Typhoon, is an abstract piece inspired by devastating typhoons unfortunately have been creating ever-heavier havoc recently, due to the undeniable climate change. Exploring spatial relationships, subtle variations of tones and shifting of patterns, I tried to capture the something unpredictable and the menacing.

Typhoon / 颱風 / Taifun  
Typhoon / 颱風 / Taifun
Pastel on Paper
8.5” x 11”
Completed in 2015

This painting is currently being exhibited at Expressions Gallery in Berkeley, in a show aptly titled "Into the Future".

Originally posted on matthewfelixsun.com

Other Related posts on Art · 文化 · Kunst:
- My Featured Painting: Dichotomic "In Distant Country"
- Featured Painting "Progression"
- Featured Painting "Liberation Road"
- My Featured Work - Portrait Painting "Grandma"
- Featured Oil Painting “Father and Son”
- Featured Oil Painting "The Triumph of Saint George"
- Video Presentation of Oil Painting "Progression"

Posted by Matthew Felix Sun on 2/10 | tags: painting drawing abstract




New Berkeley Art Museum / Pacific Film Archive Opened


IMG_3603 _ BAM PFA Pre-Opening, 30 January 2016



Last week, UC Berkeley's Berkeley Art Museum / Pacific Film Archive opened its new building to guest.  Thursday was the gala opening day for donors; Friday, opening day for students; Saturday for members of the Museum/Archive; and Sunday, a community open house. 

I visited the Museum on 30 January, Saturday and it was nice to see so many members and their families and friends exploring the space and artworks on display.  The place was full of excitement and high energy but the visitors didn't overwhelm the quite airy space.  Comparing to the old site, this one was slicker and had more conventional gallery layout, thus easier to mount exhibitions.  Because the Museum did not exhibit their usual collections at the opening exhibition, it was hard to gauge how much the exhibition space had changed.  Once the the permanent collections are back, visitors might be able to understand it better.

IMG_3611 _ BAM PFA Pre-Opening, 30 January 2016



IMG_3610 _ BAM PFA Pre-Opening, 30 January 2016

DSCN1425 _ BAM PFA Pre-Opening, 30 January 2016



DSCN1424 _ BAM PFA Pre-Opening, 30 January 2016



DSCN1463 _ BAM PFA Pre-Opening, 30 January 2016



IMG_3600 _ BAM PFA Pre-Opening, 30 January 2016



IMG_3599 _ BAM PFA Pre-Opening, 30 January 2016



IMG_3595 _ BAM PFA Pre-Opening, 30 January 2016



The initial exhibition had many exciting works and here are a handful of the highlights:


IMG_3581 _ BAM PFA Pre-Opening, 30 January 2016

DSCN1433 _ BAM PFA Pre-Opening, 30 January 2016


Architecture models

DSCN1440 _ BAM PFA Pre-Opening, 30 January 2016



DSCN1434 _ BAM PFA Pre-Opening, 30 January 2016



DSCN1438 _ BAM PFA Pre-Opening, 30 January 2016


Macadamia wood bowl

IMG_3606 _ BAM PFA Pre-Opening, 30 January 2016


Ruth Asawa

DSCN1461 _ BAM PFA Pre-Opening, 30 January 2016


Solitary, semi-social mapping of ESO-510 613 connected with intergalactic dust by one Nephila clavipes - one week - and three Cyrtophora citricola - three weeks, spider silk, glue, paper, ink, Tomas Saraceno

DSCN1459 _ BAM PFA Pre-Opening, 30 January 2016


Spider silk installation

DSCN1454 _ BAM PFA Pre-Opening, 30 January 2016



DSCN1450 _ BAM PFA Pre-Opening, 30 January 2016


4 Brushstrokes over Figure & 21 Brushstokes, Hyun-Sook Song

DSCN1447 _ BAM PFA Pre-Opening, 30 January 2016


4 Brushstrokes over Figure, Hyun-Sook Song

DSCN1444 _ BAM PFA Pre-Opening, 30 January 2016


21 Brushstrokes, Hyun-Sook Song

DSCN1445 _ BAM PFA Pre-Opening, 30 January 2016


2 Brushstrokes, Hyun-Sook Song

In case one forgot, this picture below reminded people that we were in the quirky Berkeley:

IMG_3609 _ BAM PFA Pre-Opening, 30 January 2016



There were two movie theater to showcase amazing collections of Pacific Film Archive (PFA) - one medium sized and a smaller one perhaps built for art house movies, in which I saw a wonderful short, featuring a woman in Baroque dress and modern sunglasses, running around in and around fountain and gardens, underneath an extravagant hat of a fountain:

DSCN1498 _ BAM PFA Pre-Opening, 30 January 2016

A very promising beginning.

On Sunday, it was reported that some UC Berkeley students protested at the museum, "protesting the campus’s decision to designate funds to the creation of an art museum rather than to increase benefits for campus workers."

I do support some of their arguments; yet, I cannot agree with their Leninist and Maoist approach. Universities have societal obligations to stimulate minds and art museum is one of the very useful tools for such an endeavor.


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Getting Ready for Barry McGee at Berkeley Art Museum
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- Silke Otto-Knapp at Berkeley Art Museum

Posted by Matthew Felix Sun on 2/4 | tags: video-art installation mixed-media drawing painting




“Shadow” Over the Land – Featured Painting

My landscape/allegorical oil painting, Shadow, depicts a fantastic world - a vast furrowed dark brown field, whose parallel ridges converge towards the distant horizon, which was dotted with a cluster of very insignificant white buildings, centering on a little church spire, which was barely visible. The contrast between the enormous dark fields and the tiny white village is highly dramatic, yet that is topped by several huge leaden and apparently weighty clouds, which curiously cast no shadows; instead, adds mysterious and menacing atmosphere, gliding over the entire field, s a huge shadow of an invisible bird, very much the personification of foreboding.

Shadow / 影子 / Schatten
Shadow / 影子 / Schatten
Oil on Canvas
30″ x 40"
Completed in 2008

Interestingly, this painting just joined a group show, titled "In to the Future". Perhaps, this ominous world is the vision of the future?

 

Originally posted on matthewfelixsun.com

Posted by Matthew Felix Sun on 1/24 | tags: allegory painting figurative realism traditional




My Featured Painting: Dichotomic “In Distant Country”

One of my paintings selected in a recent exhibition at Berkeley Central Arts Passage, Today's Artists Interact with Major Art Movements from the Renaissance to the Present, is a painting of part cityscape and part animal figure study.

In Distant Country / 在遙遠的国度 / In fernem Land  
In Distant Country / 在遙遠的国度 / In fernem Land
Oil on Canvas
22″ x 28"
Completed in 2011

The left side of the painting, in shades of washed-out gray, depicts the Old St. John's Hospital, an 11th-century hospital in Bruges, Belgium while the right side zooms in one of the omnipresent swans and the symbol of that ancient city, painted in intensely saturated rich hues. I conceived this painting while visiting Bruges, when I was quite intrigued and even moved by the stark contrast of immobile and somewhat faded history and threadbare nobility, and the living creatures full of grace, energy and slight menace.

Furthermore, I named this title to ensure that the German title In fernem Land is the first line of the most celebrated aria by the title character in Wagner's opera Lohengrin, a mysterious knight arrived in a boat drawn by a swan, narrating his mythical original and his frustrated hope by lacking of faith he demanded from a woman he loved and rescued, whose child-ruler brother was turned into that swan and his disappearance had triggered a chain of events.

The medieval building and the medieval story interwoven, the purity and menace of this lofty bird, along with the historical baggage of Wagner, conspire to add extra meanings to this rather deceptively simply painting.

Originally posted on matthewfelixsun.com

Other Related posts on Art · 文化 · Kunst:
- Featured Painting "Progression"
- Featured Painting "Liberation Road"
- My Featured Work - Portrait Painting "Grandma"
- Featured Oil Painting “Father and Son”
- Featured Oil Painting "The Triumph of Saint George"
- Video Presentation of Oil Painting "Progression"

Posted by Matthew Felix Sun on 12/22/15 | tags: swan Aninmal Bruges belgium medieval painting figurative conceptual realism




My Favorite Artworks at Ca' d'Oro, Venezia (Venice)

Almost every major old mansion, or Ca', as called by the locals, in Venice, are an impressive museum. Ca' d'Oro, is the most iconic of them all, famed for its Gothic columns, arched windows and fascinating asymmetrical façade, and it not only boast artifacts demonstrating the life in the begone era, it also houses some impressive artworks as well.

DSCN0631 _ Ca' d'Oro, Venezia, 12 October

Venice / 威尼斯 / Venedig

My favorite work my saw during my 2012 trip was a painting from the workshop of one of my favorite Renaissance artists, Andrea del Sarto, titled Madonna and Child with St. John, which had all the hallmarks of the said great master, particularly the pale green, blue and pink tones of draperies, and those rosy cheeked, plump figures announcing the advent of mannerism, which outgrew the naturalism of Renaissance.

DSCN1959 _ Madonna and Child with St. John, Andrea del Sarto's Workshop, Ca d'Oro, 14 October
Madonna and Child with St. John, Andrea del Sarto's Workshop, Ca' d'Oro


My second favorite was a sculpture of a nude male torso, which situated in the middle of a courtyard whose walls and floor were covered with very intricate and elaborate mosaic, and contrasting wonderfully against those complicated background with its restrained classical simplicity.

DSCN2107 _ Mosaic courtyard, Ca d'Oro, Venezia, 14 October 


DSCN2107 _ Mosaic courtyard, Ca 
d'Oro, Venezia, 14 October (detail) - 
500


My Favorite Museum Collection Series
>> My Favorite Museum Collection Series 109: My Favoritate Artwork at Ca' Pesaro, Venezia (Venice), Italy
<< My Favorite Museum Collection Series 107: My Favorite Artworks at Ca' Rezzonico, Venice

List of My Favorite Artworks in the Museums I've Visited

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Posted by Matthew Felix Sun on 12/13/15 | tags: painting figurative sculpture realism




My Favorite Artworks at Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venezia (Venice)

Collezione Peggy Guggenheim (Peggy Guggenheim Collection), located in an unfinished 18th-century palace, Palazzo Venier dei Leoni, boasts many modern masterpieces ranging in style from Cubism and Surrealism to Abstract Expressionism.

One of my favorite work there was a sculpture in the garden: The Cloven Viscount (Il visconte dimezzato) by Mimmo Paladino, which was simultaneously formal and fluid, familiar and strange, comforting and unsettling.  The figure, installed inside a small square brick confinement, in a small pile of gravels, was unassuming and even humble, but his intentionally stiff posture, resembling age-dried twigs, bore the traces of the ravage of time and wearying journey. 

DSCN2977 _ The Cloven Viscount (Il visconte dimezzato), Mimmo Paladino, 1998, Collezione Peggy Guggenheim
The Cloven Viscount (Il visconte dimezzato), Mimmo Paladino, 1998

My second favorite work was a painting by Giogiro de Chirico, titled The Red Tower, in the typical style of the highly individual artist - subtly yet strikingly contrasting colors, enigmatic landscape and cityscape, opaque symbols and overwhelming sense of desolation and loneliness.  The focal point of the work, the Red Tower, was really a foreboding fortress squatting somewhat in the background, and held secrets the artists refused to divulge.

 DSCN2881 _ The Red Tower (La Tour rouge), Giorgio de Chirico, 1913, Collezione Peggy Guggenheim, 15 October
The Red Tower (La Tour rouge), Giorgio de Chirico, 1913


My Favorite Museum Collection Series
>> My Favorite Museum Collection Series 107: My Favorite Artworks at Ca' Rezzonico, Venice
<< My Favorite Museum Collection Series 105: My Favorite Artifacts in Il Ghetto and Museo Ebraico (Jewish Museum) in Venice

List of My Favorite Artworks in the Museums I've Visited

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- Anderson Collection at Stanford University

Posted by Matthew Felix Sun on 11/22/15 | tags: painting figurative sculpture surrealism modern




My Favorite Artworks at Ca' Rezzonico, Venice

Venice has almost as many museums as its numerous Palazzi; one of these stately buildings stands along the Grand Canal is Ca' Rezzonico, whose art collections are fully in line with the peculiar tastes of the 18th century Venetians, decorative, precious, and a bit silly, but redeemed somewhat by whimsical playfulness and perhaps self-mockery.

The favorite piece I saw there was a fresco titled "Mondo Novo" by Giovanni Domenico Tiepolo, featuring vivid and even theatrical figures populating the streets in Venice, very much like those portrayed by the great Venetian Commedia dell'arte playwright Carlo Goldoni.

DSCN3002 _ Ca' Rezzonico, Venezia, 15 October

My second favorite was a bas-relief, Priamo chiede ad Achille (Priam Implores Achilles), a poignant and messy scene presented in restraint, manifested in those cleanly rendered classical lines:

DSCN2992 _ Priamo chiede ad Achille, Antonio Canova, Cà Rezzonico, Venezia, 15 October


My Favorite Museum Collection Series
>> My Favorite Museum Collection Series 108: My Favorite Artworks at Ca' d'Oro, Venezia (Venice)
<< My Favorite Museum Collection Series 106: My Favorite Artworks at Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venezia (Venice)

List of My Favorite Artworks in the Museums I've Visited

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Posted by Matthew Felix Sun on 11/19/15 | tags: venice painting figurative sculpture




My Favorite Artifacts in Il Ghetto and Museo Ebraico (Jewish Museum) in Venice


DSCN2044 _ Ghetto Vecchio, Venezia, 14 October

Il Ghetto and Museo Ebraico (The Ghetto and Jewish Museum) in Venice were poignant places to visit and unsurprisingly, one of my favorite artifacts there was a series of reliefs mounted on the wall of the huge courtyard, depicting momentous experiences of the Jewish people: 

DSCN2050 _ Il Ghetto di Venezia

Another favorite of mine was an ancient map/landscape of a walled city (Jerusalem?) housed inside the museum. I was struck by the harmoniously interwoven pleasing blue and green tones throughout the lovely piece, and the stylized presentation of a city and its surrounding countryside.

DSCN2058 _ Museo Ebraico, Venezia, 14 October

My Favorite Museum Collection Series
>> My Favorite Museum Collection Series 106: My Favorite Artworks at Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venezia (Venice)
<< My Favorite Museum Collection Series 104: My Favoritate Paintings in Scuola Grande di San Rocco, Venice

List of My Favorite Artworks in the Museums I've Visited

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Posted by Matthew Felix Sun on 10/3/15 | tags: venice relief map painting drawing figurative sculpture




My Favoritate Paintings in Scuola Grande di San Rocco, Venice


DSCN2212 _ Scuola Grande di San Rocco, Venezia, 14 October

DSCN2232 _ Scuola Grande  di San Rocco, Venezia, 14 October _ modified

A grand building in Venice, Scuola Grande di San Rocco, houses a huge cycle of paintings by Tintoretto, commissioned in 1564.  For next twenty-seven years, he and his assistants, including his son Domenico, created this opus magnum. From this cycle, I cite these two below as my favorites.

The first one is "The Annunciation" which depicted this familiar subject in a startlingly dramatic way and the dynamic momentum and the stark tonal contrast were overwhelming.


The Annunciation from the Tintoretto cycle, Image courtesy of Wikicommons by
Web Gallery of Art



The second one is "Miracle of the Bronze Serpent", which composition is even more dramatic. It told the story of the resentful Israelites wanted to go back to Egypt and God sent snakes to torment the hungry and thirsty people. Eventually they were compelled to go to Moses and asked him to pray to God for forgiveness. God dictated him to make a fiery serpent, and set it upon a pole: "and it shall come to pass, that every one that is bitten, when he looketh upon it, shall live."

The small yet centrally positioned Moses and the miracle serpent occupied a small swatch of the canvas, filled with light, a small hope, perhaps; while the rest managed to emerge from dark shadows - limbs and bodies intertwined in the formation reminiscent of that of the serpent.  Unforgettable.


Miracle of the Bronze Serpent from the Tintoretto cycle, Image courtesy of Wikicommons by
Web Gallery of Art



My Favorite Museum Collection Series
>> My Favorite Museum Collection Series 105: My Favorite Artifacts in Il Ghetto and Museo Ebraico (Jewish Museum) in Venice
<< My Favorite Museum Collection Series 103: My Favorite Painting & Sculptures in Il Redentore, Venezia

List of My Favorite Artworks in the Museums I've Visited

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- Basilica di San Petronio and San Domenico in Bologna
- My Favorite Art Works at Santa Maria Novella, Firenze
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Posted by Matthew Felix Sun on 9/19/15 | tags: Tintoretto San Rocco venice italian renaissance painting figurative realism traditional




My Favorite Painting & Sculptures in Il Redentore, Venezia


DSCN0471 _ Redentore, Venezia, 11 October




Il Chiesa del Santissimo Redentore (Church of the Most Holy Redeemer) is located on a small island facing Venice across a lagoon, and a short trip by boat brought me to see some of its eclectic artworks.  

My favorite painting in the church was Baptism of Christ by Veronese.  This painting did not present a panoramic scene of the event; rather, it brought viewers to the close proximity of the main characters in the drama -- Jesus and John the Baptist, presented as virile young men, vigorous and poised, dynamic even in a arrested still moment.  Froze in the middle of an action, their seeming pause gave the painting an ethereal atmosphere and a sense of timelessness.  The strong modulation of their bodies and the bold outlines gave added to their confidence.  They were visited by holy ghost, hovering over Baptist's blessing hand; and observed by two female biblical figures to their left; two donors, dictated tradition occupied the lower right, who in turn, were balanced by cherubim on the upper right corner of the painting.

DSCN0457 _ Baptism of Christ, Paolo Caliari known as il Veronese, Redentore, Venezia, 11 October


Baptism of Christ, Paolo Caliari known as il Veronese

My second favorite painting was Transport of Christ to the Sepulchre, by Jacopo Negretti called Palma il Giovane.

This was a beautiful painting, with typical coloration of Italy idyllic paintings, almost too much so for such a sad subject.  The curiously tranquil scene was accented by two grieve stricken female figures on the upper left and lower right of the painting.  The composition was dynamic yet understated, despite of those two female figures, whose postures were a bit overtly dramatic.

The painting was installed between two columns and underneath a weighty pediment, which echoed the semi-circular top part of the painting.  The small "dome" and the understated trimming at the inner edge of the painting let the entire ensemble an more decorative air.  However, the pureness and openness of the setting were slightly disturbed by a massive golden crown above a crucifix nearby. Impressive surely but a bit too oppressively rich and earthly to be next to this ethereal painting.

DSCN0460 _ XVII Century painting, Transport of Christ to the Sepulchre, by Jacopo Negretti called Palma il Giovane, Redentore, Venezia, 11 October


Transport of Christ to the Sepulchre, by Jacopo Negretti called Palma il Giovane


My Favorite Museum Collection Series
>> My Favorite Museum Collection Series 104: My Favoritate Paintings in Scuola Grande di San Rocco, Venice

<< My Favorite Museum Collection Series 102: My Favorite Paintings in Church of San Giorgio Maggiore, Venezia

List of My Favorite Artworks in the Museums I've Visited

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- Basilica di San Petronio and San Domenico in Bologna
- My Favorite Art Works at Santa Maria Novella, Firenze
- Magical Piazza San Marco in Venice

Posted by Matthew Felix Sun on 8/27/15 | tags: painting figurative realism traditional




My Favorite Sculpture at Punta della Dogana

When I visited Venice for the second time, I spent some time at the slightly flooded Punta della Dogana to admire some sculptures on the plaza.

One of my favorite, “Boy With Frog,” by Charles Ray, has since been unfortunately removed, due to locals' demand of the return to the spot of a "romantic" lamppost.

DSCN2728 _ Statue at the tip of Fondamenta Salute, Venezia, 15 October - modified

Without that amazing and controversial work, which would be my most favorite, I move on to cite other two sculptures as my favorites. The first one was a 2010 metaphoric one titled Vater Staat (Father State) by Thomas Schütte. It presented a wizened and stiffly upright man in a humble monkish habit and a boxy brimless hat, a figure was simultaneously self-effacing, dignified, and somewhat pompous and ridiculous, ever so slightly.  It was a perfect personification of such strange concept.

DSCN2734 _ Vater Staat by Thomas Schütte, 2010, in front of Basilica Salute, Venezia
Vater Staat by Thomas Schütte, 2010, in front of Basilica di Santa Maria della Salute

The second favorite of mine was a group sculpture of Atlas, symbolizing the might of the fabled Republic of Venice. The golden ball was held up by two giants, or two slaves as some claimed, and upon which stood a 17th-century Fortune, which turned in the sea wind - a perfect documentary of the fantastical seafaring power.

DSCN2449 _ Dogana, Venezia, 14 October
Two giants supporting Atlans, upon with stands Fortune

My Favorite Museum Collection Series
>> My Favorite Museum Collection Series 102: My Favorite Paintings in Church of San Giorgio Maggiore, Venezia
<< My Favorite Museum Collection Series 100: My Favorite Artworks at Basilica di Santa Maria della Salute, Venezia

List of My Favorite Artworks in the Museums I've Visited

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- My Favorite Art Works at Santa Maria Novella, Firenze
- Magical Piazza San Marco in Venice
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Posted by Matthew Felix Sun on 6/30/15 | tags: figurative sculpture modern traditional




My Favorite Artworks at Basilica di Santa Maria della Salute, Venezia

Basilica di Santa Maria della Salute in Venezia, though so-called a minor cathedral, due to its strategic location near the tip of Punta della Dogana, visible when entering the Piazza San Marco from the Grand Canal, was a natural stop for many visitors to the city. Its interior was relatively sparse, understated and unassuming, but that it didn't prevent Salute from accumulating some muted splendors.

Amongst several interesting and moving works, I cite these two as my favorites (below).

The one left me the strongest impression was an altar to Virgin Mary - centering on a brilliantly-painted ikon, a Byzantine Madonna and Child of the 12th or 13th century, known as Panagia Mesopantitissa in Greek ("Madonna the mediator" or "Madonna the negotiator"), framed by flowing baroque sculpture of the Queen of Heaven Expelling the Plague (1670), which was a theatrical Baroque masterpiece created by the Flemish sculptor Josse de Corte.  The colored painting and the bleached sculpture, the stiffness of the icon and the soft sensual line of the stone figures contrasted strongly and a sense of unexpected and fascinating surprise.

DSCN2781 _ Basilica di Santa Maria della Salute, Venezia, 15 October

DSCN2781 _ Basilica di Santa Maria della Salute, Venezia, 15 October

My second favorite was a painting by Titian, titled The Descent of the Holy Ghost. For modern eyes, his tableau might not be so ground-breaking; but at the time of its creation and aided with more vivid colors, the large altar piece must be breathtakingly impressive - the classical triangle composition, the seamless transition from the built columns to the painted arch, and finally the blindingly dizzying holy spirit crashing down from heaven, must be truly awe inspiring.

DSCN2771 _ Basilica di Santa Maria della Salute, Venezia, 15 October


My Favorite Museum Collection Series
>> My Favorite Museum Collection Series 101: My Favorite Sculpture at Punta della Dogana
<< My Favorite Museum Collection Series 99: My Favorite Artwork at Piazza di San Marco

List of My Favorite Artworks in the Museums I've Visited

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- My Favorite Sculptures at Stephansdom (St. Stephen's Cathedral), Vienna
- My Favorite Sculptures in Basilique Saint-Denis (Paris)
- Basilica di San Petronio and San Domenico in Bologna
- My Favorite Art Works at Santa Maria Novella, Firenze

Posted by Matthew Felix Sun on 6/16/15 | tags: painting traditional




My Favorite Artwork at Piazza di San Marco

Piazza di San Marco in Venice is a marvelous museum itself, featuring valuable historical artifacts and artistic treasures, too numerous to list.

One of my two favorites is the iconic sculpture of "I Tetrarchi (The Tetrarchs)" at the foot of Basilica di San Marco, depicting four ebony colored Tetrarchs huddling together, either in fear, or treacherous congregation. Very intriguing and engaging:

8236179866_015e3e94ec

DSCN1223 _ I Tetrarchi, Basilica di San 
Marco, Venezia, 13 October

The second favorite sculpture of mine is actually a capital, which has some very peculiar looking heads sticking out of the column, some with the spirits of figureheads on a prow, others look more despondent or stunned.  Those exotic looking heads are full of personalities and though hard to notice in the vast Piazza, are hard to forgot once seen.

DSCN1214 _ view of Campanile from loggia of Palazzo Ducale, Piazza di San Marco, 13 October

DSCN1210 _ Column Details of Palazzo Ducale, Piazza di San Marco, 13 October


My Favorite Museum Collection Series
>> My Favorite Museum Collection Series 100: My Favorite Artworks at Basilica di Santa Maria della Salute, Venezia
<< My Favorite Museum Collection Series 98:  My Favorite Artworks in Palazzo Ducale, Venezia (Doge Palace, Venice)

List of My Favorite Artworks in the Museums I've Visited

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- My Favorite Works at Palazzo Medici Riccardi, Firenze, Italia
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Posted by Matthew Felix Sun on 5/22/15 | tags: venice figurative sculpture traditional




My Oil Painting - Intense "Mackerel"

I am very proud of my 2007 oil painting "Mackerel", in which I managed to capture both beautiful and sinister elements of a daily object, fulfilling a most tantalizing pursuit of mine. With its intense colors and bold strokes, this painting economically presents a sleekly fish, intently staring upwards, as if ready to confront its captor; at the meanwhile, its eye also betrayed the fish's sad resignation to its imminent demise.

The background of the painting was plain drop cloth, hatched lightly, and dominated by sickly greenish-yellow from the left and graduated to an intense blue to the right. The intense vertical blue patch also represents the deep water being turned upright, in a disorientated world.

Mackerel / 鯖魚 / Makrele  
Mackerel
Oil on Canvas
28" x 22"
Completed in 2007

This painting was just awarded of 1st 2015 ArtSlant Showcase Winner.

It was also selected for exhibition at ViewPoint 2009, 41st Annual National Juried Art Competition, Cincinnati Art Club, Ohio, November 2009.

This painting was included in two-person show at Trilogy Studio, San Francisco, 2011, and it was exhibited at Artist-Xchange Gallery, San Francisco, in 2009.

Originally published on matthewfelixsun.com

Posted by Matthew Felix Sun on 3/21/15 | tags: fish figurative realism traditional




Allegorical Painting "Birds and Men"

I don't consider myself as a colorist; yet, sometimes, I managed to utilize some vibrant colors to create paintings with vibrant colors, bold, striking, yet harmonious, such as my 2003 oil painting, Birds and Men.

Birds and Men / 鳥與人 / Vögel und Menschen, Oil on Canvas, 30
Birds and Men / 鳥與人 / Vögel und Menschen
Oil on Canvas
30" x 40"
2003

11 Paintings Completed in 2003 (part 1 of 2)

With that painting, and several others made in 2003, I started my Apocalypse Series, intended to document human sufferings inflicted by reckless or repressive political, religious or cultural forces. The direct impetus to create such series was the impending invasion of Iraq, led by George W. Bush, Dick Cheney, Tony Blair, Condoleezza Rice, and Colin Powell, et. al.

As stated in my standard bio: "Life is a harsh experience, yet it is beautiful. Art ought to be from life, and above life. To merely document surfaces is not enough: I want to grasp what is behind, which to me is far more compelling and worthwhile.

As with many artists, my early work is grounded in realism, and evolved into a style that retains a representative cast but rejects slavish naturalism. I immerse myself in the patterns and rhythms of forms, particularly the contradiction between the surface beauty and harsh subjects, and from these foci has formed a distinctive style. The subject matter of my work ranges from portraiture and landscape/cityscape, to allegories and abstraction."

Originally published on matthewfelixsun.com

Posted by Matthew Felix Sun on 2/25/15 | tags: animal allegory painting figurative surrealism




My Favorite Artworks in Palazzo Ducale, Venezia (Doge Palace, Venice)


DSCN1604 _ view of Palazzo Ducale from Basilica di San Marco, 13 October

DSCN9982 _ Palazzo Ducale, Venezia, 11 October

DSCN0176 _ view of Ponte dei Sospiri from the prison of Palazzo Ducale, Venezia, 11 October

The vast compound of Palazzo Ducale, Venezia (Doge Palace, Venice) is a trove of architectural and art treasures scattered around within and without the highly decorated walls of the palace, therefore it took me some concentration to choose my two favorites.

My first choice was a painting by Titian, depicting the giant Saint Christopher carrying baby Jesus on his back, across a river before the child revealed himself as Christ.  The composition was powerfully dynamic, with the Saint startlingly sinewy and serious, a personification of reliability and steadfastness.  The Child, airy, playful and full of vitality, in the lighter moment of his eventful and tragic life.  The coloration was neither flashy nor rich - time might have robbed some of its tonal splendor but the muted palette gave gravitas to the painting and a sense of timelessness.

DSCN0091 _ San Christopher, Titian, Palazzo Ducale, Venezia, 11 October
San Christopher by Titian

My second favorite artwork in the palace was a relief on the outer wall, titled "The Drunkenness of Noah".  This relief cleverly utilized the confined space about a portal, positioning Noah, barely covered of his nakedness with a cloth, on one side of the portal, turning corner from the main plane, upon which carved all his three sons, who were divided into two groups, separated by the pointed arch, with his "good sons" Shem and Japheth nearing Noah, holding the garment to cover him, while his bad son "Ham" stood far away from the rest, with a clear sense of the banishment of him, whose descendents were cursed by Noah for Ham's supposed insensitivity to his father's privacy.

A very strange story out of bible, rendered with great economy, clarify and pathos. 

DSCN1193 _ Details of Palazzo Ducale, Piazza di San Marco, 13 October
The Drunkenness of Noah on the 'Vine Angle' above the 1st Capital on Palazzo Ducale

My Favorite Museum Collection Series
>> My Favorite Museum Collection Series 99: My Favorite Artwork at Piazza di San Marco

<< My Favorite Museum Collection Series 97:My Favorite Reliefs in Franziskanerkirche, Graz

List of My Favorite Artworks in the Museums I've Visited

Other Related posts on Art · 文化 · Kunst:
- My Favorite Sculptures at Stephansdom (St. Stephen's Cathedral), Vienna
- Boy With Frog Sculpture and Punta della Dogana, Venice
- Angelic and Evil - Bunkerei and Palais Augarten in Augarten, Vienna
- My Favorite Works at Palazzo Medici Riccardi, Firenze, Italia
- My Favorite Paintings at Palatina Gallery, Palazzo Pitti, Firenze, Italia
- My Favorite Paintings at the National Gallery (Schwarzenberg Palace) in Prague
- Bridges in Venice, Italy
- Magical Piazza San Marco in Venice

Posted by Matthew Felix Sun on 1/24/15 | tags: venice painting figurative sculpture realism





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